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Friday - October 31, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: p

Please click on the partial definition to see the complete definition
ID Word Definition
39110 p P is the sixteenth letter of the English Alphabet, and a labial articulation formed by a close ...
39111 paage PAAGE, n. [See Pay.] A toll for passage over another persons grounds. [Not used.]
39112 pabular PABULAR, a. [L., food.] Pertaining to food; affording food or aliment.
39113 pabulation PABULATION, n. [L., to feed.] The act of feeding or procuring provender.
39114 pabulous PABULOUS, a. [L., food.] Affording aliment or food; alimental.
39115 pabulum PABULUM, n. [L.] 1. Food; aliment; that which feeds.2. Fuel; that which supplies the means of ...
39116 paca PACA, n. A small animal of America, bearing some resemblance to a hare and a pig. It is a species ...
39117 pacate PACATE, a. [L.] Peaceful; tranquil. [Not used.]
39118 pacated PACATED, a. Appeased. [Little used.]
39119 pacation PACATION, n. [L., to calm or appease.] The act of appeasing.
39120 paccan PACCAN, n. An American tree and its nut.
39121 pace PACE, n. [L., to open, Gr., to tread. See Pass.]1. A step.2. The space between the two feet in ...
39122 paced PACED, a. 1. Having a particular gait; used chiefly in composition; as slow-paced.2. In ...
39123 pacer PACER, n. One that paces; a horse that paces.
39124 pachydermatous PACHYDERMATOUS, a. [Gr., thick, skin.] Having a thick skin; an epithet applied to an order of ...
39125 pacific PACIFIC, a. [L., to make peace. See Peace.] 1. Peace-making; conciliatory; suited to make or ...
39126 pacification PACIFICATION, n. [L. See Pacify.1. The act of making peace between nations or parties at ...
39127 pacificator PACIFICATOR, n. [L.] A peace-maker; one that restores amity between contending parties or nations.
39128 pacificatory PACIFICATORY, a. Tending to make peace; conciliatory.
39129 pacified PACIFIED, pp. Appeased; tranquilized.
39130 pacifier PACIFIER, n. One who pacifies.
39131 pacify PACIFY, v.t. [L., peace, and to make.]1. To appease, as wrath or other violent passion or appetite; ...
39132 pacifying PACIFYING, ppr. Appeasing; tranquilizing.
39133 pack PACK, n. [See the Verb.]1. A bundle of any thing inclosed in a cover or bound fast with cords; a ...
39134 package PACK'AGE, n. A bundle or bale; a quantity pressed or bound together; as a package of cloth.1. A ...
39135 packcloth PACK'CLOTH, n. A cloth for packing goods, or in which they are tied.
39136 packed PACK'ED, pp. Put together and pressed; tied or bound in a bundle; put down and salted, as meat; ...
39137 packer PACK'ER, n. One that packs; an officer appointed to pack meat, as beef, port, fish, &c.
39139 packet-boat PACKET-BOAT. [See Packet.]
39140 packet-ship PACK'ET-SHIP, n. A ship that sails regularly between distant countries for the conveyance of ...
39138 packet PACK'ET, n.1. A small pack or package; a little bundle or parcel; as a packet of letters.2. A ...
39141 packhorse PACK'HORSE, n. A horse employed in carrying packs or goods and baggage.1. A beast of burden.
39142 packing PACK'ING, ppr. Laying together in close order; binding in a bundle; putting in barrels with salt, ...
39143 packsaddle PACK'SADDLE, n. A saddle on which packs or burdens are laid for conveyance.
39144 packstaff PACK'STAFF, n. A staff on which a traveler occasionally supports his pack.
39145 packthread PACK'THREAD, n. Strong thread or twine used in tying up parcels.
39146 paco PA'CO
39147 pacos PA'COS, n. An animal of South America, resembling the camel in shape, but much smaller. It is ...
39148 pact PACT, n. [L. pactus, from pango. See Pack.]A contract; an agreement or covenant.
39149 paction PAC'TION, n. [L. pactio. See Pack.] An agreement or contract.
39150 pactional PAC'TIONAL, a. By way of agreement.
39151 pactitious PACTI'TIOUS, a. Settled by agreement or stipulation.
39152 pad PAD, n.1. A foot path; a road. [Not now used.]2. An easy paced horse.3. A robber that infests ...
39153 padar PAD'AR, n. Grouts; coarse flour or meal. [Not used in U. States.]
39154 padder PAD'DER, n. A robber on foot; a highwayman.
39156 paddle-staff PAD'DLE-STAFF, n. A staff headed with broad iron.
39155 paddle PAD'DLE, v.i. [L. pes,pedis,the foot, and this is allied to Gr., to tread.]1. To row; to beat the ...
39157 paddler PAD'DLER, n. On that paddles.
39159 paddock-pipe PAD'DOCK-PIPE, n. A plant of the genus Equisetum.
39160 paddock-stool PAD'DOCK-STOOL, n. A plant of the genus Agaricus; a mushroom, vulgarly toadstool.
39158 paddock PAD'DOCK, n. A toad or frog.PAD'DOCK, n.1. A small inclosure for deer or other animals.2. An ...
39161 padelion PADELI'ON, n. A plant.
39162 padlock PAD'LOCK, n. A lock to be hung on a staple and held by a link.PAD'LOCK, v.t. To fasten with a ...
39163 padnag PAD'NAG, n. An ambling nag.
39164 padow-pipe PAD'OW-PIPE, n. A plant. [See Paddock-pipe.]
39165 paduasoy PADUASOY', n. A particular kind of silk stuff.
39166 paean PAE'AN
39167 paer-stainer PA'ER-STAINER, n. One that stains, colors or stamps paper for hangings.
39168 pagan PA'GAN, n. [L. paganus, a peasant or countryman, from pagus, a village.] A heathen; a Gentile; an ...
39169 paganism PA'GANISM, n. Heathenism; the worship of false gods, or the system of religious opinions and ...
39170 paganize PA'GANIZE, v.t. To render heathenish; to convert to heathenism.PA'GANIZE, v.i. To behave like ...
39171 paganized PA'GANIZED, pp. Rendered heathenish.
39172 paganizing PA'GANIZING, ppr. Rendering heathenish; behaving like pagans; adopting heathen principles and ...
39173 page PAGE, n. [Gr. a boy.]1. A boy attending on a great person, rather for formality or show, than for ...
39174 pageant PAGEANT, n. pa'jent. [L. pegma; Gr. something showy carried in triumph.]1. A statue in show, or a ...
39175 pageanty PA'GEANTY, n. Show; pompous exhibition or spectacle. Such pageantry to be the people shown.
39176 pagil PA'GIL, n. A plant and flower of the genus Primula or primrose; cowslip-primrose.
39177 paginal PAG'INAL, a. Consisting of pages.
39178 pagod PA'GOD
39179 pagoda PAGO'DA, n.1. A temple in the East Indies in which idols are worshiped.2. An idol; an image of ...
39180 pagodite PA'GODITE, n. A name given to the mineral of which the Chinese make their pagodas. It is called ...
39181 paid PAID, pret. and pp. of pay; paid for payed.
39182 paigle PA'IGLE
39184 pail-full PA'IL-FULL, n. The quantity that a pail will hold.
39183 pail PAIL, n. An open wooden vessel used in families for carrying liquids, as water and milk,usually ...
39185 pailmail PAILMAIL. [See Pallmall.]
39186 pain PAIN, n. [L. paena; Gr. penalty, and pain, labor.]1. An uneasy sensation in animal bodies, of any ...
39187 painful PA'INFUL, a. Giving pain, uneasiness or distress to the body; as a painful operation in surgery.1. ...
39188 painfully PA'INFULLY, adv. With suffering of body; with affliction, uneasiness or distress of mind.1. ...
39189 painfulness PA'INFULNESS, n. Uneasiness or distress of body.1. Affliction; sorrow; grief; disquietude or ...
39190 painim PA'INIM, n. A pagan. [Not used.]PA'INIM, a. Pagan; infidel. [Not used.]
39191 painless PA'INLESS, a. Free from pain.1. Free from trouble.
39192 painstaker PA'INSTAKER, n. A laborious person.
39193 painstaking PA'INSTAKING, a. Laborious; industrious.PA'INSTAKING, n. Labor; great industry.
39194 paint PA'INT, v.t. [L. pingo,pictus.]1. To form a figure or likeness in colors; as, to paint a hero or a ...
39195 painted PA'INTED, pp. Colored; rubbed over with paint; as a painted house or cloth.1. Represented in form ...
39196 painter PA'INTER, n. One whose occupation is to paint; one skilled in representing things in ...
39197 painting PA'INTING, ppr. Representing in colors; laying on colors.PA'INTING, n. The art of forming figures ...
39198 painture PA'INTURE, n. The art of painting.
39200 pair-royal PAIR-ROYAL, n. Three of a sort in certain games of cards.
39199 pair PAIR, n. [L. par; Heb. to join, couple or associate.]1. Two things of a kind, similar in form, ...
39201 paired PA'IRED, pp. Joined in couples, fitted; suited.
39202 pairing PA'IRING, ppr. Uniting in pairs; fitting.
39204 palace-court PAL'ACE-COURT, n. The domestic court of the kings of Great Britain, which administers justice ...
39203 palace PAL'ACE, n. [L. palatium.]1. A magnificent house in which an emperor, a king or other ...
39205 palacious PALA'CIOUS, a. [from palace.] Royal; noble; magnificent. [Not used.]
39206 palankeen PALANKEE'N
39207 palanquin PALAN'QUIN, n. A covered carriage used in India, China, &c. borne on the shoulders of men, and in ...
39208 palatable PAL'ATABLE, a. [from palate.] Agreeable to the taste; savory.1. That is relished.
39209 palatableness PAL'ATABLENESS, n. The quality of being agreeable to the taste; relish.
39210 palatal PAL'ATAL, a. Pertaining to the palate; uttered by the aid of the palate.PAL'ATAL, n. A letter ...
39211 palate PAL'ATE, n. [L. palatum, properly the arch or cope of heaven.]1. The roof or upper part of the ...
39212 palatial PALA'TIAL, a. [from palate.] Pertaining to the palate; as the palatial retraction of the ...
39213 palatic PAL'ATIC, a Belonging to the palate. [Not used.]
39214 palatinate PALAT'INATE, n. [L. palatinus. See Palatine.]The province or seignory of a palatine; as the ...
39215 palatine PAL'ATINE, a. [L. palatinus, from palatium, palace.] Pertaining to a palace; an epithet applied ...
39216 palative PAL'ATIVE, a. Pleasing to the taste. [Not used.]
39217 palaver PAL`AVER, n.1. Idle talk.2. Flattery; adulation. [This is used with us in the vulgar dialect.]3. ...
39219 pale-eyed PA'LE-EYED, a. Having eyes dimmed.
39220 pale-faced PA'LE-FACED, a. Having a pale or wan face.1. Causing paleness of face; as pale-faced fear.
39221 pale-hearted PA'LE-HE`ARTED, a. Dispirited.
39218 pale PALE, a. [L. palleo,pallidus.]1. White or whitish; wan; deficient in color; not ruddy or fresh of ...
39222 paleaceous PALEA'CEOUS, a. [L. palea, straw, chaff.]1. Chaffy; resembling chaff, or consisting of it; as a ...
39223 paled PA'LED, pp. Inclosed with pales or pickets.1. Striped.
39224 palely PA'LELY, adv. Wanly; not freshly or ruddily.
39225 palendar PAL'ENDAR, n. A kind of coasting vessel.
39226 paleness PA'LENESS, n. Wanness; defect of color; want of freshness or ruddiness; a sickly whiteness of ...
39227 paleography PALEOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. ancient, and writing.]1. The art of explaining ancient writings. More ...
39228 paleologist PALEOL'OGIST, n. One who writes on antiquity, or one conversant with antiquity.
39229 paleology PALEOL'OGY, n. [Gr. ancient, and discourse.] A discourse or treatise on antiquities, or the ...
39230 paleous PA'LEOUS, a. [L. palea,chaff.] Chaffy; like chaff.
39231 palestrian PALES'TRIAN
39232 palestric PALES'TRIC, a. [Gr. a struggling or wrestling, to wrestle, to strive.] Pertaining to the exercise ...
39233 palet PAL'ET, n. The crown of the head. [Not used.]
39234 palette PALETTE. [See Pallet.]
39235 palfrey PAL'FREY, n. [Low L. paraveredi, [plu of veredus,] horses of a large size, used for carrying the ...
39236 palfreyed PAL'FREYED, a. Riding on a palfrey.
39237 palification PALIFICA'TION, n. [from L. palus,a stake or post.] The act or practice of driving piles or posts ...
39238 palindrome PAL'INDROME, n. [Gr. again.] A word, verse or sentence that is the same when read backwards or ...
39239 paling PA'LING, ppr. Inclosing with pales.PA'LING, n. A fence formed with pales.
39240 palinode PAL'INODE
39241 palinody PAL'INODY, n. [Gr. again, and a song.] A recantation, or declaration contrary to a former one.
39242 palisade PALISA'DE, n. A fence or fortification consisting of a row of stakes or posts sharpened and set ...
39243 palish PA'LISH, a. [from pale.] Somewhat pale or wan; as a palish blue.
39244 pall PALL, n. [L. pallium.]1. A cloke; a mantle of state.2. The mantle of an archbishop.3. The cloth ...
39245 palladium PALLA'DIUM, n. [Gr. from Pallas,the goddess.]1. Primarily, a statue of the goddess Pallas, which ...
39246 pallet PAL'LET, n. [L. pala.]1. Among painters, a little oval table or board, or piece of ivroy, on which ...
39247 palliament PAL'LIAMENT, n. [L. pallium, a cloke.] A dress; a robe. [Not used.]
39248 palliard PAL'LIARD, n. A lecher; a lewd person. [Not used nor English.]
39249 palliardise PAL'LIARDISE, n. Fornication. [Not used.]
39250 palliate PAL'LIATE, v.t. [Low L. pallio, from pallium, a cloke or robe.]1. To clothe.2. To cover with ...
39251 palliated PAL'LIATED, pp. Covered by excuses; extenuated; softened.
39252 palliating PAL'LIATING, ppr. Concealing the enormity or most censurable part of conduct; extenuating; ...
39253 palliation PALLIA'TION, n. The act of palliating; concealment of the most flagrant circumstances of an ...
39254 palliative PAL'LIATIVE, a. Extenuating; serving to extenuate by excuses or favorable representation.1. ...
39255 pallid PAL'LID, a. [L. pallidus, from palleo, to become pale. See Pale.]Pale; wan; deficient in color; ...
39256 pallidly PAL'LIDLY, adv. Palely; wanly.
39257 pallidness PAL'LIDNESS, n. Paleness; wanness.
39258 pallmall PALL'MALL, n. [L. pila, a ball, and malleus, mallet.] A play in which a ball is driven through an ...
39259 pallor PAL'LOR, n. [L.] Paleness.
39261 palm-sunday PALM-SUNDAY, n. p`am-sunday. The Sunday next before Easter; so called in commemoration of our ...
39262 palm-tree PALM-TREE, n. p`am-tree. The date tree, or Phoenix Lactylifera, a native of Asia and Africa, which ...
39260 palm PALM, n. p`am.. [L. palma.]1. The inner part of the hand.2. A hand or hand's breadth; a lineal ...
39263 palmar PAL'MAR, a. [L. palmaris.] Of the breadth of the hand.
39264 palmated PAL'MATED, a. [L. palmatus, from palma, palm.]1. Having the shape of a hand; resembling a hand ...
39266 palmer-worm PALMER-WORM, n. p`amer-worm. A worm covered with hair; supposed to be so called because he wanders ...
39265 palmer PALMER, n. p`amer. One that returned from the Holy Land bearing branches of palm; a pilgrim or ...
39267 palmetto PALMET'TO, n. A species of palm-tree, growing in the West Indies, of the genus Chamaerops.
39268 palmiferous PALMIF'EROUS, a. [L. palma and fero, to bear.] Bearing palms.
39269 palmiped PAL'MIPED, a. [L. palma and pes, foot.] Web-footed; having the toes connected by a membrane; as a ...
39270 palmister PAL'MISTER, n. [L. palma.] One who deals in palmistry, or pretends to tell fortunes by the palm of ...
39271 palmistry PAL'MISTRY, n. [L. palma, palm.] The art or practice of divining or telling fortunes by the lines ...
39272 palmy PALMY, a. p`amy. Bearing palms.
39273 palp PALP, v.t. to feel. [Not authorized.]
39274 palpability PALPABIL'ITY, n. [from palpable.] The quality of being perceptible by the touch.
39275 palpable PAL'PABLE, a. [L. palpor, to feel.]1. Perceptible by the touch; that may be felt; as a palpable ...
39276 palpableness PAL'PABLENESS, n. The quality of being palpable; plainness; obviousness; grossness.
39277 palpably PAL'PABLY, adv. In such a manner as to be perceived by the touch.1. Grossly; plainly; obviously. ...
39278 palpation PALPA'TION, n. [L. palpatio, from palpo, to feel, to stroke, from the root of feel, and Gr. to ...
39279 palpitate PAL'PITATE, v.i. [L. palpito, from palpo. Palpito illustrates the primary sense of palpo.] To ...
39280 palpitation PALPITA'TION, n. [L. palpitatio.] A beating of the heart; particularly, a preternatural beating or ...
39281 palsgrave PALS'GRAVE, n. pawlzgrave. [L. palatium, palace, and graf, an earl.] A count or earl who has the ...
39282 palsical PAL'SICAL, a. s as z. [from palsy.] Affected with palsy; paralytic.
39283 palsied PAL'SIED, a. [from palsy.] Affected with palsy.
39284 palsy PAL'SY, n. s as z. [supposed to be contracted from Gr. relaxation; to loosen or relax.] The loss ...
39285 palter PAL'TER, v.i. [Eng. fail.] To shift; to dodge; to play tricks. Rather, to fail; to come short; to ...
39286 palterer PAL'TERER, n. One that palters, fails or falls short.
39287 paltriness PAL'TRINESS, n. [from paltry.] The state of being paltry,vile or worthless.
39288 paltry PAL'TRY, a. [Gr. vile, and to fail.] Ragged; mean; vile; worthless; despicable; as a paltry boy; a ...
39289 paly PA'LY, a. [from pale.] Pale; wanting color; used only in poetry.1. In heraldry, divided by pales ...
39290 pam PAM, n. [supposed to be from palm, victory.] The knave of clubs.
39291 pamper PAM'PER, v.t. [L. bibo.]1. To feed to the full; to glut; to saginate; to feed luxuriously; as, to ...
39292 pampered PAM'PERED, pp. Fed high; glutted or gratified to the full.
39293 pampering PAM'PERING, ppr. Glutting; feeding luxuriously; gratifying to the full.PAM'PERING, a. Luxuriancy.
39294 pamphlet PAM'PHLET, n. A small book consisting of a sheet of paper, or of sheets stitched together but not ...
39295 pamphleteer PAMPHLETEE'R, n. A writer of pamphlets; a scribbler.
39296 pan PAN, n.1. A vessel broad and somewhat hollow or depressed in the middle, or with a raised border; ...
39297 panacea PANACE'A, n. [L. from Gr. all, and to cure.]1. A remedy for all diseases; a universal medicine.2. ...
39298 panada PANA'DA
39299 panado PANA'DO,n. [L. panis.] A kind of food made by boiling bread in water to the consistence of pulp ...
39300 pancake PAN'CAKE, n. A thin cake fried in a pan. Some folks think it will never be good times, till houses ...
39301 panch PANCH, n. Among seamen, a thick and strong mat, to be fastened on yards to prevent friction.
39302 pancratic PANCRAT'IC
39303 pancratical PANCRAT'ICAL, a. [Gr. all, and strength.] Excelling in all gymnastic exercises; very strong or ...
39304 pancreas PAN'CREAS, n. [Gr. all, and flesh.] A gland of the body situated between the bottom of the stomach ...
39305 pancreatic PANCREAT'IC, a. Pertaining to the pancreas; as pancreatic juice.
39306 pancy PANCY. [See Pansy.]
39307 pandect PAN'DECT, n. [L. pandectoe, from Gr. all, and to contain,to take.]1. A treatise which contains the ...
39308 pandemic PANDEM'IC, a. [Gr. all, and people.] Incident to a whole people; epidemic; as a pandemic disease.
39309 pander PAN'DER, n. [L. mango.] A pimp, a procurer; a male bawd; a mean profligate wretch who caters for ...
39310 panderage PAN'DERAGE, n. A procuring of sexual connection.
39311 panderism PAN'DERISM, n. The employment or vices of a pander; a pimping.
39312 panderly PAN'DERLY, a. Pimping; acting the pander.
39313 pandiculation PANDICULA'TION, n. [L. pandiculor,to yawn, to stretch.] A yawning; a stretching; the tension of ...
39314 pandit PAN'DIT
39315 pandoran PAN'DORAN, n. [Gr.] An instrument of music of the lute kind; a bandore.
39316 pandore PAN'DORE
39317 pane PANE, n. A square of glass.1. A piece of any thing in variegated works.
39318 panegyric PANEGYR'IC, n. [L. panegyricus, from Gr. a public meeting or celebration, all, and an assembly.]1. ...
39319 panegyris PANEGY'RIS, n. A festival; a public meeting.
39320 panegyrist PANEGYR'IST, n. One who bestows praise; an eulogist; an encomiast, either by writing or speaking.
39321 panegyrize PAN'EGYRIZE, v.t. To praise highly; to write or pronounce an eulogy on.PAN'EGYRIZE, v.i. To ...
39322 panegyrized PAN'EGYRIZED, pp. Highly praised or eulogized.
39323 panegyrizing PAN'EGYRIZING, ppr. Praising highly; eulogizing.
39324 panel PAN'EL, n.1. A square piece of board, or other piece somewhat similar inserted between other ...
39325 paneless PA'NELESS, a. Without panes of glass.
39326 pang PANG, n. Extreme pain; anguish; agony of body; particularly, a sudden paroxysm of extreme pain, as ...
39327 pangolin PAN'GOLIN, n. A species of Manis or scaly lizard, found only in Hindoostan.
39329 panic-grass PAN'IC-GRASS, n. A plant of the genus Panicum.
39328 panic PAN'IC, n. A sudden fright; particularly, a sudden fright without real cause, or terror inspired ...
39330 panicle PAN'ICLE, n. [L. panicula, down upon reeds, cat's tail, allied to L. pannus, cloth.] In botany, a ...
39331 panicled PAN'ICLED, a. Furnished with panicles.
39332 paniculate PANIC'ULATE
39333 paniculated PANIC'ULATED, a. Having branches variously subdivided; as a paniculate stem.1. Having the flowers ...
39334 pannade PAN'NADE, n. The curvet of a horse. [See Panic.]
39335 pannage PAN'NAGE, n. [from L. panis.] The food of swine in the woods; as beach nuts, acorns, &c. called ...
39336 pannel PAN'NEL, n. [L. pannus,cloth.] A kind of rustic saddle.1. The stomach of a hawk.
39337 pannellation PANNELLA'TION, n. The act of impanneling a jury. [Not used.]
39338 pannier PANNIER, n. pan'yer. [L. panis, bread.] A wicker basket; primarily, a bread-basket, but used for ...
39339 pannikel PAN'NIKEL, n. The brain pan or skull. [Not in use.]
39340 panoply PAN'OPLY, n. [Gr. all,and arms.] Complete armor or defense. We had need to take the christian ...
39341 panorama PANOR`AMA, n. [Gr. all, and view, to see.] Complete or entire view; a circular painting having ...
39342 pansophical PANSOPH'ICAL, a. [See Pansophy.[ Pretending to have a knowledge of every thing.
39343 pansophy PAN'SOPHY, n. [Gr. all, and wisdom.] Universal wisdom or knowledge. [Little used.]
39344 pansy PAN'SY, n. A plant and flower of the genus Viola; the viola tricolor, or garden violet.
39345 pant P`ANT, v.i.1. To palpitate; to beat with preternatural violence or rapidity, as the heart in ...
39346 pantaloon PANTALOON', n.1. A garment for males in which breeches and stockings are in a piece; a species of ...
39347 panter P`ANTER, n. One that pants.
39348 pantess P`ANTESS, n. [from pant.] The difficulty of breathing in a hawk.
39349 pantheism PAN'THEISM, n. [Gr. all, and God, whence theism.] The doctrine that the universe is God, or the ...
39350 pantheist PANTHE'IST, n. One that believes the universe to be God; a name given to the followers of Spinosa. ...
39351 pantheistic PANTHEIS'TIC
39352 pantheistical PANTHEIS'TICAL, n. Pertaining to pantheism; confounding God with the universe.
39353 pantheon PANTHE'ON, n. [Gr. all, and God.] A temple or magnificent edifice at Rome, dedicated to all the ...
39354 panther PAN'THER, n. [L. from Gr.] A fierce, ferocious quadruped of the genus Felis, of the size of a ...
39355 pantile PAN'TILE, n. A gutter tile.
39356 panting P`ANTING, ppr. [See Pant.] Palpitating; breathing with a rapid succession of inspirations and ...
39357 pantingly P`ANTINGLY, adv. With palpitation or rapid breathing.
39358 pantler PANT'LER, n. [L. panis, bread.] The officer in a great family who has charge of the bread.
39359 pantofle PAN'TOFLE, n. A slipper for the foot.
39360 pantograph PAN'TOGRAPH, n. [Gr. all, and to describe.] A mathematical instrument so formed as to copy any ...
39361 pantographic PANTOGRAPH'IC
39362 pantographical PANTOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a pantograph; performed by a pantograph.
39363 pantography PANTOG'RAPHY, n. General description; view of an entire thing.
39364 pantometer PANTOM'ETER, n. [Gr. all, and to measure.] An instrument for measuring all sorts of elevations, ...
39365 pantometric PANTOMET'RIC
39366 pantometrical PANTOMET'RICAL, a. Pertaining to a pantometer; performed by a pantometer.
39367 pantomime PAN'TOMIME, n. [L. pantomimus; Gr. all, and a mimic.]1. One that imitates all sorts of actions and ...
39368 pantomimic PANTOMIM'IC
39369 pantomimical PANTOMIM'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the pantomime; representing characters and actions by dumb show.
39371 panton-shoe PAN'TON-SHOE, n. [L. pando, to open.] A horse shoe contrived to recover a narrow and hoof-bound ...
39370 panton PAN'TON
39372 pantry PAN'TRY, n. [L. panarium, from panis, bread.] An apartment or closet in which provisions are kept.
39373 panurgy PAN'URGY, n. [Gr. all, and work.] Skill in all kinds or work or business; craft.
39374 pap PAP, n. [L. papilla.] A nipple of the breast; a teat.PAP, n. [Low L. papa.]1. A soft food for ...
39375 papa PAP`A, n. [L. papa.] Father; a word with us used by children.
39376 papacy PA'PACY, n.1. The office and dignity of the pope or bishop of Rome; popedom.2. Papal authority.
39377 papal PA'PAL, a. Belonging to the pope or pontiff of Rome; popish; as papal authority; the papal ...
39378 papalin PA'PALIN, n. A papist. [Not used.]
39379 papaverous PAPAV'EROUS, a. [L. papavereus, from papaver,a poppy.]Resembling the poppy; of the nature or ...
39380 papaw PAPAW', n. The carica papaya, a tree growing in warm climates to the highth of eighteen or twenty ...
39381 pape PAPE, n. The pope.
39383 paper-credit PAPER-CRED'IT, n. Evidences of debt; promissory notes, &c. passing current in commercial ...
39384 paper-faced PA'PER-FACED, a. Having a face as white as paper.
39385 paper-kite PA'PER-KITE, n. A light frame covered with paper for flying in the air like a kite.
39386 paper-maker PA'PER-MAKER, n. One that manufactures paper.
39387 paper-mill PA'PER-MILL, n. A mill in which paper is manufactured.
39388 paper-money PAPER-MONEY, n. Notes or bills issued by authority, and promising the payment of money, circulated ...
39382 paper PA'PER, n. [L. papyrus, the name of an Egyptian plant, from which was made a kind of paper.]1. A ...
39389 papescent PAPES'CENT, a. [from pap.] Containing pap; having the qualities of pap.
39390 papess PA'PESS, n. A female pope.
39391 papil PAP'IL, n. [L. papilla.] A small pap or nipple.
39392 papilio PAPIL'IO, n. [L.] A butterfly. In zoology a genus of insects of numerous species. These insects ...
39393 papilionaceous PAPILIONA'CEOUS, a. Resembling the butterfly; a term in botany, used to describe the corols of ...
39394 papillary PAP'ILLARY
39395 papillate PAP'ILLATE, v.i. To grow into a nipple.
39396 papillose PAP'ILLOSE, a. Nipply; covered with fleshy dots or points; verrucose; warty; as a papillose ...
39397 papillous PAP'ILLOUS, a. Pertaining to the pap or nipple; resembling the nipple; covered with papils.
39398 papism PA'PISM, n. Popery.
39399 papist PA'PIST,n. A Roman catholic; one that adheres to the church of Rome and the authority of the pope.
39400 papistic PAPIS'TIC
39401 papistical PAPIS'TICAL, a. Popish; pertaining to popery; adherent to the church of Rome and its doctrines and ...
39402 papistry PA'PISTRY, n. Popery; the doctrines and ceremonies of the church of Rome.
39403 papized PA'PIZED, a. Conformed to popery.
39404 pappous PAP'POUS, a. [from L. pappus.] Downy; furnished with a pappus, as the seeds of certain plants, ...
39405 pappus PAP'PUS, n. [L. from Gr. an old man or grandfather,hence a substance resembling gray hairs.] The ...
39406 pappy PAP'PY, a. [from pap.] Like pap; soft; succulent.
39407 papulae PAP'ULAE, n. [L.] Pimples; blisters; eruptions on the skin.
39408 papulose PAP'ULOSE, a. Covered with vesicular points or with little blisters; as a papulose leaf.
39409 papulous PAP'ULOUS, a. Full of pimples or pustules.
39410 papyrus PAPY'RUS, n. [L.] An Egyptian plant, a kind of reed, of which the ancients made paper.
39411 par P`AR, n. [L. par, equal, paro.]1. State of equality; equal value; equivalence without discount or ...
39412 parable PAR'ABLE, n. [L. parabilis.] Easily procured. [Not used.]PAR'ABLE, n. [L. parabola; Gr. to throw ...
39413 parabola PARAB'OLA, n. [L. See Parable.] A conic section arising from cutting a cone by a plane parallel to ...
39414 parabole PARABOLE, n. parab'oly. [See Parable.] In oratory, similitude; comparison.
39415 parabolic PARABOL'IC
39416 parabolical PARABOL'ICAL, a. Expressed by parable or allegorical representation; as parabolical instruction or ...
39417 parabolically PARABOL'ICALLY, adv. By way of parable.1. In the form of a parabola.
39418 paraboliform PARABOL'IFORM, a. Having the form of a parabola.
39419 parabolism PARAB'OLISM, n. [from parabola.] In algebra, the division of the terms of an equation by a known ...
39420 paraboloid PARAB'OLOID, n. [Gr. form.] In geometry, a paraboliform curve whose ordinates are supposed to be in ...
39421 paracelsian PARACEL'SIAN,n. A physician who follows the practice of Paracelsus, a Swiss physician of ...
39422 paracentesis PARACENTE'SIS
39423 paracentesy PARACEN'TESY, n. [Gr. through, and to pierce.] The operation in surgery called tapping.
39424 paracentric PARACEN'TRIC
39425 paracentrical PARACEN'TRICAL, a. [Gr. beyond, and center.] Deviating from circularity.
39426 parachment-maker P`ARACHMENT-MAKER, n. One who dresses skins for parchment.
39427 parachronism PARACH'RONISM, n. [Gr. beyond, and time.] An error in chronology; a mistake in regard to the true ...
39428 parachute PAR'ACHUTE, n. [Gr. against.] In aerostation, an instrument to prevent the rapidity of descent.
39429 paraclete PAR'ACLETE, n. [Gr. to call.] Properly, an advocate; one called to aid or support; hence, the ...
39430 parade PARA'DE,n. [L. paro.]1. In military affairs, the place where troops assemble for exercise, ...
39431 paraded PARA'DED, pp. Assembled and arrayed.
39432 paradigm PARADIGM, n. par'adim. [Gr. example, to show.] An example; a model. In grammar, an example of a ...
39433 paradigmatic PARADIGMAT'IC
39434 paradigmatical PARADIGMAT'ICAL, a. Exemplary. [Little used.]
39435 paradigmatize PARADIG'MATIZE, v.t. To set forth as a model or example. [Little used.]
39436 parading PARA'DING, ppr. Assembling and arraying in due order; making an ostentatious show.
39437 paradise PAR'ADISE, n. [Gr.] The garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed immediately after their ...
39438 paradisea PARADIS'EA, n. Bird of Paradise, a genus of fowls, natives of the isles in the East Indies and of ...
39439 paradisean PARADIS'EAN
39440 paradisiacal PARADISI'ACAL, a. Pertaining to Eden or Paradise, or to a place of felicity.1. Suiting paradise; ...
39441 paradox PAR'ADOX, n. [Gr. beyond, and opinion; to or suppose.] A tenet or proposition contrary to received ...
39442 paradoxical PARADOX'ICAL, a. Having the nature of a paradox.1. Inclined to tenets or notions contrary to ...
39443 paradoxically PARADOX'ICALLY, adv. In a paradoxical manner, or in a manner seemingly absurd.
39444 paradoxicalness PARADOX'ICALNESS, n. State of being paradoxical.
39445 paradoxology PARADOXOL'OGY, n. [paradox and Gr.discourse.] The use of paradoxes. [Not used.]
39446 paragoge PARAGOGE, n. par'agojy. [Gr. a drawing out.] The addition of a letter or syllable to the end of a ...
39447 paragogic PARAGOG'IC
39448 paragogical PARAGOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a paragoge; lengthening a word by the addition of a letter or ...
39449 paragon PAR'AGON, n. [L. par,equal.]1. A model or pattern; a model by way of distinction, implying ...
39450 paragram PAR'AGRAM,n. [Gr.] A play upon words or a pun.
39451 paragrammatist PARAGRAM'MATIST, n. A punster.
39452 paragraph PAR'AGRAPH, n. [Gr. a marginal note; to write near or beyond the text; beyond, and to write.] A ...
39453 paragraphic PARAGRAPH'IC, a. Consisting of paragraphs or short divisions, with breaks.
39454 paragraphically PARAGRAPH'ICALLY, adv. By paragraphs; with distinct breaks or divisions.
39455 paralepsis PARALEP'SIS
39456 paralepsy PAR'ALEPSY, n. [Gr. omission; beyond or by, and to leave.]In rhetoric, a pretended or apparent ...
39457 paralipomena PARALIPOM'ENA, n. [Gr. to omit; beyond, and to leave.]Things omitted; a supplement containing ...
39458 paralize PAR'ALIZE, v.t. [Gr.] To affect as with palsy; to check action, or destroy the power of action.
39459 parallactic PARALLAC'TIC
39460 parallactical PARALLAC'TICAL, a. [See Parallax.] Pertaining to the parallax of a heavenly body.
39461 parallax PAR'ALLAX, n. [Gr. to vary, to decline or wander; beyond, and to change.] In astronomy, the change ...
39462 parallel PAR'ALLEL, a. [Gr. against or opposite, and one the other.]1. In geometry, extended in the same ...
39463 parallelable PAR'ALLELABLE, a. That may be equaled. [Not much used.]
39464 parallelism PAR'ALLELISM, n. State of being parallel.1. Resemblance; equality of state; comparison.
39465 parallelly PAR'ALLELLY, adv. In a parallel manner; with parallelism.
39466 parallelogram PARALLEL'OGRAM, n. [Gr.]1. In geometry, a right lined quadrilateral figure, whose opposite sides ...
39467 parallelogramic PARALLELOGRAM'IC
39468 parallelogramical PARALLELOGRAM'ICAL, a. Having the properties of a parallelogram.
39469 parallelopiped PARALLELOPIP'ED, n. [parallel and Gr. on, and a plain.]In geometry, a regular solid comprehended ...
39470 parallelopipedia PARALLELOPIPE'DIA, n. A genus of spars,externally of a determinate and regular figure, always ...
39471 paralogism PARAL'OGISM, n. [Gr. beyond, and reasoning; discourse, reason.]In logic, a fallacious argument or ...
39472 paralogize PARAL'OGIZE, v.i. To reason falsely.
39473 paralogy PARAL'OGY, n. False reasoning. [supra.]
39474 paralysis PARAL'YSIS, n. [Gr. to loosen, dissolve or weaken.] Palsy; the loss of the power of muscular ...
39475 paralytic PARALYT'IC
39476 paralytical PARALYT'ICAL, a. Affected with palsy; deprived of the power of muscular motion; sometimes, weak; ...
39477 parameter PARAM'ETER, n. [ Gr.] 1. The latus rectum of a parabola. It is a third proportional to the ...
39478 paramount PAR'AMOUNT, a.1. Superior to all others; possessing the highest title or jurisdiction; as lord ...
39479 paramour PAR'AMOUR, n. [L. per, and amour.]1. A lover; a wooer.2. A mistress.
39480 paranthine PARANTHINE. [See Scapolite.]
39481 paranymph PAR'ANYMPH, n. [Gr. by, and a bride or spouse.]1. A brideman; one who leads the bride to her ...
39482 parapegm PARAPEGM, n. par'apem. [Gr.] A brazen table fixed to a pillar, on which laws and proclamations ...
39483 parapet PAR'APET, n. [L. pectus.] Literally, a wall or rampart to the breast or breast high; but in ...
39484 parapherna PARAPHER'NA
39485 paraphernal PARAPHERNAL, a. Pertaining to or consisting in parapherna; as paraphernal property.
39486 paraphernalia PARAPHERNA'LIA, n. [Gr. beyond, and dower.] The goods which a wife brings with her at her ...
39487 paraphrase PAR'APHRASE, n. s as z. [Gr. beyond, and phrase.] An explanation of some text or passage in a ...
39488 paraphrased PAR'APHRASED, pp. Amply explained or translated.
39489 paraphrasing PAR'APHRASING, ppr. Explaining or translating amply and freely.
39490 paraphrast PAR'APHRAST, n. [Gr.] One that paraphrases; one that explains or translates in words more ample ...
39491 paraphrastically PARAPHRAS'TICALLY, adv. In a paraphrastic manner.
39492 paraphrenitis PARAPHREN'ITIS, n. [Gr. delirium.] An inflammation of the diaphragm.
39493 paraplegy PAR'APLEGY, n. [Gr. beyond, and stroke; to smite.]That kind of palsy which affects the lower part ...
39494 paraquet PARAQUET', n. A little parrot.
39495 parasang PAR'ASANG, n. A persian measure of length, which Herodotus states to be thirty stadia, nearly four ...
39496 parasceuastic PARASCEUAS'TIC, a. Preparatory.
39497 parasceve PARASCE'VE, n. [Gr. preparation.] Preparation; the sabbath-eve of the Jews.
39498 paraselene PARASELE'NE, n. [Gr. about or near, and the moon.] A mock moon; a luminous ring or circle ...
39499 parasite PAR'ASITE, n. [L. parasita; Gr. by, and corn.]1. In ancient Greece, a priest or minister of the ...
39500 parasitic PARASIT'IC
39501 parasitical PARASIT'ICAL, a. Flattering; wheedling; fawning for bread or favors.1. Growing on the stem or ...
39502 parasitically PARASIT'ICALLY, adv. In a flattering or wheedling manner; by dependence on another.
39503 parasitism PAR'ASITISM, n. The behavior or manners of a parasite.
39504 parasol PAR'ASOL, n. [L. sol.] A small umbrella used by ladies to defend themselves from rain, or their ...
39505 parat PAR'AT, n. A fish or the mullet kind, found in Brazil.
39506 parathesis PARATH'ESIS, n. [Gr.] In grammar, apposition, or the placing of two or more nouns in the same ...
39507 paravail PARAVA'IL, a. In feudal law, the tenant paravail, is the lowest tenant holding under a mean or ...
39508 paravant PAR'AVANT
39509 paravaunt PAR'AVAUNT, adv. In front; publicly. [Not English nor used.]
39510 parboil P`ARBOIL, v.t.1. To boil in part; to boil in a moderate degree.2. To cause little pustules or ...
39511 parbreak P`ARBREAK, v.i. [See Break.] To vomit.
39512 parbuckle P`ARBUCKLE, n. Among seamen, a rope like a pair of slings for hoisting casks, &c.
39513 parcel P`ARCEL, n. [L. particula, particle, from pars, part.]1. A part; a portion of any thing taken ...
39514 parceled P`ARCELED, pp. Divided into portions.
39515 parceling P`ARCELING, ppr. Dividing into portions.P`ARCELING, n. Among seamen, long narrow slips of canvas ...
39516 parcenary P`ARCENARY, n. Co-heirship; the holding or occupation of lands of inheritance by two or more ...
39517 parcener P`ARCENER, n. [L. pars.] Parcener or co-parcener is a co-heir, or one who holds lands by descent ...
39518 parch P`ARCH, v.t. [I know not from what source we have received this word. It corresponds in elements ...
39519 parched P`ARCHED, pp. Scorched; dried to extremity.
39520 parchedness P`ARCHEDNESS, n. The state of being scorched or dried to extremity.
39521 parching P`ARCHING, ppr. Scorching; drying to extremity.1. a. Having the quality of burning or drying; as ...
39522 parchment P`ARCHMENT, [L. pergamena; purgo] The skin of a sheep or goat dressed or prepared and rendered fit ...
39523 pard P`ARD, n. [L. pardus.] The leopard; or in poetry, any spotted beast. Instead of pard, we ...
39524 pardon P`ARDON, v.t. [L. per and dono, to give; per having the sense of the English for in forgive, and re ...
39525 pardonable P`ARDONABLE, a. That may be pardoned; applied to persons. The offender is pardonable.1. Venial; ...
39526 pardonableness P`ARDONABLENESS, n. The quality of being pardonable; venialness; susceptibility of forgiveness; as ...
39527 pardonably P`ARDONABLY, adv. In a manner admitting of pardon; venially; excusably.
39528 pardoned P`ARDONED, pp. Forgiven; excused.
39529 pardoner P`ARDONER, n. One that forgives; one that absolves an offender.1. One that sells the pope's ...
39530 pardoning P`ARDONING, ppr. Forgiving; remitting an offense or crime; absolving from punishment.
39531 pare PARE, v.t. [L. paro; Gr. lame; to mutilate; Heb. to create; to cut off. The primary sense is to ...
39532 pared PA'RED, pp. Freed from any thing superfluous on the surface or at the extremities.
39533 paregoric PAREGOR'IC, a. [Gr. to mitigate.]Mitigating; assuaging pain; as paregoric elixir.PAREGOR'IC, n. A ...
39534 parelcon PAREL'CON, n. [Gr. to draw out.] In grammar, the addition of a word or syllable to the end of ...
39535 parembole PAREMBOLE, n. parem'boly. [Gr. insertion.] In rhetoric,the insertion of something relating to the ...
39536 parenchyma PAREN'CHYMA, n. [Gr. to suffuse.]1. In anatomy, the solid and interior part of the viscera, or the ...
39537 parenchymatous PARENCHYM'ATOUS
39538 parenchymous PAREN'CHYMOUS, a. [See the Noun.] Pertaining to parenchyma; spungy; soft; porous.
39539 parenesis PAREN'ESIS, n. [Gr. to exhort.] Persuasion; exhortation. [Little used.]
39540 parenetic PARENET'IC
39541 parenetical PARENET'ICAL, a. Hortatory; encouraging.
39542 parent PA'RENT, n. [L. parens, from pario, to produce or bring forth. The regular participle of pario is ...
39543 parentage PAR'ENTAGE, n. Extraction; birth; condition with respect to the rank of parents; as a man of mean ...
39544 parental PARENT'AL, a. Pertaining to parents; as parental government.1. Becoming parents; tender; ...
39545 parentation PARENTA'TION, n. [from L. parento.] Something done or said in honor of the dead.
39546 parenthesis PAREN'THESIS, n. [Gr. to insert.] A sentence, or certain words inserted in a sentence, which ...
39547 parentheticical PARENTHET'IC'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a parenthesis; expressed in a parenthesis.1. Using ...
39548 parenticide PARENT'ICIDE, n. [L. parens and coedo.] One who kills a parent.
39549 parentless PA'RENTLESS, a. Deprived of parents.
39550 parer PA'RER, n. [from pare.] He or that which pares; an instrument for paring.
39551 parergy PAR'ERGY, n. [Gr. beyond, and work.] Something unimportant, or done by the by. [Not used.]
39552 pargasite P`ARGASITE, n. [from the isle Pargas, in Finland.] A mineral of a grayish or bluish green, in ...
39553 parget P`ARGET, n. Gypsum or plaster stone.1. Plaster laid on roofs or walls.2. Paint.Parget is applied ...
39554 pargeted P`ARGETED, pp. Plastered; stuccoed.
39555 pargeter P`ARGETER, n. A plasterer.
39556 pargeting P`ARGETING, ppr. Plastering; as a noun, plaster or stucco.
39557 parhelion PARHE'LION, n. [Gr. near, and the sun.] A mock sun or meteor, appearing in the form of a bright ...
39558 parial PA'RIAL
39559 parian PA'RIAN, a. Pertaining to Paros, an isle in the Egean sea; as Parian marble.Parian chronicle, a ...
39560 parietal PARIE'TAL, a. [from L. paries, a wall, properly a partition wall, from the root of part or pare.] ...
39561 parietary PARI'ETARY, n. [L. paries, a wall.] A plant, the pellitory of the wall, of the genus Parietaria.
39562 parietine PAR'IETINE, n. [L. paries, wall.] A piece of a wall. [Not used.]
39563 paring PA'RING, ppr. Cutting or shaving off the extremities.PA'RING, n. That which is pared off; rind ...
39564 paris PAR'IS, n. A plant, herb Paris or true-love, or rather a genus of plants of one species.
39565 parish PAR'ISH, n. [Low L. parochia; Gr. a dwelling or near residence; near, and house, or to dwell; or ...
39566 parishioner PARISH'IONER, n. One that belongs to a parish.
39567 parisyllabic PARISYLLAB'IC
39568 parisyllabical PARISYLLAB'ICAL, a. [L. par, equal, and syllaba, syllable.]Having equal or like syllables.
39569 paritor PAR'ITOR, n. [for apparitor.] A beadle; a summoner of the courts of civil law.
39570 parity PAR'ITY, n. [L. par, equal. See Pair and Peer.]1. Equality; as parity of reason.2. Equality; ...
39571 park P`ARK, n. [L. parcus, saving.] A large piece of ground inclosed and privileged for wild beasts of ...
39572 parker P`ARKER, n. The keeper of a park.
39573 parkleaves P`ARKLEAVES, n. A plant of the genus Hypericum.
39574 parlance P`ARLANCE, n. Conversation; discourse; talk.
39575 parle PARLE, n. p`arl. Conversation; talk; oral treaty or discussion. [Not used.] [See Parley.]
39576 parley P`ARLEY, v.i. [L. fero, or pario.] In a general sense, to speak with another; to discourse; but ...
39577 parliament P`ARLIAMENT, n. Literally, a speaking, conference, mutual discourse or consultation; hence,1. In ...
39578 parliamentarian PARLIAMENTA'RIAN
39579 parliamentary PARLIAMENT'ARY, a. Pertaining to parliament; as parliamentary authority.1. Enacted or done by ...
39580 parliamenteer PARLIAMENTEE'R , n. One of those who adhered to the parliament in the time of Charles I.
39581 parlor P`ARLOR, n. Primarily, the apartment in a nunnery where the nuns are permitted to meet and ...
39582 parlous P`ARLOUS, a. Keen; sprightly; waggish. [Not used.]
39583 parochial PARO'CHIAL, a. [from L. parochia.] Belonging to a parish; as parochial clergy; parochial duties.
39584 parochiality PAROCHIAL'ITY, n. The state of being parochial.
39585 parochian PARO'CHIAN, a. Pertaining to a parish.PARO'CHIAN, n. [supra.] A parishioner.
39586 parodic PAROD'IC
39587 parodical PAROD'ICAL, a. [See Parody.] Copying after the manner of parody.
39588 parody PAR'ODY, n. [Gr. ode.]1. A kind of writing in which the words of an author or his thoughts are, ...
39589 paroket PAR'OKET, n. A small species of parrot.[More properly perroquet, which see.]
39590 parol PAROL
39591 parole PARO'LE, n. [L. parabola.]1. Properly, a word; hence, in a legal sense, words or oral ...
39592 paronomasia PARONOMA'SIA
39593 paronomastic PARONOMAS'TIC
39594 paronomastical PARONOMAS'TICAL, a. Pertaining to paronomasy; consisting in a play upon words.
39595 paronomasy PARONOM'ASY , n. [from Gr. to transgress law or rule.]A rhetorical figure, by which words nearly ...
39596 paronychia PARONYCH'IA, n. [Gr. by, and the nail.] In surgery, a whitlow or felon.
39597 paronymous PARON'YMOUS, a. [Gr. name.] Resembling another word.
39598 paroquet PAR'OQUET
39599 parotid PAROT'ID, a. [Gr. near, and ear.] Pertaining to or denoting certain glands below and before the ...
39600 parotis PARO'TIS, n. [Gr. See Parotid.]1. The parotid gland; a secreting salivary conglomerate gland ...
39601 paroxysm PAR'OXYSM, n. [Gr. to excite or sharpen; and sharp.] An exasperation or exacerbation of a disease; ...
39602 paroxysmal PAROXYS'MAL, a. Pertaining to paroxysm; as a paroxysmal disposition.
39603 parphrastictical PARPHRAS'TIC'TICAL, a. Free, clear and ample in explanation; explaining or translating in words ...
39604 parrel PAR'REL, n. [L. paro. It coincides with apparel, which see.]Among seamen, an apparatus or frame ...
39605 parricidal PARRICI'DAL
39606 parricide PAR'RICIDE, n. [L. paricida, from pater, father, and coedo, to kill.]1. A person who murders his ...
39607 parridicious PARRIDIC'IOUS, a. [See Parricide.] Pertaining to parricide; containing the crime of murdering a ...
39608 parried PAR'RIED, pp. [See Parry.] Warded off; driven aside.
39609 parrot PAR'ROT, n.1. The name of fowls of the genus Psittacus, of numerous species. The bill is hooked ...
39610 parry PAR'RY, v.t.1. In fencing, to ward off; to stop or to put or turn by; as, to parry a thrust.2. To ...
39611 parrying PAR'RYING, ppr. Warding off, as a thrust or blow.
39612 parse PARSE, v.t. p`ars. [from L. pars, part.] In grammar, to resolve a sentence into its elements, or ...
39613 parsimonious PARSIMO'NIOUS, a. [See Parsimony.] Sparing in the use or expenditure of money; covetous; near; ...
39614 parsimoniously PARSIMO'NIOUSLY, adv. With a very sparing use of money; covetously.
39615 parsimoniousness PARSIMO'NIOUSNESS, n. A very sparing use of money, or a disposition to save expense.
39616 parsimony P`ARSIMONY, n. [L. parsimonia, from parcus, saving,literally close; Eng. park.] Closeness or ...
39617 parsley P`ARSLEY, n. [L. petroselinon; Gr. a stone, and parsley; stone-parsley, a plant growing among ...
39618 parsnep P`ARSNEP, n. [L. napus, which occurs also in turnep.] A plant of the genus Pastinaca. The root of ...
39619 parson PARSON, n. p`arsn.1. The priest of a parish or ecclesiastical society; the rector or incumbent of ...
39620 parsonage P`ARSONAGE, n. In America, the glebe and house belonging to a parish or ecclesiastical society, and ...
39621 part P`ART, n. [L. pars, partis.]1. A portion, piece or fragment separated from a whole thing; as, to ...
39622 partable PARTABLE. [See Partible.]
39623 partage P`ARTAGE, n. Division; severance; the act of dividing or sharing; a French word. [Little used.]
39624 partake PARTA'KE, v.i. pret. partook; pp. partaken. [part and take.]1. To take a part, portion or share in ...
39625 partaken PARTA'KEN, pp. Shared with others; participated.
39626 partaker PARTA'KER, n. One who has or takes a part, share or portion in common with others; a sharer; a ...
39627 partaking PARTA'KING, ppr. Sharing with others; participating. PARTA'KING, n. An associating; combination in ...
39628 parted P`ARTED, pp. Separated; divided; severed.
39629 parter P`ARTER, n. One that parts or separates.
39630 parterre PARTERRE, n. parta're. In gardening, a level division of ground furnished with evergreens and ...
39631 partial P`ARTIAL, a. [L. pars.]1. Biased to one party; inclined to favor one party in a cause, or one side ...
39632 partialist P`ARTIALIST, n. One who is partial. [Unusual.]
39633 partiality PARTIALITY, n. parshal'ity. Inclination to favor one party or one side of a question more than ...
39634 partialize P`ARTIALIZE, v.t. To render partial. [Not used.]
39635 partially P`ARTIALLY, adv. With undue bias of mind to one party or side; with unjust favor or dislike; as, ...
39636 partibility PARTIBILITY, n. [See Partible.] Susceptibility of division, partition or severance; separability; ...
39637 partible P`ARTIBLE, a. Divisible; separable; susceptible of severance or partition; as, an estate of ...
39638 participable PARTIC'IPABLE, a. [See Participate.] That may be participated or shared.
39639 participant PARTIC'IPANT, a. [See Participate.] Sharing; having a share or part; followed by of. The prince ...
39640 participate PARTIC'IPATE, v.i. [L. participo; pars, part, and capio, to take.]1. To partake; to have a share ...
39641 participated PARTIC'IPATED, pp. Shared in common with others; partaken.
39642 participating PARTIC'IPATING, ppr. Having a part or share; partaking.
39643 participation PARTICIPA'TION, n. The state of sharing in common with others; as a participation of joys or ...
39644 participative PARTIC'IPATIVE, a. Capable of participating.
39645 participial PARTICIP'IAL, a. [L. participialis. See Participle.]1. Having the nature and use of a ...
39646 participially PARTICIP'IALLY, adv. In the sense or manner of a participle.
39647 participle P`ARTICIPLE, n. [L. participium, from participo; pars, part, and capio,to take.]1. In grammar, a ...
39648 particle P`ARTICLE, n. [L. particula, from pars, part.]1. A minute part or portion of matter; as a particle ...
39649 particular PARTIC'ULAR, a. [Low L. particularis, from particula.]1. Pertaining to a single person or thing; ...
39650 particularity PARTICULAR'ITY, n. Distinct notice or specification of particulars. --Even descending to ...
39651 particularize PARTIC'ULARIZE, v.t. To mention distinctly or in particulars; to enumerate or specify in detail. ...
39652 particularly PARTIC'ULARLY, adv. Distinctly; singly.1. In an especial manner. This exact propriety of Virgil I ...
39653 particulate PARTICULATE, to mention, is not in use.
39654 parting P`ARTING, ppr. [from part.] Dividing; separating; breaking in pieces.1. a. Given at separation; ...
39655 partisan P`ARTISAN, n. s as z.1. An adherent to a party or faction.2. In war, the commander of a party or ...
39656 partite P`ARTITE, a. [L. partitus, from partio, to divide. See Part.]In botany, divided. A partite leaf ...
39657 partition PARTI'TION, n. [L. partitio, from partio, to divide.]1. The act of dividing, or state of being ...
39658 partitive P`ARTITIVE, a. In grammar, distributive; as a noun partitive.
39659 partitively P`ARTITIVELY, adv. In a partitive manner; distributively.
39660 partlet P`ARTLET, n. [from part.] A ruff; a band or collar for the neck.1. A hen.
39661 partly P`ARTLY, adv. In part; in some measure or degree; not wholly.
39662 partner P`ARTNER, n. [from part.] One who partakes or shares with another; a partaker; an associate; as, ...
39663 partnership P`ARTNERSHIP, n. The association of two or more persons for the purpose of undertaking and ...
39664 partook PARTOOK', pret. of partake.
39665 partridge P`ARTRIDGE, n. [L. perdix.] A wild fowl of the genus Tatrao. Latham arranges the partridge and ...
39666 parturiate PARTU'RIATE, v.i. [L. parturio, from partus, birth, from pario, to bear.] To bring forth young. ...
39667 parturient PARTU'RIENT, a. [L. parturiens.] Bringing forth or about to bring forth young.
39668 parturition PARTURI'TION, n. [L. parturio.] The act of bringing forth or being delivered of young.
39670 party-colored P`ARTY-COLORED, a. Having divers colors; as a party-colored plume; a party-colored flower.
39671 party-jury P`ARTY-JURY, n. A jury consisting of half natives and half foreigners.
39672 party-man P`ARTY-MAN, n. One of a party; usually, a factious man; a man of violent party principles; an ...
39673 party-spirit P`ARTY-SPIRIT, n. The spirit that supports a party.
39674 party-wall P`ARTY-WALL, n. A wall that separates one house from the next.
39669 party P`ARTY, n. [L. pars. See Part.]1. A number of persons united in opinion or design, in opposition ...
39675 paru PAR'U, n. A singular American fish.
39676 parvis P`ARVIS, n. A church or church porch. [Not used.]
39677 parvitude P`ARVITUDE
39678 parvity P`ARVITY, n. Littleness. [Not used.]
39679 pas PAS, n. Right of going foremost; precedence. [Not used.]
39681 pasch-egg PASCH-EGG, n. An egg stained and presented to young persons, about the time of Easter. [Local.]
39680 pasch PASCH, n. [See Paschal.] The passover; the feast of Easter. [Not used.]
39682 paschal PAS'CHAL, a. [L. pascha.] Pertaining to the passover, or to Easter.
39683 pash PASH, n. [L. facies, face.] A face. [Not used.]1. A blow. [Not used.]PASH, v.t. To strike; to ...
39684 pashaw PASHAW', n. In the Turkish dominions, a viceroy, governor or commander; a bashaw.
39685 pashawlic PASHAW'LIC, n. The jurisdiction of a pashaw.
39686 pasigraphy PASIG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. all, and writing.] A system of universal writing, or a manner of writing that ...
39687 pasque-flower PASQUE-FLOWER, n. pask'-flower. A flower, a species of anemone.
39688 pasquil PAS'QUIL
39689 pasquiler PAS'QUILER, n. A lampooner.
39690 pasquin PAS'QUIN, n. A mutilated statue at Rome, in a corner of the palace of Ursini, so called from a ...
39691 pasquinade PASQUINA'DE, v.t. To lampoon; to satirize.
39693 pass-parole P`ASS-PARO'LE, n. [pass and parole.] In military affairs, a command given at the head of an army ...
39692 pass P`ASS, v.i. [Eng. pat, and as a noun, a pass, a defile, an ambling, pace; passen, to be fit, to ...
39694 passable P`ASSABLE, a. That may be passed, traveled or navigated. The roads are not passable. The stream ...
39695 passably P`ASSABLY, adv. Tolerably. [See Passibly.]
39696 passade PASSA'DE
39697 passado PASSA'DO, n. A push or thrust.
39698 passage P`ASSAGE, n.1. The act of passing or moving by land or water, or through the air or other ...
39699 passager P`ASSAGER, n. A traveler or voyager; one who passes or journeys on foot, in a vehicle, or in a ...
39700 passed P`ASSED
39701 passenger P`ASSENGER, n. One who is traveling, as in a public coach, or in a ship, or on foot. This is the ...
39702 passer P`ASSER, n. One that passes; a passenger.
39703 passerine P`ASSERINE, a. [L. passer, a sparrow.] Pertaining to sparrows, or to the order of birds to which ...
39704 passibility PASSIBIL'ITY, n. The quality or capacity of receiving impressions from external agents; aptness to ...
39705 passible PAS'SIBLE, a. Susceptible of feeling or of impressions from external agents. Apollinarius held ...
39706 passibleness PASSIBLENESS, the same as passibility.
39708 passing-bell P`ASSING-BELL, n. The bell that rings at the hour of death to obtain prayers for the passing soul. ...
39709 passing-note P`ASSING-NOTE, n. In music, a note introduced between two others for the purpose of softening a ...
39707 passing P`ASSING, ppr. Moving; proceeding.1. a. Exceeding; surpassing; eminent.2. Adverbially used to ...
39710 passingly P`ASSINGLY, adv. Exceedingly.
39712 passion-flower PAS'SION-FLOWER, n. A flower and plant of the genus Passiflora.
39713 passion-week PAS'SION-WEEK, n. The week immediately preceding the festival of Easter; so called because in that ...
39711 passion PAS'SION, n. [L. passio, from patior, to suffer.]1. The impression or effect of an external agent ...
39714 passionary PAS'SIONARY, n. A book in which are described the sufferings of saints and martyrs.
39715 passionate PAS'SIONATE, a.1. Easily moved to anger; easily excited or agitated by injury or insult; applied ...
39716 passionately PAS'SIONATELY, adv. With passion; with strong feeling; ardently; vehemently; as, to covet any thing ...
39717 passionateness PAS'SIONATENESS, n. State of being subject to passion or anger.1. Vehemence of mind.
39718 passioned PAS'SIONED, a. Disordered; violently affected.1. Expressing passion.
39719 passionless PAS'SIONLESS, a. Not easily excited to anger; of a calm temper.1. Void of passion.
39720 passive P`ASSIVE, a. [L. passivus, from passus, patior, to suffer.]1. Suffering; not acting, receiving or ...
39721 passively P`ASSIVELY, adv. With a passive nature or temper; with a temper disposed to submit to the acts of ...
39722 passiveness P`ASSIVENESS, n. Quality of receiving impressions from external agents or causes; as the ...
39723 passivity PASSIV'ITY, n. Passiveness, which see. [Little used.]1. The tendency of a body to persevere in a ...
39724 passless P`ASSLESS, a. Having no passage.
39725 passover P`ASSOVER, n. [pass and over.] A feast of the Jews, instituted to commemorate the providential ...
39726 passport P`ASSPORT, n.1. A written license from a king or other proper authority, granting permission or ...
39727 passy-measure PAS'SY-MEASURE, n. An old stately kind of dance; a cinque-pace.
39728 past P`AST , pp. Gone by; done; accomplished; ended.1. Enacted; having received all the formalities ...
39729 paste PASTE, n. [L. pistus, or Gr. to sprinkle, or some root which signifies to mix and knead.]1. A soft ...
39730 pasteboard PASTEBOARD, n. A species of thick paper formed of several single sheets pasted one upon another, ...
39731 pastel PAS'TEL, n. A plant, the woad, of the genus Isatis.1. A coloring substance.
39733 pastern-joint PAS'TERN-JOINT, n. The joint in a horse's leg next the foot.
39732 pastern PAS'TERN, n. The part of a horse's leg between the joint next the foot and the coronet of the ...
39734 pasticcio PASTIC'CIO, n. A medley; an olio.
39735 pastil PAS'TIL, n. [L. pastillus.]1. A roll of paste, or a kind of paste made of different colors ground ...
39736 pastime P`ASTIME, n. [pass and time.] Sport; amusement; diversion; that which amuses and serves to make ...
39737 pastor P`ASTOR, n. [L. from pasco, pastum, to feed.]1. A shepherd; one that has the care of flocks and ...
39738 pastoral P`ASTORAL, a. [L. pastoralis.] Pertaining to shepherds; as a pastoral life; pastoral manners.1. ...
39739 pastorate P`ASTORATE, n. The office, state or jurisdiction of a spiritual pastor.
39740 pastorlike P`ASTORLIKE
39741 pastorly P`ASTORLY , a. Becoming a pastor.
39742 pastorship P`ASTORSHIP, n. The office or rank of pastor.
39744 pastry-cook PASTRY-COOK, n. One whose occupation is to make and sell articles made of paste.
39743 pastry PASTRY, n. [from paste.] Things in general which are made of paste, or of which paste constitutes ...
39745 pasturable P`ASTURABLE, a. [from pasture.] Fit for pasture.
39746 pasturage P`ASTURAGE, n.1. The business of feeding or grazing cattle.2. Grazing ground; land appropriated ...
39747 pasture P`ASTURE, n. [L. pasco, pastum, to feed.]1. Grass for the food of cattle; the food of cattle taken ...
39748 pasty PASTY, a. Like paste; of the consistence of paste.PASTY, n. [from paste.] A pie made of paste and ...
39749 pat PAT, a. Fit; convenient; exactly suitable either as to time or place. [Not an elegant word, but ...
39750 pataca PATA'CA
39751 patache PATA'CHE, n. A tender or small vessel employed in conveying men or orders from one ship or place ...
39752 patacoon PATACOON', n. A Spanish coin of the value of 4s. 8d.sterling, or about $1.04 cents.
39753 patavinity PATAVIN'ITY, n. The use of local words, or the peculiar style or diction of Livy, the Roman ...
39754 patch PATCH, n.1. A piece of cloth sewed on a garment to repair it.2. A small piece of any thing used ...
39755 patched PATCH'ED, pp. Mended with a patch or patches; mended clumsily.
39756 patcher PATCH'ER, n. One that patches or botches.
39757 patchery PATCH'ERY, n. Bungling work; botchery; forgery.
39758 patching PATCH'ING, ppr. Mending with a piece or pieces; botching.
39759 patchwork PATCH'WORK, n. Work composed of pieces of various figures sewed together.1. Work composed of ...
39760 pate PATE, n. 1. The head, or rather the top of the head; applied to persons, it is now used in ...
39761 pated PA'TED, a. In composition, having a pate; as long-pated, cunning; shallow-pated, having weak ...
39762 patee PATEE'
39763 patefaction PATEFAC'TION,n. [L. patefactio; pateo, to open, and facio, to make.] The act of opening or ...
39764 patelliform PATEL'LIFORM, a. [L. patella, a dish, and form.] Of the form of a dish or saucer.
39765 patellite PAT'ELLITE, n. Fossil remains of the patella, a shell.
39766 paten PAT'EN
39768 patent-rolls PATENT-ROLLS, n. The records or registers of patents.
39767 patent PAT'ENT, a. [L. patens, from pateo, to open.]1. In botany, spreading; forming an acute angle with ...
39769 patented PAT'ENTED, pp. Granted by patent; secured by patent or by law as an exclusive privilege.
39770 patentee PATENTEE', n. One to whom a grant is made or a privilege secured by patent or by law.
39771 patenting PAT'ENTING, ppr. Granting by patent; securing as a privilege.
39772 paternal PATERN'AL, a. [L. paternus, from pater, father.]1. Pertaining to a father; fatherly; as paternal ...
39773 paternity PATERN'ITY, n. Fathership; the relation of a father. The world, while it had scarcity of people, ...
39774 paternoster PA'TERNOSTER, n. [L. our father.] The Lord's prayer.
39775 path P`ATH, n. plu. paths. [Gr. to tread.]1. A way beaten or trodden by the feet of man or beast, or ...
39776 pathetic PATHET'IC
39777 pathetical PATHET'ICAL, a. [Gr. passion; to suffer.] Affecting or moving the passions, particularly pity, ...
39778 pathetically PATHET'ICALLY, adv. In such a manner as to excite the tender passions.
39779 patheticalness PATHET'ICALNESS, n. The quality of moving the tender passions.
39780 pathfly P`ATHFLY, n. A fly found in foot-paths.
39781 pathic PATH'IC, n. [Gr.] A catamite; a male that submits to the crime against nature.
39782 pathless P`ATHLESS, a. Having no beaten way; untrodden; as a pathless forest; a pathless coast.
39783 pathognomonic PATHOGNOMON'IC, a. [Gr. passion or suffering, and to know.]Indicating that which is inseparable ...
39784 pathognomy PATHOG'NOMY, n. [Gr. signification.] Expression of the passions; the science of the signs by which ...
39785 pathologic PATHOLOG'IC
39786 pathological PATHOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Pathology.] Pertaining to pathology.
39787 pathologically PATHOLOG'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of pathology.
39788 pathologist PATHOL'OGIST, n. One who treats of pathology.
39789 pathology PATHOL'OGY, n. [Gr. passion, suffering, and discourse.] That part of medicine which explains the ...
39790 pathos PA'THOS, n. [Gr. to suffer.] Passion; warmth or vehemence, in a speaker; or in language, that ...
39791 pathway P`ATHWAY, n. A path;usually, a narrow way to be passed on foot.1. A way; a course of life. ...
39792 patible PAT'IBLE, a. [L. patibilis, from patior, to suffer.]Sufferable; tolerable; that may be endured. ...
39793 patibulary PATIB'ULARY, a. [L. patibulum, a gallows.] Belonging to the gallows,or to execution on the cross.
39794 patience PATIENCE, n. pa'shens. [L. patientia, from patior, to suffer.]1. The suffering of afflictions, ...
39795 patient PATIENT, a. pa'shent. [L. patiens.]1. Having the quality of enduring evils without murmuring or ...
39796 patiently PA'TIENTLY, adv. With calmness or composure; without discontent or murmuring. Submit patiently to ...
39797 patin PAT'IN, n. [L. patina.] A plate. [Not used.]1. In the Romish church, the cover of the ...
39798 patly PAT'LY, adv. [from pat.] Fitly; conveniently.
39799 patness PAT'NESS, n. [from pat.] Fitness; suitableness; convenience.
39800 patriarch PA'TRIARCH, n. [L. patriarcha; Gr. a family, father, and a chief.]1. The father and ruler of a ...
39801 patriarchal PATRIARCH'AL
39802 patriarchate PA'TRIARCHATE
39803 patriarchic PATRIARCH'IC, a. Belonging to patriarchs; possessed by patriarchs; as patriarchal power or ...
39804 patriarchship PA'TRIARCHSHIP, n. The office,dignity or jurisdiction of a patriarch or ecclesiastical superior.
39805 patriarchy PA'TRIARCHY, n. The jurisdiction of a patriarch; a patriarchate.
39806 patrician PATRI'CIAN, a. [L. patricius, from pater, father.] Senatorial; noble; not plebeian. This epithet ...
39807 patrimonial PATRIMO'NIAL, a. Pertaining to a patrimony; inherited from ancestors; as a patrimonial estate.
39808 patrimonially PATRIMO'NIALLY, adv. By inheritance.
39809 patrimony PAT'RIMONY, n. [L.patrimonium, from pater, father.]1. A right or estate inherited from one's ...
39810 patriot PAT'RIOT, n. [L. patria, one's native country, form pater, father.]A person who loves his country, ...
39811 patriotic PATRIOT'IC, a. Full of patriotism; actuated by the love of one's country; as a patriotic hero or ...
39812 patriotism PAT'RIOTISM ,n. Love of one's country; the passion which aims to serve one's country, either in ...
39813 patristic PATRIS'TIC
39814 patristical PATRIS'TICAL, a. [from L. pater, patres, fathers.]Pertaining to the ancient fathers of the ...
39815 patrocinate PATROC'INATE, v.t. To patronize. [Not used.]
39816 patrocination PATROCINA'TION, n. Countenance; support. [Not used.]
39817 patrol PATROL
39818 patroll PATROLL,n.1. In war, a round; a walking or marching round by a guard in the night, to watch and ...
39819 patrolling PATROLLING, ppr. Going the rounds, as a guard.
39820 patron PAT'RON, n. [L. patronus; Gr. father.]1. Among the Romans, a master who had freed his slave, and ...
39821 patronage PAT'RONAGE, n. Special countenance or support; favor or aid afforded to second the views of a ...
39822 patronal PAT'RONAL, a. Doing the office of a patron; protecting; supporting; favoring; defending. [Little ...
39823 patroness PAT'RONESS, n. A female that favors, countenances or supports. Now night came down,and rose full ...
39824 patronize PAT'RONIZE, v.t. To support; to countenance; to defend; as a patron his client.1. To favor; to ...
39825 patronized PAT'RONIZED, pp. Defended; supported; favored; promoted.
39826 patronizer PAT'RONIZER, n. One that supports, countenances or favors.
39827 patronizing PAT'RONIZING, ppr. Defending; supporting; favoring; promoting.
39828 patronless PAT'RONLESS, a. Destitute of a patron.
39829 patronymic PATRONYM'IC, n. [L. patronymicus; from Gr. father, and name.]A name of men or women derived from ...
39830 pattee PATTEE', n. In heraldry, a cross small in the center, and widening to the extremities which are ...
39832 patten-maker PAT'TEN-MAKER, n. One that makes pattens.
39831 patten PAT'TEN, n.1. The base of a column or pillar.2. A wooden shoe with an iron ring, worn to keep the ...
39833 patter PAT'TER, v.i. To strike, as falling drops of water or hail, with a quick succession of small ...
39834 pattering PAT'TERING, ppr. Striking with a quick succession of small sounds.
39835 pattern PAT'TERN, n.1. An original or model proposed for imitation; the archetype; an exemplar; that which ...
39837 patty-pan PAT'TY-PAN, n. A pan to bake a little pie in.
39836 patty PAT'TY, n. A little pie.
39838 patulous PAT'ULOUS, a. [L. patulus, from pateo, to be open.]Spreading, as a patulous calyx; bearing the ...
39839 pauciloquy PAUCIL'OQUY, n. [L. paucus, few, and loquor, to speak.]The utterance of few words. [Little used.]
39840 paucity PAU'CITY, n. [L. paucitas, from paucus, few.]1. Fewness; smallness of number; as the paucity of ...
39841 paum PAUM, v.t. To impose by fraud; a corruption of palm.
39842 paunch PAUNCH, n. [L. pantex.] The belly and its contents.The paunch, in ruminating quadrupeds, is the ...
39843 pauper PAUP'ER, n. [L. pauper.] A poor person; particularly, one so indigent as to depend on the parish ...
39844 pauperism PAUP'ERISM, n. The state of being poor or destitute of the means of support; the state of indigent ...
39845 pause PAUSE, n. paux. [L. pausa; Gr. to cease, or cause to rest.]1. A stop; a cessation or intermission ...
39846 pauser PAUS'ER, n. s as z. One who pauses; one who deliberates.
39847 pausing PAUS'ING, ppr. Stopping for a time; ceasing to speak or act; deliberating.
39848 pausingly PAUS'INGLY, adv. After a pause; by breaks.
39849 pavan PAVAN', n. [L. pavo, a peacock.] A grave dance among the Spaniards. In this dance, the performers ...
39850 pave PAVE, v.t. [L. pavio; Gr. to beat, to strike.]1. To lay or cover with stone or brick so as to make ...
39851 paved PA'VED, pp. Laid over with stones or bricks; prepared; as a way.
39852 pavement PA'VEMENT, n. [L. pavimentum.] A floor or covering consisting of stones or bricks, laid on the ...
39853 paver PA'VER
39854 pavier PA'VIER, n. One who lays stones for a floor, or whose occupation is to pave.
39855 pavilion PAVILION, n. pavil'yun. [L. papilio, a butterfly, and a pavilion.]1. A tent; a temporary movable ...
39856 pavilioned PAVIL'IONED, pp. Furnished with pavilions; sheltered by a tent.
39857 paving PA'VING, ppr. Flooring with stones or bricks.PA'VING, n. Pavement; a floor of stones or bricks.
39858 pavo PA'VO, n. [L. a peacock.] A constellation in the southern hemisphere, consisting of fourteen ...
39859 pavone PAVO'NE, n. [L. pavo.] A peacock. [Not used.]
39860 pavonine PAV'ONINE, a. [L. pavoninus, from pavo, a peacock.]Resembling the tail of a peacock; iridescent.
39861 paw PAW, n. [L. pes, pedis; Eng. foot.]1. The foot of beasts of prey having claws, as the lion, the ...
39862 pawed PAW'ED, a. Having paws.1. Broad footed.
39863 pawky PAWK'Y, a. Arch; cunning. [Local.]
39864 pawl PAWL, n. [Eng. pole; L. palus. See Pole.] Among seamen, a short bar of wood or iron fixed close ...
39865 pawn PAWN, n. [L. pignus.]1. Something given or deposited as security for the payment of money ...
39866 pawned PAWN'ED, pp. Pledged; given in security.
39867 pawnee PAWNEE', n. The person to whom a pawn is delivered as security; one that takes any thing in pawn. ...
39868 pawner PAWN'ER, n. One that pledges any thing as security for the payment of borrowed money.
39869 pawning PAWN'ING, ppr. Pledging, as goods; giving as security.
39870 pax PAX, n. [L. pax, peace.] A little image or piece of board with the image of Christ upon the cross ...
39872 pay-bill PA'Y-BILL, n. A bill of money to be paid to the soldiers of a company.
39873 pay-day PA'Y-DAY, n. The day when payment is to be made or debts discharged; the day on which wages or ...
39874 pay-office PA'Y-OFFICE, n. A place or office where payment is made of public debts.
39871 pay PAY, v.t. pret. and pp. paid.1. To discharge a debt; to deliver to a creditor the value of the ...
39875 payable PA'YABLE, a. That may or ought to be paid. In general, money is payable as soon as it is due, or ...
39876 payee PAYEE', n. The person to whom money is to be paid; the person named in a bill or note to whom the ...
39877 payer PAY'ER, n. One that pays. In bills of exchange,the person on whom the bill is drawn, and who is ...
39878 paymaster PA'YMASTER, n. One who is to pay; one from whom wages or reward is received.1. In the army, an ...
39879 payment PA'YMENT, n. The act of paying, or giving compensation.1. The thing given in discharge of a debt ...
39880 paynim PAYNIM. [See Painim.]
39881 payse PAYSE, PAYSER, for poise, poiser, not used.
39882 payser PAYSE, PAYSER, for poise, poiser, not used.
39884 pea-shell PE'A-SHELL, n. The legume or pericarp of the pea.
39883 pea PEA, n. [L. pisum.] A plant and its fruit of the genus Pisum, of many varieties. This plant has a ...
39886 peace-offering PE'ACE-OFFERING, n. An offering that procures peace. Among the Jews, an offering or sacrifice to ...
39887 peace-officer PE'ACE-OFFICER, n. A civil officer whose duty is to preserve the public peace, to prevent or ...
39888 peace-parted PE'ACE-PARTED, a. Dismissed from the world in peace.
39885 peace PEACE, n. [L. pax, paco, to appease.]1. In a general sense, a state of quiet or tranquillity; ...
39889 peaceable PE'ACEABLE, a. Free from war, tumult or public commotion. We live in peaceable times. The ...
39890 peaceableness PE'ACEABLENESS, n. The state of being peaceable; quietness.1. Disposition to peace.
39891 peaceably PE'ACEABLY, adv. Without war; without tumult or commotion; without private feuds and quarrels.1. ...
39892 peacebreaker PE'ACEBREAKER, n. One that violates or disturbs public peace.
39893 peaceful PE'ACEFUL, a. Quiet; undisturbed; not in a state of war or commotion; as a peaceful time; a ...
39894 peacefully PE'ACEFULLY, adv. Without war or commotion.1. Quietly; without disturbance. Our loved earth, where ...
39895 peacefulness PE'ACEFULNESS, n. Quiet; freedom from war, tumult, disturbance or discord.1. Freedom from mental ...
39896 peaceless PE'ACELESS, a. Without peace; disturbed.
39897 peacemaker PE'ACEMAKER, n. One who makes peace by reconciling parties that are at variance. Blessed are the ...
39899 peach-color PE'ACH-COLOR, n. The pale red color of the peach blossom.
39900 peach-colored PEA'CH-COLORED, a. Of the color of a peach blossom.
39901 peach-tree PE'ACH-TREE, n. The tree that produces the peach.
39898 peach PEACH, n. A tree and its fruit, of the genus Amygdalus, of many varieties. This is a delicious ...
39902 peacher PE'ACHER, n. An accuser. [Not used.]
39903 peachick PE'ACHICK, n. The chicken or young of the peacock.
39905 peacock-fish PE'ACOCK-FISH, n. A fish of the Indian seas, having streaks of beautiful colors.
39904 peacock PE'ACOCK, n. [L. pavo.] A large and beautiful fowl of the genus Pavo, properly the male of the ...
39906 peahen PE'AHEN, n. The hen or female of the peacock.
39907 peak PEAK, n. [Eng. pike, beak.]1. The top of a hill or mountain, ending in a point; as the peak of ...
39908 peaking PE'AKING, a. Mean; sneaking; poor. [Vulgar.]
39909 peakish PE'AKISH, a. Denoting or belonging to an acuminated situation.
39910 peal PEAL, n. [from L. pello, whence appello, to appeal. The sense is to drive; a peal is a driving of ...
39911 pealed PE'ALED, pp. Assailed with sound; resounded; celebrated.
39912 pealing PE'ALING, ppr. Uttering a loud sound or successive sounds; resounding.
39913 pean PE'AN , n. Among the ancients, a song of rejoicing in honor of Apollo; hence, a song of triumph.1. ...
39914 peanism PE'ANISM, n. The song or shouts of praise or of battle; shouts of triumph.
39916 pear-tree PEAR-TREE, n. The tree that produces pears.
39915 pear PEAR, n. [L. pyrum.] The fruit of the Pyrus communis, of many varieties, some of which are ...
39917 pearch PEARCH. [See Perch.]
39919 pearl-eyed PEARL-EYED, a. perl'-eyed. Having a speck in the eye.
39920 pearl-grass PEARL-GRASS, n. A plant of the genus Sagina.
39921 pearl-sinter PEARL-SINTER, n. Fiorite; a variety of silicious sinter, the color gray and white.
39922 pearl-spar PEARL-SPAR, n. perl'-spar. Brown spar.
39923 pearl-stone PEARL-STONE, n. A mineral regarded as a volcanic production. It occurs in basaltic and ...
39924 pearl-wort PEARL-WORT
39918 pearl PEARL, n. perl.1. A white, hard, smooth, shining body, usually roundish, found in a testaceous ...
39925 pearlash PEARLASH, n. perl'ash. An alkali obtained from the ashes of wood; refined potash.
39926 pearled PEARLED, a. perl'ed. Set or adorned with pearls.
39927 pearly PEARLY, a. perl'y. Containing pearl; abounding with pearls; as pearly shells; a pearly shore.1. ...
39928 pearmain PEARMAIN, n. A variety of the apple.
39929 peas-antlike PEAS-ANTLIKE
39930 peas-antly PEAS-ANTLY, a. Rude, clownish; illiterate; resembling peasants.
39931 peas-cod PE'AS-COD
39932 peasant PEASANT, n. pez'ant. A countryman; one whose business is rural labor.PEASANT, a. pez'ant. ...
39933 peasantry PEASANTRY, n. pez'antry. Peasants; rustics; the body of country people.1. Rusticity. [Not used.]
39934 pease PEASE, n. Peas collectively, or used as food. [See Pea.]
39935 peastone PE'ASTONE, n. A subspecies of limestone.
39937 peat-moss PEAT-MOSS, n. [peat and moss.] An earthy material used as fuel.1. A fen producing peat.
39936 peat PEAT, n. A substance resembling turf, used as fuel. It is found in low grounds or moorish lands, ...
39939 pebble-crystal PEB'BLE-CRYSTAL, n. A crystal in form of nodules, found in earthy stratums and irregular in shape.
39938 pebble PEB'BLE
39940 pebbled PEB'BLED, a. Abounding with pebbles.
39941 pebblestone PEB'BLESTONE, n. In popular usage, a roundish stone of any kind from the size of a nut to that of ...
39942 pebbly PEB'BLY, a. Full of pebbles; abounding with small roundish stones.
39943 pec-cary PEC-CARY, n. A quadruped of Mexico, in general appearance resembling a hog, but its body is less ...
39944 pecary PEC'ARY
39945 peccability PECCABIL'ITY, n. [from peccable.] State of being subject to sin; capacity of sinning.
39946 peccable PEC'CABLE, a. [from L. pecco.] Liable to sin; subject to transgress the divine law.
39947 peccadillo PECCADIL'LO, n. [L. peccatum.]1. A slight trespass or offense; a petty crime or fault.2. A sort ...
39948 peccancy PEC'CANCY, n. [from peccant.] Bad quality; as the peccancy of the humors.1. Offense.
39949 peccant PEC'CANT, a. [L. peccans. See Peccable.]1. Sinning; guilty of sin or transgression; criminal; as ...
39950 peccavi PECCA'VI. [L. I have offended.] A colloquial word used to express confession or acknowledgment of ...
39951 pechblend PECH'BLEND, n. Pitchblend, an ore of uranium; a metallic substance found in masses, or stratified ...
39952 peck PECK, n.1. The fourth part of a bushel; a dry measure of eight quarts; as a peck of wheat or ...
39953 pecked PECK'ED, pp. Struck or penetrated with a beak or pointed instrument.
39954 pecker PECK'ER, n. One that pecks; a bird that pecks holes in trees; a woodpecker.
39955 pecking PECK'ING, ppr. Striking with the bill; thrusting the beak into; thrusting into with a pointed ...
39956 peckled PECKLED, for speckled, not used.
39957 pectinal PEC'TINAL, a. [L. pecten, a comb; pecto, to comb.]Pertaining to a comb; resembling a ...
39958 pectinate PEC'TINATE
39959 pectinated PEC'TINATED, a. [from L. pecten, a comb.] Having resemblance to the teeth of a comb. In botany, a ...
39960 pectination PECTINA'TION, n. The state of being pectinated.1. A combing; the combing of the head.
39961 pectinite PEC'TINITE, n. [L. pecten, a comb.] A fossil pecten or scallop, or scallop petrified.
39962 pectoral PEC'TORAL, a. [L. pectoralis, from pectus, breast.]Pertaining to the breast; as the pectoral ...
39963 peculate PEC'ULATE, v.i. [L. peculatus, peculor, from peculium, private property, from pecus, cattle.]1. To ...
39964 peculation PECULA'TION, n. The act, practice or crime of defrauding the public by appropriating to one's own ...
39965 peculator PEC'ULATOR, n.[L.] One that defrauds the public by appropriating to his own use money entrusted to ...
39966 peculiar PECU'LIAR, a. [L. peculiaris, from peculium, one's own property, from pecus, cattle.]1. ...
39967 peculiarity PECULIAR'ITY, n. Something peculiar to a person or thing; that which belongs to or is found in one ...
39968 peculiarize PECU'LIARIZE, v.t. To appropriate; to make peculiar.
39969 peculiarly PECU'LIARLY, adv. Particularly; singly.1. In a manner not common to others.
39970 peculiarness PECU'LIARNESS, n. The state of being peculiar; appropriation. [Little used.]
39971 pecuniary PECU'NIARY, a. [L. pecuniarius, from pecunia, money, from pecus, cattle.]1. Relating to money; as ...
39972 pecunious PECU'NIOUS, a. Full of money. [Not used.]
39973 ped PED, n. [for pad.] A small pack-saddle.1. A basket; a hamper.
39974 pedagogic PEDAGOG'IC
39975 pedagogical PEDAGOG'ICAL, a. [from pedagogue.]Suiting or belonging to a teacher of children or to a pedagogue.
39976 pedagogism PED'AGOGISM, n. The business, character or manners of a pedagogue.
39977 pedagogue PEDAGOGUE, n. ped'agog.[Gr. a child, and to lead.]1. A teacher of children; one whose occupation ...
39978 pedagogy PED'AGOGY, n. Instruction in the first rudiments; preparatory discipline.
39980 pedal-note PED'AL-NOTE, n. In music, a holding note.
39979 pedal PE'DAL, a. [L. pedalis, from pes,pedis,foot.] Pertaining to a foot.
39981 pedaneous PEDA'NEOUS, a. [L.pedaneus, from pes, the foot.] Going on foot; walking.
39982 pedant PED'ANT, n.1. A schoolmaster.2. A person who makes a vain display of his learning.
39983 pedantic PEDANT'IC
39984 pedantical PEDANT'ICAL, a. Ostentatious of learning; vainly displaying or making a show of knowledge; applied ...
39985 pedantically PEDANT'ICALLY, adv. With a vain or boastful display of learning.
39986 pedantize PED'ANTIZE, v.i. To play the pedant; to domineer over lads; to use pedantic expressions.
39987 pedantry PED'ANTRY, n. Vain ostentation of learning; a boastful display of knowledge of any kind. Horace ...
39988 pedarian PEDA'RIAN, n. A Roman senator who gave his vote by the feet, that is, by walking over to the side ...
39989 pedate PED'ATE, a. [L. pedatus, from pes, the foot.] In botany, divided like the toes. A pedate leaf is ...
39990 pedatifid PED'ATIFID, a. [L. pes, foot, and findo, to divide.]A pedatifid leaf, in botany, is one whose parts ...
39991 peddle PED'DLE, v.i. To be busy about trifles.1. To travel about the country and retail goods. He ...
39992 peddling PED'DLING, ppr. Traveling about and selling small wares.1. a. Trifling; unimportant.
39993 pederast PED'ERAST, n. [Gr. a boy, and love.] A sodomite.
39994 pederastic PEDERAS'TIC, a. Pertaining to pederasty.
39995 pederasty PED'ERASTY, n. Sodomy; the crime against nature.
39996 pederero PEDERE'RO, n. [L. petra; Gr. so named from the use of stones in the charge, before the invention or ...
39997 pedestal PED'ESTAL, n. [L. pes, the foot.] In architecture, the lowest part of a column or pillar; the part ...
39998 pedestrial PEDES'TRIAL, a. [L. pedestris.] Pertaining to the foot.
39999 pedestrian PEDES'TRIAN, a. [L. pedestris, form pes, the foot.]Going on foot; walking; made on foot; as a ...
40000 pedestrious PEDES'TRIOUS, a. Going on foot; not winged.
40001 pedicel PED'ICEL
40002 pedicellate PED'ICELLATE, a. Having a pedicel, or supported by a pedicel.
40003 pedicle PED'ICLE, n. [L. pediculus, form pes, the foot.] In botany, the ultimate division of a common ...
40004 pedicular PEDIC'ULAR
40005 pediculous PEDIC'ULOUS, a. [L. pedicularis, form pediculus, a louse.]Lousy; having the lousy distemper.
40006 pedigree PED'IGREE, n. [probably from L. pes,pedis, foot.]1. Lineage; line of ancestors from which a person ...
40007 pediluvy PED'ILUVY, n. [L. pes, foot,and lavo, to wash.]The bathing of the feet; a bath for the feet.
40008 pediment PED'IMENT, n. [from L. pes, the foot.] In architecture, an ornament that crowns the ordinances, ...
40009 pedler PED'LER, n. [L.pes, pedis,the foot.] A traveling foot-trader; one that carries about small ...
40010 pedleress PED'LERESS, n. A female pedler.
40011 pedlery PED'LERY, n. Small wares sold or carried about for sale by pedlers.
40012 pedobaptism PEDOBAP'TISM, n. [Gr. a child, and baptism.] The baptism of infants or of children.
40013 pedobaptist PEDOBAP'TIST, n. One that holds to infant baptism; one that practices the baptism of children. ...
40014 pedometer PEDOM'ETER, n. [L. pes, the foot, and Gr.measure.] An instrument by which paces are numbered as a ...
40015 pedometrical PEDOMET'RICAL, a. Pertaining to or measured by a pedometer.
40016 peduncle PEDUN'CLE, n. [L. pes,the foot.] In botany,the stem or stalk that supports the fructification of a ...
40017 peduncular PEDUN'CULAR, a. Pertaining to a peduncle; growing from a peduncle; as a peduncular tendril.
40018 pedunculate PEDUN'CULATE, a. Growing on a peduncle; as a pedunculate flower.
40019 pee PEE, v.i. To look with one eye. [Not used.]
40020 peed PEED, a. Blind of one eye. [Not used.]
40021 peek PEEK, in our popular dialect, is the same as peep, to look through a crevice.
40022 peel PEEL, v.t. [L. pilo, to pull off hair and to pillage; pilus, the hair.]1. To strip off skin, bark ...
40023 peeled PEE'LED, pp. Stripped of skin, bark or rind; plundered; pillaged.
40024 peeler PEE'LER, n. One that peels, strips or flays.1. A plunderer; pillaged.
40025 peeling PEE'LING, ppr. Stripping off skin or bark; plundering.
40027 peep-hole PEE'P-HOLE
40026 peep PEEP, v.i. [L. pipio; Heb. to cry out.]1. To begin to appear; to make the first appearance; to ...
40028 peeper PEE'PER, n. A chicken just breaking the shell.1. In familiar language,the eye.
40029 peeping-hole PEE'PING-HOLE, n. A hole or crevice through which one may peep or look without being discovered.
40030 peer PEER, n. [L. par.]1. An equal; one of the same rank. A man may be familiar with his peers.2. An ...
40031 peerage PEE'RAGE, n. [See Peer, an equal.]The rank or dignity of a peer or nobleman.1. The body of peers.
40032 peerdom PEE'RDOM, n. Peerage. [Not used.]
40033 peeress PEE'RESS, n. The consort of a peer; a noble lady.
40034 peerless PEE'RLESS, a. Unequaled; having no peer or equal; as peerless beauty or majesty.
40035 peerlessly PEE'RLESSLY, adv. Without an equal.
40036 peerlessness PEE'RLESSNESS, n. The state of having no equal.
40037 peevish PEE'VISH, a.1. Fretful; petulant; apt to mutter and complain; easily vexed or fretted; querulous; ...
40038 peevishly PEE'VISHLY, adv. Fretfully; petulantly; with discontent and murmuring.
40039 peevishness PEE'VISHNESS, n. Fretfulness; petulance; disposition to murmur; sourness of temper; as childish ...
40040 peg PEG, n. [This is probably from the root of L.pango, pactus; Gr. denoting that which fastens, or ...
40041 pegger PEG'GER, n. One that fastens with pegs.
40042 pegm PEGM, n. pem. [Gr.] A sort of moving machine in the old pageants.
40043 pegmatite PEG'MATITE, n. Primitive granitic rock, composed essentially of lamellar feldspar and quartz; ...
40044 peirastic PEIRAS'TIC,a. [Gr. to strain, to attempt.] Attempting; making trial.1. Treating of or ...
40045 peise PEISE. [See Poise.]
40046 pekan PEK'AN, n. A species of weasel.
40047 pelage PEL'AGE, n. [L. pilus, hair.] The vesture or covering of wild beasts, consisting of hair, fur or ...
40048 pelagian PELA'GIAN
40049 pelagianism PELA'GIANISM, n. The doctrines of Pelagius.
40050 pelagic PEL'AGIC, a. [L. pelagus, the sea.] Pertaining to the sea; as pelagian shells.
40051 pelf PELF, n. [probably allied to pilfer.] Money; riches; but it often conveys the idea of something ...
40052 pelican PEL'ICAN, n. [Low L. pelicanus.]1. A fowl of the genus Pelicanus. It is larger than the swan, and ...
40053 peliom PE'LIOM, n. [Gr. black color.] A mineral, a variety of iolite.
40054 pelisse PELISSE, n. pelee's. [L. pellis,skin.] Originally, a furred robe or coat. But the name is now ...
40055 pell PELL, n. [L. pellis.] A skin or hide.Clerk of the pells, in England, an officer of the exchequer, ...
40056 pellet PEL'LET, n. [L. pila, a ball.] A little ball; as a pellet of wax or lint.1. A bullet; a ball for ...
40057 pelleted PEL'LETED, a. Consisting of bullets.
40058 pellicle PEL'LICLE, n. [L.pellicula, dim. of pellis, skin.] A thin skin or film.1. Among chimists, a thin ...
40059 pellitory PEL'LITORY, n. [L. parietaria, the wall plant, from paries.]The name of several plants of different ...
40060 pellucid PELLU'CID, a. [L. pellucidus; per and lucidus; very bright. See Light.] Perfectly clear; ...
40061 pellucidity PELLUCID'ITY
40062 pellucidness PELLU'CIDNESS, n. Perfect clearness; transparency; as the pellucidity of the air; the pellucidness ...
40063 pelt PELT, n. [L. pellis.]1. The skin of a beast with the hair on it; a raw hide.2. The quarry of a ...
40064 peltate PELT'ATE
40065 peltated PELT'ATED, a. [L. pelta, a target.] In botany, having the shape of a target or round shield, as a ...
40066 peltately PELT'ATELY, adv. In the form of a target.
40067 pelted PELT'ED, pp. Struck with something thrown or driven.
40068 pelter PELT'ER, n. One that pelts; also, a pinch-penny; a mean, sordid person.
40069 pelting PELT'ING, ppr. Striking with something thrown or driven.PELT'ING, n. An assault with any thing ...
40070 peltry PEL'TRY, n. [from pelt, a skin.] The skins of animals producing fur; skins in general,with the fur ...
40071 pelvimeter PELVIM'ETER, n. [L. pelvis, and Gr. measure.] An instrument to measure the dimensions of the ...
40072 pelvis PEL'VIS, n. [L. pelvis, a bason.] The cavity of the body formed by the os sacrum, os coccyx, and ...
40073 pen PEN, n. [L. penna; pinna, a fin, that is, a shoot or point.]1. An instrument used for writing, ...
40074 penal PE'NAL, a. [L. poena; Gr. pain, punishment. See Pain.]1. Enacting punishment; denouncing the ...
40075 penality PENAL'ITY, n. Liableness or condemnation to punishment. [Not used.]
40076 penalty PEN'ALTY, n.1. The suffering in person or property which is annexed by law or judicial decision to ...
40077 penance PEN'ANCE, n.1. The suffering, labor or pain to which a person voluntarily subjects himself, or ...
40078 pence PENCE, n. pens. The plural of penny, when used of a sum of money or value. When pieces of coin ...
40080 pencil-shaped PEN'CIL-SHAPED, a. Having the shape of a pencil.
40079 pencil PEN'CIL, n. [L. penicillus.]1. A small brush used by painters for laying on colors. The proper ...
40081 penciled PEN'CILED, pp. Painted, drawn or marked with a pencil.1. Radiated; having pencils of rays.
40082 penciling PEN'CILING, ppr. Painting, drawing or marking with a pencil.
40083 pendant PEND'ANT, n. [L. pendeo, to hang.]1. An ornament or jewel hanging at the ear, usually composed of ...
40084 pendence PEND'ENCE, n. [L. pendens, pendeo, to hang.] Slope; inclination.
40085 pendency PEND'ENCY, n. [L.pendens, pendeo, supra.] Suspense; the state of being undecided; as, to wait ...
40086 pendent PEND'ENT, a. [L. pendens.] Hanging; fastened at one end, the other being loose. With ribbons ...
40087 pending PEND'ING, a. [L. pendeo, to hang; pendente lite.] Depending; remaining undecided; not terminated. ...
40088 pendulosity PENDULOS'ITY
40089 pendulous PEND'ULOUS, a. [L. pendulus, from pendeo, to hang.] Hanging; swinging; fastened to one end,the ...
40090 pendulousness PEND'ULOUSNESS, n. [See Pendulous.] The state of hanging; suspension. [The latter is the ...
40091 pendulum PEND'ULUM, n. [L. pendulus, pendulum.] A vibrating body suspended from a fixed point; as the ...
40092 penetrability PENETRABIL'ITY, n. [from penetrable.] Susceptibility of being penetrated, or of being entered or ...
40093 penetrable PEN'ETRABLE, a. [L. penetrabilis. See Penetrate.]1. That may be penetrated,entered, or pierced by ...
40094 penetrail PEN'ETRAIL, n. [L.penetralia.] Interior parts. [Not used.]
40095 penetrancy PEN'ETRANCY, n. [L. penetrans.] Power of entering or piercing; as the penetrancy of subtil ...
40096 penetrant PEN'ETRANT, a. [L. penetrans.] Having the power to enter or pierce; sharp; subtil; as penetrant ...
40097 penetrate PEN'ETRATE, v.t. [L. penetro, from the root of pen, a point.]1. To enter or pierce; to make way ...
40098 penetrated PEN'ETRATED, pp. Entered; pierced; understood; fathomed.
40099 penetrating PEN'ETRATING, ppr. Entering; piercing; understanding.1. a. Having the power of entering or ...
40100 penetration PENETRA'TION, n. The act of entering a body.1. Mental entrance into any thing abstruse; as a ...
40101 penetrative PEN'ETRATIVE, a. Piercing; sharp; subtil. Let not air be too gross nor too penetrative.1. Acute; ...
40102 penetrativeness PEN'ETRATIVENESS, n. The quality of being penetrative.
40103 penfish PEN'FISH, n. A kind of eelpout with a smooth skin.
40104 penguin PEN'GUIN, n. [L. pinguidine, with fatness.]1. A genus of fowls of the order of Palmipeds. The ...
40105 penicil PEN'ICIL, n. [L. penicillus. See Pencil.]1. Among physicians, a tent or pledget for wounds or ...
40106 peninsula PENIN'SULA, n. [L. pene, almost, and insula, an isle.]1. A portion of land, connected with a ...
40107 peninsular PENIN'SULAR, a. In the form or state of a peninsula; pertaining to a peninsula.
40108 peninsulate PENIN'SULATE, v.t. To encompass almost with water; to form a peninsula. South river peninsulates ...
40109 peninsulated PENIN'SULATED, pp. Almost surrounded with water.
40110 peninsulating PENIN'SULATING, ppr. Nearly surrounding with water.
40111 penitence PEN'ITENCE
40112 penitency PENITENCY, n. [L. poenitentia, from poeniteo, from poena, pain, punishment. See Pain.] ...
40113 penitent PEN'ITENT, a. [L.poenitens.] Suffering pain or sorrow of heart on account of sins, crimes or ...
40114 penitential PENITEN'TIAL, a. Proceeding from or expressing penitence or contrition of heart; as penitential ...
40115 penitentiary PENITEN'TIARY, a. Relating to penance, or to the rules and measures of penance.PENITEN'TIARY, n. ...
40116 penitently PEN'ITENTLY, adv. With penitence; with repentance, sorrow or contrition for sin.
40117 penknife PEN'KNIFE, n. [See Pen and Knife.] A small knife used for making and mending pens.
40118 penman PEN'MAN, n. plu. penmen. [See Pen and Man.]1. A man that professes or teaches the art of writing. ...
40119 penmanship PEN'MANSHIP, n. The use of the pen in writing; the art of writing.1. Manner of writing; as good ...
40120 pennached PEN'NACHED, a. Radiated; diversified with natural stripes of various colors; as a flower. [Little ...
40121 pennant PEN'NANT
40122 pennate PEN'NATE
40123 pennated PEN'NATED, a. [L.pennatus, winged, from penna, a quill or wing.]1. Winged.2. In botany, a pennate ...
40124 penned PEN'NED, pp. Written.PEN'NED, a. Winged; having plumes.
40125 penner PEN'NER, n. A writer.1. A pen-case. [Local.]
40126 penniform PEN'NIFORM, a. [L.penna, a feather or quill, and form.]Having the form of a quill or feather.
40127 penniless PEN'NILESS, a. [from penny.] Moneyless; destitute of money; poor.
40128 penning PEN'NING, ppr. Committing to writing.
40129 pennon PEN'NON, n. [L.pannus, a cloth]1. A small flag; a banner. [See Pendant.]2. A tackle for hoisting ...
40130 penny PEN'NY, n. plu. pennies or pence. Pennies denotes the number of coins; pence the amount of pennies ...
40131 pennypost PEN'NYPOST, n. One that carries letters from the post office and delivers them to the proper ...
40132 pennyroyal PENNYROY'AL, n. A plant of the genus Mentha.The English pennyroyal is the Mentha pulegium; the N. ...
40133 pennyweight PEN'NYWEIGHT, n. A troy weight containing twenty four grains, each grain being equal in weight to ...
40134 pennywise PEN'NYWISE, a. Saving small sums at the hazard of larger; niggardly on improper occasions.
40135 pennyworth PEN'NYWORTH, n. As much as is bought for a penny.1. Any purchase; any thing bought or sold for ...
40136 pensile PEN'SILE, a. [L. pensilis, from pendeo, to hang.]1. Hanging; suspended; as a pensile bell.2. ...
40137 pensileness PEN'SILENESS, n. The state of hanging.
40138 pension PEN'SION, n. [L.pensio, form pendo, pensum, to pay.]1. An annual allowance of a sum of money to a ...
40139 pensionary PEN'SIONARY, a. Maintained by a pension; receiving a pension; as pensionary spies.1. Consisting in ...
40140 pensioned PEN'SIONED, pp. Having a pension.
40141 pensioner PEN'SIONER, n. One to whom an annual sum of money is paid by government in consideration of past ...
40142 pensioning PEN'SIONING, ppr. Granting an annual allowance for past services.
40143 pensive PEN'SIVE, a. [L.penso, to weigh, to consider; pendo, to weigh.]1. Literally, thoughtful; employed ...
40144 pensively PEN'SIVELY, adv. With thoughtfulness; with gloomy seriousness or some degree of melancholy.
40145 pensiveness PEN'SIVENESS, n. Gloomy thoughtfulness; melancholy; seriousness from depressed spirits.
40146 penstock PEN'STOCK, n. [pen and stock.] A narrow or confined place formed by a frame of timber planked or ...
40147 pent PENT, pp. of pen. Shut up; closely confined.
40148 pentacapsular PENTACAP'SULAR, a. [Gr. five, and capsular.] In botany, having five capsules.
40149 pentachord PEN'TACHORD,n. [Gr. five, and chord.]1. An instrument of music with five strings.2. An order or ...
40150 pentacoccous PEN'TACOCCOUS, a. [Gr. five, and L. coccus, a berry.]Having or containing five grains or seeds, or ...
40151 pentacoster PEN'TACOSTER, n. [Gr.] In ancient Greece, a military officer commanding fifty men; but the number ...
40152 pentacostys PEN'TACOSTYS, n. [Gr.] A body of fifty soldiers; but the number varied.
40153 pentacrinite PENTAC'RINITE, n. The fossil remains of a zoophyte.
40154 pentacrostic PENTACROS'TIC, a. [Gr. five, and acrostic.] Containing five acrostics of the same name in five ...
40155 pentadactyl PENTADAC'TYL, n. [Gr. five, and finger.]1. In botany, a plant called five fingers; a name given to ...
40156 pentagon PEN'TAGON, n. [Gr. five, and a corner.]1. In geometry, a figure of five sides and five angles.2. ...
40157 pentagonal PENTAG'ONAL
40158 pentagonous PENTAG'ONOUS, a. Having five corners or angles.
40159 pentagraph PEN'TAGRAPH, n. [Gr. five, and to write.] An instrument for drawing figures in any proportion at ...
40160 pentagraphic PENTAGRAPH'IC
40161 pentagraphical PENTAGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a pentagraph; performed by a pentagraph.
40162 pentagyn PEN'TAGYN, n. [Gr. five, and a female.] In botany, a plant having five pistils.
40163 pentagynian PENTAGYN'IAN, a. Having five pistils.
40164 pentahedral PENTAHE'DRAL
40165 pentahedron PENTAHE'DRON, n. [Gr. five, and a side or base.] A figure having five equal sides.
40166 pentahedrous PENTAHE'DROUS, a. Having five equal sides.
40167 pentahexahedral PENTAHEXAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr. five, and hexahedral.] In crystalography, exhibiting five ranges of ...
40168 pentameter PENTAM'ETER, n. [Gr. five, and measure.] In ancient poetry, a verse of five feet. The two first ...
40169 pentander PENTAN'DER, n. [Gr. five, and a male.] In botany, a plant having five stamens.
40170 pentandrian PENTAN'DRIAN, a. Having five stamens.
40171 pentangular PENTAN'GULAR, a. [Gr. five, and angular.] Having five corners or angles.
40172 pentapetalous PENTAPET'ALOUS, a. [Gr. five, and a petal.]Having five petals or flower leaves.
40173 pentaphyllous PENTAPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. five, and a leaf.] Having five leaves.
40174 pentarchy PEN'TARCHY,n. [Gr. five, and rule.] A government in the hands of five persons.
40175 pentaspast PEN'TASPAST, n. [Gr. five, and to draw.] An engine with five pulleys.
40176 pentaspermous PENTASPERM'OUS, a. [Gr. five, and seed.] Containing five seeds.
40177 pentastich PEN'TASTICH, n. [Gr. five, and verse.]A composition consisting of five verses.
40178 pentastyle PEN'TASTYLE, n. [Gr. five, and a column.] In architecture, a work containing five rows of columns.
40179 pentateuch PEN'TATEUCH, n. [Gr. five, and a book or composition.]The first five books of the Old Testament.
40180 penteconter PEN'TECONTER, n. [from the Greek.] A Grecian vessel of fifty oars,smaller than a trireme.
40181 pentecost PEN'TECOST,n. [Gr. fiftieth.]1. A solemn festival of the Jews, so called because celebrated on the ...
40182 pentecostal PEN'TECOSTAL, a. Pertaining to Whitsuntide.
40183 pentecostals PENTECOS'TALS, n. Oblations formerly made by parishioners to the parish priest at the feast of ...
40184 penthouse PENT'HOUSE, n. A shed standing aslope from the main wall or building.
40185 pentice PEN'TICE, n. [L. pendo, to bend.] A sloping roof. [Little used.]
40186 pentile PEN'TILE, n. A tile for covering the sloping part of a roof.
40187 pentremite PEN'TREMITE, n. A genus of zoophytes or fossil shells.
40188 penult PENULT', n. [L. penultimus; pene, almost, and ultimus, last.]The last syllable of a word except ...
40189 penultimate PENULT'IMATE, a. [supra.] The last but one; a word used of the last syllable of a word except one. ...
40190 penumbra PENUM'BRA, n. [L.pene, almost,and umbra,shade.] In astronomy, a partial shade or obscurity on the ...
40191 penurious PENU'RIOUS, a. [L.penuria, scarcity, want; Gr. poor; rare.]1. Excessively saving or sparing in the ...
40192 penuriously PENU'RIOUSLY, adv. In a saving or parsimonious manner; with scanty supply.
40193 penury PEN'URY, n. [L. penuria, from Gr. needy.] Want of property; indigence; extreme poverty. All ...
40194 peon PE'ON, n. In Hindoostan, a foot soldier, or a footman armed with sword and target; said to be ...
40195 peony PE'ONY, n. [L. poeonia; Gr. from Apollo.]A plant and flower of the genus Paeonia. It is written ...
40196 people PEOPLE, n. [L. populus.]1. The body of persons who compose a community, town, city or nation. We ...
40197 peopled PEOPLED, pp. Stocked or furnished with inhabitants.
40198 peopling PEOPLING, ppr. Stocking with inhabitants.
40199 peoplish PEOPLISH, a. Vulgar.
40200 pepastic PEPAS'TIC, n. [Gr. to concoct or mature.] A medicine that serves to help digestion; applied ...
40202 pepper-box PEP'PER-BOX, n. A small box with a perforated lid,used for sprinkling pulverized pepper on food.
40203 pepper-cake PEP'PER-CAKE, n. A kind of spiced cake or gingerbread.
40204 pepper-corn PEP'PER-CORN, n. The berry or seed of the pepper-plant.1. Something of inconsiderable value; as ...
40205 pepper-gingerbread PEPPER-GIN'GERBREAD, n. A kind of cake made in England.
40206 pepper-pot PEP'PER-POT, n. A plant of the genus Capsicum.
40207 pepper-tree PEP'PER-TREE, n. A plant of the venus Vitis.
40208 pepper-water PEP'PER-WATER, n. A liquor prepared from powdered black pepper; used in microscopical ...
40209 pepper-wort PEP'PER-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Lepidium.
40201 pepper PEP'PER, n. [L. piper.] A plant and its seed or grain, of the genus Piper. The stem of the plant ...
40210 peppered PEP'PERED, pp. Sprinkled with pepper; pelted; spotted.
40211 peppergrass PEP'PERGRASS, n. A plant of the genus Pilularia; also, a plant of the genus Lepidium.
40212 peppering PEP'PERING, ppr. Sprinkling with pepper; pelting.1. a. Hot; pungent; angry.
40214 peppermint-tree PEP'PERMINT-TREE, n. The Eucalyptus piperita, a native of New South Wales.
40213 peppermint PEP'PERMINT, n. A plant of the genus Mentha. It is aromatic and pungent. Also, a liquor ...
40215 peptic PEP'TIC, a. [Gr. to digest.] Promoting digestion; dietetic, as peptic precepts.
40216 per PER, a Latin preposition, denoting through, passing,or over the whole extent, as in perambulo. ...
40217 peracute PERACU'TE, a. [L. peracutus; per, through, and acutus, sharp.]Very sharp; very violent; as a ...
40218 peradventure PERADVENT'URE, adv. [L. venio, to come.] By chance; perhaps; it may be.It has been used as a noun ...
40219 peragrate PER'AGRATE, v.i. [L. peragro; per, through, over, and ager, a field.] To travel over or through; ...
40220 peragration PERAGRA'TION, n. The act of passing through any space; as the peragration of the moon in her ...
40221 perambulate PERAM'BULATE, v.t. [L. perambulo; per and ambulo, to walk.]To walk through or over; properly and ...
40222 perambulated PERAM'BULATED, pp. Passed over; inspected.
40223 perambulating PERAM'BULATING, ppr. Passing over or through for the purpose of inspection.
40224 perambulation PERAMBULA'TION,n. The act of passing or walking through or over.1. A traveling survey or ...
40225 perambulator PERAM'BULATOR, n. An instrument or wheel for measuring distances, to be used in surveying or ...
40226 perbisulphate PERBISUL'PHATE, n. A sulphate with two proportions of sulphuric acid, and combined with an oxyd at ...
40227 percarbureted PERC`ARBURETED, a. The percarbureted hydrogen of the French chimists is said to be the only ...
40228 percase PERCA'SE, adv. [per and case, by case.] Perhaps; perchance. [Not used.]
40229 perceant PER'CEANT, n. Piercing; penetrating. [Not used.]
40230 perceivable PERCE'IVABLE, a. [See Perceive.] Perceptible; that may be perceived; that may fall under ...
40231 perceivably PERCE'IVABLY, adv. In such a manner as to be perceived.
40232 perceivance PERCE'IVANCE, n. Power of perceiving. [Not in use.]
40233 perceive PERCE'IVE, v.t. [L. percipio; per and capio, to take.]1. To have knowledge or receive impressions ...
40234 perceived PERCE'IVED, pp. Known by the senses; felt; understood; observed.
40235 perceiver PERCE'IVER, n. One who perceives, feels or observes.
40236 perceptibility PERCEPTIBIL'ITY, n. The state or quality of being perceptible; as the perceptibility of light or ...
40237 perceptible PERCEP'TIBLE, a. [L. percipio, perceptus.]1. That may be perceived; that may impress the bodily ...
40238 perceptibly PERCEP'TIBLY, adv. In a manner to be perceived. The woman decays perceptibly every week.
40239 perception PERCEP'TION, n. [L. perceptio. See Perceive.]1. The act of perceiving or of receiving impressions ...
40240 perceptive PERCEP'TIVE, a. Having the faculty of perceiving.
40241 perceptivity PERCEPTIV'ITY, n. The power of perception of thinking.
40242 perch PERCH, n. [L. perca.] A fish of the genus Perca. This fish has a deep body, very rough scales, an ...
40243 perchance PERCH`ANCE, adv. [per and chance.] By chance; perhaps.
40244 perchers PERCH'ERS, n. Paris candles anciently used in England; also, a larger sort of wax candles which ...
40245 perchlorate PERCHLO'RATE, n. A compound of perchloric acid with a base.
40246 perchloric PERCHLO'RIC, a. Perchloric acid is chlorine converted into an acid by combining with a maximum of ...
40247 percipient PERCIP'IENT, a. [L. percipiens.] Perceiving; having the faculty of perception. Animals are ...
40248 perclose PERCLO'SE, n. s as z. Conclusion. [Not used.]
40249 percolate PER'COLATE, v.t. [L. percolo; per and colo, to strain.] To strain through; to cause to pass ...
40250 percolated PER'COLATED, pp. Filtered; passed through small interstices.
40251 percolating PER'COLATING, ppr. Filtering.
40252 percolation PERCOLA'TION, n. The act of straining or filtering; filtration; the act of passing through small ...
40253 percuss PERCUSS', v.t. [L. percussus, from percutio, to strike.]To strike. [Little used.]
40254 percussion PERCUS'SION, n. [L.percussio.] The act of striking one body against another, with some violence; ...
40255 percutient PERCU'TIENT, n. [L.percutiens.] That which strikes, or has power to strike.
40256 perdifoil PER'DIFOIL, n. [L. perdo, to lose, and folium, leaf.] A plant that annually loses or drops its ...
40257 perdition PERDI'TION, n. [L. perditio, from perdo, to lose, to ruin.]1. Entire loss or ruin; utter ...
40258 perdu PERDU'
40259 perdue PERDU'E, adv. [L. perdo.] Close; in concealment. The moderator, out of view, Beneath the desk had ...
40260 perdulous PER'DULOUS, a. [L. perdo.] Lost; thrown away. [Not used.]
40261 perdurable PERDU'RABLE, a. [L.perduro; per and duro, to last.]Very durable; lasting; continuing long. [Not ...
40262 perdurably PERDU'RABLY, adv. Very durably. [Not used.]
40263 perduration PERDURA'TION, n. Long continuance. [Not used.]
40264 perdy PER'DY, adv. Certainly; verily; in truth.
40265 peregal PER'EGAL, a. Equal. [Not used.]
40266 peregrinate PER'EGRINATE, v.i. [L.peregrinor, from peregrinus, a traveler or stranger; peragro, to wander; per ...
40267 peregrination PEREGRINA'TION, n. A traveling from one country to another; a wandering; abode in foreign ...
40268 peregrinator PER'EGRINATOR, n. A traveler into foreign countries.
40269 peregrine PER'EGRINE, a. [L. peregrinus.] Foreign; not native. [Little used.]Peregrine falcon, a species of ...
40270 perempt PEREMPT', v.t. [L. peremptus, perimo, to kill.]In law, to kill; to crush or destroy. [Not used.]
40271 peremption PEREMP'TION, n. [L. peremptio.] A killing; a quashing; nonsuit. [Not used.]
40272 peremptorily PER'EMPTORILY, adv. [from peremptory.] Absolutely; positively; in a decisive manner; so as to ...
40273 peremptoriness PER'EMPTORINESS, n. Positiveness; absolute decision; dogmatism. Peremptoriness is of two sorts; ...
40274 peremptory PER'EMPTORY, a. [L. peremptorius, from peremptus, taken away, killed.]1. Express; positive; ...
40275 perennial PEREN'NIAL, a. [L. perennis; per and annus, a year.]1. Lasting or continuing without cessation ...
40276 perennially PEREN'NIALLY, adv. Continually; without ceasing.
40277 perennity PEREN'NITY, n. [L. perennitas.] An enduring or continuing through the whole year without ceasing.
40278 pererration PERERRA'TION, n. [L. perrro; per and erro, to wander.]A wandering or rambling through various ...
40279 perfect PER'FECT, a. [L. perfectus, perficio, to complete; per and facio, to do or make through, to carry ...
40280 perfected PER'FECTED, pp. Finished; completed.
40281 perfecter PER'FECTER, n. One that makes perfect.
40282 perfectibility PERFECTIBIL'ITY, n. [from perfectible.] The capacity of becoming or being made perfect.
40283 perfectible PERFECT'IBLE, a. Capable of becoming or being made perfect, or of arriving at the utmost ...
40284 perfecting PER'FECTING, ppr. Finishing; completing; consummating.
40285 perfection PERFEC'TION, n. [L. perfectio.] The state of being perfect or complete, so that nothing requisite ...
40286 perfectional PERFEC'TIONAL, a. Made complete.
40287 perfectionate PERFEC'TIONATE, used by Dryden and Tooke, in lieu of the verb to perfect, is a useless word.
40288 perfectionist PERFEC'TIONIST, n. One pretending to perfection; an enthusiast in religion.
40289 perfective PERFECT'IVE, a. Conducing to make perfect or bring to perfection; followed by of. Praise and ...
40290 perfectively PERFECT'IVELY, adv. In a manner that brings to perfection.
40291 perfectly PER'FECTLY, adv. In the highest degree of excellence.1. Totally; completely; as work perfectly ...
40292 perfectness PER'FECTNESS, n. Completeness; consummate excellence; perfection.1. The highest degree of ...
40293 perficient PERFI'CIENT, n. [L. perficiens.] One who endows a charity.
40294 perfidious PERFID'IOUS, a. [L. perfidus; per and fidus, faithful. Per in this word signifies through, beyond, ...
40295 perfidiously PERFID'IOUSLY, adv. Treacherously; traitorously; by breach of faith or allegiance.
40296 perfidiousness PERFID'IOUSNESS, n. The quality of being perfidious; treachery; traitorousness; breach of faith, ...
40297 perfidy PER'FIDY, n. [L. perfidia; per and fides, faith.] The act of violating faith, a promise, vow or ...
40298 perflate PERFLA'TE,v.t. [L. perflo; per and flo, to blow.] To blow through.
40299 perflation PERFLA'TION, n. The act of blowing through.
40300 perfoliate PERFO'LIATE, a. [L. per and folium, a leaf.] In botany, a perfoliate or perforated leaf,is one ...
40301 perforate PER'FORATE, v.t. [L. perforo; per and foro; Eng. to bore.]1. To bore through.2. To pierce with a ...
40302 perforated PER'FORATED, pp. Bored or pierced through; pierced.
40303 perforating PER'FORATING, ppr. Boring or piercing through; piercing.
40304 perforation PERFORA'TION, n. The act of boring or piercing through.1. A hole or aperture passing through any ...
40305 perforative PER'FORATIVE, a. Having power to pierce; as an instrument.
40306 perforator PER'FORATOR, n. An instrument that bores or perforates.
40307 perforce PERFORCE, adv. [per and force.] By force or violence.
40308 perform PERFORM', v.t. [L. per and formo, to make.]1. To do; to execute; to accomplish; as, to perform two ...
40309 performable PERFORM'ABLE, a. That may be done, executed or fulfilled; practicable.
40310 performance PERFORM'ANCE, n. Execution or completion of any thing; a doing; as the performance of work or of an ...
40311 performed PERFORM'ED, pp. Done; executed; discharged.
40312 performer PERFORM'ER, n. One that performs any thing,particularly in an art; as a good performer on the ...
40313 performing PERFORM'ING, ppr. Doing; executing; accomplishing.PERFORM'ING, n. Act done; deed; act of ...
40314 perfumatory PERFU'MATORY, a. [from perfume.] That perfumes.
40315 perfume PERFU'ME, n. [L. per and fumus, smoke, or fumo, to fumigate.]1. A substance that emits a scent or ...
40316 perfumed PERFU'MED, pp. Scented; impregnated with fragrant odors.
40317 perfumer PERFU'MER, n. He or that which perfumes.1. One whose trade is to see perfumes.
40318 perfumery PERFU'MERY, n. Perfumes in general.
40319 perfuming PERFU'MING, ppr. Scenting; impregnating with sweet odors.
40320 perfunctorily PERFUNC'TORILY, adv. [L. perfunctorie, from perfungor; per and fungor, to do or execute.] ...
40321 perfunctoriness PERFUNC'TORINESS, n. Negligent performance; carelessness.
40322 perfunctory PERFUNC'TORY, a. [supra.] Slight; careless; negligent.1. Done only for the sake of getting rid of ...
40323 perfuse PERFU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. perfusus, perfundo; per and fundo,to pour.] To sprinkle, pour or spread ...
40324 pergola PER'GOLA, n. A kind of arbor.
40325 perhaps PERHAPS', adv. [per and hap. See Happen.] By chance; it may be. Perhaps her love, perhaps her ...
40326 periagua PERIAGUA [See Pirogue.]
40327 perianth PER'IANTH, n. [Gr. about, and flower.] The calyx of a flower when contiguous to the other parts of ...
40328 periapt PER'IAPT, n. [Gr. to fit or tie to.] An amulet; a charm worn to defend against disease or ...
40329 periauger PERIAUGER
40330 pericardium PERICARD'IUM, n. [Gr. around, and the heart.] A membrane that incloses the heart. It contains a ...
40331 pericarp PER'ICARP,n. [Gr. about, and fruit.] The seed-vessel of a plant; a general name including the ...
40332 pericranium PERICRA'NIUM, n. [Gr. about,and the skull.] The periosteum or membrane that invests the skull.
40333 periculous PERIC'ULOUS, a. [L. periculosus. See Peril.] Dangerous; hazardous.
40334 peridodecahedral PERIDODECAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr.] Designating a crystal whose primitive form is a four sided prism,and ...
40335 peridot PER'IDOT, n. Another name of the chrysolite. It may be known by its leek or olive green color of ...
40336 periecian PERIE'CIAN, n. [Gr.] An inhabitant of the opposite side of the globe,in the same parallel of ...
40337 perigee PER'IGEE
40338 perigeum PERIGE'UM, n. [Gr. about, and the earth.] That point in the orbit of the sun or moon in which it ...
40339 perigord-stone PER'IGORD-STONE, n. An ore of manganese of a dark gray color, like basalt or trap; so called from ...
40340 perigraph PER'IGRAPH, n. [Gr. about, and a writing.]1. A careless or inaccurate delineation of any thing.2. ...
40341 perigynous PERIG'YNOUS, a. [Gr. about, and female.] In botany, inserted around the pistil, as the corol or ...
40342 perihelion PERIHE'LION
40343 perihelium PERIHE'LIUM, n. [Gr. about, and the sun.] That part of the orbit of a planet or comet, in which it ...
40344 perihexahedral PERIHEXAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr.] Designating a crystal whose primitive form is a four sided prism, and in ...
40345 peril PER'IL, n. [L. periculum, from Gr. to try, to attempt, that is, to strain; an attempt, danger, ...
40346 perilous PER'ILOUS, a. Dangerous; hazardous; full of risk; as a perilous undertaking; a perilous ...
40347 perilously PER'ILOUSLY, adv. Dangerously; with hazard.
40348 perilousness PER'ILOUSNESS, n. Dangerousness; danger; hazard.
40349 perimeter PERIM'ETER, n. [Gr. about, and measure.] In geometry, the bounds and limits of a body or figure. ...
40350 perioctahedral PERIOCTAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr. octahedral.] Designating a crystal whose primitive form is a four sided ...
40351 period PE'RIOD, n. [L. periodus; Gr. about, and way.]1. Properly, a circuit; hence, the time which is ...
40352 periodic PERIOD'IC
40353 periodical PERIOD'ICAL, a. 1. Performed in a circuit, or in a regular revolution in a certain time, or in a ...
40354 periodically PERIOD'ICALLY, adv. At stated periods; as a festival celebrated periodically.
40355 periosteum PERIOS'TEUM, n. [Gr. about, and bone.] A nervous vascular membrane endued with quick sensibility, ...
40356 peripatetic PERIPATET'IC, a. [Gr. to walk about.] Pertaining to Aristotle's system of philosophy, or to the ...
40357 peripateticism PERIPATET'ICISM, n. The notions or philosophical system of Aristotle and his followers.
40358 peripheral PERIPH'ERAL, a. Peripheric.
40359 peripheric PERIPHER'IC
40360 peripherical PERIPHER'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a periphery; constituting a periphery.
40361 periphery PERIPH'ERY, n. [Gr. around, and to bear.] The circumference of a circle, ellipsis, or other ...
40362 periphrase PER'IPHRASE, n. s as z. [Gr. about, and to speak.] Circumlocution; a circuit of words; the use of ...
40363 periphrasis PERIPHRASIS. [See Periphrase.]
40364 periphrastic PERIPHRAS'TIC
40365 periphrastical PERIPHRAS'TICAL, a. Circumlocutory; expressing or expressed in more words than are necessary; ...
40366 periphrastically PERIPHRAS'TICALLY, adv. With circumlocution.
40367 periplus PER'IPLUS, n. [Gr. about, and to sail.] Circumnavigation; a voyage round a certain sea or sea ...
40368 peripneumonic PERIPNEUMON'IC, a. Pertaining to peripneumony; consisting in an inflammation of the lungs.
40369 peripneumony PERIPNEU'MONY, n. [Gr. about, and the lungs.] An inflammation of the lungs, or of some part of the ...
40370 peripolygonal PERIPOLYG'ONAL, a. [Gr. polygon.] In crystalography, having a great number of sides.
40371 periscian PERIS'CIAN, n. [Gr. around, and shadow.] An inhabitant of a frigid zone or within a polar circle, ...
40372 perish PER'ISH, v.i.[L. pereo, supposed to be compounded of per and eo, to go; literally, to depart ...
40373 perishable PER'ISHABLE, a. Liable to perish; subject to decay and destruction. The bodies of animals and ...
40374 perishableness PER'ISHABLENESS, n. Liableness to decay or destruction.
40375 perisperm PER'ISPERM, n. [Gr. around, and seed.] A thick, farinaceous, fleshy, horny or woody part of the ...
40376 perispheric PERISPHER'IC, a. [Gr.] Globular; having the form of a ball.
40377 perissological PERISSOLOG'ICAL, a. Redundant in words.
40378 perissology PERISSOL'OGY, n. [Gr. redundant,and discourse.] Superfluous words; much talk to little purpose. ...
40379 peristaltic PERISTAL'TIC, a. [Gr. to involve.] Spiral; vermicular or worm-like. The peristaltic motion of the ...
40380 peristerion PERISTE'RION, n. [Gr.] The herb vervain.
40381 peristyle PER'ISTYLE, n. [Gr. about, and a column.] A circular range of columns, or a building encompassed ...
40382 perisystole PERISYSTOLE, n. perisys'toly. [Gr. about, and contraction.] The pause or interval between the ...
40383 perite PERI'TE, a. [L. peritus.] Skillful. [Little used.]
40384 peritoneal PERITO'NEAL, a. Pertaining to the peritoneum.
40385 peritoneum PERITONE'UM, n. [Gr. about, and to stretch.] A thin, smooth, lubricous membrane investing the ...
40386 periwig PER'IWIG, n. A small wig; a kind of close cap formed by an intertexture of false hair, worn by men ...
40387 periwinkle PER'IWINKLE, n. [L. vinca.]1. A sea snail, or small shell fish.2. A plant of the genus Vinca.
40388 perjure PERJURE, v.t. per'jur. [L. perjuro; per and juro, to swear; that is, to swear aside or beyond.] ...
40389 perjured PER'JURED, pp. Guilty of perjury; having sworn falsely.
40390 perjurer PER'JURER, n. One that willfully takes a false oath lawfully administered.
40391 perjuring PER'JURING, ppr. Taking a false oath lawfully administered.
40392 perjurious PERJU'RIOUS, a. Guilty of perjury; containing perjury.
40393 perjury PER'JURY, n. [L. perjurium.] The act or crime of willfully making a false oath, when lawfully ...
40394 perk PERK, a. Properly, erect; hence, smart; trim.PERK, v.i. To hold up the head with affected ...
40395 perkin PERK'IN, n. Cyderkin; a kind of cyder made by steeping the murk in water.Perlate acid, the ...
40396 perlexity PERLEX'ITY, n. Intricacy; entanglement. The jury were embarrassed by the perplexity of the case.1. ...
40397 perlous PER'LOUS, for perilous, is not used.
40398 perlustration PERLUSTRA'TION, n. [L. perlustro; per and lustro, to survey.]The act of viewing all over.
40399 permagy PER'MAGY n. A little Turkish boat.
40400 permanence PER'MANENCE
40401 permanency PER'MANENCY, n. [See Permanent.] Continuance in the same state, or without a change that destroys ...
40402 permanent PER'MANENT, a. [L.permanens, permaneo,per and maneo, to remain.]Durable; lasting; continuing in the ...
40403 permanently PER'MANENTLY, adv. With long continuance; durably; in a fixed state or place; as a government ...
40404 permansion PERMAN'SION, n. [L. permansio.] Continuance. [Not used.]
40405 permeability PERMEABIL'ITY, n. [infra.] The quality or state of being permeable.
40406 permeable PER'MEABLE, a. [L.permeo; per and meo, to pass or glide.]That may be passed through without rupture ...
40407 permeant PER'MEANT, a. [supra.] Passing through. [Not used.]
40408 permeate PER'MEATE, v.t. [L.permeo; per and meo, to glide, flow, or pass.]To pass through the pores or ...
40409 permeated PER'MEATED, pp. Passed through, as by a fluid.
40410 permeating PER'MEATING, ppr. Passing through the pores or interstices of a substance.
40411 permeation PERMEA'TION, n. The act of passing through the pores or interstices of a body.
40412 permiscible PERMIS'CIBLE, a. [L. permisceo; per and misceo, to mix.]That may be mixed. [Little used.]
40413 permissible PERMIS'SIBLE, a. [See Permit.] That may be permitted or allowed.
40414 permission PERMIS'SION, n. [L.permissio, from permitto, to permit.]1. The act of permitting or allowing.2. ...
40415 permissive PERMIS'SIVE, a. Granting liberty; allowing.1. Granted; suffered without hinderance. Thus I ...
40416 permissively PERMIS'SIVELY, adv. By allowance; without prohibition or hinderance.
40417 permistion PERMIS'TION
40418 permit PERMIT', v.t. [L. permitto; per and mitto, to send.]1. To allow; to grant leave or liberty to by ...
40419 permittance PERMIT'TANCE, n. Allowance; forbearance of prohibition; permission.
40420 permixtion PERMIX'TION, n. [L. permistio, permixtio.] The act of mixing; the state of being mingled.
40421 permutation PERMUTA'TION, n. [L. permutatio,permuto; per and muto, to change.]1. In commerce, exchange of one ...
40422 permute PERMU'TE, v.t. [L.permuto; per and muto, to change.]To exchange; to barter. [Not used.]
40423 permuter PERMU'TER, n. One that exchanges. [Not used.]
40424 pernancy PER'NANCY, n. A taking or reception, as the receiving of rents or tithes in kind.
40425 pernicious PERNI'CIOUS, a. [L. perniciosus, from pernicies; perneco, to kill; per and nex, necis,death.]1. ...
40426 perniciously PERNI'CIOUSLY, adv. Destructively; with ruinous tendency or effects.
40427 perniciousness PERNI'CIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being very injurious, mischievous or destructive.
40428 pernicity PERNIC'ITY, n. [L. pernicitas, from pernix.]Swiftness of motion; celerity. [Little used.]
40429 pernoctation PERNOCTA'TION, n. [L. pernocto; per and nox, night.]The act of passing the whole night; a remaining ...
40430 perogue PEROGUE. [See Pirogue.]
40431 peroration PERORA'TION, n. [L. peroratio, from peroro; per and oro, to pray.]The concluding part of an ...
40432 peroxyd PEROX'YD, n. [per and oxyd.] A substance containing an unusual quantity of oxygen.
40433 peroxydize PEROX'YDIZE, v.t. To oxydize to the utmost degree.
40434 perpend PERPEND', v.t. [L. perpendo; per and pendo, to weigh.]To weigh in the mind; to consider ...
40435 perpender PERPEND'ER, n. A coping stone.
40436 perpendicle PERPEND'ICLE, n. [L. perpendiculum.]Something hanging down in a direct line; a plumb line.
40437 perpendicular PERPENDIC'ULAR, a. [L. perpendicularis, from perpendiculum, a plumb line; perpendeo; per and ...
40438 perpendicularity PERPENDICULAR'ITY, n. The state of being perpendicular.
40439 perpendicularly PERPENDIC'ULARLY, adv. In a manner to fall on another line at right angles.1. So as to fall on ...
40440 perpension PERPEN'SION, n. [L. perpendo.] Consideration. [Not used.]
40441 perpession PERPES'SION, n. [L.perpessio,perpetior, to suffer; per and patior.]Suffering; endurance. [Not ...
40442 perpetrate PER'PETRATE, v.t. [L. perpetro; per and patro, to go through, to finish.] To do; to commit; to ...
40443 perpetrated PER'PETRATED, pp. Done; committed; as an evil act.
40444 perpetrating PER'PETRATING, ppr. Committing; as a crime or evil act.
40445 perpetration PERPETRA'TION, n. The act of committing a crime.1. An evil action.
40446 perpetrator PER'PETRATOR, n. One that commits a crime.
40447 perpetual PERPET'UAL, a. [L. perpetuus, from perpes, perpetis; per and pes, from a root signifying to ...
40448 perpetually PERPET'UALLY, adv. Constantly; continually; applied to things which proceed without intermission, ...
40449 perpetuate PERPET'UATE, v.t. [L. perpetuo.] To make perpetual; to eternize.1. To cause to endure or to be ...
40450 perpetuated PERPET'UATED, pp. Made perpetual; continued through eternity, or for an indefinite time.
40451 perpetuating PERPET'UATING, ppr. Continuing forever or indefinitely.
40452 perpetuation PERPETUA'TION, n. The act of making perpetual, or of preserving from extinction or oblivion ...
40453 perpetuity PERPETU'ITY, n. [L.perpetuitas.] Endless duration; continuance to eternity.1. Continued ...
40454 perphosphate PERPHOS'PHATE, n. A phosphate in which the phosphoric acid is combined with an oxyd at the maximum ...
40455 perplex PERPLEX', v.t. [L. perplexus, perplexor; per and plector, to twist; L. plico, to fold.]1. To make ...
40456 perplexed PERPLEX'ED, pp. Made intricate; embarrassed; puzzled.
40457 perplexedly PERPLEX'EDLY, adv. Intricately; with involution.
40458 perplexedness PERPLEX'EDNESS, n. Intricacy; difficulty from want of order or precision.1. Embarrassment of mind ...
40459 perquadrisulphate PERQUADRISUL'PHATE, n. A sulphate with four proportions of sulphuric acid combined with a maximum ...
40460 perquisite PER'QUISITE, n. s as z. [L.perquisitus, perquiro; per and quoero, to seek.] A fee or pecuniary ...
40461 perquisited PER'QUISITED, a. Supplied with perquisites. [A bad word and not used.]
40462 perquisition PERQUISI'TION, n. s as z. [L. perquisitus.] An accurate inquiry or search.
40463 perroquet PERROQUET', n. A species of parrot; also, the Alca Psittacula, an aquatic fowl inhabiting the ...
40464 perry PER'RY, n. The juice of pears, which being clarified by fermentation, is a pleasant drink.
40465 perscrutation PERSCRUTA'TION, n. [L. perscrutatio, perscrutor.]A searching thoroughly; minute search or inquiry.
40466 persecute PER'SECUTE, v.t. [L. persequor; per and sequor, to pursue. See Seek and Essay.]1. In a general ...
40467 persecuted PER'SECUTED, pp. Harassed by troubles or punishments unjustly inflicted, particularly for ...
40468 persecuting PER'SECUTING, ppr. Pursuing with enmity or vengeance, particularly for adhering to a particular ...
40469 persecution PERSECU'TION, n. The act or practice of persecuting; the infliction of pain, punishment or death ...
40470 persecutor PER'SECUTOR, n. One that persecutes; one that pursues another unjustly and vexatiously, ...
40471 perseverance PERSEVE'RANCE, n. [L. perseverantia. See Persevere.]1. Persistence in any thing undertaken; ...
40472 perseverant PERSEVE'RANT, a. Constant in pursuit of an undertaking. [Not used.]
40473 persevere PERSEVE'RE, v.i. [L.persevero. The last component part of this word, severo,must be the same as in ...
40474 persevering PERSEVE'RING, ppr. Persisting in any business or course begun.1. a. Constant in the execution of ...
40475 perseveringly PERSEVE'RINGLY, adv. With perseverance or continued pursuit of what is undertaken.
40476 persiflage PER'SIFLAGE, n. [L. sibilo, to hiss.] A jeering; ridicule.
40477 persimmon PERSIM'MON, n. A tree and its fruit, a species of Diospyros, a native of the states south of New ...
40478 persist PERSIST', v.i. [L. persisto; per and sisto, to stand or be fixed.]To continue steadily and firmly ...
40479 persistence PERSIST'ENCE, n. The state of persisting; steady pursuit of what is undertaken; perseverance in a ...
40480 persistent PERSIST'ENT
40481 persisting PERSIST'ING, a. In botany, continuing without withering; opposed to marcescent; as a persisting ...
40482 persistive PERSIST'IVE, a. Steady in pursuit; not receding from a purpose or undertaking; persevering.
40483 person PERSON, n. per'sn. [L. persona; said to be compounded of per, through or by, and sonus, sound; a ...
40484 personable PER'SONABLE, a. Having a well formed body or person; graceful; of good appearance; as a personable ...
40485 personage PER'SONAGE, n. A man or woman of distinction; as an illustrious personage.1. Exterior appearance; ...
40486 personal PER'SONAL, a. [L. personalis.] Belonging to men or women, not to things; not real. Every man so ...
40487 personality PERSONAL'ITY, n. That which constitutes an individual a distinct person, or that which constitutes ...
40488 personally PER'SONALLY, adv. In person; by bodily presence; not by representative or substitute; as, to be ...
40489 personate PER'SONATE, v.t. To represent by a fictitious or assumed character so as to pass for the person ...
40490 personation PERSONA'TION, n. The counterfeiting of the person and character of another.
40491 personator PER'SONATOR, n. One who assumes the character of another.1. One that acts or performs.
40492 personification PERSONIFICA'TION, n. [from personify.] The giving to an inanimate being the figure or the ...
40493 personified PERSON'IFIED, pp. Represented with the attributes of a person.
40494 personify PERSON'IFY, v.t. [L. persona and facio.] To give animation to inanimate objects; to ascribe to an ...
40495 personifying PERSON'IFYING, ppr. Giving to an inanimate being the attributes of a person.
40496 personize PER'SONIZE, v.t. To personify. [Not much used.]
40497 perspective PERSPEC'TIVE, a. [infra.] Pertaining to the science of optics; optical.1. Pertaining to the art ...
40498 perspectively PERSPEC'TIVELY, adv. Optically; through a glass; by representation.
40499 perspicable PER'SPICABLE, a. Discernible.
40500 perspicacious PERSPICA'CIOUS, a. [L. perspicax, from perspicio.]1. Quick sighted; sharp of sight.2. Of acute ...
40501 perspicaciousness PERSPICA'CIOUSNESS, n. Acuteness of sight.
40502 perspicacity PERSPICAC'ITY, n. [L. perspicacitas.]1. Acuteness of sight; quickness of sight.2. Acuteness of ...
40503 perspicacy PER'SPICACY, n. Acuteness of sight or discernment.
40504 perspicil PER'SPICIL, n. [L.per and speculum, a glass.]An optic glass. [Little used.]
40505 perspicuity PERSPICU'ITY, n. [L. perspicuitas, from perspicio.]1. Transparency; clearness; that quality of a ...
40506 perspicuous PERSPIC'UOUS, a. [L.perspicuus.] Transparent; translucent. [Little used.]1. Clear to the ...
40507 perspicuously PERSPIC'UOUSLY, adv. Clearly; plainly; in a manner to be easily understood.
40508 perspicuousness PERSPIC'UOUSNESS, n. Clearness to intellectual vision; plainness; freedom from obscurity.[We ...
40509 perspirability PERSPIRABIL'ITY, n. [from perspirable.]The quality of being perspirable.
40510 perspirable PER'SPIRABLE, a. [from L. perspiro. See Perspire.]1. That may be perspired; that may be evacuated ...
40511 perspiration PERSPIRA'TION, n. [L. perspiro. See Perspire.]1. The act of perspiring; excretion by the ...
40512 perspirative PER'SPIRATIVE, a. Performing the act of perspiration.
40513 perspiratory PER'SPIRATORY, a. Perspirative.
40514 perspire PERSPI'RE, v.i. [L. per and spiro, to breathe.]1. To evacuate the fluids of the body through the ...
40515 perstringe PERSTRINGE, v.t. perstrinj'. [L. perstringo; per and stringo, to graze or brush.] To graze; to ...
40516 persuadable PERSUA'DABLE, a. [See Persuade.] That may be persuaded.
40517 persuadably PERSUA'DABLY, adv. So as to be persuaded.
40518 persuade PERSUA'DE, v.t. [L. persuadeo; per and suadeo, to urge or incite.]1. To influence by argument, ...
40519 persuaded PERSUA'DED, pp. Influenced or drawn to an opinion or determination by argument, advice or reasons ...
40520 persuader PERSUA'DER, n. One that persuades or influences another.1. That which incites. Hunger and thirst ...
40521 persuading PERSUA'DING, ppr. Influencing by motives presented.
40522 persuasibility PERSUASIBIL'ITY, n. Capability of being persuaded.
40523 persuasible PERSUA'SIBLE, a. [L. persuasibilis.] That may be persuaded or influenced by reasons offered.
40524 persuasibleness PERSUA'SIBLENESS, n. The quality of being influenced by persuasion.
40525 persuasion PERSUA'SION, n. s as z. [L. persuasio.]1. The act of persuading; the act of influencing the mind ...
40526 persuasive PERSUA'SIVE, a. Having the power of persuading; influencing the mind or passions; as persuasive ...
40527 persuasively PERSUA'SIVELY, adv. In such a manner as to persuade or convince.
40528 persuasiveness PERSUA'SIVENESS, n. The quality of having influence on the mind or passions.
40529 persuasory PERSUA'SORY, a. Having the power or tendency to persuade.
40530 persulphate PERSUL'PHATE, n. A combination of sulphuric acid with the peroxyd of iron.
40531 pert PERT, a.1. Lively; brisk; smart. Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth. On the lawny sands and ...
40532 pertain PERTA'IN, v.i. [L. pertineo, per and tenco, to hold.]1. To belong; to be the property, right or ...
40533 perterebration PERTEREBRA'TION, n. [L. per and terebratio.] The act of boring through.
40534 perterer PERT'ERER, n. One that troubles or harasses with vexation.
40535 pertilence PERT'ILENCE, n. [L. pestilentia, from pestilens; pestis,plague.]1. Plague, appropriately so ...
40536 pertinacious PERTINA'CIOUS, a. [L.pertinax; per and teneo, to hold.]1. Holding or adhering to any opinion, ...
40537 pertinaciously PERTINA'CIOUSLY, adv. Obstinately; with firm or perverse adherence to opinion or purpose. He ...
40538 pertinaciousness PERTINA'CIOUSNESS
40539 pertinacity PERTINAC'ITY, n. [L. pertinacia.] Firm or unyielding adherence to opinion or purpose; obstinacy. ...
40540 pertinacy PER'TINACY, n. [supra.] Obstinacy; stubbornness; persistency; resolution; steadiness. [Little ...
40541 pertinence PER'TINENCE
40542 pertinency PER'TINENCY, n. [L. pertinens,pertineo; per and teneo, to hold.]Justness of relation to the subject ...
40543 pertinent PER'TINENT, a. [L. pertinens.] Related to the subject or matter in hand; just to the purpose; ...
40544 pertinently PER'TINENTLY, adv. Appositely; to the purpose. He answered pertinently.
40545 pertinentness PER'TINENTNESS, n. Appositeness.
40546 pertingent PERTIN'GENT, a. [L. pertingens.] Reaching to.
40547 pertly PERT'LY, adv. Briskly; smartly; with prompt boldness.1. Saucily; with indecorous confidence or ...
40548 pertness PERT'NESS, n. Briskness; smartness.1. Sauciness; forward promptness or boldness; implying less ...
40549 perturb PERTURB'
40550 perturbate PER'TURBATE, v.t. [L. perturbo; per and turbo, properly to turn, or to stir by turning.]1. To ...
40551 perturbation PERTURBA'TION, n. [L. perturbatio.]1. Disquiet or agitation of mind.2. Restlessness of passions; ...
40552 perturbator PERTURBA'TOR
40553 perturbed PERTURB'ED, pp. Disturbed; agitated; disquieted. Rest, rest, perturbed spirit.
40554 perturber PERTURB'ER, n. One that disturbs or raises commotion. [Little used.]
40555 pertuse PERTU'SE
40556 pertused PERTU'SED, a. [L. pertusus, pertundo; per and tundo, to beat.]1. Punched; pierced with holes.2. ...
40557 pertusion PERTU'SION, n. s as z. [L. pertusus, pertundo.]1. The act of punching, piercing or thrusting ...
40559 peruke-maker PERU'KE-MAKER, n. A maker of perukes; a wig-maker.
40558 peruke PERU'KE, n. An artificial cap of hair; a periwig.
40560 peruriousness PERU'RIOUSNESS, n. Parsimony; a sordid disposition to save money.1. Scantiness; not plenty.
40561 perusal PERU'SAL, n. s as z. [from peruse.] The act of reading. This treatise requires application in the ...
40562 peruse PERU'SE, v.t. s as z. [Some of the senses of this word would lead to the inference that it is from ...
40563 perused PERU'SED, pp. Read; observed; examined.
40564 peruser PERU'SER, n. One that reads or examines.
40565 perusing PERU'SING, ppr. Reading; examining.
40566 peruvian PERU'VIAN, a. Pertaining to Peru, in South America.Peruvian bark, the bark of the Cinchona, a tree ...
40567 pervade PERVA'DE, v.t. [L. pervado; per and vado,to go; Eng. to wade.]1. To pass through an aperture,pore ...
40568 pervaded PERVA'DED, pp. Passed through; permeated; penetrated in every part.
40569 pervading PERVA'DING, ppr. Passing through or extending to every part of a thing.
40570 pervasion PERVA'SION, n. s as z. The act of pervading or passing through the whole extent of a thing.
40571 perverse PERVERSE, a. pervers'. [L. perversus. See Pervert.]1. Literally, turned aside; hence, distorted ...
40572 perversely PERVERSELY, adv. pervers'ly. With intent to vex; crossly; peevishly; obstinately in the wrong.
40573 perverseness PERVERSENESS, n. pervers'ness. Disposition to cross or vex; untractableness; crossness of temper; ...
40574 perversion PERVER'SION, n. [L. perversus.] The act of perverting; a turning from truth or propriety; a ...
40575 perversity PERVERS'ITY, n. Perverseness; crossness; disposition to thwart or cross.
40576 perversive PERVERS'IVE, a. Tending to pervert or corrupt.
40577 pervert PERVERT', v.t. [L. perverto; per and verto, to turn.]1. To turn from truth, propriety, or from its ...
40578 perverted PERVERT'ED, pp. Turned from right to wrong; distorted; corrupted; misinterpreted; misemployed.
40579 perverter PERVERT'ER, n. One that perverts or turns from right to wrong; one that distorts, misinterprets or ...
40580 pervertible PERVERT'IBLE, a. That may be perverted.
40581 perverting PERVERT'ING, ppr. Turning from right to wrong; distorting; misinterpreting; misapplying; ...
40582 pervestigate PERVES'TIGATE, v.t. [L. pervestigo; per and vestigo, to trace; vestigium, a track.] To find out by ...
40583 pervestigation PERVESTIGA'TION, n. Diligent inquiry; thorough research.
40584 pervicacious PERVICA'CIOUS, a. [L. pervicax; composed perhaps of per and Teutonic wigan, to strive or ...
40585 pervicaciously PERVICA'CIOUSLY, adv. With willful obstinacy.
40586 pervicaciousness PERVICA'CIOUSNESS
40587 pervicacity PERVICAC'ITY , n. Stubbornness; willful obstinacy. [Little used.]
40588 pervious PER'VIOUS, a. [L. pervius; per and via, way, or from the root of that word.]1. Admitting passage; ...
40589 perviousness PER'VIOUSNESS, n. The quality of admitting passage or of being penetrated; as the perviousness of ...
40590 pesade PESA'DE, n. The motion of a horse when he raises his fore quarters, keeping his hind feet on the ...
40591 peso PE'SO, n. [supra.] A Spanish coin weighing an ounce; a piaster; a piece of eight.
40592 pessary PES'SARY, n. [L. pessus.] A solid substance composed of wool, lint or linen, mixed with powder, ...
40593 pest PEST, n. [L. pestis; Heb. to be fetid.]1. Plague; pestilence; a fatal epidemic disease. Let fierce ...
40594 pester PEST'ER, v.t. To trouble; to disturb; to annoy; to harass with little vexations. We are pestered ...
40595 pestered PEST'ERED, pp. Troubled; disturbed; annoyed.
40596 pestering PEST'ERING, ppr. Troubling; disturbing.
40597 pesterous PEST'EROUS, a. Encumbering; burdensome. [Little used.]
40598 pesthouse PEST'HOUSE, n. A house or hospital for persons infected with any contagious and mortal disease.
40599 pestiferous PESTIF'EROUS, a. [L. pestis, plague, and fero, to produce.]1. Pestilential; noxious to health; ...
40600 pestilent PEST'ILENT, a. [L. pestilens, from pestis, plague.]1. Producing the plague, or other malignant, ...
40601 pestilential PESTILEN'TIAL, a. Partaking of the nature of the plague or other infectious disease; as a ...
40602 pestilently PEST'ILENTLY, adv. Mischievously; destructively.
40603 pestillation PESTILLA'TION, n. [from L. pistillum; Eng. pestle.]The act of pounding and bruising in a mortar. ...
40604 pestle PESTLE, n. pes'l. [L. pistillum, and probably pinso, for piso, to pound or beat.] An instrument ...
40605 pet PET, n. [This word may be contracted from petulant, or belong to the root of that word. Peevish, ...
40607 petal-shaped PET'AL-SHAPED, a Having the shape of a petal.
40606 petal PE'TAL, n. [Gr. to expand; L. pateo.] In botany, a flower leaf. In flowers of one petal, the corol ...
40608 petaled PET'ALED
40609 petaline PET'ALINE, a. Pertaining to a petal; attached to a petal; as a petaline nectary.
40610 petalism PET'ALISM, n. [Gr. See Petal.] A form of sentence among the ancient Syracusans,by which they ...
40611 petalite PET'ALITE, n. [Gr. a leaf.] A rare mineral occurring in masses, having a foliated structure; its ...
40612 petaloid PET'ALOID, a. [petal and Gr. form.] Having the form of petals.
40613 petalous PET'ALOUS, a. Having petals; as a petaled flower; opposed to apetalous. This word is much used in ...
40614 petard PET`ARD, n. An engine of war made of metal, nearly in the shape of a hat, to be loaded with powder ...
40615 petechiae PETE'CHIAE, n. Purple spots which appear on the skin in malignant fevers.
40616 petechial PETE'CHIAL, a. Spotted. A petechial fever is a malignant fever accompanied with purple spots on ...
40617 petency COMPETENCE,PETENCY, n.1. Sufficiency; such a quantity as is sufficient; property or means of ...
40618 peter PETER
40619 peterel PET'EREL
40620 peterpence PE'TERPENCE,n. A tax or tribute formerly paid by the English people to the pope; being a penny for ...
40621 peterwort PE'TERWORT, n. A plant.
40622 petiolar PET'IOLAR
40623 petiolary PET'IOLARY, a. Pertaining to a petiole, or proceeding from it; as a petiolar tendril.1. Formed ...
40624 petiolate PET'IOLATE
40625 petiole PET'IOLE, n. [L. petiolus, probably a diminutive from pes, pedis.]In botany, a leaf-stalk; the ...
40626 petioled PET'IOLED, a. Growing on a petiole; as a petiolate leaf.
40628 petit-maitre PETIT-MAITRE, n. pet'ty-maitre. A spruce fellow that dangles about females; a fop; a coxcomb.
40627 petit PETIT, a. pet'ty. Small; little; mean.This word petit is now generally written petty.Petit ...
40629 petition PETI'TION, n. [L. petitio, from peto, to ask, properly to urge or press.]1. In a general sense, a ...
40630 petitionarily PETI'TIONARILY, adv. By way of begging the question.
40631 petitionary PETI'TIONARY, a. Supplicatory; coming with a petition. Pardon thy petitionary countrymen.1. ...
40632 petitioner PETI'TIONER, n. One that presents a petition, either verbal or written.
40633 petitioning PETI'TIONING, ppr. Asking as a favor, grant, right or mercy; supplicating.PETI'TIONING, n. The act ...
40634 petitory PET'ITORY, a. Petitioning; soliciting. [Not used.]
40635 petong PETONG', n. The Chinese name of a species of copper of a white color. It is sometimes confounded ...
40636 petre PETRE, [See Saltpeter.]
40637 petrean PETRE'AN, a. [L.petra, a rock.] Pertaining to rock or stone.
40638 petrel PET'REL, n. An aquatic fowl of the genus Procellaria.
40639 petrescence PETRES'CENCE, n. The process of changing into stone.
40640 petrescent PETRES'CENT, a. [Gr. a stone; L. petra.]Converting into stone; changing into stony hardness.
40641 petrifaction PETRIFAC'TION,n. [See Petrify.] The process of changing into stone; the conversion of wood or any ...
40642 petrifactive PETRIFAC'TIVE, a. Pertaining to petrifaction.1. Having power to convert vegetable or animal ...
40643 petrific PETRIF'IC, a. Having power to convert into stone. The cold, dry, petrific mace of a false and ...
40644 petrificate PET'RIFICATE, v.t. To petrify. [Not used.]
40645 petrification PETRIFICA'TION, n. The process of petrifying.1. That which is petrified; a petrifaction.[The ...
40646 petrified PET'RIFIED, pp. Changed into stone.1. Fixed in amazement.
40647 petrify PET'RIFY, v.t. [L. petra; Gr. a stone or rock, and facio, to make.]1. To convert to stone or stony ...
40648 petrifying PET'RIFYING, ppr. Converting into stone; as petrifying operation.
40649 petrol PE'TROL
40650 petroleum PETRO'LEUM, n. [Gr. a stone, and oil; quasi petrolaion.]Rock oil, a liquid inflammable substance or ...
40651 petronel PET'RONEL, n. A horseman's pistol.
40652 petrosilex PET'ROSILEX, n. [L. petra, Gr. a stone, and silex, flint.]Rock stone; rock flint, or compact ...
40653 petrosilicious PETROSILI'CIOUS, a. Consisting of petrosilex; as petrosilicious breccias.
40654 petrous PE'TROUS, a. [L. petra, a stone.] Like stone; hard; stony.
40655 petticoat PET'TICOAT, n. A garment worn by females and covering the lower limbs.
40656 pettifog PET'TIFOG, v.i. [L. voco, like advocate.]To do small business; as a lawyer. [Vulgar.]
40657 pettifogger PET'TIFOGGER, n. An inferior attorney or lawyer who is employed in small or mean business.
40658 pettifoggery PET'TIFOGGERY, n. The practice of a pettifogger; tricks; quibbles.
40659 pettiness PET'TINESS, n. [from petty.] Smallness; littleness.
40660 pettish PET'TISH, a. [from pet.] Fretful; peevish; subject to freaks of ill temper.
40661 pettishly PET'TISHLY, adv. In a pet; with a freak of ill temper.
40662 pettishness PET'TISHNESS, a. Fretfulness; petulance; peevishness.
40663 pettitoes PET'TITOES, n. [petty and toes.] The toes or feet of a pig; sometimes used for the human feet in ...
40664 petto PET'TO, n. [L. pectus, the breast.]The breast; hence, in petto, in secrecy; in reserve.
40665 petty PET'TY, a. Small; little; trifling; inconsiderable; as a petty trespass; a petty crime.1. ...
40666 pettychaps PET'TYCHAPS, n. A small bird of the genus Motacilla, called also beambird; found in the north of ...
40667 pettycoy PET'TYCOY, n. An herb.
40668 petulanceulancy PET'ULANCE'ULANCY, n. [L. petulantia.] Freakish passion; peevishness; pettishness; sauciness. ...
40669 petulant PET'ULANT, a. [L. petulans.] Saucy; pert or forward with fretfulness or sourness of temper; as a ...
40670 petulantly PET'ULANTLY, adv. With petulance; with saucy pertness.
40671 petunse PETUNSE
40672 petuntse PETUNTSE
40673 petuntze PETUNTZE, n. petuns'. Porcelain clay so called, used by the Chinese in the manufacture of ...
40675 pew-fellow PEW'-FELLOW, n. A companion.
40674 pew PEW, n. [L. podium.] An inclosed seat in a church. Pews were formerly made square; in modern ...
40676 pewet PE'WET, n. An aquatic fowl, the sea crow or mire crow, of the genus Larus.1. The lapwing.
40677 pewter PEW'TER, n.1. A composition or factitious metal, consisting of tin and lead, or tin, lead and ...
40678 pewterer PEW'TERER, n. One whose occupation is to make vessels and utensils of pewter.
40679 phaeton PHA'ETON, n. [Gr. to shine.]1. In mythology, the son of Phoebus and Clymene, or of Cephalus and ...
40680 phagedenic PHAGEDEN'IC, a. [Gr. to eat.] Eating or corroding flesh; as a phagedenic ulcer or ...
40681 phalangious PHALAN'GIOUS, a. [Gr. a kind of spider.] Pertaining to the genus of spiders denominated ...
40682 phalangite PHAL'ANGITE, n. [Gr. a legionary soldier.] A soldier belonging to a phalanx.
40683 phalanx PHAL'ANX, n. In Grecian antiquity, a square battalion or body of soldiers, formed in ranks and ...
40684 phalarope PHAL'AROPE, n. The name of several species of water fowls inhabiting the northern latitudes of ...
40685 phantasm PHAN'TASM, n. [Gr. to show, to shine, to appear.]That which appears to the mind; the image of an ...
40686 phantastic PHANTAS'TIC
40687 phantasy PHAN'TASY, [See Fantastic and Fancy.]
40688 phantom PHAN'TOM, n. [L.phantasma.]1. Something that appears; an apparition; a specter. Strange phantoms ...
40689 pharaon PHA'RAON, n. The name of a game of chance.
40690 pharaonic PHARAON'IC, a. Pertaining to the Pharaohs or kings of Egypt, or to the old Egyptians.
40691 pharisaicalness PHARISA'ICALNESS, n. Devotion to external rites and ceremonies; external show of religion without ...
40692 pharisaicical PHARISA'IC'ICAL, a. [from Pharisee.] Pertaining to the Pharisees; resembling the Pharisees, a sect ...
40693 pharisaism PHAR'ISAISM, n. The notions, doctrines and conduct of the Pharisees, as a sect.1. Rigid ...
40694 pharisean PHARISE'AN, a. Following the practice of the Pharisees.
40695 pharisee PHAR'ISEE, n. [Heb. to separate.] One of a sect among the Jews, whose religion consisted in a ...
40696 pharmaceutic PHARMACEU'TIC
40697 pharmaceutical PHARMACEU'TICAL, a. [Gr. to practice witchcraft or use medicine; poison or medicine.] Pertaining ...
40698 pharmaceutically PHARMACEU'TICALLY, adv. In the manner of pharmacy.
40699 pharmaceutics PHARMACEU'TICS, n. The science of preparing and exhibiting medicines.
40700 pharmacolite PHAR'MACOLITE, n. Arseniate of lime, snow white or milk white, inclining to reddish or yellowish ...
40701 pharmacologist PHARMACOL'OGIST, n. [Gr.] One that writes on drugs, or the composition and preparation of ...
40702 pharmacology PHARMACOL'OGY, n. [supra.] The science or knowledge of drugs, or the art of preparing medicines.1. ...
40703 pharmacopaeia PHARMACOPAE'IA
40704 pharmacopolist PHARMACOP'OLIST, n. [Gr. to sell.] One that sells medicines; an apothecary.
40705 pharmacopy PHAR'MACOPY, n. [Gr. to make.] A dispensatory; a book or treatise describing the preparations of ...
40706 pharmacy PHAR'MACY, n. [Gr. a medicament, whether salutary or poisonous.]The art or practice of preparing, ...
40707 pharos PHA'ROS, n. [Gr. This word is generally supposed to be taken from the name of a small isle, near ...
40708 pharyngotomy PHARYNGOT'OMY, n. [Gr. the muscular and glandular bag that leads to the esophagus, and to cut.] ...
40709 phase PHASE
40710 phasel PHAS'EL, n. [Gr.] The French bean or kidney bean.
40711 phasis PHA'SIS, n. plu. phases. [Gr. to shine.]1. In a general sense, an appearance; that which is ...
40712 phasm PHASM
40713 phasma PHAS'MA,n. [Gr. supra.] Appearance; fancied apparition; phantom.[Little used.]
40714 phassachate PHAS'SACHATE, n. The lead colored agate. [See Agate.]
40715 pheasant PHEASANT, n. phez'ant. [L. phasianus.] A fowl of the genus Phasianus, of beautiful plumage, and ...
40716 pheer PHEER, n. A companion. [See Peer.]
40717 pheese PHEESE, v.t. To comb. [See Fease.]
40718 phengite PHEN'GITE, n. [Gr. to shine.] A beautiful species of alabaster, superior in brightness to most ...
40719 phenicopter PHEN'ICOPTER, n. [Gr. red winged; red, and wing.]A fowl of the genus Phaenicopterus, the flamingo, ...
40720 phenix PHE'NIX, n. [L. phoenix, the palm or date tree, and a fowl.]1. The fowl which is said to exist ...
40721 phenogamian PHENOGAM'IAN, a. [Gr.] In botany, having the essential organs of fructification visible.
40722 phenomenology PHENOMENOL'OGY, n. [phenomenon and Gr. discourse.] A description or history of phenomena.
40723 phenomenon PHENOM'ENON, n. plu. phenomena. [Gr. to appear.]In a general sense, an appearance; any thing ...
40724 pheon PHE'ON, n. In heraldry, the barbed iron head of a dart.
40725 phial PHI'AL, n. [L. phiala.]1. A glass vessel or bottle; in common usage, a small glass vessel used for ...
40726 philadelphian PHILADELPH'IAN, a. [Gr.] Pertaining to Philadelphia, or to Ptolemy Philadelphus.PHILADELPH'IAN, n. ...
40727 philanthropic PHILANTHROP'IC
40728 philanthropical PHILANTHROP'ICAL, a. [See Philanthropy.] Possessing general benevolence; entertaining good will ...
40729 philanthropist PHILAN'THROPIST, n. A person of general benevolence; one who loves or wishes well to his fellow ...
40730 philanthropy PHILAN'THROPY, n. [Gr. to love, a friend, and man.] The love of mankind; benevolence towards the ...
40731 philippic PHILIP'PIC, n. An oration of Demosthenes, the Grecian orator, against Philip, king of Macedon, in ...
40732 philippize PHIL'IPPIZE, v.i. To write or utter invective; to declaim against. [Unusual.]1. To side with ...
40733 phillyrea PHILLYRE'A, n. A genus of plants, Mock privet.
40734 philologer PHILOL'OGER
40735 philologic PHILOLOG'IC
40736 philological PHILOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Philology.] Pertaining to philology, or to the study and knowledge of ...
40737 philologist PHILOL'OGIST, n. One versed in the history and construction of language. Philologist is generally ...
40738 philologize PHILOL'OGIZE, v.i. To offer criticisms. [Little used.]
40739 philology PHILOL'OGY, n. [Gr. to love, a word.]1. Primarily, a love of words, or a desire to know the origin ...
40740 philomath PHI'LOMATH, n. [Gr. a lover, and to learn.] A lover of learning.
40741 philomathic PHILOMATH'IC, a. Pertaining to the love of learning.1. Having a love of letters.
40742 philomathy PHIL'OMATHY, n. The love of learning.
40743 philomel PHI'LOMEL
40744 philomela PHILOME'LA, n. [from Philomela, daughter of Pandion, king of Athens, who was changed into a ...
40745 philomot PHIL'OMOT, a. Of the color of a dead leaf.
40746 philomusical PHILOMU'SICAL, a. Loving music.
40747 philopolemic PHILOPOLEM'IC, a. [Gr. a lover, and warlike.]Ruling over opposite or contending natures; an epithet ...
40748 philosophation PHILOSOPHA'TION, n. Philosophical discussion. [Not used.]
40749 philosopheme PHILOS'OPHEME, n. [Gr.] Principle of reasoning; a theorem.[Little used.]
40750 philosopher PHILOS'OPHER, n. [See Philosophy.] A person versed in philosophy, or in the principles of nature ...
40751 philosophic PHILOSOPH'IC
40752 philosophical PHILOSOPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to philosophy; as a philosophical experiment or problem.1. ...
40753 philosophically PHILOSOPH'ICALLY, adv. In a philosophical manner; according to the rules or principles of ...
40754 philosophism PHILOS'OPHISM, n. [Gr. a lover, and sophism.]1. The love of fallacious arguments or false ...
40755 philosophist PHILOS'OPHIST, n. A lover of sophistry; one who practices sophistry.
40756 philosophistic PHILOSOPHIS'TIC
40757 philosophistical PHILOSOPHIS'TICAL, a. Pertaining to the love or practice of sophistry.
40758 philosophize PHILOS'OPHIZE, v.i. [from philosophy.] To reason like a philosopher; to search into the reason and ...
40759 philosophizing PHILOS'OPHIZING, ppr. Searching into the reasons of things; assigning reasons for phenomena.
40760 philosophy PHILOS'OPHY, n. [L. philosophia; Gr. love, to love, and wisdom.]1. Literally, the love of wisdom. ...
40761 philosphate PHILOS'PHATE, v.i. [L. philosophor, philosophatus.]To play the philosopher; to moralize. [Not ...
40762 philter PHIL'TER, n. [L. philtra; Gr. to love.]1. A potion intended or adapted to excite love.2. A charm ...
40763 phiz PHIZ, n. [supposed to be a contraction of physiognomy.]The face or visage; in contempt.
40764 phlebotomist PHLEBOT'OMIST,n. [See Phlebotomy.]One that opens a vein for letting blood; a blood-letter.
40765 phlebotomize PHLEBOT'OMIZE, v.t. To let blood from a vein.
40766 phlebotomy PHLEBOT'OMY, n. [Gr. a vein, and to cut.] The act or practice of opening a vein for letting blood ...
40767 phlegm PHLEGM
40768 phlegmagogue PHLEGMAGOGUE, n. phleg'magog. [Gr. phlegm, and to drive.]A term anciently used to denote a medicine ...
40769 phlegmatic PHLEGMAT'IC, a. [Gr.]1. Abounding in phlegm; as phlegmatic humors; a phlegmatic constitution.2. ...
40770 phlegmatically PHLEGMAT'ICALLY, adv. Coldly; heavily.
40771 phlegmon PHLEG'MON, n. [Gr. to burn.] An external inflammation and tumor, attended with burning heat.
40772 phlegmonous PHLEG'MONOUS, a. Having the nature or properties of a phlegmon; inflammatory; burning; as a ...
40773 phlem PHLEM, n. [Gr. inflammation; and pituitous matter, to burn; hence the word must have originally ...
40774 phleme PHLEME, n. [See Fleam.]
40775 phlogistian PHLOGIS'TIAN, n. A believer in the existence of phlogiston.
40776 phlogistic PHLOGIS'TIC, a. [See Phlogiston.] Partaking of phlogiston; inflaming.
40777 phlogisticate PHLOGIS'TICATE, v.t. To combine phlogiston with.
40778 phlogistication PHLOGISTICA'TION, n. The act or process of combining with phlogiston.
40779 phlogiston PHLOGIS'TON, n. [Gr. to burn or inflame.]The principle of inflammability; the matter of fire in ...
40780 pholadite PHO'LADITE, n. A petrified shell of the genus Pholas.
40781 phonics PHON'ICS, n. [Gr. sound.] The doctrine or science of sounds; otherwise called acoustics.1. The ...
40782 phonocamptic PHONOCAMP'TIC, a. [Gr. sound, and to inflect.] Having the power to inflect sound, or turn it from ...
40783 phonolite PHON'OLITE, n. [Gr. sound, and stone.] Sounding stone; a name proposed as a substitute for ...
40784 phonological PHONOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to phonology.
40785 phonology PHONOL'OGY, n. [Gr. sound, voice, and discourse.] A treatise on sounds, or the science or doctrine ...
40786 phosgene PHOS'GENE, a. [Gr. light, and to generate.] Generating light. Phosgene gas is generated by the ...
40787 phosphate PHOS'PHATE, n. [See Phosphor and Phosphorus.]1. A salt formed by a combination of phosphoric acid ...
40788 phosphite PHOS'PHITE, n. A salt formed by a combination of phosphorous acid with a salifiable base.
40789 phospholite PHOS'PHOLITE, n. [phosphor and Gr. a stone.]An earth united with phosphoric acid.
40790 phosphor PHOS'PHOR, n. [Gr. light, to shine, and to bring. See Phosphorus.]The morning star or Lucifer; ...
40791 phosphorate PHOS'PHORATE, v.t. To combine or impregnate with phosphorus.
40792 phosphorated PHOS'PHORATED, pp. Combined or impregnated with phosphorus.
40793 phosphorating PHOS'PHORATING, ppr. Combining with phosphorus.
40794 phosphoresce PHOSPHORESCE, v.i. phosphoress'. [See Phosphorus.]To shine, as phosphorus, by exhibiting a faint ...
40795 phosphorescence PHOSPHORES'CENCE, n. A faint light or luminousness of a body, unaccompanied with sensible heat. ...
40796 phosphorescent PHOSPHORES'CENT, a. Shining with a faint light; luminous without sensible heat.
40797 phosphorescing PHOSPHORES'CING, ppr. Exhibiting light without sensible heat.
40798 phosphoric PHOS'PHORIC, a. Pertaining to or obtained from phosphorus. The phosphoric acid is formed by a ...
40799 phosphorite PHOS'PHORITE, n. A species of calcarious earth; a subspecies of apatite.
40800 phosphoritic PHOSPHORIT'IC, a. Pertaining to phosphorite, or of the nature of phosphorite.
40801 phosphorous PHOS'PHOROUS, a. The phosphorous acid is formed by a combination of phosphorus with oxygen.
40802 phosphorus PHOS'PHORUS
40803 phosphuret PHOS'PHURET, n. A combination of phosphorus not oxygenated, with a base; as phosphyret of iron or ...
40804 phosphureted PHOS'PHURETED, a. Combined with a phosphuret.
40805 photizite PHO'TIZITE, n. A mineral, an oxyd of manganese.
40806 photologic PHOTOLOG'IC
40807 photological PHOTOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Photology.] Pertaining to photology, or the doctrine of light.
40808 photology PHOTOL'OGY, n. [Gr. light, and discourse.] The doctrine or science of light, explaining its nature ...
40809 photometer PHOTOM'ETER, n. [Gr. light, and measure.]An instrument for measuring the relative intensities of ...
40810 photometric PHOTOMET'RIC
40811 photometrical PHOTOMET'RICAL, a. Pertaining to or made by a photometer.
40812 phrase PHRASE, n. s as z. [Gr. to speak.]1. A short sentence or expression. A phrase may be complete, as ...
40813 phraseless PHRA'SELESS, a. Not to be expressed or described.
40814 phraseologic PHRASEOLOG'IC
40815 phraseological PHRASEOLOG'ICAL, a. Peculiar in expression; consisting of a peculiar form of words.
40816 phraseology PHRASEOL'OGY, n. [Gr. phrase, and to speak.]1. Manner of expression; peculiar words used in a ...
40817 phrenetic PHRENET'IC, a. [Gr. See Phrensy.] Subject to strong or violent sallies of imagination or ...
40818 phrenic PHREN'IC, a. [from Gr. the diaphragm.] Belonging to the diaphragm; as a phrenic vein.
40819 phrenitis PHREN'ITIS, n. [Gr. from the mind; L. animus, animosus,and the Teutonic mod; Eng. mood.]1. In ...
40820 phrenology PHRENOL'OGY, n. [Gr. the mind, and discourse.] The science of the human mind and its various ...
40821 phrensy PHREN'SY, n. s as z. [supra.] Madness; delirium, or that partial madness which manifests itself in ...
40822 phrontistery PHRON'TISTERY, n. [Gr. to think; mind.] A school or seminary of learning. [Not used.]
40823 phrygian PHRYG'IAN, a. [from Phrygia, in Asia Minor.] Pertaining to Phrygia; an epithet applied to a ...
40824 phthagorean PHTHAGOREAN, n. A follower of Pythagoras, the founder of the Italic sect of philosophers.
40825 phthisic PHTHIS'IC, n. tiz'zic. A consumption. [Little used.]
40826 phthisical PHTHISICAL, a. tiz'zical. [Gr. See Phthisis.] Wasting the flesh; as a phthisical consumption.
40827 phthisis PHTHISIS, n. the'sis or thi'sis. [Gr. to consume.] A consumption occasioned by ulcerated lungs.
40828 phylacter PHYLAC'TER
40829 phylactered PHYLAC'TERED, a. Wearing a phylactery; dressed like the Pharisees.
40830 phylacteric PHYLAC'TERIC
40831 phylacterical PHYLACTER'ICAL, a. Pertaining to phylacteries.
40832 phylactery PHYLAC'TERY, n. [Gr. to defend or guard.]1. In a general sense, any charm, spell or amulet worn as ...
40833 phyllite PHYL'LITE, n. [Gr. a leaf, and a stone.] A petrified leaf, or a mineral having the figure of a ...
40834 phyllophorous PHYLLOPH'OROUS, a. [Gr. a leaf, and to bear.] Leaf-bearing; producing leaves.
40835 physalite PHYS'ALITE, n. [Gr. to swell or inflate, and a stone.] A mineral of a greenish white color, a ...
40836 physeter PHYSETER. [See Cachalot.]
40837 physianthropy PHYSIAN'THROPY, n. [Gr.nature,and man.] The philosophy of human life, or the doctrine of the ...
40838 physic PHYS'IC, n. s as z. [Gr. from nature; to produce.]1. The art of healing diseases. This is now ...
40839 physical PHYS'ICAL, a. Pertaining to nature or natural productions, or to material things, as opposed to ...
40840 physically PHYS'ICALLY, adv. According to nature; by natural power or the operation of natural laws in the ...
40841 physician PHYSI'CIAN, n. A person skilled in the art of healing; one whose profession is to prescribe ...
40842 physico-logic PHYSICO-LOG'IC, n. Logic illustrated by natural philosophy.
40843 physico-logical PHYSICO-LOG'ICAL. a. Pertaining to physico-logic. [Little used.]
40844 physico-theology PHYSICO-THEOL'OGY, n. [physic or physical and theology.] Theology or divinity illustrated or ...
40845 physics PHYS'ICS, n. s as z. In its most extensive sense, the science of nature or of natural objects, ...
40846 physiognomer PHYSIOGNOMER. [See Physiognomist.]
40847 physiognomicical PHYSIOGNOM'IC'ICAL, a. s as z. [See Physiognomy.] Pertaining to physiognomy; expressing the ...
40848 physiognomics PHYSIOGNOM'ICS, n. Among physicians, signs in the countenance which indicate the state, ...
40849 physiognomist PHYSIOG'NOMIST, n. One that is skilled in physiognomy; one that is able to judge of the particular ...
40850 physiognomy PHYSIOG'NOMY, n. [Gr. nature, and knowing; to know.]1. The art or science of discerning the ...
40851 physiography PHYSIOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. nature, and to describe.] A description of nature, or the science of ...
40852 physiologer PHYSIOL'OGER, n. A physiologist. [The latter is generally used.]
40853 physiologic PHYSIOLOG'IC
40854 physiological PHYSIOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Physiology.] Pertaining to physiology; relating to the science of the ...
40855 physiologically PHYSIOLOG'ICALLY, adv. According to the principles of physiology.
40856 physiologist PHYSIOL'OGIST, n. One who is versed in the science of living beings, or in the properties and ...
40857 physiology PHYSIOL'OGY, n. [Gr. nature, to discourse.]1. According to the Greek, this word signifies a ...
40858 physy PHYSY, for fusee. [Not used.]
40859 phytivorous PHYTIV'OROUS, a. [Gr. a plant, and L. voro, to eat.] Feeding on plants or herbage; as phytivorous ...
40860 phytographical PHYTOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the description of plants.
40861 phytography PHYTOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a plant, and description.] A description of plants.
40862 phytolite PHYT'OLITE, n. [Gr. a plant, and a stone.] A plant petrified, or fossil vegetable.
40863 phytologist PHYTOL'OGIST, n. [See Phytology.] One versed in plants, or skilled in phytology; a botanist.
40864 phytology PHYTOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a plant, and discourse.] A discourse or treatise of plants, or the doctrine of ...
40865 piaba PIABA, n. A small fresh water fish of Brazil, about the size of the minnow, much esteemed for ...
40866 piacle PI'ACLE,n. [L. piaculum.] An enormous crime. [Not used.]
40867 piacular PIAC'ULAR,
40868 piaculous PIAC'ULOUS, a. [L. piacularis, from pio, to expiate.]1. Expiatory; having power to atone.2. ...
40869 pianet PI'ANET, n. [L. pica or picus.] A bird, the lesser woodpecker.1. The magpie.
40870 pianist PI'ANIST, n. A performer on the forte-piano, or one well skilled in it.
40871 piano-forte PIANO-FORTE, n. [L. planus,plain, smooth; L. fortis, strong.]A keyed musical instrument of German ...
40872 piaster PIAS'TER, n. An Italian coin of about 80 cents value, or 3s.7d. sterling. But the value is ...
40873 piazza PIAZ'ZA, n. [Eng. id.] In building, a portico or covered walk supported by arches or columns.
40874 pibroch PI'BROCH, n. A wild irregular species of music, peculiar to the Highlands of Scotland. It is ...
40875 pica PI'CA, n. In ornithology, the pie or mag-pie, a species of Corvus.1. In medicine, a vitiated ...
40876 picaroon PICAROON', n. A plunderer; a pirate. This word is not applied to a highway robber, but to pirates ...
40877 piccadil PIC'CADIL
40878 piccadilly PICCADIL'LY
40879 piccage PIC'CAGE, n. Money paid at fairs for breaking ground for booths.
40880 pick PICK, v.t. [L. pecto.]1. To pull off or pluck with the fingers something that grows or adheres to ...
40881 pickapack PICKAPACK, adv. In manner of a pack. [Vulgar.]
40882 pickardil PICK'ARDIL , n. [probably from the root of pike, peak.] A high collar or a kind of ruff.
40883 pickax PICK'AX, n. [pick and ax.] An ax with a sharp point at tone end and a broad blade at the other.
40884 pickback PICK'BACK, a. On the back.
40885 picked PICK'ED, pp. Plucked off by the fingers, teeth or claws; cleaned by picking; opened by an ...
40886 pickedness PICK'EDNESS, n. State of being pointed at the end; sharpness.1. Foppery; spruceness.
40887 pickeer PICKEE'R, v.t.1. To pillage; to pirate.2. To skirmish, as soldiers on the outposts of an army, or ...
40888 picker PICK'ER, n. One that picks or culls.1. A pickax or instrument for picking or separating.2. One ...
40890 pickerel-weed PICK'EREL-WEED, n. A plant supposed to breed pickerels.
40889 pickerel PICK'EREL, n. [from pike.] A small pike, a fish of the genus Esox.
40891 picket PICK'ET, n. A stake sharpened or pointed; used in fortification and encampments.1. A narrow board ...
40892 picketed PICK'ETED, pp. Fortified or inclosed with pickets.
40893 picketing PICK'ETING, ppr. Inclosing or fortifying with pickets.
40894 picking PICK'ING, ppr. Pulling off with the fingers or teeth; selecting.PICK'ING, n. The act of plucking; ...
40896 pickle-herring PICKLE-HER'RING, n. A merry Andrew; a zany; a buffoon.
40895 pickle PICK'LE, n. Brine; a solution of salt and water, sometimes impregnated with spices,in which flesh, ...
40897 picklock PICK'LOCK, n. [pick and lock.] An instrument for opening locks without the key.1. A person who ...
40898 picknick PICK'NICK, n. An assembly where each person contributes to the entertainment.
40899 pickpocket PICK'POCKET, n. One who steals from the pocket of another.
40900 pickpurse PICK'PURSE, n. One that steals from the purse of another.
40901 pickthank PICK'THANK, n. An officious fellow who does what he is not desired to do, for the sake of gaining ...
40902 picktooth PICK'TOOTH, n. An instrument for picking or cleaning the teeth. [But toothpick is more generally ...
40903 pico PICO, n. A peak; the pointed head of a mountain.
40904 picrolite PIC'ROLITE, n. A mineral composed chiefly of the carbonate of magnesia, of a green color. [See ...
40905 picromel PIC'ROMEL, n. [Gr. bitter.] The characteristic principle of bile.
40906 picrotoxin PICROTOX'IN, n. [Gr. bitter, and L. toxicum.] The bitter and poisonous principle of the Cocculus ...
40907 pict PICT, n. [L. pictus, pingo.] A person whose body is painted.
40908 pictorial PICTO'RIAL, a. [L. pictor,a painter.] Pertaining to a painter; produced by a painter.
40909 pictural PIC'TURAL, n. A representation. [Not in use.]
40910 picture PIC'TURE, n. [L. pictura, from pingo, to paint.]1. A painting exhibiting the resemblance of any ...
40911 pictured PIC'TURED, pp. Painted in resemblance; drawn in colors; represented.
40912 picturesk PICTURESK', a. [L. pictura, or pictor. In English,this would be picturish.] Expressing that ...
40913 pictureskly PICTURESK'LY , adv. In a picturesque manner.
40914 pictureskness PICTURESK'NESS, n. The state of being picturesque.
40915 picturesque PICTURESQUE
40916 picturesquely PICTURESQUELY
40917 picturesqueness PICTURESQUENESS
40918 piddle PID'DLE, v.i. [This is a different spelling of peddle, or from the same source.]1. To deal in ...
40919 piddler PID'DLER, n. One who busies himself about little things.1. One that eats squeamishly or without ...
40920 pie PIE, n. [Gr. thick; or from mixing.]An article of food consisting of paste baked with something in ...
40921 piebald PI'EBALD, a. Of various colors; diversified in color; as a piebald horse.
40922 piece PIECE, n. [Heb. to cut off or clip.]1. A fragment or part of any thing separated from the whole, ...
40923 pieced PIE'CED, pp. Mended or enlarged by a piece or pieces.
40924 pieceless PIE'CELESS, a. Not made of pieces; consisting of an entire thing.
40925 piecemeal PIE'CEMEAL, adv.1. In pieces; in fragments. On which it piecemeal broke.2. By pieces; by little ...
40926 piecemealed PIE'CEMEALED, a. Divided into small pieces.
40927 piecer PIE'CER, n. One that pieces; a patcher.
40928 pied PI'ED, a. [allied probably to pie,in piebald, and a contracted word, perhaps from the root of L. ...
40929 piedness PI'EDNESS, n. Diversity of colors in spots.
40930 pieled PIE'LED, a. [See Peel.] Bald; bare.
40931 piepoudre PIE'POUDRE, n. An ancient court of record in England,incident to every fair and market, of which ...
40932 pier PIER, n. [L. petra.]1. A mass of solid stone work for supporting an arch or the timbers of a ...
40933 pierce PIERCE, v.t. pers.1. To thrust into with a pointed instrument; as, to pierce the body with a sword ...
40934 pierceable PIERCEABLE, a. pers'able. That may be pierced.
40935 pierced PIERCED, pp. pers'ed. Penetrated; entered by force; transfixed.
40936 piercer PIERCER, n. pers'er. An instrument that pierces, penetrates or bores.1. One that pierces or ...
40937 piercing PIERCING, ppr. pers'ing. Penetrating; entering, as a pointed instrument; making a way by force ...
40938 piercingly PIERCINGLY, adv. pers'ingly. With penetrating force or effect; sharply.
40939 piercingness PIERCINGNESS, n. pers'ingness. The power of piercing or penetrating; sharpness; keenness.
40940 pietism PI'ETISM, n. [See Piety.] Extremely strict devotion, or affectation of piety.
40941 pietist PI'ETIST, n. One of a sect professing great strictness and purity of life, despising learning, ...
40942 piety PI'ETY, n. [L. pietas, from pius, or its root, probably a contracted word.]1. Piety in principle, ...
40943 piezometer PIEZOM'ETER, n. [Gr. to press, and measure.] An instrument for ascertaining the compressibility of ...
40944 pig PIG, n.1. The young of swine, male or female.2. An oblong mass of unforged iron, lead or other ...
40946 pigeon-foot PIG'EON-FOOT, n. A plant.
40947 pigeon-hearted PIG'EON-HE`ARTED, a. Timid; easily frightened.
40948 pigeon-hole PIG'EON-HOLE, n. A little apartment or division in a case for papers.
40949 pigeon-holes PIG'EON-HOLES, n. An old English game in which balls were rolled through little cavities or ...
40950 pigeon-livered PIG'EON-LIVERED, a. Mild in temper; soft; gentle.
40951 pigeon-pea PIG'EON-PEA, n. A plant of the genus Cytisus.
40945 pigeon PIG'EON, n. A fowl of the genus Columba, of several species, as the stock dove, the ring dove, the ...
40952 piggin PIG'GIN, n. A small wooden vessel with an erect handle, used as a dipper.
40953 pigheaded PIG'HEADED, a. Having a large head; stupid.
40954 pight PIGHT, pp. pite. Pitched; fixed; determined.PIGHT, v.t. To pierce.
40955 pightel PIGHTEL, n. A little inclosure. [Local.]
40956 pigmean PIGME'AN, a. [from pigmy.] Very small; like a pigmy; as an image of pigmean size.
40957 pigment PIG'MENT, n. [L. pigmentum, from the root of pingo, to paint.]Paint; a preparation used by ...
40958 pigmy PIG'MY, n. [L. pygmoeus; Gr. the fist.] A dwarf; a person of very small stature; a name applied to ...
40959 pignoration PIGNORA'TION,n. [L. pignero, to pledge.] The act of pledging or pawning.
40960 pignorative PIG'NORATIVE, a. Pledging; pawning. [Little used.]
40961 pignut PIG'NUT, n. [pig and nut.] The ground nut, a plant of the genus Bunium; also, a tree and its fruit ...
40962 pigsney PIG'SNEY, n. A word of endearment to a girl. [Little used.]
40963 pigtail PIG'TAIL, n. [pig and tail.] A cue; the hair of the head tied in the form of a pig's tail.1. A ...
40964 pigwidgeon PIGWID'GEON, n. [pig and widgeon.] A fairy; a cant word for any thing very small.
40965 pike PIKE, n. [This word belongs to a numerous family of words expressing something pointed, or a sharp ...
40966 piked PIK'ED, a. Pointed; sharp. Let the stake be made picked at the top.
40967 pikeman PI'KEMAN, n. A soldier armed with a pike.
40968 pikestaff PI'KESTAFF, n. The staff or shaft of a pike.
40969 pikrolite PIK'ROLITE, n. [Gr.bitter, and a stone.] A mineral found at Taberg, in Sweden, supposed to be a ...
40970 pil-garlick PIL-G`ARLICK
40971 pilaster PILAS'TER, n. A square column, sometimes insulated; but usually pilasters are set within a wall, ...
40972 pilch PILCH,n. [L. pellis, a skin.] A furred gown or case; something lined with fur. [Not used.]
40973 pilchard PIL'CHARD, n. A fish resembling the herring, but thicker and rounder; the nose is shorter and turns ...
40974 pile PILE, n. [L. pila.]1. A heap; a mass or collection of things in a roundish or elevated form; as a ...
40975 pileate PIL'EATE
40976 pileated PIL'EATED, a. [L. pileus, a cap.] Having the form of a cap or cover for the head.
40977 pilement PI'LEMENT, n. An accumulation. [Not used.]
40978 piler PI'LER, n. [from pile, a heap.] One who piles or forms a heap.
40979 piles PILES, n. plu. The hemorrhoids, a disease.
40980 pileworm PI'LEWORM, n. A worm found in piles in Holland.
40981 pilewort PI'LEWORT, n. A plant of the genus Ranunculus.
40982 pilfer PIL'FER, v.i. To steal in small quantities; to practice petty theft; as a boy accustomed to ...
40983 pilfered PIL'FERED, pp. Stolen in small parcels.
40984 pilferer PIL'FERER, n. One that pilfers or practices petty theft.
40985 pilfering PIL'FERING, pp. Stealing; practicing petty thefts.PIL'FERING, n. Petty theft. Pilfering was so ...
40986 pilferingly PIL'FERINGLY, adv. With petty theft; filchingly.
40987 pilgrim PIL'GRIM, n. [L. peregrinus. Gu.L. peragro, to wander, palor.]1. A wanderer; a traveler; ...
40988 pilgrimage PIL'GRIMAGE, n. A long journey, particularly a journey to some place deemed sacred and venerable, ...
40989 pilgrimize PIL'GRIMIZE, v.i. To wander about as a pilgrim. [Not used.]
40990 pill PILL, n. [L. pila, a ball; pilula, a little ball.]1. In pharmacy, a medicine in the form of a ...
40991 pillage PILL'AGE, n.1. Plunder; spoil; that which is taken from another by open force, particularly an