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Wednesday - August 20, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: s

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ID Word Definition
47591 s S, the nineteenth letter of the English Alphabet, is a sibilant articulation, and numbered among ...
47592 sabaoth SABAOTH, n. Armies; a word used, Rom. 9:29, James 5:4, the Lord of Sabaoth.
47593 sabbatarian SABBATARIAN, n. [from sabbath.] One who observes the seventh day of the week as the sabbath, ...
47595 sabbath-breaker SABBATH-BREAKER, n. One who profanes the sabbath by violating the laws of God or man which enjoin ...
47596 sabbath-breaking SABBATH-BREAKING, n. A profanation of the sabbath by violating the injunction of the fourth ...
47594 sabbath SABBATH, n. 1. The day which God appointed to be observed by the Jews as a day of rest from all ...
47597 sabbathless SABBATHLESS, a. Without intermission of labor.
47598 sabbatic SABBATIC,
47599 sabbatical SABBATICAL, a. 1. Pertaining to the sabbath.2. Resembling the sabbath; enjoying or bringing an ...
47600 sabbatism SABBATISM, n. Rest; intermission of labor.
47601 sabean SABEAN, [See Sabian.]
47602 sabeism SABEISM, N. The same as Sabianism.
47603 sabellian SABELLIAN, a. Pertaining to the heresy of Sabellius.SABELLIAN, n. A follower of Sabellius, a ...
47604 sabellianism SABELLIANISM, n. The doctrines or tenets of Sabellius.
47605 saber SABER,
47606 sabian SABIAN,
47607 sabianism SABIANISM, n. That species of idolatry which consisted in worshiping the sun, moon and stars. ...
47608 sabine SABINE, n. A plant; usually written savin, which see.
47609 sable SABLE, n. 1. A small animal of the weasel kind, the mustela zibelina, found in the northern ...
47610 sabliere SAB'LIERE, n. [L. sabulum.]1. A sand pit. [Not much used.]2. In carpentry, a piece of timber as ...
47611 sabot SABOT, n. A wooden shoe. [Not English.]
47612 sabre SABRE, n. A sword or cimitar with a broad and heavy blade, thick at the back, and a little ...
47613 sabulosity SABULOS'ITY, n. [from sabulous.] Sandiness; grittiness.
47614 sabulous SAB'ULOUS, a. [L. sabulosus, from sabulum, sand.] Sandy; gritty.
47615 sac SAC, n. [This is the English sake, which see.]In English law, the privilege enjoyed by the lord of ...
47616 saccade SACCA'DE, n. A sudden violent check of a horse by drawing or twitching the reins on a sudden and ...
47617 sacchariferous SACCHARIF'EROUS, a. [L. saccharum, sugar, and fero, to produce.]Producing sugar; as sacchariferous ...
47618 saccharine SAC'CHARINE, a. [L. saccharum, sugar.]Pertaining to sugar; having the qualities of sugar; as a ...
47619 saccholactic SACCHOLAC'TIC, a. [L. saccharum, sugar, and lac, milk.]A term in the new chimistry, denoting an ...
47620 saccholate SAC'CHOLATE, n. In chimistry, a salt formed by the union of the saccholactic acid with a base.
47621 sacerdotal SACERDO'TAL, a. [L. sacerdotalis, from sacerdos, a priest. See Sacred.]Pertaining to priests or ...
47622 sachel SACH'EL, n. [L. sacculus, dim. of saccus.]A small sack or bag; a bag in which lawyers and children ...
47623 sachem SA'CHEM, n. In America, a chief among some of the native Indian tribes. [See Sagamore.]
47625 sack-posset SACK-POS'SET, n. [sack and posset.] A posset made of sack, milk and some other ingredients.
47624 sack SACK, n. [L. saccus. Heb. See the verb to sack.]1. A bag, usually a large cloth bag, used for ...
47626 sackage SACK'AGE, n. The act of taking by storm and pillaging.
47627 sackbut SACK'BUT, n. [The last syllable is the L. buxus.]A wind instrument of music; a kind of trumpet, so ...
47628 sackcloth SACK'CLOTH, n. [sack and cloth.] Cloth of which sacks are made; coarse cloth. This word is ...
47629 sackclothed SACK'CLOTHED, a. Clothed in sackcloth.
47630 sacked SACK'ED, pp. Pillaged; stormed and plundered.
47631 sacker SACK'ER, n. One that takes a town or plunders it.
47632 sackful SACK'FUL, n. A full sack or bag.
47633 sacking SACK'ING, ppr. Taking by assault and plundering or pillaging.SACK'ING, n. The act of taking by ...
47634 sackless SACK'LESS, a. Quiet; peaceable; not quarrelsome; harmless; innocent. [Local.]
47635 sacrament SAC'RAMENT, n. [L. sacramentum, an oath, from sacer, sacred.]1. Among ancient christian writers, ...
47636 sacramental SACRAMENT'AL, a. Constituting a sacrament or pertaining to it; as sacramental rites or ...
47637 sacramentally SACRAMENT'ALLY, adv. After the manner of a sacrament.
47638 sacramentarian SACRAMENTA'RIAN, n. One that differs from the Romish church in regard to the sacraments, or to the ...
47639 sacramentary SACRAMENT'ARY, n. 1. An ancient book of the Romish church, written by pope Gelasius, and revised, ...
47640 sacre SACRE. [See Saker.]
47641 sacred SA'CRED, a. [L. sacer, sacred, holy, cursed, damnable. We here see the connection between ...
47642 sacredly SA'CREDLY, adv.1. Religiously; with due reverence as of something holy or consecrated to God; as, ...
47643 sacredness SA'CREDNESS, n.1. The state of being sacred, or consecrated to God, to his worship or to religious ...
47644 sacrific SACRIF'IC,
47645 sacrificable SACRIF'ICABLE, a. Capable of being offered in sacrifice. [Ill formed, harsh and not used.]
47646 sacrifical SACRIF'ICAL, a. [L. sacrificus. See Sacrifice.] Employed in sacrifice.
47647 sacrificant SACRIF'ICANT, n. [L. sacrificans.] One that offers a sacrifice.
47648 sacrificator SACRIFICA'TOR, n. A sacrificer; one that offers a sacrifice. [Not used.]
47649 sacrificatory SACRIF'ICATORY, a. Offering sacrifice.
47650 sacrifice SAC'RIFICE, v.t. sac'rifize. [L. sacrifico; sacer, sacred, and facio, to make.]1. To offer to ...
47651 sacrificed SAC'RIFICED, pp. Offered to God upon an altar; destroyed, surrendered, or suffered to be lost.
47652 sacrificer SAC'RIFICER, n. One that sacrifices or immolates.
47653 sacrificial SACRIFI'CIAL, a. Performing sacrifice; included in sacrifice; consisting in sacrifice.
47654 sacrilege SAC'RILEGE, n. [L. sacrilegium; sacer, sacred, and lego, to take or steal.]The crime of violating ...
47655 sacrilegious SACRILE'GIOUS, a. [L. sacrilegus.] 1. Violating sacred things; polluted with the crime of ...
47656 sacrilegiously SACRILE'GIOUSLY, adv. With sacrilege; in violation of sacred things; as sacrilegiously invading ...
47657 sacrilegiousness SACRILE'GIOUSNESS, n.1. The quality of being sacrilegious.2. Disposition to sacrilege.
47658 sacrilegist SAC'RILEGIST, n. One who is guilty of sacrilege.
47660 sacring-bell SA'CRING-BELL, n. A bell rung before the host.
47659 sacring SA'CRING, ppr. Consecrating. [Not in use.]
47661 sacrist SA'CRIST, n. A sacristan; a person retained in a cathedral to copy out music for the choir, and ...
47662 sacristan SAC'RISTAN, n. [L. sacer, sacred.]An officer of the church who has the care of the utensils or ...
47663 sacristy SAC'RISTY, n. [L. sacer, sacred.]An apartment in a church where the sacred utensils are kept; now ...
47664 sacrosanct SAC'ROSANCT, a. [L. sacrosanctus; sacer and sanctus, holy.] Sacred; inviolable. [Not in use.]
47665 sad SAD, a. [It is probable this word is from the root of set. I have not found the word is from the ...
47666 sadden SADDEN, v.t. sad'n.1. To make sad or sorrowful; also, to make melancholy or gloomy.2. To make ...
47667 saddened SAD'DENED, pp. Made sad or gloomy.
47668 saddening SAD'DENING, ppr. Making sad or gloomy.
47670 saddle-backed SAD'DLE-BACKED, a. Having a low back and an elevated neck and head, as a horse.
47671 saddle-bow SAD'DLE-BOW, n. The bows of a saddle, or the pieces which form the front.
47672 saddle-maker SAD'DLE-MAKER,
47669 saddle SADDLE, n. sad'l. [L. sedeo, sedile.]1. A seat to be placed on a horse's back for the rider to ...
47673 saddler SAD'DLER, n. One whose occupation is to make saddles.
47674 sadducean SADDUCE'AN, a. Pertaining to the Sadducees, a sect among the ancient Jews, who denied the ...
47675 sadducism SAD'DUCISM, n. The tenets of the Sadducees.
47676 sadly SAD'LY, adv. 1. Sorrowfully; mournfully.He sadly suffers in their grief.2. In a calamitous or ...
47677 sadness SAD'NESS, n.1. Sorrowfulness; mournfulness; dejection of mind; as grief and sadness at the memory ...
47679 safe-conduct SAFE-CON'DUCT, n. [safe and conduct.]That which gives a safe passage, either a convoy or guard to ...
47680 safe-keeping SAFE-KEE'PING, n. [safe and keep.] The act of keeping or preserving in safety from injury or from ...
47678 safe SAFE, a. [L. salvus, from salus, safety, health.]1. Free from danger of any kind; as safe from ...
47681 safeguard SA'FEGU'ARD, n. [safe and guard.]1. He or that which defends or protects; defense; protection.The ...
47682 safely SA'FELY, adv.1. In a safe manner; without incurring danger or hazard of evil consequences. We may ...
47683 safeness SA'FENESS, n. 1. Freedom from danger; as the safeness of an experiment.2. The state of being ...
47685 safety-valve SA'FETY-VALVE, n. A valve by means of which a boiler is preserved from bursting by the force of ...
47684 safety SA'FETY, n.1. Freedom from danger or hazard; as the safety of an electrical experiment; the safety ...
47686 safflow SAF'FLOW,
47687 safflower SAF'FLOWER, n. The plant, bastard saffron, of the genus Carthamus.SAF'FLOWER, n. A deep red ...
47688 saffron SAF'FRON, n. [The radical sense is to fail, or to be hollow, or to be exhausted.1. A plant of the ...
47689 sag SAG, v.i. [a different spelling of swag, which see.]1. To yield; to give way; to lean or incline ...
47690 sagacious SAGA'CIOUS, a. [L. sagax, from sagus, wise, foreseeing; saga, a wise woman; sagio, to perceive ...
47691 sagaciously SAGA'CIOUSLY, adv.1. With quick scent.2. With quick discernment or penetration.
47692 sagaciousness SAGA'CIOUSNESS, n.1. The quality of being sagacious; quickness of scent.2. Quickness or acuteness ...
47693 sagacity SAGAC'ITY, n. [L. sagacitas.]1. Quickness or acuteness of scent; applied to animals.2. Quickness ...
47694 sagamore SAG'AMORE, n. Among some tribes of American Indians, a king or chief.
47695 sagapen SAG'APEN,
47696 sagapenum SAGAPE'NUM, n. In pharmacy, a gum-resin, brought from Persia and the East in granules or in ...
47697 sagathy SAG'ATHY, n. A kind of serge; a slight woolen stuff.
47698 sage SAGE, n. A plant of the genius Salvia, of several species; as the officinalis, or common large ...
47699 sagely SA'GELY, adv. Wisely; with just discernment and prudence.
47700 sagene SAGE'NE, n. A Russian measure of about seven English feet. [See Sajene.]
47701 sageness SA'GENESS, n. Wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity.
47702 sagenite SAG'ENITE, n. Acicular rutile.
47703 sagittal SAG'ITTAL, a. [L. sagittalis, from sagitta, an arrow; that which is thrown or driven, probably ...
47704 sagittarius SAGITTA'RIUS, n. [L. an archer.] One of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters ...
47705 sagittary SAG'ITTARY, n. [supra.] A centaur, an animal half man, half horse, armed with a bow and quiver.
47706 sagittate SAG'ITTATE, a. In botany, shaped like the head of an arrow; triangular, hollowed at the base, with ...
47707 sago SA'GO, n. a dry mealy substance or granulated paste, imported from Java and the Philippine and ...
47708 sagoin SAGOIN', n. The Sagoins form a division of the genus Simia, including such of the monkeys of ...
47709 sagy SA'GY, a. [from sage.] Full of sage; seasoned with sage.
47710 sahlite SAH'LITE, n. A mineral name from the mountain Sahla, in Westermania, where it was discovered. It ...
47711 saic SAIC, n. a Turkish or Grecian vessel, very common in the Levant, a kind of ketch which has no ...
47712 said SAID, pret. and pp. of say; so written for sayed. 1. Declared; uttered; reported.2. Aforesaid; ...
47714 sail-board SA'IL-BOARD, a. [See Broad.] Spreading like a sail.
47715 sail-borne SA'IL-BORNE, n. Borne or conveyed by sails.
47716 sail-loft SA'IL-LOFT, n. A loft or apartment where sails are cut out and made.
47717 sail-maker SA'IL-MAKER, n.1. One whose occupation is to make sails.2. An officer on board ships of war, ...
47718 sail-making SA'IL-MAKING, n. The art or business of making sails.
47719 sail-yard SA'IL-YARD, n. The yard or spar on which sails are extended.
47713 sail SAIL, n. [L. sal, salt.]1. In navigation, a spread of canvas, or an assemblage of several ...
47720 sailable SA'ILABLE, a. Navigable; that may be passed by ships.
47721 sailed SA'ILED, pp. Passed in ships or other water craft.
47722 sailer SA'ILER, n. 1. One that sails; a seaman; usually sailor.2. A ship or other vessel, with ...
47723 sailing SA'ILING, ppr. Moving on water or in air; passing in a ship or other vessel.SA'ILING, n.1. The ...
47724 sailor SA'ILOR, n. [a more common spelling than sailer.]A mariner; a seaman; one who follows the business ...
47725 saim SAIM, n. [L. sebum, contracted.] Lard. [Local.]
47726 sain SAIN, for sayen, pp. of say. Obs.
47727 sainfoin SA'INFOIN,
47729 saint-seeming SA'INT-SEEMING, a. Having the appearance of a saint.
47728 saint SAINT, n. [L. sanctus.]1. A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety and ...
47730 sainted SA'INTED, pp.1. Canonized; enrolled among the saints.2. a. Holy; pious; as, thy father was a ...
47731 saintess SA'INTESS, n. A female saint.
47732 saintfoin SA'INTFOIN, n. A plant cultivated for fodder, of the genus Hedysarum.
47733 saintlike SA'INTLIKE, a. [saint and like.] 1. Resembling a saint; as a saintlike prince.2. Suiting a ...
47734 saintly SA'INTLY, a. Like a saint; becoming a holy person; as wrongs with saintly patience borne.
47735 saintship SA'INTSHIP, n. The character or qualities of a saint.
47736 sajene SAJE'NE, n. [written also sagene. Tooke writes it sajene.]A Russian measure of length, equal to ...
47737 sake SAKE, n. [Heb. to press or oppress. The primary sense is to strain, urge, press or drive forward, ...
47738 saker SA'KER, n. 1. A hawk; a species of falcon.2. A piece of artillery.
47739 sakeret SAK'ERET, n. The male of the sakerhawk.
47741 sal-alembroth SAL-ALEMBROTH, n. A compound muriate of mercury and ammonia.
47740 sal SAL, n. [See Salt.] Salt; a word much used in chimistry and pharmacy.
47742 salable SA'LABLE, a. [from sale.] That may be sold; that finds a ready market; being in good demand.
47743 salableness SA'LABLENESS, n. The state of being salable.
47744 salably SA'LABLY, adv. In a salable manner.
47745 salacious SALA'CIOUS, a. [L. salax, from the root of sal, salt; the primary sense of which is shooting, ...
47746 salaciously SALA'CIOUSLY, adv. Lustfully; with eager animal appetite.
47747 salaciousness SALA'CIOUSNESS,
47748 salacity SALAC'ITY, n. Lust; lecherousness; strong propensity to venery.
47749 salad SAL'AD, n.Raw herbs, usually dressed with salt, vinegar, oil or spices, and eaten for giving a ...
47750 salading SAL'ADING, n. Vegetables for salads.
47751 salam SALAM', n. [Oriental, peace or safety.] A salutation or compliment of ceremony or respect. [Not ...
47752 salamander SAL'AMANDER, n. [L. Gr. salamandra.] An animal of the genus Lacerta or Lizard, one of the smaller ...
47753 salamandrine SALAMAN'DRINE, a. Pertaining to or resembling a salamander; enduring fire.Sal ammoniac, muriate of ...
47754 salaried SAL'ARIED, a. Enjoying a salary.
47755 salary SAL'ARY, n. [L. salarium; said to be from sal, salt, which was part of the pay of Roman ...
47756 sale SALE, n. [The primary sense of sell, is simply to deliver or cause to pass from one person to ...
47757 salebrosity SALEBROS'ITY, n. [See Salebrous.] Roughness or ruggedness of a place or road.
47758 salebrous SAL'EBROUS, a. [L. salebrosus, from salebra, a rough place; probably allied to salio, to shoot ...
47759 salep SAL'EP, n. [said to be a Turkish word; written also salop, saloop and saleb.]In the materia ...
47760 salesman SA'LESMAN, n. [sale and man.] One that sells clothes ready made.
47761 salework SA'LEWORK, n. Work or things made for sale; hence, work carelessly done. This last sense is a ...
47762 salic SAL'IC, a. [The origin of this word is not ascertained.]The Salic law of France is a fundamental ...
47763 salient SA'LIENT, a. [L. saliens, salio, to leap.]1. Leaping; an epithet in heraldry applied to a lion or ...
47764 saliferous SALIF'EROUS, a. [L. sal, salt, and fero, to produce.]Producing or bearing salt; as saliferous ...
47765 salifiable SAL'IFIABLE, a. [from salify.] Capable of becoming a salt, or of combining with an acid to form a ...
47766 salification SALIFICA'TION, n. The act of salifying.
47767 salified SAL'IFIED, pp. Formed into a neutral salt by combination with an acid.
47768 salify SAL'IFY, v.t. [L. sal, salt, and facio, to make.]To form into a neutral salt, by combining an acid ...
47769 salifying SAL'IFYING, ppr. Forming into a salt by combination with an acid.
47770 saligot SAL'IGOT, n. A plant, the water thistle.
47771 salination SALINA'TION, n. [L. sal, salt; salinator, a salt maker.]The act of washing with salt water.
47772 saline SALI'NE,
47773 saliniferous SALINIF'EROUS, a. [L. sal, salinum, and fero, to produce.] Producing salt.
47774 saliniform SALIN'IFORM, a. [L. sal, salinum, and form.] Having the form of salt.
47775 salino-terrene SALINO-TERRENE, a. [L. sal, salinum, and terrenus, from terra, earth.] Denoting a compound of ...
47776 salinous SALI'NOUS, a. [L. sal, salt.] 1. Consisting of salt or constituting salt; as saline particles; ...
47777 salite SAL'ITE, v.t. [L. salio, from sal, salt.] To salt; to impregnate or season with salt. [Little ...
47778 saliva SALI'VA,
47779 salival SAL'IVAL,
47780 salivary SAL'IVARY, a. [from saliva.] Pertaining to saliva; secreting or conveying saliva; as salivary ...
47781 salivate SAL'IVATE, v.t. [from saliva.]To excite an unusual secretion and discharge of saliva in a person, ...
47782 salivated SAL'IVATED, pp. Having an increased secretion of saliva from medicine.
47783 salivating SAL'IVATING, ppr. Exciting increased secretion of saliva.
47784 salivation SALIVA'TION, n. The act or process of promoting ptyalism, or of producing an increased secretion ...
47785 salive SAL'IVE, n. [L. saliva.]The fluid which is secreted by the salivary glands, and which serves to ...
47786 salivous SALI'VOUS, a. Pertaining to saliva; partaking of the nature of saliva.
47787 sallet SAL'LET, n. A head-piece or helmet.SAL'LET,
47788 salleting SAL'LETING, n. [corrupted from salad. Not in use.]
47789 salliance SAL'LIANCE, n. [from sally.] An issuing forth. [Not in use.]
47790 sallow SAL'LOW, n. [L. salix.] A tree of the willow kind, or genus Salix.SAL'LOW, a. [L. salix, the ...
47791 sallowness SAL'LOWNESS, n. A yellowish color; paleness tinged with a dark yellow; as sallowness of ...
47793 sally-port SAL'LY-PORT, n. 1. In fortification, a postern gate, or a passage under ground from the inner to ...
47792 sally SAL'LY, n. [See the Verb.] In a general sense, a spring; a darting or shooting. Hence,1. An ...
47794 sallying SAL'LYING, ppr. Issuing or rushing out.
47795 salmagundi SALMAGUN'DI, n. [See salpicon.]A mixture of chopped meat and pickled herring with oil, vinegar, ...
47797 salmon-trout SALMON-TROUT, n. sam'mon-trout. A species of trout resembling the salmon in color.
47796 salmon SALMON, n. sam'mon. [L. salmo.]A fish of the genus Salmo, found in all the northern climates of ...
47798 saloon SALOON', n. [See Hall.]In architecture, a lofty spacious hall, vaulted at the top, and usually ...
47799 saloop SALOOP,
47800 salop SALOP, [See Salep.]
47801 salpicon SAL'PICON, n.Stuffing; farce; chopped meat or bread, &c. used to stuff legs of veal; called also ...
47802 salsamentarious SALSAMENTA'RIOUS, a. [L. salsamentarius.] Pertaining to salt things. [Not in use.]
47803 salsify SAL'SIFY, n. Goat's beard, a plant of the genus Tragopogon.
47804 salsoacid SALSOAC'ID, a. [L. salsus, salt, and acidus, acid.]Having a taste compounded of saltness and ...
47805 salsuginous SALSU'GINOUS, a. [from L. salsugo, from sal, salt.] Saltish; somewhat salt.
47807 salt-work SALT'-WORK, n. A house or place where salt is made.
47806 salt SALT, n. [Gr.; L. The radical sense is probably pungent, and if s is radical, the word belongs to ...
47808 saltant SALT'ANT, a. [L. saltans, from salto, to leap.] Leaping; jumping; dancing.
47809 saltation SALTA'TION, n. [L. saltatio, from salto, to leap.]1. A leaping or jumping.2. Beating or ...
47810 saltcat SALT'CAT, n. A lump or heap of salt, made at the salt-works, which attracts pigeons.
47811 salted SALT'ED, pp. Sprinkled, seasoned or impregnated with salt.
47812 salter SALT'ER, n.1. One who salts; one who gives or applies salt.2. One that sells salt.
47813 saltern SALT'ERN, n. A salt-work; a building in which salt is made by boiling or evaporation.
47814 saltier SALT'IER, n. [L. salto, to leap.]In heraldry, one of the honorable ordinaries, in the form of St. ...
47815 saltinbanco SALT'INBANCO, n. A mountebank; a quack. [Not in use.]
47816 salting SALT'ING, ppr. Sprinkling, seasoning or impregnating with salt.SALT'ING, n. The act of sprinkling ...
47817 saltish SALT'ISH, a. Somewhat salt; tinctured or impregnated moderately with salt.
47818 saltishly SALT'ISHLY, adv. With a moderate degree of saltness.
47819 saltishness SALT'ISHNESS, n. A moderate degree of saltness.
47820 saltless SALT'LESS, a. Destitute of salt; insipid.
47821 saltly SALT'LY, adv. With taste of salt; in a salt manner.
47822 saltness SALT'NESS, n.1. The quality of being impregnated with salt; as the saltness of sea water or of ...
47823 saltpeter SALTPE'TER,'TRE, n. [salt and Gr. stone.] A neutral salt formed by the nitric acid in combination ...
47824 saltpetrous SALTPE'TROUS, a. Pertaining to saltpeter, or partaking of its qualities; impregnated with ...
47825 salts SALTS, n. The salt water of rivers entering from the ocean.
47826 salubrious SALU'BRIOUS, a. [L. saluber, salubris, from salus. See safe.]Favorable to health; healthful; ...
47827 salubriously SALU'BRIOUSLY, adv. So as to promote health.
47828 salubrity SALU'BRITY, n. [L. salubritas.] Wholesomeness; healthfulness; favorableness to the preservation ...
47829 salutariness SAL'UTARINESS, n. [See Salutary.]1. Wholesomeness; the quality of contributing to health or ...
47830 salutary SAL'UTARY, a. [L. salutaris, from salus, health.]1. Wholesome; healthful; promoting health. Diet ...
47831 salutation SALUTA'TION, n. [L. salutatio. See Salute.]The act of saluting; a greeting; the act of paying ...
47832 salute SALU'TE, v.t. [L. saluto; salus or salvus.]1. To greet; to hail; to address with expressions of ...
47833 saluted SALU'TED, pp. Hailed; greeted.
47834 saluter SALU'TER, n. One who salutes.
47835 salutiferous SALUTIF'EROUS, a. [L. salutifer; salus, health, and fero, to bring.] Bringing health; healthy; as ...
47836 salvability SALVABIL'ITY, n. [from salvable.] The possibility of being saved or admitted to everlasting life.
47837 salvable SALV'ABLE, a. [L. salvus, safe; salvo, to save.]That may be saved, or received to everlasting ...
47838 salvage SALV'AGE, n. [L. salvus, salvo.]In commerce, a reward or recompense allowed by law for the saving ...
47839 salvation SALVA'TION, n. [L. salvo, to save.]1. The act of saving; preservation from destruction, danger or ...
47840 salvatory SALV'ATORY, n. A place where things are preserved; a repository.
47841 salve SALVE, n. sav. [L. salvus.]1. A glutinous composition or substance to be applied to wounds or ...
47842 salver SAL'VER, n. A piece of plate with a foot; or a plate on which any thing is presented.
47843 salvific SALVIF'IC, a. [L. salvus and facio.] Tending to save or secure safety. [A bad word and not ...
47844 salvo SAL'VO, n. [from the L. salvo jure, an expression used in reserving rights.] An exception; a ...
47845 salvor SALV'OR, n. One who saves a ship or goods at sea.
47846 samaritan SAMAR'ITAN, a.1. Pertaining to Samaria, the principal city of the ten tribes of Israel, belonging ...
47847 sambo SAM'BO, n. The offspring of a black person and a mulatto.
47848 same SAME, a. [L. simul, together. Gr. Shall we suppose then that s has passed into an aspirate in ...
47849 sameness SA'MENESS, n.1. Identity; the state of being not different or other; as the sameness of an ...
47850 samiel SA'MIEL,
47851 samite SAM'ITE, n. A species of silk stuff. Obs.
47852 samlet SAM'LET, n. A little salmon.
47853 samp SAMP, n. A species of food composed of maize broken or bruised, boiled and mixed with milk; a dish ...
47854 sampane SAMP'ANE, n. A kind of vessel used by the Chinese.
47855 samphire SAM'PHIRE, n. [said to be a corruption of Saint Pierre.]A plant of the genus Crithmum. The golden ...
47856 sample SAM'PLE, n. [L. exemplum.]1. A specimen; a part of any thing presented for inspection or intended ...
47857 sampler SAM'PLER, n. [L. exemplar, supra.] A pattern of work; a specimen; particularly, a piece of needle ...
47858 samsons-post SAM'SON'S-POST, n. In ships, a notched post used instead of a ladder; also, a piece of timber that ...
47859 sanable SAN'ABLE, a. [L. sanabilis, from sano, to heal; sanus, sound. See Sound.]That may be healed or ...
47860 sanation SANA'TION, n. [L. sanatio, from sano, to heal.] The act of healing or curing. [Not used.]
47861 sanative SAN'ATIVE, a. [L. sano, to heal.] Having the power to cure or heal; healing; tending to heal.
47862 sanativeness SAN'ATIVENESS, n. The power of healing.
47863 sanctificate SANC'TIFICATE, v.t. To sanctify. [Not in use.]
47864 sanctification SANCTIFICA'TION, n. [See Sanctify.]1. The act of making holy. In an evangelical sense, the act ...
47865 sanctified SANC'TIFIED, pp. 1. Made holy; consecrated; set apart for sacred services.2. Affectedly holy.
47866 sanctifier SANC'TIFIER, n. He that sanctifies or makes holy. In theology, the Holy Spirit is, by way of ...
47867 sanctify SANC'TIFY, v.t. [Low L. sanctifico; from sanctus, holy, and facio, to make.]1. In a general ...
47868 sanctifying SANC'TIFYING, ppr. 1. Making holy; purifying from the defilements of sin; separating to a holy ...
47869 sanctimonious SANCTIMO'NIOUS, a. [L. sanctimonia, from sanctus, holy.]Saintly; having the appearance of ...
47870 sanctimoniously SANCTIMO'NIOUSLY, adv. With sanctimony.
47871 sanctimoniousness SANCTIMO'NIOUSNESS, n. State of being sanctimonious; sanctity, or the appearance of it. [little ...
47872 sanctimony SANC'TIMONY, n. [L. sanctimonia.] Holiness; devoutness; scrupulous austerity; sanctity, or the ...
47873 sanction SANC'TION, n. [L. sanctio, from sanctus, holy, solemn, established.]1. Ratification; an official ...
47874 sanctioned SANC'TIONED, pp. Ratified; confirmed; authorized.
47875 sanctioning SANC'TIONING, ppr. Ratifying; authorizing.
47876 sanctitude SANC'TITUDE, n. [L. sanctus, sanctitudo.] Holiness; sacredness.
47877 sanctity SANC'TITY, n. [L. sanctitas.]1. Holiness; state of being sacred or holy. God attributes no ...
47878 sanctuarize SANC'TUARIZE, v.t. [from sanctuary.] To shelter by means of a sanctuary or sacred privileges. [A ...
47879 sanctuary SANC'TUARY, n. [L. sanctuarium, from sanctus, sacred.]1. A sacred place; particularly among the ...
47880 sand SAND, n.1. Any mass or collection of fine particles of stone, particularly of fine particles of ...
47882 sandal-wood SAN'DAL-WOOD,
47881 sandal SAN'DAL, n. [L. sandalium; Gr.]1. A kind of shoe, consisting of a sole fastened to the foot. ...
47883 sandarac SAN'DARAC,
47884 sandarach SAN'DARACH, n. [L. sandaraca.]1. A resin in white tears, more transparent than those of mastic; ...
47885 sanded SAND'ED, pp.1. Sprinkled with sand; as a sanded floor.2. a. Covered with sand; barren.3. Marked ...
47886 sanderling SAND'ERLING, n. A bird of the plover kind.
47887 sanders SAN'DERS, n.A kind of wood which grows in the East Indies and on some of the isles of the Pacific. ...
47888 sandever SAN'DEVER,
47889 sandiness SAND'INESS, n. [from sandy.] 1. The state of being sandy; as the sandiness of a road.2. The ...
47890 sandish SAND'ISH, a. [from sand.] Approaching the nature of sand; loose; not compact.
47891 sandiver SAN'DIVER, n.Glass-gall; a whitish salt which is cast up from the materials of glass in fusion, and ...
47892 sandix SAND'IX, n. A kind of minium or red lead, made of ceruse, but inferior to the true minium.
47893 sandpiper SAND'PIPER, n. A bird of the genus Tringa.
47894 sandstone SAND'STONE, n. [sand and stone.] Sandstone is, in most cases, composed chiefly of grains of ...
47895 sandy SAND'Y, a. 1. Abounding with sand; full of sand; covered or sprinkled with sand; as a sandy ...
47896 sane SANE, a. [L. sanus, Eng. sound. This is the Eng. sound. See sound.]1. Sound; not disordered or ...
47897 sang SANG, pret. of sing.
47898 sangiac SAN'GIAC, n. A Turkish governor of a province.
47899 sanguiferous SANGUIF'EROUS, a. [L. sanguifer; sanguis, blood, and fero, to carry.]Conveying blood. The ...
47900 sanguification SANGUIFICA'TION, n. [L. sanguis, blood, and facio, to make.]In the animal economy, the production ...
47901 sanguifier SAN'GUIFIER, n. A producer of blood.
47902 sanguifluous SANGUIF'LUOUS, a. [L. sanguis, blood, and fluo, to flow.] Floating or running with blood.
47903 sanguify SAN'GUIFY, v.i. To produce blood.
47904 sanguifying SAN'GUIFYING, ppr. Producing blood.
47905 sanguin SAN'GUIN, a. [L. sanguineus, from sanguis, blood.]1. Red; having the color of blood; as a ...
47906 sanguinary SAN'GUINARY, a. [L. sanguinarius, from sanguis, blood.]1. Bloody; attended with much bloodshed; ...
47907 sanguine SAN'GUINE,
47908 sanguineless SAN'GUINELESS, a. Destitute of blood; pale. [A bad word and little used.]
47909 sanguinely SAN'GUINELY, adv. Ardently; with confidence of success.
47910 sanguineness SAN'GUINENESS, n. 1. Redness; color of blood in the skin; as sanguineness of countenance.2. ...
47911 sanguineous SANGUIN'EOUS, a. [L. sanguineus.]1. Abounding with blood; plethoric.2. Constituting blood.
47912 sanguinity SANGUIN'ITY, for sanguineness, is not in use.
47913 sanguisuge SAN'GUISUGE, n. [L. sanguisuga; sanguis, blood, and sugo, to suck.]The blood-sucker; a leech, or ...
47914 sanhedrim SAN'HEDRIM, n. [Low L. synedrium; Gr. with, together and seat.]The great council of seventy elders ...
47915 sanicle SAN'ICLE, n. [from L. sano, to heal.] Self-heal, a plant or genus of plants, the Sanicula; also, ...
47916 sanidium SANID'IUM, n. A genus of fossils of the class of selenites, composed of plain flat plates.
47917 sanies SA'NIES, n. [L.] A thin acrid discharge from wounds or sores; a serous matter, less thick and ...
47918 sanious SA'NIOUS, a. [from sanies.] 1. Pertaining to sanies, or partaking of its nature and appearance; ...
47919 sanity SAN'ITY, n. [L. sanitas. See Sane.] Soundness; particularly, a sound state of mind; the state of ...
47920 sank SANK, pret. of sink, but nearly obsolete.
47921 sannah SAN'NAH, n. The name of certain kinds of India muslins.
47922 sans SANS, pret. Without.
47923 sanscrit SAN'SCRIT, n. The ancient language of Hindoostan, from which are formed all the modern languages ...
47924 santer SANTER. [See Saunter.]
47925 santon SANT'ON, n. A Turkish priest; a kind of dervis, regarded by the vulgar as a saint.
47926 sap SAP, n.1. The juice of plants of any kind, which flows chiefly between the wood and the bark. ...
47927 sapadillo-tree SAPADIL'LO-TREE, n. A tree of the genus Sloanea.
47928 sapajo SAP'AJO, n. The sapajos form a division of the genus Simia, including such of the monkeys of ...
47929 sapid SAP'ID, a. [L. sapidus, from sapio, to taste.]Tasteful; tastable; having the power of affecting ...
47930 sapidity SAPID'ITY,
47931 sapidness SAP'IDNESS, n. Taste; tastefulness; savor; the quality of affecting the organs of taste; as the ...
47932 sapience SA'PIENCE, n. [L. sapientia, from sapio, to taste, to know.]Wisdom; sageness; knowledge.- Still ...
47933 sapient SA'PIENT, a. Wise; sage; discerning.There the sapient king held dalliance.
47934 sapiential SAPIEN'TIAL, a. Affording wisdom or instructions for wisdom. [Not much used.]
47935 sapless SAP'LESS, a. [from sap.] 1. Destitute of sap; as a sapless tree or branch.2. Dry; old; husky; as ...
47936 sapling SAP'LING, n. [from sap.] A young tree.Nurse the saplings tall.
47937 saponaceous SAPONA'CEOUS, a. [from L. sapo, soap.] Soapy; resembling soap; having the qualities of soap. ...
47938 saponary SAP'ONARY, a. Saponaceous.
47939 saponification SAPONIFICA'TION, n. Conversion into soap.
47940 saponify SAPON'IFY, v.t. [L. sapo, soap, and facio, to make.]To convert into soap by combination with an ...
47941 saponule SAP'ONULE, n. A combination of volatile or essential oil with some base.
47942 sapor SA'POR, n. [L.] Taste; savor; relish; the power of affecting the organs of taste.There is some ...
47943 saporific SAPORIF'IC, a. [L. sapor and facio, to make.]Having the power to produce taste; producing taste.
47944 saporosity SAPOROS'ITY, n. The quality of a body by which it excites the sensation of taste.
47945 saporous SA'POROUS, a. Having taste; yielding some kind of taste.
47946 sapota SAPO'TA, n. In botany, a tree or plant of the genus Achras.
47947 sappadillo-tree SAPPADIL'LO-TREE,
47948 sappare SAP'PARE, n. A mineral or species of earth, the kyanite; called by Hauy, disthene.
47949 sapped SAP'PED, pp. Undermined; subverted.
47950 sapper SAP'PER, n. One who saps. In an army, sappers and miners are employed in working at saps, to ...
47951 sapphic SAPPHIC, a. saf'ic. Pertaining to Sappho, a Grecian poetess; as sapphic odes; Sapphic verse. The ...
47952 sapphire SAP'PHIRE, n. [L. sapphirus; Gr. to scrape, to shine, to be fair, open, beautiful.]A species of ...
47953 sapphirine SAP'PHIRINE, a. Resembling sapphire; made of sapphire; having the qualities of sapphire.
47954 sappiness SAP'PINESS, n. [from sappy.] The state or quality of being full of sap; succulence; juiciness.
47955 sappy SAP'PY, a. 1. Abounding with sap; juicy; succulent.2. Young; not firm; weak.When he had passed ...
47956 saraband SAR'ABAND, n. A dance and a tune used in Spain, said to be derived from the Saracens.
47957 saracenic SARACEN'IC, a. 1. Pertaining to the Saracens, inhabitants of Arabia; so called from sara, a ...
47958 saragoy SAR'AGOY, n. The opossum of the Molucca isles.
47959 sarasin SAR'ASIN,
47960 sarcasm S'ARCASM, n. [l. sarcasmus; Gr. from to deride or sneer at, primarily to fly or pluck off the ...
47961 sarcastic SARCAS'TIC,
47962 sarcastical SARCAS'TICAL, a. Bitterly satirical; scornfully severe; taunting.What a fierce and sarcastic ...
47963 sarcastically SARCAS'TICALLY, adv. In a sarcastic manner; with scornful satire.
47964 sarcenet S'ARCENET, n. A species of fine thin woven silk.
47965 sarcocele S'ARCOCELE, n. [Gr. flesh, and tumor.]A spurious rupture or hernia, in which the testicle is ...
47966 sarcocol S'ARCOCOL,
47967 sarcocolla S'ARCOCOL'LA, n. [Gr. compounded of flesh and glue.]A semi-transparent solid substance, imported ...
47968 sarcolite S'ARCOLITE, n. [flesh-stone.] A substance of a vitreous nature, and of a rose flesh color, found ...
47969 sarcological SARCOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to sarcology.
47970 sarcology SARCOL'OGY, n. [Gr. flesh, and discourse.]That part of anatomy which treats of the soft parts of ...
47971 sarcoma SARCO'MA, n. [Gr from flesh.] Any fleshy excrescence on an animal body.
47972 sarcophagous SARCOPH'AGOUS, a. [See sarcophagus.] Feeding on flesh; flesh-eating.
47973 sarcophagus SARCOPH'AGUS, n. [L. from Gr. flesh and to eat.]1. A species of stone used among the Greeks in ...
47974 sarcophagy SARCOPH'AGY, n. [supra.] The practice of eating flesh.
47975 sarcotic SARCOT'IC, a. [Gr. flesh.] In surgery, producing or generating flesh.SARCOT'IC, n. A medicine or ...
47976 sardachate S'ARDACHATE, n. The clouded and spotted agate, of a pale flesh color.
47977 sardan S'ARDAN, n. A fish resembling the herring.
47978 sarde S'ARDE,
47979 sardel S'ARDEL,
47980 sardine S'ARDINE,
47981 sardius S'ARDIUS, n. [L. sardius; Gr. from Sardis, in Asia Minor, now Sart.] A precious stone. One of ...
47982 sardoin S'ARDOIN, n. A mineral, a variety of carnelian, which displays on its surface a rich reddish ...
47983 sardonian SARDO'NIAN,
47984 sardonic SARDON'IC, a. Sardonian or sardonic laughter, a convulsive involuntary laughter, so called from ...
47985 sardonyx S'ARDONYX, n. [L. sardonyches, from Gr. from Sardis, a city of Asia Minor, and a nail; so named, ...
47986 sargus S'ARGUS, n. A fish of the Mediterranean, whose body is variegated with brown transverse rings, ...
47987 sark S'ARK, n.1. In Scotland, a shirt.2. A shark. [Not used.]
47988 sarlac S'ARLAC, n. The grunting ox of Tartary.
47989 sarmatian SARMA'TIAN,
47990 sarmatic SARMAT'IC, a. Pertaining to Sarmatia and its inhabitants, the ancestors of the Russians and Poles.
47991 sarmentous SARMENT'OUS, a. [L. sarmentosus, from sarmentum, a twig.]A sarmentous stem, in botany, is one that ...
47992 saronic SARON'IC, a. Denoting a gulf of Greece between Attica and Sparta.
47993 sarplar S'ARPLAR, n. A sarplar of wool is a sack containing 80 tod; a tod contains two stone of 14 pounds ...
47994 sarplier S'ARPLIER, n. Canvas, or a packing cloth.
47995 sarrasine SAR'RASINE, n. 1. A plant, a kind of birth wort.2. A portcullis or herse.
47996 sarsa S'ARSA,
47997 sarsaparilla S'ARSAPARIL'LA, n. A plant, a species of Smilax, valued in medicine for its mucilaginous and ...
47998 sarse S'ARSE, n. A fine sieve; usually written searce or searse. [Little used.]S'ARSE, v.t. [from the ...
47999 sart S'ART, n. A piece of woodland turned into arabic. [Not used in America.]
48000 sash SASH, n. 1. A belt worn for ornament. Sashes are worn by military officers as badges of ...
48001 sashoon SASH'OON, n. A kind of leather stuffing put into a boot for the wearer's ease.
48002 sassafras SAS'SAFRAS, n. [L. saxifraga; saxum, a stone, and frango, to break.]A tree of the genus Laurus, ...
48003 sasse SASSE, n. A sluice, canal or lock on a navigable river; a word found in old British statutes.
48004 sassolin SAS'SOLIN,
48005 sassoline SAS'SOLINE, n. Native boracic acid, found in saline incrustations on the borders of hot springs ...
48006 sassorol SAS'SOROL,
48007 sassorolla SASSOROL'LA, n. A species of pigeon, called rock pigeon.
48008 sastra SAS'TRA, n. Among the Hindoos, a sacred book; a book containing sacred ordinances. The six great ...
48009 sat SAT, pret of sit.
48010 satan SA'TAN, n. [Heb. an adversary.] The grand adversary of man; the devil or prince of darkness; the ...
48011 satanic SATAN'IC,
48012 satanical SATAN'ICAL, a. Having the qualities of Satan; resembling Satan; extremely malicious or wicked; ...
48013 satanically SATAN'ICALLY, adv. With the wicked and malicious spirit of Satan; diabolically.
48014 satanism SA'TANISM, n. The evil and malicious disposition of Satan; a diabolical spirit.
48015 satanist SA'TANIST, n. A very wicked person. [Little used.]
48016 satchel SATCH'EL, n. [See Sachel.] A little sack or bag.
48017 sate SATE, v.t. [L. satio. The primary sense is to stuff, to fill, from crowding, driving.]To satiate; ...
48018 sated SA'TED, pp. Filled; glutted; satiated.
48019 sateless SA'TELESS, a. Insatiable; not capable of being satisfied.
48020 satellite SAT'ELLITE, n. [L. satelles.]1. A secondary planet or moon; a small planet revolving round ...
48021 satellitious SATELLI'TIOUS, a. Consisting of satellites.
48022 satiate SATIATE, v.t. sa'shate. [L. satiatus, from satio. See sate.]1. To fill; to satisfy appetite or ...
48023 satiation SATIA'TION, n. The state of being filled.
48024 satiety SATI'ETY, n. [L. satietas. See Sate.]Properly, fullness of gratification, either of the appetite ...
48026 satin-flower SAT'IN-FLOWER, n. A plant of the genus Lunaria.
48027 satin-spar SAT'IN-SPAR, n. A mineral, fibrous limestone.
48025 satin SAT'IN, n. [Gr. L. sindon. Heb.] A species of glossy silk cloth, of a thick close texture.
48028 satinet SATINET', n. 1. A thin species of satin.2. A particular kind of woolen cloth.
48029 satire SAT'IRE, n. [L. satira; so named from sharpness, pungency. See satyriasis.]1. A discourse or ...
48030 satiric SATIR'IC,
48031 satirical SATIR'ICAL, a. [L. satiricus.] 1. Belonging to satire; conveying satire; as a satiric style.2. ...
48032 satirically SATIR'ICALLY, adv. With severity of remark; with invective; with intention to censure.
48033 satirist SAT'IRIST, n. One who writes satire.Wycherly, in his writings, is the sharpest satirist of his ...
48034 satirize SAT'IRIZE, v.t. To censure with keenness or severity.It is as hard to satirize well a man of ...
48035 satirized SAT'IRIZED, pp. Severely censured.
48036 satirizing SAT'IRIZING, ppr. Censuring with severity.
48037 satisfaction SATISFAC'TION, n. [L. satisfactio. See Satisfy.]1. That state of the mind which results from the ...
48038 satisfactive SATISFAC'TIVE, a. Giving satisfaction. [Little used or not at all.]
48039 satisfactorily SATISFAC'TORILY, adv. 1. In a manner to give satisfaction or content.2. In a manner to impress ...
48040 satisfactoriness SATISFAC'TORINESS, n. The power of satisfying or giving content; as the satisfactoriness of ...
48041 satisfactory SATISFAC'TORY, a.1. Giving or producing satisfaction; yielding content; particularly, relieving ...
48042 satisfied SAT'ISFIED, pp. Having the desires fully gratified; made content.
48043 satisfier SAT'ISFIER, n. One that gives satisfaction.
48044 satisfy SAT'ISFY, v.t. [L. satisfacio; satis, enough, and facio, to make.]1. To gratify wants, wishes or ...
48045 satisfying SAT'ISFYING, ppr. Giving content; feeding or supplying to the full extent of desire; convincing; ...
48046 sative SA'TIVE, a. [L. sativus, from sero, satum, to sow.] Sown in gardens.
48047 satrap SAT'RAP, n. In Persia, an admiral; more generally, the governor of a province.
48048 satrapal SAT'RAPAL, a. Pertaining to a satrap or a satrapy.
48049 satrapess SAT'RAPESS, n. A female satrap.
48050 satrapy SAT'RAPY, n. The government or jurisdiction of a satrap.
48051 saturable SAT'URABLE, a. [See Saturate.] That may be saturated; capable of saturation.
48052 saturanlian SATURAN'LIAN, a. [from L. saturnalia, feasts of Saturn.]1. Pertaining to the festivals celebrated ...
48053 saturant SAT'URANT, a. [L. saturans.] Saturating; impregnating to the full.SAT'URANT, n. In medicine, a ...
48054 saturate SAT'URATE, v.t. [L. saturo, from satur, filled; satio, to feed to the full. See Sate.]1. To ...
48055 saturated SAT'URATED, pp. Supplied to fullness.
48056 saturating SAT'URATING, ppr. Supplying to fullness.
48057 saturation SATURA'TION, n. In a general sense, a filling or supply to fullness. In chimistry, the union, ...
48058 saturday SAT'URDAY, n.The last day of the week; the day next preceding the sabbath.
48059 saturity SATU'RITY, n. [L. saturitas. See Saturate.]Fullness of supply; the state of being saturated. ...
48060 saturn SAT'URN, n. [L. saturnus.] 1. In mythology, one of the oldest and principal deities, the son of ...
48061 saturnian SATURN'IAN, a. In fabulous history, pertaining to Saturn, whose age or reign, from the mildness ...
48062 saturnine SAT'URNINE, a. [L. Saturnus.]1. Supposed to be under the influence of Saturn. Hence,2. Dull; ...
48063 saturnist SAT'URNIST, n. A person of a dull, grave, gloomy temperament.
48064 saturnite SAT'URNITE, n. A metallic substance of recent discovery, separated from lead in torrefaction, ...
48065 satyr SA'TYR, n. [l. satyrus; Gr. a monkey, a fawn.]In mythology, a sylvan deity or demi-god, ...
48066 satyriasis SATYRI'ASIS, n. [Gr. We observe in this word a connection with satire, in the sense of ...
48067 satyrion SATYR'ION, n. A plant.
48069 sauce-box SAUCE-BOX, n. saus'-box. [from saucy.] A saucy impudent fellow.
48070 sauce-pan SAUCE-PAN, n. saus'-pan. A small pan for sauce, or a small skillet with a long handle, in which ...
48068 sauce SAUCE, n. [L. salsus, salt, from sal.]1. A mixture or composition to be eaten with food for ...
48071 saucer SAU'CER, n.1. A small pan in which sauce is set on a table.2. A piece of china or other ware, in ...
48072 saucily SAU'CILY, adv. [from saucy.] Impudently; with impertinent boldness; petulantly.
48073 sauciness SAU'CINESS, n. Impudence; impertinent boldness; petulance; contempt of superiors.
48074 saucisse SAU'CISSE,
48075 saucisson SAU'CISSON, n.In mining or gunnery, a long pipe or bag, made of cloth well pitched, or of leather, ...
48076 saucy SAU'CY, a. [from sauce; L. salsus, salt or salted. The use of this word leads to the primary ...
48077 saul SAUL, an old spelling of soul.
48078 saunders SAUNDERS. [See Sandal and Sanders.]
48079 saunter SAUNTER, v.i. s'anter. 1. To wander about idly; as sauntering from place to place.2. To loiter; ...
48080 saunterer S'AUNTERER, n. One that wanders about idly.
48081 sauntering S'AUNTERING, ppr. Wandering about lazily or idly; loitering.
48082 saurian SAU'RIAN, a. [Gr. a lizard.] Pertaining to lizards; designating an order of reptiles.
48083 sausage SAUS'AGE, n. [L. salsus.]The intestine of an animal stuffed with minced meat and seasoned.
48084 saussurite SAUS'SURITE, n. A mineral so named from Saussure, the discoverer, of a white gray or green color, ...
48085 savable SA'VABLE, a. [from save.] Capable of being saved.
48086 savableness SA'VABLENESS, n. Capability of being saved.
48087 savage SAV'AGE, a. [L. silva, a wood, or silvicola, an inhabitant of a wood, or silvaticus.]1. ...
48088 savagely SAV'AGELY, adv. In the manner of a savage; cruelly; inhumanly.
48089 savageness SAV'AGENESS, n. 1. Wildness; an untamed, uncultivated or uncivilized state; barbarism. Hence,2. ...
48090 savagery SAV'AGERY, n. 1. Wild growth, as of plants.2. Cruelty; barbarity.
48091 savagism SAV'AGISM, n. The state of rude uncivilized men; the state of men in their native wildness and ...
48092 savanna SAVAN'NA, n. An extensive open plain or meadow, or a plain destitute of trees.
48093 save SAVE, v.t. [L. salvo. As salve is used in Latin for salutation or wishing health, as hail is in ...
48094 saveall SA'VEALL, n. [save and all.] A small pan inserted in a candlestick to save the ends of candles.
48095 saved SA'VED, pp. Preserved from evil; injury or destruction; kept frugally; prevented; spared; taken in ...
48096 savelin SA'VELIN, n. A fish of the trout kind, having very small scales and a black back.
48097 saver SA'VER, n.1. One that saves, preserves or rescues from evil or destruction; as the saver of the ...
48098 savin SAV'IN, n. A tree or shrub of the genus Juniperus. The savin of Europe resembles the red cedar of ...
48099 saving SA'VING, ppr.1. Preserving from evil or destruction; hindering from waste or loss; sparing; taking ...
48100 savingly SA'VINGLY, adv.1. With frugality or parsimony.2. So as to be finally saved from eternal death; as ...
48101 savingness SA'VINGNESS, n. 1. Frugality; parsimony, caution not to expend money without necessity or use.2. ...
48102 savior SAVIOR, n. savyur. One that saves or preserves; but properly applied only to Jesus Christ, the ...
48103 savor SA'VOR, n. [L. sapor, sapio, to taste.]1. Taste or odor; something that perceptibly affects the ...
48104 savorily SA'VORILY, adv. [from savory.]1. With gust or appetite.2. With a pleasing relish.
48105 savoriness SA'VORINESS, n. Pleasing taste or smell; as the savoriness of a pineapple or a peach.
48106 savorless SA'VORLESS, a. Destitute of smell or taste; insipid.
48107 savorly SA'VORLY, a. Well seasoned; of good taste.SA'VORLY, adv. With a pleasing relish.
48108 savory SA'VORY, a. [from savor.] Pleasing to the organs of smell or taste; as a savory odor.Make me ...
48109 savoy SAVOY', n. A variety of the common cabbage, much cultivated for winter use.
48111 saw-fly SAW'-FLY, n. A genus of flies, having a serrated sting.
48112 saw-pit SAW'-PIT, n. A pit over which timber is sawed by two men, one standing below the timber and the ...
48110 saw SAW, pret. of see.SAW, n. [See the Verb.]1. A cutting instrument consisting of a blade or thin ...
48113 sawed SAW'ED, pp. Cut, divided or formed with a saw.
48114 sawer SAW'ER, n. One that saws; corrupted into sawyer.
48115 sawyer SAW'YER, n.1. One whose occupation is to saw timber into planks or boards, or to saw wood for ...
48116 saxifrage SAX'IFRAGE, n. [L. saqxifraga; composed of saxum, a stone, and frango, to break.]A medicine that ...
48117 saxifragous SAXIF'RAGOUS, a. Dissolving the stone.
48118 saxon SAX'ON, n.1. One of the nation or people who formerly dwelt in the northern part of Germany, and ...
48119 saxonism SAX'ONISM, n. An idiom of the Saxon language.
48120 saxonist SAX'ONIST, n. One versed in the Saxon language.
48121 say SAY, v.t. pret. and pp. said, contracted from sayed.1. To speak; to utter in words; as, he said ...
48122 saye SAYE, n. In commerce, a kind of serge used for linings, shirts, aprons, &c.
48123 saying SA'YING, ppr. Uttering in articulate sounds or words; speaking; telling; relating; ...
48124 scab SCAB, n. [L. scabbies, scaber, rough.]1. An encrusted substance, dry and rough, formed over a ...
48125 scabbard SCAB'BARD, n. The sheath of a sword.SCAB'BARD, v.t. To put in a sheath.
48126 scabbed SCAB'BED, a. [from scab.] 1. Abounding with scabs; diseased with scabs.2. Mean; paltry; vile; ...
48127 scabbedness SCAB'BEDNESS, n. The state of being scabbed.
48128 scabbiness SCAB'BINESS, n. [from scabby.] The quality of being scabby.
48129 scabby SCAB'BY, a. [from scab.] 1. Affected with scabs; full of scabs.2. Diseased with the scab or ...
48130 scabious SCA'BIOUS, a. [L. scabisus, from scabies, scab.]Consisting of scabs; rough itch; leprous; as ...
48131 scabredity SCABRED'ITY, n. [L. scabredo, scabrities.] Roughness; ruggedness. [Not in use.]
48132 scabrous SCA'BROUS, a. [L. scabrosus, scaber, from scabies, scab.1. Rough; rugged; having sharp points.2. ...
48133 scabrousness SCA'BROUSNESS, n. Roughness; ruggedness.
48134 scabwort SCAB'WORT, n. A plant, a species of Helenium.
48135 scad SCAD, n. 1. A fish, the shad which see.2. A fish of the genus Caranx.
48136 scaffold SCAF'FOLD, n. [The last syllable is the L. fala.]1. Among builders, an assemblage or structure of ...
48137 scaffoldage SCAF'FOLDAGE, n. A gallery; a hollow floor.
48138 scaffolding SCAF'FOLDING, n.1. A frame or structure for support in an elevated place.2. That which sustains; ...
48139 scalable SCA'LABLE, a. That may be sealed.
48140 scalade SCALA'DE,
48141 scalado SCALA'DO, n. [L. scala, a latter. See Scale.]A storm or assault on a fortified place, in which ...
48142 scalary SCA'LARY, a. Resembling a ladder; formed with steps. [Little used.]
48143 scald SCALD, v.t. [L. caleo, caida, calidus. I suppose the primary sense of caleo is to contract, to ...
48144 scalded SCALD'ED, pp. Injured by a hot liquor; exposed to boiling heat.
48145 scalder SCALD'ER, n. A scald; a Scandinavian poet.
48146 scaldhead SCALD'HEAD, n. [See Scald.] A lothesome affection of the head, in which it is covered with a ...
48147 scaldic SCALD'IC, a. Pertaining to the scalds or poets of antiquity; composed by scalds.
48149 scalding-hot SCALD'ING-HOT, a. So hot as to scald the skin.
48148 scalding SCALD'ING, ppr. 1. Burning or injuring by hot liquor.2. Exposing to a boiling heat in liquor.
48151 scale-stone SCA'LE-STONE, n. A rare mineral, called also tafelspath and tabular spar, occurring in masses ...
48150 scale SCALE, n. [L. id. If the sense is to strip, it coincides with the Gr. to spoil.]1. The dish of a ...
48152 scaled SCA'LED, pp.1. Ascended by ladders or steps; cleared of scales; pared; scattered.2. a. Having ...
48153 scaleless SCA'LELESS, a. Destitute of scales.
48154 scalene SCALE'NE,
48155 scalenous SCALE'NOUS, a. [Gr. oblique, unequal.]A scalene triangle, is one whose sides and angles are ...
48156 scaliness SCA'LINESS, n. [from scaly.] the state of being scaly; roughness.
48158 scaling-ladder SCA'LING-LADDER, n. a ladder made for enabling troops to scale a wall.
48157 scaling SCA'LING, ppr.1. Ascending by ladders or steps; storming.2. Stripping of scales.3. Peeling; ...
48159 scall SCALL, n. [See Scald and Scaldhead.]Scab; scabbiness; leprosy.It is a dry scall, even a leprosy on ...
48160 scallion SCAL'LION, n. [ascalonia.]a plant of the genus Allium; a variety of the common onion, which never ...
48161 scallop SCAL'LOP, n. [This is from the root of shell, scale; coinciding with scalp.]1. A shell fish, or ...
48162 scalp SCALP, n. [L. scalpo.]1. The skin of the top of the head; as a hairless scalp.2. The skin of the ...
48163 scalped SCALP'ED, pp. Deprived of the skin of the head.
48164 scalpel SCALP'EL, n. [L. scalpellum, from scalpo, to scrape.]In surgery, a knife used in anatomical ...
48165 scalper SCALP'ER,
48167 scalping-iron SCALP'ING-IRON, n. An instrument of surgery, used in scraping foul and carious bones; a raspatory.
48166 scalping SCALP'ING, ppr. Depriving of the skin of the top of the head.
48168 scaly SCA'LY, a. [from scale.]1. Covered or abounding with scales; rough; as a scaly fish; the scaly ...
48169 scamble SCAM'BLE, v.i.1. To stir quick; to be busy; to scramble; to be bold or turbulent.2. To shift ...
48170 scambler SCAM'BLER, n. A bold intruder upon the generosity or hospitality of others.
48171 scambling SCAM'BLING, ppr. Stirring; scrambling; intruding.
48172 scamblingly SCAM'BLINGLY, adv. With turbulence and noise; with bold intrusiveness.
48173 scammel SCAM'MEL, n. A bird.
48174 scammoniate SCAMMO'NIATE, a. [from scammony.] Made with scammony. [Not used.]
48175 scammony SCAM'MONY, n. [L. scammonia.]1. A plant of the genus convolvulus.2. A gum resin, obtained from ...
48176 scamper SCAMP'ER, v.i. To run with speed; to hasten escape.
48177 scampering SCAMP'ERING, ppr. Running with speed; hastening in flight.
48178 scan SCAN, v.t. [L. ascendo. See Ascend.]1. To examine with critical care; to scrutinize.The actions ...
48179 scandal SCAN'DAL, n. [L. scandalum; Gr. In Greek, this word signifies a stumbling block, something ...
48180 scandalize SCAN'DALIZE, v.t. [Gr. L. scandalizo.]1. To offend by some action supposed criminal.I demand who ...
48181 scandalized SCAN'DALIZED, pp. Offended; defamed; disgraced.
48182 scandalizing SCAN'DALIZING, ppr. Giving offense to; disgracing.
48183 scandalous SCAN'DALOUS, a. 1. Giving offense.Nothing scandalous or offensive to any.2. Opprobrious; ...
48184 scandalously SCAN'DALOUSLY, adv. 1. Shamefully; in a manner to give offense.His discourse at table was ...
48185 scandalousness SCAN'DALOUSNESS, n. The quality of being scandalous; the quality of giving offense, or of being ...
48186 scandent SCAND'ENT, a. [L. scandens, scando, to climb.]Climbing, either with spiral tendrils for its ...
48187 scanned SCAN'NED, pp. Critically sifted or examined; resolved into feet in recital.
48188 scanning SCAN'NING, ppr. Critically examining; resolving into feet, as verse.
48189 scansion SCAN'SION, n. The act of scanning.
48190 scant SCANT, v.t.To limit; to straiten; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of ...
48191 scantily SCANT'ILY, adv. [from scanty.]1. Not fully; not plentifully. the troops were scantily supplied ...
48192 scantiness SCANT'INESS, n.1. Narrowness; want of space or compass; as the scantiness of our heroic verse.2. ...
48193 scantle SCANT'LE, v.t. To be deficient; to fail.SCANT'LE, v.i. To divide into thin or small pieces; to ...
48194 scantlet SCANT'LET, n. [See Scantling.] A small pattern; a small quantity. [Not in use.]
48195 scantling SCANT'LING, n.1. A pattern; a quantity cut for a particular purpose.2. A small quantity; as a ...
48196 scantly SCANT'LY, adv.1. Scarcely; hardly. Obs.2. Not fully or sufficiently; narrowly; penuriously; ...
48197 scantness SCANT'NESS, n. [from scant.] Narrowness; smallness; as the scantness of our capacities.
48198 scanty SCANT'Y, a. [from scant, and having the same signification.]1. Narrow; small; wanting amplitude ...
48199 scapaism SCAP'AISM, n. [Gr. to dig or make hollow.]Among the Persians, a barbarous punishment inflicted on ...
48201 scape-goat SCA'PE-GOAT, n. [escape and goat.] In the Jewish ritual, a goat which was brought to the door of ...
48200 scape SCAPE, v.t. To escape; a contracted word, not now used except in poetry, and with a mark of ...
48202 scapeless SCA'PELESS, a. [from scape.] In botany, destitute of a scape.
48203 scapement SCA'PEMENT, n. The method of communicating the impulse of the wheels to the pendulum of a clock.
48204 scaphite SCA'PHITE, n. [L. scapha.] Fossil remains of the scapha.
48205 scapolite SCAP'OLITE, n. [Gr. a rod, and a stone.]A mineral which occurs massive, or more commonly in four ...
48206 scapula SCAP'ULA, n. [L.] The shoulder blade.
48207 scapular SCAP'ULAR, a. [L. scapularis.] Pertaining to the shoulder, or to the scapula; as the scapular ...
48208 scapulary SCAP'ULARY, n. A part of the habit of certain religious orders in the Romish church, consisting of ...
48209 scar SC'AR, n. 1. A mark in the skin or flesh of an animal made by a wound or an ulcer, and remaining ...
48210 scarab SCAR'AB,
48211 scarabee SCAR'ABEE, n. [L. scarabaeus, from Gr.]A beetle; an insect of the genus Scarabaeus, whose wings ...
48212 scaramouch SCAR'AMOUCH, n.A buffoon in motley dress.
48213 scarce SCARCE, a.1. Not plentiful or abundant; being in small quantity in proportion to the demand. We ...
48214 scarcely SCARCELY, adv. 1. Hardly; scantly.We scarcely think our miseries our foes.2. Hardly; with ...
48215 scarceness SCARCENESS,
48216 scarcity SCARCITY, n. 1. Smallness of quantity, or smallness in proportion to the wants or demands; ...
48217 scare SCARE, v.t. [L. ex and cor, heart; but qu.]To fright; to terrify suddenly; to strike with sudden ...
48218 scarecrow SCARECROW, n. [scarce and crow.]1. Any frightful thing set up to frighten crows or other fowls ...
48219 scared SCARED, pp. Frightened; suddenly terrified.
48220 scarefire SCAREFIRE, n. A fire breaking out so as to frighten people. [Not used.]
48221 scarf SCARF, n. plu. scarfsSomething that hangs loose upon the shoulders; as a piece of cloth.Put on your ...
48222 scarfskin SC'ARFSKIN, n. [scarf and skin.] The cuticle; the epidermis; the outer thin integument of the ...
48223 scarification SCARIFICA'TION, n. [L. scarificatio. See Scarify.]In surgery, the operation of making several ...
48224 scarificator SCARIFICA'TOR, n. An instrument used in scarification.
48225 scarifier SCAR'IFIER, n. [from scarify.]1. The person who scarifies.2. The instrument used for scarifying.
48226 scarify SCAR'IFY, v.t. [L. scarifico. Gr. L. facio, to make. But the Greek is from a pointed instrument, ...
48227 scarifying SCAR'IFYING, ppr. Making small incisions in the skin with an instrument.
48228 scarious SCA'RIOUS, a. [Low L. scarrosus, rough.] In botany, tough, thinSCA'RIOUS, a. [Low L. scarrosus, ...
48229 scarlatina SCARLATI'NA, n. the scarlet fever; called in popular language, the canker rash.
48230 scarlatinous SCARLAT'INOUS, a. Of a scarlet color; pertaining to the scarlet fever.
48232 scarlet-bean SC'ARLET-BEAN, n. A plant; a red bean.
48233 scarlet-fever SC'ARLET-FE'VER, n. [scarlatina.] a disease in which the body is covered with an efflorescence or ...
48234 scarlet-oak SC'ARLET-OAK, n. a species of oak, the Quercus coccifera, or kermes oak, producing small glandular ...
48231 scarlet SC'ARLET, n. 1. A beautiful bright red color, brighter than crimson.2. Cloth of a scarlet ...
48235 scarmage SC'ARMAGE,
48236 scarmoge SC'ARMOGE, peculiar modes of spelling skirmish. [Not in use or local.]
48238 scarn-bee SC'ARN-BEE, n. a beetle. [Not in use or local.]
48237 scarn SC'ARN, n. Dung. [Not in use or local.]
48239 scarp SC'ARP, n.In fortification, the interior talus or slope of the ditch next the place, at the foot of ...
48240 scarus SCA'RUS, n. A fish. [See Scar.]
48241 scary SCA'RY, n. Barren land having only a thin coat of grass upon it. [Local.]
48242 scatch SCATCH, n. A kind of horsebit for bridles.
48243 scatches SCATCH'ES, n. plu. Stilts to put the feet in for walking in dirty places.
48244 scate SCATE, n. [This word may belong to the root of shoot, and L. scateo.]A wooden shoe furnished with ...
48245 scatebrous SCA'TEBROUS, a. [L. scatebra, a spring; scateo, to overflow.] Abounding with springs.
48246 scath SCATH, v.t. To damage; to waste; to destroy. [Little used.]SCATH, n. Damage; injury; waste; ...
48247 scathful SCATH'FUL, a. Without waste or damage. [Little used.]
48248 scathless SCATH'LESS, a. Without waste or damage. [Little used.]
48249 scatter SCAT'TER, v.t. [L. scateo, discutio; Gr. to scatter, to discuss. This word may be formed on the ...
48250 scattered SCAT'TERED, pp.1. Dispersed; dissipated; thinly spread; sprinkled or thinly spread over.2. In ...
48251 scatteredly SCAT'TEREDLY, adv. In a dispersed manner; separately. [Not much used.]
48252 scattering SCAT'TERING, ppr.1. Dispersing; spreading thinly; sprinkling.2. a. Not united; divided among ...
48253 scatteringly SCAT'TERINGLY, adv. Loosely; in a dispersed manner; thinly; as habitations scatteringly placed ...
48254 scatterling SCAT'TERLING, n. A vagabond; one that no fixed habitation or residence. [Little used.]
48255 scaturient SCATU'RIENT, a. [L. scaturiens.] Springing, as the water of a fountain. [Not used.]
48256 scaturiginous SCATURIG'INOUS, a. [L. scaturigo.] Abounding with springs. [Not used.]
48257 scaup SCAUP, n. A fowl of the duck kind.
48258 scavage SCAV'AGE, n. In ancient customs, a toll or duty exacted of merchant-strangers by mayors, sheriffs, ...
48259 scavenger SCAV'ENGER, n. [L. scabio.]A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by ...
48260 scelerat SCEL'ERAT, n. [L. sceleratus.] a villain; a criminal. [Not in use.]
48261 scene SCENE, n. [L. scena; Gr. Heb. The Greek word signifies a tent, hut or cottage. In L. it is an ...
48262 scenery SCE'NERY, n. The appearance of a place, or of the various objects presented to view; or the ...
48263 scenic SCEN'IC,
48264 scenical SCEN'ICAL, a. [L. scenicus.] Pertaining to scenery; dramatic; theatrical.
48265 scenographic SCENOGRAPH'IC,
48266 scenographical SCENOGRAPH'ICAL, a. [See scenography.] Pertaining to scenography; drawn in perspective.
48267 scenographically SCENOGRAPH'ICALLY, adv. In perspective.
48268 scenography SCENOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. scene, to describel.]the representation of a body on a perspective plane; or ...
48269 scent SCENT, n. [L. sentio, to perceive.]1. Odor; smell; that substance which issuing from a body, ...
48270 scentful SCENT'FUL, a. 1. Odorous; yielding much smell.2. Of quick smell.
48271 scentless SCENT'LESS, a. Inodorous; destitute of smell.
48272 scepter SCEP'TER, n. [L. sceptrum; Gr. from to send or thrust; coinciding with L. scipio, that is, a shoot ...
48273 sceptered SCEP'TERED, a. Bearing a scepter; as a sceptered prince.To Britain's queen the scepter'd suppliant ...
48274 sceptic SCEP'TIC, n. [Gr. from to look about, to consider, to speculate. See Show.]1. One who doubts the ...
48275 sceptical SCEP'TICAL, a.1. Doubting; hesitating to admit the certainty of doctrines or principles; doubting ...
48276 sceptically SCEP'TICALLY, adv. With doubt; in a doubting manner.
48277 scepticism SCEP'TICISM, n. 1. The doctrines and opinions of the Pyrrhonists or sceptical philosophers; ...
48278 scepticize SCEP'TICIZE, v.i. To doubt; to pretend to doubt of every thing. [Little used.]
48279 scession SCES'SION, n. [L. secessio. See Secede.] 1. The act of withdrawing, particularly from ...
48280 schaalstein SCHAALSTEIN,
48281 schedule SCHED'ULE, n. [L. schedula, from scheda, a sheet or leaf of paper; Gr. from to cut or divide; L. ...
48282 scheelin SCHEE'LIN,
48283 scheich SCHEICH, Among the Arabians and Moors, an old man, and hence a chief, a lord, a man of eminence.
48284 schelium SCHE'LIUM, n. A different, name of tungsten, a hard brittle metal of a grayish white color, and ...
48285 schematism SCHE'MATISM, n. [Gr. See Scheme.]1. Combination of the aspects of heavenly bodies.2. Particular ...
48286 schematist SCHE'MATIST, n. A projector; one given to forming schemes. [Schemer is more generally used.]
48287 scheme SCHEME, n. [L. schema; Gr. from a contracted word, probably from to have or hold.]1. A plan; a ...
48288 schemer SCHE'MER, n. One that contrives; a projector; a contriver.
48289 scheming SCHE'MING, ppr.1. Planning; contriving.2. a. Given to forming schemes; artful.
48290 schemist SCHE'MIST, n. A schemer; a projector.
48291 schene SCHENE, n. [L. schaenos; Gr.] An Egyptian measure of length, equal to sixty stadia, or about 7 ...
48292 schesis SCHE'SIS, n. [Gr. from to have or hold.]Habitude; general state or disposition of the body or ...
48293 schiller-spar SCHILLER-SPAR, n. A mineral containing two subspecies, bronzite and common schiller-spar.
48294 schism SCHISM, n. sizm. [L. schisma; Gr. to divide, L. scindo.]1. In a general sense, division or ...
48295 schismatic SCHISMAT'IC, sizmat'ic,
48296 schismatical SCHISMAT'ICAL, a. sizmat'ical. Pertaining to schism; implying schism; partaking of the nature of ...
48297 schismatically SCHISMAT'ICALLY, adv. In a schismatical manner; by separation from a church on account of a ...
48298 schismaticalness SCHISMAT'ICALNESS, n. The state of being schismatical.
48299 schismatize SCHIS'MATIZE, v.i. To commit or practice schism; to make a breach of communion in the church.
48300 schismless SCHISM'LESS, a. Free from schism; not affected by schism. [Little used.]
48301 schist SCHIST. [See Shist.]
48303 scholar-like SCHOL'AR-LIKE, a. Like a scholar; becoming a scholar.
48302 scholar SCHOL'AR, n. [Low L. scholaris, from schola, a school; Gr. leisure, a school. See School.]1. One ...
48304 scholarity SCHOLAR'ITY, n. Scholarship. [Not used.]
48305 scholarship SCHOL'ARSHIP, n.1. Learning; attainments in science or literature; as a man of great ...
48306 scholastic SCHOLAS'TIC,
48307 scholastical SCHOLAS'TICAL, a. [L. scholasticus.] 1. Pertaining to a scholar, to a school or to schools; as ...
48308 scholastically SCHOLAS'TICALLY, adv. In the manner of schools; according to the niceties or method of the ...
48309 scholasticism SCHOLAS'TICISM, n. The method or subtilties of the schools.The spirit of the old scholasticism, ...
48310 scholiast SCHO'LIAST, n. [Gr. See scholium.]A commentator or annotator; one who writes notes upon the works ...
48311 scholiaze SCHO'LIAZE, v.i. To write notes on an author's works. [Not used.]
48312 scholical SCHO'LICAL, a. Scholastic. [Not in use.]
48313 scholium SCHO'LIUM, n. plu. scholia or scholiums. [L. scholion; Gr. from leisure, lucubration.]In ...
48314 scholy SCHO'LY, n. A scholium. [Not in use.]SCHO'LY, v.i. To write comments. [Not in use.]
48316 school-fellow SCHOOL'-FELLOW, n. [See Fellow.] One bred at the same school; an associate in school.
48317 school-house SCHOOL'-HOUSE, n. [See House.] A house appropriated for the use of schools, or for instruction; ...
48315 school SCHOOL, n. [L. schola; Gr. leisure, vacation from business, lucubration at leisure, a place where ...
48318 schoolery SCHOOL'ERY, n. Something taught; precepts. [Not used.]
48319 schooling SCHOOL'ING, ppr. Instructing; teaching; reproving.SCHOOL'ING, n.1. Instruction in school; ...
48320 schoolmaid SCHOOL'MAID, n. [See Maid.] A girl at school.
48321 schoolman SCHOOL'MAN, n. [See Man.]1. A man versed in the niceties of academical disputation or of school ...
48322 schoolmaster SCHOOL'MASTER, n. [See Master.1. The man who presides over and teaches a school; a teacher, ...
48323 schoolmistress SCHOOL'MISTRESS, n. [See Mistress.] A woman who governs and teaches a school.
48324 schooner SCHOON'ER, n. A vessel with two masts, whose main-sail and fore- sail are suspended by gaffs, like ...
48325 schorl SCHORL. [See Shorl.]
48326 schware SCHWARE, n. A copper coin and money of account in Bremen, value one fifth of a groat, and 72 ...
48327 sciagraphical SCIAGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to sciagraphy.
48328 sciagraphy SCIAG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a shadow, and to describe.]1. The art of sketching or delineating.2. In ...
48329 sciatheric SCIATHER'IC,
48330 sciatherical SCIATHER'ICAL, a. [Gr. a shadow, and a catching.]Belonging to a sun-dial. [Little used.]
48331 sciatherically SCIATHER'ICALLY, adv. After the manner of a sun-dial.
48332 sciatic SCIAT'IC,
48333 sciatica SCIAT'ICA, n. [L. sciatica, from Gr. pain in the hips, from the hip, from the loin.] Rheumatism ...
48334 sciatical SCIAT'ICAL, a. 1. Pertaining to the hip; as the sciatic artery.2. Affecting the hip; as sciatic ...
48335 science SCI'ENCE, n. [L. scientia, from scio, to know.]1. In a general sense, knowledge, or certain ...
48336 scient SCI'ENT, a. [L. sciens.] Skillful. [Not used.]
48337 sciential SCIEN'TIAL, Producing science.
48338 scientific SCIENTIF'IC,
48339 scientifical SCIENTIF'ICAL, a. [L. scientia and facio, to make.]1. Producing certain knowledge or ...
48340 scientifically SCIENTIF'ICALLY, adv. 1. In such a manner as to produce knowledge.It is easier to believe, than ...
48341 scillitin SCIL'LITIN, n. [See Squill.] a white transparent acrid substance, extracted from squills by ...
48342 scimitar SCIM'ITAR, [See cimiter.]
48343 scink SCINK, n. a cast calf. [Not in use or local.]
48344 scintillant SCIN'TILLANT, a. [See Scintillate.] emitting sparks or fine igneous particles; sparkling.
48345 scintillate SCIN'TILLATE, v.i. [L. scintillo. This word seems to be a diminutive formed on the Teutonic ...
48346 scintillating SCIN'TILLATING, ppr. emitting sparks; sparkling.
48347 scintillation SCINTILLA'TION, n. the act of emitting sparks or igneous particles; the act of sparkling.
48348 sciolism SCI'OLISM, n. [See Sciolist.] Superficial knowledge.
48349 sciolist SCI'OLIST, n. [L. sciolus, a diminutive formed on scio, to know.]One who knows little, or who ...
48350 sciolous SCI'OLOUS, a. Superficially or imperfectly knowing.
48351 sciomachy SCIOM'ACHY, n. [Gr. a shadow, and a battle.]A battle with a shadow. [Little used.]
48352 scion SCION. [See Cion.]
48353 scioptic SCIOP'TIC, a. [Gr. shadow and to see.]Pertaining to the camera obscura, or to the art of ...
48354 scioptics SCIOP'TICS, n. The science of exhibiting images of external objects, received through a double ...
48355 sciroc SCI'ROC,
48356 scirocco SCIROC'CO, n. In Italy, a southeast wind; a hot suffocating wind, blowing from the burning deserts ...
48357 scirrosity SCIRROS'ITY, n. [See Scirrus.] An induration of the glands.
48358 scirrous SCIR'ROUS, a.1. Indurated; hard; knotty; as a gland.2. Proceeding from scirrus; as scirrous ...
48359 scirrus SCIR'RUS, n. [L. scirrus; Gr.]In surgery and medicine, a hard tumor on any part of the body, ...
48360 sciscitation SCISCITA'TION, n. [L. sciscitor, to inquire or demand.]The act of inquiring; inquiry; demand. ...
48361 scissible SCIS'SIBLE, a. [L. scissus, scindo, to cut.] Capable of being cut or divided by a sharp ...
48362 scissile SCIS'SILE, a. [L. scissilis, from scindo, to cut.]That may be cut or divided by a sharp ...
48363 scission SCISSION, n. sizh'on. [L. scissio, scindo, to cut.]The act of cutting or dividing by an edged ...
48364 scissors SCISSORS, n. siz'zors, plu. [L. scissor, from scindo, to cut, Gr.]A cutting instrument resembling ...
48365 scissure SCIS'SURE, n. [L. scissura, from scindo, to cut.]A longitudinal opening in a body, made by ...
48366 scitamineous SCITAMIN'EOUS, a. Belonging to the Scitamineae, one of Linne's natural orders of plants.
48367 sclavonian SCLAVO'NIAN,
48368 sclerotic SCLEROT'IC, a. [Gr. hard; hardness.]Hard; firm; as the sclerotic coat or tunicle of the ...
48369 scoat SCOAT. [See Scot.]
48370 scobiform SCOB'IFORM, a. [L. scobs, saw dust, and form.]Having the form of saw dust or raspings.
48371 scobs SCOBS, n. [L. from scabo, to scrape.] Raspings of ivory, hartshorn or other hard substance; dross ...
48372 scoff SCOFF, v.i. [Gr. The primary sense is probably to throw. But I do not find the word in the ...
48373 scoffer SCOFF'ER, n. One who scoffs; one that mocks, derides or reproaches in the language of contempt; a ...
48374 scoffing SCOFF'ING, ppr. Deriding or mocking; treating with reproachful language.
48375 scoffingly SCOFF'INGLY, adv. In mockery or contempt; by way of derision.Aristotle applied this hemistich ...
48376 scold SCOLD, v.i.To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter railing or harsh, rude, ...
48377 scolder SCOLDER, n. One that scolds or rails.
48378 scolding SCOLDING, ppr. 1. Railing with clamor; uttering rebuke in rude and boisterous language.2. a. ...
48379 scoldingly SCOLDINGLY, adv. With rude clamor or railing.
48380 scollop SCOL'LOP, n. 1. A pectinated shell. [See Scallop.]2. An indenting or cut like those of a ...
48381 scolopendra SCOLOPEN'DRA, n. [Gr. ] 1. A venomous serpent.2. A genus of insects of the order of Apters, ...
48382 scomm SCOMM, n. [L. scomma; Gr. See Scoff.]1. A buffoon. [Not in use.]2. A flout; a jeer. [Not in ...
48383 sconce SCONCE, n.1. A fort or bulwark; a work for defense. Obs.2. A hanging or projecting candlestick, ...
48384 scoop SCOOP, n. 1. A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle fastened to a dish, used for dipping ...
48385 scooped SCOOP'ED, pp. Taken out as with a scoop or ladle; hollowed; excavated; removed so as to leave a ...
48386 scooper SCOOP'ER, n. One that scoops; also, a water fowl.
48387 scooping SCOOP'ING, ppr. Lading out; making hollow; excavating; removing so as to leave a hollow.
48388 scope SCOPE, n. [L. scopus; Gr. from to see or view; Heb. to see, to behold] The primary sense is to ...
48389 scopiform SCO'PIFORM, a. [L. scopa, a broom, and form.] Having the form of a broom or besom.Zeolite, ...
48390 scoppet SCOP'PET, v.t. To lade out. [Not in use.]
48391 scoptical SCOP'TICAL, a. [Gr.] Scoffing. [Not in use.]
48392 scopulous SCOP'ULOUS, a. [L. scopulosus.] Full of rocks; rocky. [Not in use.]
48393 scorbute SCORBUTE, n. [L. scorbutus.] Scurvy. [Not in use.]
48394 scorbutic SCORBU'TIC,
48395 scorbutical SCORBU'TICAL, a. [L. scorbutus, the scurvy. See Scurf, Scurvy.]1. Affected or diseased with ...
48396 scorbutically SCORBU'TICALLY, adv. With the scurvy, or with a tendency to it; as a woman scorbutically affected.
48397 scorce SCORCE. [See Scorse.]
48398 scorch SCORCH, v.t.1. To burn superficially; to subject to a degree of heat that changes the color of a ...
48399 scorched SCORCH'ED, pp. Burnt on the surface; pained by heat.
48401 scorching-fennel SCORCH'ING-FENNEL, n. A plant of the genus Thapsia; deadly carrot.
48400 scorching SCORCH'ING, ppr. Burning on the surface; paining by heat.
48402 scordium SCOR'DIUM, n. [L.] A plant, the water-germander, a species of Teucrium.
48403 score SCORE, n.1. A notch or incision; hence, the number twenty. Our ancestors, before the knowledge of ...
48404 scored SCO'RED, pp. Notched; set down; marked; prepared for hewing.In botany, a scored stem is marked with ...
48405 scoria SCO'RIA, n. [L. from the Gr. rejected matter, that which is thrown off.]Dross; the recrement of ...
48406 scoriaceous SCORIA'CEOUS, a. Pertaining to dross; like dross or the recrement of metals; partaking of the ...
48407 scorification SCORIFICA'TION, n. In metallurgy, the act or operation of reducing a body, either wholly or in ...
48408 scorified SCO'RIFIED, pp. Reduced to scoria.
48409 scoriform SCO'RIFORM, a. [L. scoria and form.] Like scoria; in the form of dross.
48410 scorify SCO'RIFY, v.t. To reduce to scoria or drossy matter.
48411 scorifying SCO'RIFYING, ppr. Reducing to scoria.
48412 scoring SCO'RING, ppr. Notching; marking; setting down as an account or debt; forming a score.
48413 scorious SCO'RIOUS, a. Drossy; recrementitious.
48414 scorn SCORN, n.1. Extreme contempt; that disdain which springs from a person's opinion of the meanness ...
48415 scorned SCORN'ED, pp. Extremely contemned or despised; disdained.
48416 scorner SCORN'ER, n.1. One that scorns; a contemner; a despiser.They are great scorners of death.2. A ...
48417 scornful SCORN'FUL, a. 1. Contemptuous; disdainful; entertaining scorn; insolent.Th' enamor'd deity the ...
48418 scornfully SCORN'FULLY, adv. With extreme contempt; contemptuously; insolently.The sacred rights of the ...
48419 scornfulness SCORN'FULNESS, n. The quality of being scornful.
48420 scorning SCORN'ING, ppr. Holding in great contempt; despising; disdaining.SCORN'ING, n. The act of ...
48422 scorpion-fly SCOR'PION-FLY, n. An insect of the genus Panorna, having a tail which resembles that of a ...
48423 scorpion-grass SCOR'PION-GRASS,
48424 scorpion-senna SCOR'PION-SENNA, n. A plant of the genus Coronilla.
48425 scorpion-wort SCOR'PION-WORT, n. A plant, the Ornithopus scorpioides.
48421 scorpion SCOR'PION, n. [L. scorpio; Gr. probably altered from the Oriental.]1. In zoology, an insect of ...
48426 scorpions-thorn SCOR'PION'S-THORN, n. A plant of the genus Ulex.
48427 scorse SCORSE, n. [L. ex and cursus.] A course or dealing; barter. Obs.SCORSE, v.t.1. To chase. ...
48428 scortatory SCORT'ATORY, a. [L. scortator, from scortor.] Pertaining to or consisting in lewdness.
48429 scorza SCOR'ZA, n. [L. ex and cortex.] In mineralogy, a variety of epidote.
48430 scot SCOT,
48431 scotal SCOT'AL,
48432 scotale SCOT'ALE, n. [scot and ale.] In law, the keeping of an alehouse by the officer of a forest, and ...
48434 scotch-collops SCOTCH-COLLOPS,
48435 scotch-hopper SCOTCH-HOPPER, n. A play in which boys hop over scotches or lines in the ground.
48433 scotch SCOTCH, v.t.To support, as a wheel, by placing some obstacle to prevent its rolling. Our wagoners ...
48436 scotched-collops SCOTCHED-COLLOPS, n. Veal cut into small pieces.
48437 scoter SCO'TER, n. The black diver or duck, a species of Anas.
48438 scotfree SCOT'FREE, a. 1. Free from payment or scot; untaxed.2. Unhurt; clear; safe.
48439 scotia SCO'TIA, n. In architecture, a semicircular cavity or channel between the tores in the bases of ...
48440 scotish SCOT'ISH,
48441 scotist SCO'TIST, n.One of the followers of Scotus, a sect of school divines who maintained the immaculate ...
48442 scotomy SCOT'OMY, n. [Gr. vertigo, from to darken.]Dizziness or swimming of the head, with dimness of ...
48443 scottering SCOT'TERING, n. A provincial word in Herefordshire, England, denoting the burning of a wad of ...
48444 scotticism SCOT'TICISM, n. An idiom or peculiar expression of the natives of Scotland.
48445 scottish SCOT'TISH, a. Pertaining to the inhabitants of Scotland, or to their country or language; as ...
48446 scoundrel SCOUN'DREL, n. [L. abscondo. ]A mean, worthless fellow; a rascal; a low petty villain; a man ...
48447 scoundrelism SCOUN'DRELISM, n. Baseness; turpitude; rascality.
48448 scour SCOUR, v.t.1. To rub hard with something rough, for the purpose of cleaning; as, to scour a ...
48449 scoured SCOUR'ED, pp. Rubbed with something rough, or made clean by rubbing; severely purged; brushed ...
48450 scourer SCOUR'ER, n.1. One that scours or cleans by rubbing.2. A drastic cathartic.3. One that runs with ...
48451 scourge SCOURGE, n. skurj. [L. corriggia, from corrigo, to straighten.]1. To whip; a lash consisting of a ...
48452 scourged SCOURG'ED, pp. Whipped; lashed; punished severely; harassed.
48453 scourger SCOURG'ER, n. One that scourges or punishes; one that afflicts severely.
48454 scourging SCOURG'ING, ppr. Whipping; lashing with severity; punishing or afflicting severely.
48455 scouring SCOUR'ING, ppr. Rubbing hard with something rough; cleaning by rubbing; cleansing with a drastic ...
48456 scourse SCOURSE. [See Scorse.]
48457 scout SCOUT, n. [L. ausculto, culto, colo; Gr. the ear.]1. In military affairs, a person sent before an ...
48458 scovel SCO'VEL, n. [L. scopa.]A mop for sweeping ovens; a maulkin.
48459 scow SCOW, n.A large flat bottomed boat; used as a ferry boat, or for loading and unloading vessels. [A ...
48460 scowl SCOWL, v.i. [Gr. to twist.]1. To wrinkle the brows, as in frowning or displeasure; to put on a ...
48461 scowling SCOWL'ING, ppr. contracting the brows into wrinkles; frowning; expressing displeasure or ...
48462 scowlingly SCOWL'INGLY, adv. With a wrinkled, frowning aspect; with a sullen look.
48463 scrabble SCRAB'BLE, v.i. [L. scribo, Eng. grave, engrave, &c. See Scrape.]1. To scrape, paw or scratch ...
48464 scrabbling SCRAB'BLING, ppr. Scraping; scratching; scrambling; making irregular marks.
48465 scrag SCRAG, n. [This word is formed from the root of rag, crag, Gr. rack.]Something thin or lean with ...
48466 scragged SCRAG'GED,
48467 scraggedness SCRAG'GEDNESS,
48468 scraggily SCRAG'GILY, adv. With leanness and roughness.
48469 scragginess SCRAG'GINESS, n. Leanness, or leanness with roughness; ruggedness; roughness occasioned by broken ...
48470 scraggy SCRAG'GY, a. [supra.]1. Rough with irregular points or a broken surface; as a scraggy hill; a ...
48471 scramble SCRAM'BLE, v.i. [It is not improbably that this word is corrupted from the root of scrape, ...
48472 scrambler SCRAM'BLER, n. One who scrambles; one who climbs by the help of the hands.
48473 scrambling SCRAM'BLING, ppr.1. Climbing by the help of the hands.2. Catching at eagerly and without ...
48474 scranch SCR'ANCH, v.t.To grind with the teeth, and with a crackling sound; to craunch. [This is in vulgar ...
48475 scrannel SCRAN'NEL, a. Slight; poor.Grate on their scrannel pipes of wretched straw. [Not in use.]
48476 scrap SCRAP, n. [from scrape.]1. A small piece; properly something scraped off, but used for any thing ...
48477 scrape SCRAPE, v.t. [L. scribo, Gr. to write. See Grave.]1. To rub the surface of any thing with a ...
48478 scraped SCRA'PED, pp. Rubbed on the surface with a sharp or rough instrument; cleaned by rubbing; cleared ...
48479 scraper SCRA'PER, n.1. An instrument with which any thing is scraped; as a scraper for shoes.2. An ...
48480 scraping SCRA'PING, ppr. Rubbing the surface with something sharp or hard; cleaning by a scraper; removing ...
48481 scrat SCRAT, v.t. [formed on the root of L. rado.] To scratch. [Not in use.]SCRAT, v.i. To rake; to ...
48482 scratch SCRATCH, v.t. [L. rado.]1. To rub and tear the surface of any thing with something sharp or ...
48483 scratched SCRATCH'ED, pp. Torn by the rubbing of something rough or pointed.
48484 scratcher SCRATCH'ER, n. He or that which scratches.
48485 scratches SCRATCH'ES, n. plu. Cracked ulcers on a horse's foot, just above the hoof.
48486 scratching SCRATCH'ING, ppr. Rubbing with something pointed or rough; rubbing and tearing the surface.
48487 scratchingly SCRATCH'INGLY, adv. With the action of scratching.
48488 scraw SCRAW, n. Surface; cut turf. [Not in use.]
48489 scrawl SCRAWL, v.t.1. To draw or mark awkwardly and irregularly.2. To write awkwardly.SCRAWL, v.i.1. To ...
48490 scrawler SCRAWL'ER, n. One who scrawls; a hasty or awkward writer.
48491 scray SCRAY, n. A fowl called the sea swallow, of the genus Terna.
48492 screable SCRE'ABLE, a. [L. screabilis, from screo, to spit out.] That may be spit out. Obs.
48493 screak SCREAK, v.i. [This word is only a different orthography of screech and shriek, but is not ...
48494 scream SCREAM, v.i. [English skirmish.]1. To cry out with a shrill voice; to utter a sudden, sharp ...
48495 screamer SCRE'AMER, n. A fowl, or genus of fowls, of the grallic order, of two species, natives of America.
48496 screaming SCRE'AMING, ppr. Uttering suddenly a sharp shrill cry; crying with a shrill voice.SCRE'AMING, n. ...
48498 screech-owl SCREE'CH-OWL, n. An owl that utters a harsh disagreeable cry at night, no more ominous of evil ...
48497 screech SCREECH, v.i. [See Screak and Shriek.]1. To cry out with a sharp shrill voice; to utter a sudden ...
48499 screeching SCREE'CHING, ppr. Uttering a shrill or harsh cry.
48500 screed SCREED, n. With plasterers, the floated work behind a cornice.
48501 screen SCREEN, n. [L. cerno, excerno, Gr. to separate, to sift, to judge, to fight, contend skirmish. ...
48502 screened SCREE'NED, pp. Protected or sheltered from injury or danger; sifted.
48503 screening SCREE'NING, ppr. Protecting from injury or danger.
48504 screw SCREW, n.1. A cylinder of wood or metal, grooved spirally; or a cylinder with a spiral channel or ...
48505 screwed SCREW'ED, pp. Fastened with screws; pressed with screws; forced.
48506 screwer SCREW'ER, n. He or that which screws.
48507 screwing SCREW'ING, ppr. Turning a screw; fastening or pressing with a screw.
48508 scribble SCRIB'BLE, v.t. [L. scribillo, dim. of scribo, to write. See Scribe.]1. To write with haste, or ...
48509 scribbled SCRIB'BLED, pp. Written hastily and without care.
48510 scribbler SCRIB'BLER, n. A petty author; a writer of no reputation.The scribbler pinch'd with hunger, writes ...
48511 scribe SCRIBE, n. [L. scriba, from scribo, to write; formed probably on the root of grave, scrape, scrub. ...
48512 scrimer SCRI'MER, n. A fencing-master. Obs.
48513 scrimp SCRIMP, v.t.To contract; to shorten; to make too small or short; to limit or straiten; as, to ...
48514 scrine SCRINE, n. [L. scrinium;, cerno, secerno.]A shrine; a chest, book-case or other place where ...
48515 scringe SCRINGE, v.i. To cringe, of which this word is a corruption.
48516 scrip SCRIP, n. [This belongs to the root of gripe, our vulgar grab, that is, to seize or press.]A small ...
48517 scrippage SCRIP'PAGE, n. That which is contained in a scrip. [Not in use.]
48518 script SCRIPT, n. A scrip. [Not in use.]
48519 scriptory SCRIP'TORY, a. [L. scriptorius. See Scribe.]Written; expressed in writing; not verbal. [Little ...
48520 scriptural SCRIP'TURAL, a. [from scripture.]1. Contained in the Scriptures, so called by way of eminence, ...
48521 scripturalist SCRIP'TURALIST, n. One who adheres literally to the Scriptures and makes them the foundation of ...
48522 scripture SCRIP'TURE, n. [L. scriptura, from scribo, to write.]1. In its primary sense, a writing; any ...
48523 scripturist SCRIP'TURIST, n. One well versed in the Scriptures.
48524 scrivener SCRIV'ENER, n. [See Scribe.]1. A writer; one whose occupation is to draw contracts or other ...
48525 scrofula SCROF'ULA, n. [L.]A disease, called vulgarly the king's evil, characterized by hard, scirrous, and ...
48526 scrofulous SCROF'ULOUS, a.1. Pertaining to scrofula, or partaking of its nature; as scrofulous tumors; a ...
48527 scroll SCROLL, n. [probably formed from roll, or its root.]A roll of paper or parchment; or a writing ...
48528 scrotum SCRO'TUM, n. The bag which contains the testicles.
48529 scroyle SCROYLE, n. A mean fellow; a wretch. [Not in use.]
48530 scrub SCRUB, v.t. [This word is probably formed on rub, or its root, and perhaps scrape, L. scribo, may ...
48531 scrubbed SCRUB'BED,
48532 scrubby SCRUB'BY, a. Small and mean; stunted in growth; as a scrubbed boy; a scrubby cur; a scrubby tree.
48533 scruf SCRUF, for scurf, not in use.
48534 scruple SCRU'PLE, n. [L. scrupulus, a doubt; scrupulum, the third part of a dram, from scrupus, a ...
48535 scrupled SCRU'PLED, pp. Doubted; questioned.
48536 scrupler SCRU'PLER, n. A doubter; one who hesitates.
48537 scrupling SCRU'PLING, ppr. Doubting; hesitating; questioning.
48538 scrupulosity SCRUPULOS'ITY, n. [L. scrupulositas.]1. The quality or state of being scrupulous; doubt; ...
48539 scrupulous SCRU'PULOUS, a. [L. scrupulosus.]1. Nicely doubtful; hesitating to determine or to act; cautious ...
48540 scrupulously SCRU'PULOUSLY, adv. With a nice regard to minute particulars or to exact propriety. The duty ...
48541 scrupulousness SCRU'PULOUSNESS, n. The state or quality of being scrupulous; niceness, exactness or caution in ...
48542 scrutable SCRU'TABLE, a. [See Scrutiny.] Discoverable by inquiry or critical examination.
48543 scrutation SCRUTA'TION, n. Search; scrutiny.
48544 scrutator SCRUTA'TOR, n. [L. from scrutor.] One that scrutinizes; a close examiner or inquirer.
48545 scrutinize SCRU'TINIZE, v.t. [from scrutiny.] To search closely; to examine or inquire into critically; as, ...
48546 scrutinized SCRU'TINIZED, pp. Examined closely.
48547 scrutinizer SCRU'TINIZER, n. One who examines with critical care.
48548 scrutinous SCRU'TINOUS, a. Closely inquiring or examining; captious.
48549 scrutiny SCRU'TINY, n. [L. scrutinium, from scrutor, to search closely, to pry into.] 1. Close ...
48550 scrutoir SCRUTO'IR, n. A kind of desk, case of drawers or cabinet, with a lid opening downward for the ...
48551 scruze SCRUZE, v.t. To crowd; to squeeze.
48552 scud SCUD, v.i. 1. In a gereral sense, to be driven or to flee or fly with haste. In ...
48553 scudding SCUD'DING, ppr. Driving or being driven before a tempest; running with fleetness.
48554 scuddle SCUD'DLE, v.i.. To run with a kind of affected haste; commonly pronounced scuttle.
48555 scuffle SCUF'FLE, n. [This is a different orthography of shuffle; from shove, or its root.] 1. ...
48556 scuffler SCUF'FLER, n. One who scuffles.
48557 scuffling SCUF'FLING, ppr. Striving for superiority with close embrace; struggling for contending without ...
48558 scug SCUG, v.t. To hide.
48559 sculk SCULK, v.i. To retire into a close or covered place for concealment; to lurl; to lie close from ...
48560 sculker SCULK'ER, n. A lurker; one that lies close for hiding.
48561 sculking SCULK'ING, ppr. Withdrawing into a close or covered place for concealment; lying close.
48562 scull SCULL, n. 1. The brain pan. 2. A boat; a cock boat. 3. One who ...
48563 scullcap SCULL'CAP [See Skull-cap.]
48564 sculler SCULL'ER, n. 1. A boat rowed by one man with two sculls or short oars. 2. One ...
48565 scullery SCULL'ERY, n. [probably from the root of shell, scale, G. schale, a scale, a shell, a dish or ...
48566 scullion SCULL'ION, n. A servant taht cleans pots and kettles, and does other menial services in the ...
48567 scullionly SCULL'IONLY, a. Like a scullion; base; low; mean.
48568 sculp SCULP, v.t. [L. sculpo, scalpo.] To carve; to engrave.
48569 sculptile SCULP'TILE, a. [L. sculptilis,] Formed by carving; as sculptile images.
48570 sculptor SCULP'TOR, n. [L. See Sculp.] One whose occupation is to carve wood or stone int images; a ...
48571 sculpture SCULP'TURE, n. [L. sculptura.] 1. The art of carving, cutting or hewing wood or stone ...
48572 sculptured SCULP'TURED, pp. Carved; engraved; as a sculptured vase; sculptured marble.
48573 sculpturing SCULP'TURING, ppr. Carving; engraving.
48574 scum SCUM, n. 1. The extraneous matter or impurities which rise to the surface of liquors ...
48575 scumber SCUM'BER, n. The dung of the fox.
48576 scummed SCUM'MED, pp. Cleaned of scum; skimmed.
48577 scummer SCUM'MER, n. An instrument used for taking off the scum of liquors; a skimmer.
48578 scumming SCUM'MING, ppr. Clearing of scum; slimming.
48579 scummings SCUM'MINGS, n. The matter skimmed from boiling liquors; as the scummings of the boiling house.
48581 scupper-hose SCUP'PER-HOSE, n. A lethern pipe attached to the mouth of the scuppers of the lower deck of a ...
48582 scupper-nail SCUP'PER-NAIL, n. A nail with a very broad head for covering a large surface of the hose.
48583 scupper-plug SCUP'PER-PLUG, n. A plug to stop a scupper.
48580 scupper SCUP'PER, n. The scuppers or scupper holes of a ship, are channels cut through the water ways and ...
48584 scurf SCURF, n. [L. scorbutus.] 1. A dry military scab or crust formed on the skin of an ...
48585 scurff SCURFF, n. Another name for the bulltrout.
48586 scurfiness SCURF'INESS, n. The state of being scurfy.
48587 scurfy SCURF'Y, a. 1. Having scurf; covered with scurf. 2. Resembling scurf.
48588 scurril SCUR'RIL, a. [L. scurrilis, from scurra ,a buffoon.] Such as befits a buffoon or vulgar jester; ...
48589 scurrility SCURRIL'ITY, n. [L. scurrilitas.] Such low. vulgar, indecent or abusive language as is used by ...
48590 scurrilous SCUR'RILOUS, a. 1. Using the low and indecent language of the meaner sort of people, or ...
48591 scurrilously SCUR'RILOUSLY, adv. With gross reproach; with low indecent language. It is ...
48592 scurrilousness SCUR'RILOUSNESS, n. Indecency of language; vulgarity; baseness of manners.
48593 scurtinizing SCUR'TINIZING, ppr. Inquiring into with critical minuteness or exactness.
48594 scurvily SCUR'VILY, adv. [from scurvy.] Basely; meanly; with coarse and vulgar incivility. ...
48595 scurviness SCUR'VINESS, n. [from scurvy.] The state of being scurvy.
48596 scurvogel SCUR'VOGEL, n. A Brazilian fowl of the stork kind, the jabiru guacu.
48598 scurvy-grass SCUR'VY-GRASS, n. A plant of the genus Cochlearia; spoonwort. It grows on rocks near the sea, ...
48597 scurvy SCUR'VY, n. [from scurf; scurvy for scurfy; Low L. scorbutus.] A disease characterized by great ...
48599 scuses 'SCUSES, for excuses.
48600 scut SCUT, n. The tail of a hare or other animal whose tail is short.
48601 scutage SCU'TAGE, n. [Law L. scutagium, from scutum, a shield.] In English history, a tax or ...
48602 scutcheon SCUTCHEON, A contractiion of escutcheon, which see.
48603 scute SCUTE, n. [L. scutum, a buckler.] A french gold coin of 3s. 4d. sterling.
48604 scutellated SCU'TELLATED, a. [L. scutella, a dish. See Scuttle.] Formed like a pan; divided into small ...
48605 scutiform SCU'TIFORM, a. [L. scutum, a buckler, and form.] Having a form of a buckler or shield.
48607 scuttle-butt SCUT'TLE-BUTT, n. A butt or cask having a square piece sawn out of its lilge, and lashed
48608 scuttle-cask SCUT'TLE-CASK, upon deck.
48609 scuttle-fish SCUT'TLE-FISH, n. The cuttle-fich, so called. [See Cuttle-fish.]
48606 scuttle SCUT'TLE, n. [L. scutella, a pan or saucer.] A broad shallow basket; so called from its ...
48610 scuttled SCUT'TLED, pp. Having holes made in the bottom or sides; sunk by means of cutting holes in the ...
48611 scuttling SCUT'TLING, ppr. Cutting holes in the bottom or sides; sinking by such holes.
48612 scytale SCYT'ALE, n. A species of serpent.
48613 scythe SCYTHE, A wrong spelling. [See Sythe.]
48614 scythian SCYTH'IAN, a. Pretaining to Scythia, a name given to the northern part of Asia, and Europe ...
48615 sdain SDAIN, for disdain. [Not in use.]
48616 sdeinful SDEINFUL, for disdainful. [Not in use.]
48618 sea-anemony SEA-ANEM'ONY, n. The animal flower, which see.
48619 sea-ape SE'A-APE, n. [sea and ape.] The name given to a marine animal which plays tricks like an ape.
48620 sea-bank SE'A-BANK, n. [sea and bank.] 1. The sea shore. 2. A bank or mole to defend ...
48621 sea-bar SE'A-BAR, n. [sea and bar.] The sea-swallow.
48622 sea-bat SE'A-BAT, n. [sea and bat.] A sort of flying fish.
48623 sea-bathed SEA-BA'THED, a. [sea and bathe.] Bathed dipped or washed in the sea.
48624 sea-bear SE'A-BEAR, n. [sea and bear.] An animal of the bear kind that frequents the sea; the white or ...
48625 sea-beard SE'A-BEARD, n. [sea and beard.] A marine plant.
48626 sea-beast SE'A-BEAST, n. [sea and beast.] A beast or monstrous animal of the sea.
48627 sea-beat SE'A-BEAT, a. [sea and beat.] Beaten by the sea; lashed by the waves.
48628 sea-beaten SE'A-BEATEN, Along the sea-beat shore. Pope
48629 sea-boat SE'A-BOAT, n. [sea and boat.] A vessel that bears the sea firmly, without laboring or straining ...
48630 sea-bord SE'A-BORD, a. Bordering on the sea or ocean.
48631 sea-bordering SEA-BORD'ERING,
48632 sea-born SE'A-BORN, a. [sea and born.] 1. Born of the sea; produced by the sea; as Neptune and ...
48633 sea-bound SE'A-BOUND, a. [sea and bound.] Bounded by the sea.
48634 sea-bounded SE'A-BOUNDED,
48635 sea-boy SE'A-BOY, n. [sea and boy.] A boy employed on shipboard.
48636 sea-breach SE'A-BREACH, n. [sea and breach.] Irruption of the sea by breaking the banks.
48637 sea-bream SE'A-BREAM, n. [sea and bream.] A fish of the Sparus kind.
48638 sea-breeze SE'A-BREEZE, n. [sea and breeze.] A wind or current of air blowing from the sea upon land; for ...
48639 sea-built SE'A-BUILT, a. [sea and built.] Built for the sea; as sea-built forts, [ships.]
48640 sea-cabbage SE'A-CAB'BAGE, n. [sea and cabbage.] Sea-colewort, a plant of the genus Crambe.
48641 sea-cale SE'A-CALE,
48642 sea-calf SE'A-CALF, n. [sea and calf.] The connom seal, a species of Phoca.
48643 sea-cap SE'A-CAP, n. [sea and cap.] A cap made to be worn at sea.
48644 sea-card SE'A-C'ARD, n. [sea and card.] The mariner's card or compass.
48645 sea-carp SE'A-CARP, n. [sea and carp.] A spotted fish fiving among rocks and stones.
48646 sea-change SE'A-CHANGE, n. [sea and change.] A change wrought by the sea.
48647 sea-chart SE'A-CH'ART, n. [sea and chart.] A chart or map on which the line of the shore, isles, shoals, ...
48648 sea-circled SE'A-CIRCLED, a. [sea and circle.] Surrounded by the sea.
48649 sea-coal SE'A-COAL, n. [sea and coal.] Coal brought by sea; a vulgar name for fossil coal, in ...
48650 sea-coast SE'A-COAST, n. [sea and coast.] The shore or border of the land adjacent to the sea or ocean.
48651 sea-cob SE'A-COB, n. [sea and cob.] A fowl, called also sea-gull.
48652 sea-colewort SE'A-COLEWORT, n. Sea-cale, which see.
48653 sea-compass SE'A-COMPASS, n. [sea and campass.] The mariner's card and needle; the compass constructed for ...
48654 sea-coot SE'A-COOT, n. [sea and coot.] A sea fowl,
48655 sea-cow SE'A-COW, n. [sea and cow.] The Trichecus manatus, or manati. [See Manati.]
48656 sea-crow SE'A-CROW, n. [sea and crow.] A fowl of the full kind; the mire-crow or pewet.
48657 sea-devil SE'A-DEVIL, n. [sea and devil.] The fishing frog or toad-fish, of the genus Lophius; a fish of a ...
48658 sea-dog SE'A-DOG, n. [sea and dog.] 1. A fish, perhaps the shark. 2. The sea-calf or ...
48659 sea-dragon SE'A-DRAGON, n. [sea and dragon.] A marine monster caught in England in 1749, resembling in some ...
48660 sea-ear SE'A-EAR, n. [sea and ear.] A sea plant.
48661 sea-eel SE'A-EEL, n. [sea and eel.] An eel caught in salt water; the conger.
48662 sea-encircled SEA-ENCIR'CLED, a. [sea and encircled.] Encompassed by the sea.
48663 sea-farer SE'A-FARER, n. [sea and fare.] One that follows the seas; a mariner.
48664 sea-faring SE'A-FARING, a. Following the business of a seaman; customarily employed in navigation.
48665 sea-fennel SE'A-FENNEL, n. [sea and fennel.] The sea as samphire.
48666 sea-fight SE'A-FIGHT, n. [sea and fight.] An engagement between ships at sea; a naval action.
48667 sea-fish SE'A-FISH, n. [sea and fish.] Any marine fish; any fish that lives usually in salt water.
48668 sea-fowl SE'A-FOWL, n. [sea and fowl.] A marine fowl; any fowl that lives by the sea, and procures it ...
48669 sea-fox SE'A-FOX, n. A species of squalus, having a tail longer than the body.
48670 sea-gage SE'A-GAGE, n. [sea and gage.] The depth that a vessel sinks in the water.
48671 sea-garland SE'A-G'ARLAND, n. [sea and garland.] A plant.
48672 sea-girdles SE'A-GIRDLES, n. [sea and girdle.] A sort of sea mushroom.
48673 sea-girt SE'A-GIRT, a. [sea and girt.] Surrounded by the water of the sea or ocean; as a sea-girt isle.
48674 sea-god SE'A-GOD, n. [sea and god.] A marine deity; a fabulous being supposed to preside over the ocean ...
48675 sea-gown SE'A-GOWN, n. [sea and gown.] A gown or garment with short sleeves, worn by mariners.
48676 sea-grass SE'A-GR'ASS, [sea and grass.] A plant growing on the sea shore; an aquatic plant of the genus ...
48677 sea-green SE'A-GREEN, a. [sea and green.] Having the color of sea water; being of a faint green ...
48678 sea-gull SE'A-GULL, n. [sea and gull.] A fowl of the genus Larus; a species of gull; called also ...
48679 sea-hare SE'A-HARE, n. [sea and hare.] A marine animal of the genus Laplysia, whose body is covered with ...
48680 sea-hedghog SEA-HEDGHOG, n. A sea shell, a species of Echinus, so called from its prickles, which resemble in ...
48681 sea-hen SE'A-HEN, n. [sea and hen.] Anothe name of the guillemot.
48682 sea-hog SE'A-HOG, n. [sea and hog.] The porpes, which see.
48683 sea-holly SE'A-HOLLY, n. [sea and holly.] A plant of the genus Eryngium.
48684 sea-holm SE'A-HOLM, n. 1. A small uninhabited isle. 2. Sea-holly.
48685 sea-horse SE'A-HORSE, n. [sea and horse.] 1. In ichthyoilogy, the morse, a species of Trichechus ...
48686 sea-legs SE'A-LEGS, n. [sea and leg.] The ability to walk on a ship' deck when pitching or rolling.
48687 sea-lemon SE'A-LEMON, n. [sea and lemon] A marine animal of the genus Doris, having an oval body, convex, ...
48688 sea-like SE'A-LIKE, a. [sea and like] Resembling the sea.
48689 sea-lion SE'A-LION, n. [sea and lion] An animal of the genus Phoca or seal, which has a mane like a lion, ...
48690 sea-maid SE'A-MAID, n. [sea and maid] 1. The mermaid. [See Mermaid.] 2. A sea nymph.
48691 sea-mall SE'A-MALL, n. A fowl, a species of gull or Larus.
48692 sea-man SE'A-MAN, n. [sea and man] 1. A sailor; a mariner; a man whose occupation is to assist ...
48693 sea-mark SE'A-M'ARK, n. [sea and mark.] Any elevated object on land which serves for a direction to ...
48694 sea-mew SE'A-MEW,
48695 sea-monster SE'A-MONSTER, n. [sea and monster.] A huge marine animal. Lam. 4.
48696 sea-moss SE'A-MOSS, n. [sea and moss.] A name given to coral. [See Coral.]
48697 sea-navelwort SEA-NAVELWORT, n. [sea, navel and wort.] A plant growing in Syria, which is said to effect great ...
48698 sea-needle SE'A-NEEDLE, n. [sea and needle.] A name of the gar or garfish, of the genus Esox. This fish ...
48699 sea-nettle SE'A-NETTLE, n. [sea and nettle.] Another name of the animal flower, sea-anemony.
48700 sea-nursed SE'A-NURSED, a. [sea and nursed.] Nursed by the sea.
48701 sea-nymph SE'A-NYMPH, n. [sea and nymph.] A nymph or goddess of the sea.
48702 sea-onion SE'A-ONION, n. [sea and onion.] A plant.
48703 sea-ooze SE'A-OOZE, n. [sea and ooze.] The soft mud on or near the sea shore.
48704 sea-otter SE'A-OTTER, n. [sea and otter.] A species of otter that has hind feet like those of a seal. It ...
48705 sea-owl SE'A-OWL, n. [sea and owl.] Another name of the lump-fish.
48706 sea-pad SE'A-PAD, n. The star-fish. [Stella marina.]
48707 sea-panther SE'A-PANTHER, n. [sea and panther.] A fish like a lamprey.
48708 sea-pheasant SE'A-PHEASANT, n. [sea and pheasant.] The pin-tailed duck.
48709 sea-pie SE'A-PIE, n. [sea and pie, pica.] A fowl of the genus Haematopus, and grallic order; called
48710 sea-piece SE'A-PIECE, n. [sea and piece.] A picture representing a scene at sea.
48711 sea-plant SE'A-PLANT, n. [sea and plant.] A plant that grows in salt water, as the fucus, conferva &c.
48712 sea-pool SE'A-POOL, n. [sea and pool.] A lake of salt water.
48713 sea-pye SE'A-PYE, also the oyster-catcher, from its thrusting its beak into oysters when open, and taking ...
48714 sea-resembling SEA-RESEM'BLING, a. Like the sea; sea-like.
48715 sea-risk SE'A-RISK, n. [sea and risk.] Hazard or risk at sea; danger of injury or destruction by the sea.
48716 sea-robber SE'A-ROBBER, n. [sea and robber.] A pirate; one that robs on the high seas.
48717 sea-rocket SE'A-ROCKET, n. A plant of the genus Bunias.
48718 sea-room SE'A-ROOM, n..[sea and room.] Ample space or distance from land, shoals or rocks, sufficient for ...
48719 sea-rover SE'A-ROVER, n. [sea and rover.] 1. A pirate; one that cruizes for plunder. ...
48720 sea-ruff SE'A-RUFF, n. A kind of sea fish. [L. orphus.]
48721 sea-scorpion SEA-SCOR'PION, n. [sea and scorpion.] Another name for a fatherlasher.
48722 sea-serpent SE'A-SERPENT, n. [sea and serpent.] A huge animal like a serpent inhabiting the sea.
48723 sea-service SE'A-SERVICE, n. [sea and service.] Naval service; service in the navy or in ships of war.
48724 sea-shark SE'A-SH'ARK, n. [sea and shark.] A ravenous sea fish.
48725 sea-shell SE'A-SHELL, n. [sea ansd shell.] A marine shell; a shell that grows in the sea.
48726 sea-shore SEA-SHO'RE, n. [sea and shore.] The coast of the sea; the land that lied adjacent to the sea or ...
48727 sea-sick SE'A-SICK, a. [sea and sick.] Affected with sickness or nausea by means of the pitching or ...
48728 sea-sickness SE'A-SICKNESS, n. The sickness or nausea occasioned by the pitching and rolling of a ship in an ...
48729 sea-side SE'A-SIDE, n. [sea and side.] The land bordering on the sea; the country adjacent to the sea, or ...
48730 sea-star SE'A-ST'AR, n. [sea and star.] The starfish, a genus of marine animals, called technically ...
48731 sea-surgeon SEA-SUR'GEON, n. [sea and surgeon.] A surgeon employed on shipboard.
48732 sea-surrounded SEA-SURROUND'ED, a. [sea and surround.] Encompassed by the sea.
48733 sea-term SE'A-TERM, n. [sea and term.] A word or term used appropriately by seamen, or peculiar to the ...
48734 sea-thief SE'A-THIEF, n. [sea and thief.] A pirate.
48735 sea-toad SE'A-TOAD, n. [sea and toad.] An ugly fish, so called.
48736 sea-torn SE'A-TORN, a. [sea and torn.] Torn by or at sea.
48737 sea-tossed SE'A-TOSSED, a. [sea and tossed.] Tossed by sea.
48738 sea-urchin SE'A-URCHIN, n. [sea and urchin.] A genus of marine animals, the Echinus, of many species. The ...
48739 sea-walled SE'A-WALLED, a. [sea and walled.] Surrounded or defended by the sea.
48740 sea-water SE'A-WATER, n. [sea and water.] Water of the sea or ocean, which is salt.
48741 sea-weed SE'A-WEED, n. [sea and weed.] A marine plant of the genus Fucus, used as manure, and for glass ...
48742 sea-withwind SE'A-WITHWIND, n. Bindweed.
48743 sea-wolf SE'A-WOLF, n. [sea and wolf. See Wolf.] A fish of the genus Anarrhicas, found in northern ...
48744 sea-wormwood SEA-WORM'WOOD, n. A sort of wormwood growing in the sea, the Artemisia maritima.
48617 sea SEA, n. see. [This word, like lake, signifies primarily a seat, set or lay, a repository, a ...
48745 seaboard SE'ABOARD, adv. Towards the sea.
48746 seabord SE'ABORD n. The sea shore.
48747 seal SEAL, n. The common name for the species of the genus Phoca. These animals are ampibious, most ...
48748 sealed SE'ALED, pp. Furnished with a seal; fastened with a seal; confirmed; closed.
48749 sealer SE'ALER, n. 1. One who seals; an officer in chancery who seals writs and instruments. ...
48751 sealing-voyage SE'ALING-VOYAGE, n. A voyage for the purpose of killing seals and obtaining their skins.
48752 sealing-wax SE'ALING-WAX, n. [seal and wax.] A compound of gum lac and the red oxyd of mercury; used for ...
48750 sealing SE'ALING, ppr. Fixing a seal; fastening with a seal; confirming; closing; keeping secret; fixing a ...
48754 seam-rent SE'AM-RENT, n. [seam and rent.] The rent of a seam; the separation of a suture.
48753 seam SEAM, n. 1. The suture or uniting of two edges of cloth by the needle. ...
48755 seaman SEAMAN. [See under Sea.]
48756 seamanship SE'AMANSHIP, n. The skill of a good seaman; an acquaintance with the art of managing and ...
48757 seamed SE'AMED, pp. Marked with seams; having seams or scars.
48758 seaming SE'AMING, ppr. Marking with scars; making seams.
48759 seamless SE'AMLESS, a. Having mo seam; as the seamless garment of Christ.
48760 seamouse SE'AMOUSE, n. [sea and mouse.] A marine animal of the genus Aphrodita.
48761 seamster SE'AMSTER, n. One that sews well, or whose occupation is to sew.
48762 seamstress SE'AMSTRESS, n. A woman whose occupation is sewing.
48763 seamy SE'AMY, a. Having a seam; containing seams or showing them.
48764 sean SEAN, n. a met. [See Seine.]
48765 seaport SE'APORT, n. [sea and port.] 1. A harbor near the sea, formed by an arm of the sea or ...
48766 seapoy SE'APOY, n. A native of India in the military service of an European power, and disceplined SE'POY, ...
48768 sear-cloth SE'AR-CLOTH, n. A cloth to cover a sore; a plaster.
48767 sear SEAR, v. t. [Gr. to dry; to parch; dry. L. torreo, in a diffrent dialect.] 1. To burn ...
48769 searce SEARCE, v. t. sers. To shift; to bolt; to separate the fine part of meal from the coarse. ...
48770 searcer SEARCER, n. sers'er. One that sifts or bolts. [Little used.]
48771 search SEARCH, v. t. serch 1. To look over or through for the purpose of finding something; ...
48772 searchable SEARCHABLE, a. serch'able. That may be searched or explored.
48773 searched SEARCHED, pp. serch'ed. Looked over carefully; explored; examined.
48774 searcher SEARCHER, n. serch'er. 1. One who searches, explores or examines for the prupose of ...
48775 searching SEARCHING, pp. serch'ing. 1. Looking into or over; exploring; examining; inquiring; ...
48776 searchless SEARCHLESS, n. serch'less. Inscrutable; eluding search or investigation.
48777 seared SE'ARED, pp. [from sear.] Burnt on the furface; cauterized; hardened;
48778 searedness SE'AREDNESS, n. The state of being seared, cauterized or hardened; hardness; hence insensibility.
48779 season SE'ASON. n. se'zn.Season literally signifies that which comes or arrives; and in this general ...
48780 seasonable SE'ASONABLE, a. Opportune; that comes, happens or is done in good time, in due season or in ...
48781 seasonableness SE'ASONABLENESS, n. Opportuneness of time; that state of being in good time, or in time ...
48782 seasonably SE'ASONABLY, adv. In due time; in time convenient; sufficiently early; as, to sow or plant ...
48783 seasonage SE'ASONAGE, n. Seasoning; sauce. [Not used.]
48784 seasoned SE'ASONED, pp. Mixed or sprinkled with something that gives a relish; tempered; moderated; ...
48785 seasoner SE'ASONER, n. He that seasons; that which seasons, matures or gives a relish.
48786 seasoning SE'ASONING, ppr. Giving a relish by something added; moderating; qualifying; maturing; drying and ...
48787 seat SEAT, n. [L. sedes, situs.] 1. That on which one sits; a chair, bench, stool or any ...
48788 seated SE'ATED, pp. Placed in a chair or on a bench, &c.; set; fixed; settled; established; furnished ...
48789 seating SE'ATING, ppr. Placing on a seat; setting; settling; furnishing with a seat; having its seats ...
48790 seaves SEAVES, n. plu. [Heb. suf.] Rushes.
48791 seavy SE'AVY, a. Overgrown with rushes.
48792 seaward SE'AWARD, a. [sea and ward.] Directed towards the sea.SE'AWARD, adv. Towards the sea.
48793 seaworthy SE'AWORTHY, A. [sea and worthy.] Fit for a voyage; worthy of being trusted to transport a cargo ...
48794 sebaceous SEBA'CEOUS, a. [Low L. sebaceus, from sebum, sevum, tallow.] Made of tallow or fat; pretaining ...
48795 sebacic SEBAC'IC, a. [supra.] In chimistry, pretaining to fat; obtained fro fat; as the sebacic acid.
48796 sebate SE'BATE, n. [supra.] In chimistry, a salt formed by the sebacic acid and a base.
48797 sebesten SEBES'TEN, n. The Assyrian plum, a plant of the genus Cordia, a species of jujube.
48798 secant SE'CANT, a. [L. secans, seco, to cut or cut off, coinciding with Eng. saw.] Cutting; dividing ...
48799 secede SECE'DE, v.i. [L. secedo; se, from, and cedo, to move. Se is an inseparable preposition or prefix ...
48800 seceder SECE'DER, n. One who secedes. In Scotland, the seceders are a numerous body of presbyterians who ...
48801 seceding SECE'DING, ppr. Withdrawing from fellowship or communion.
48802 secern SECERN', v.t. [L. secerno; se and cerno, to separate.] In the animal economy, to secrete. ...
48803 secerned SECERN'ED, pp. Separated; secreted.
48804 secernent SECERN'ENT, n. That which promotes secretion; that which increases the irritative motions, which ...
48805 secerning SECERN'ING, ppr. Separating; secreting; as secerning vessels.
48806 seclude SECLU'DE, v. t. [L. secludo; se and claudo, cludo, to shut.] 1. To separate, as from ...
48807 secluded SECLU'DED, pp. Separated from others; living in retirement; shut out.
48808 secluding SECLU'DING, ppr. Separating from others; confining in solitude or in a separate state; preventing ...
48809 seclusion SECLU'SION, n. s as z. The act of separating from society or connection; the state of being ...
48811 second-hand SEC'OND-HAND, n. Possession received from the first possessor.SEC'OND-HAND, a. 1. ...
48812 second-rate SEC'OND-RATE, n. [second and rate.] The second order in size, dignity, or value. ...
48813 second-sight SEC'OND-SIGHT, n. The power of seeing things future or distant; a power claimed by some of the ...
48814 second-sighted SEC'OND-SIGHTED, a. Having the power of second-sight.
48810 second SEC'OND, a. [L. secundus; L. sequor, to follow. See Seek.] 1. That immediately ...
48815 secondarily SEC'ONDARILY, adv. [from secondary.] In second degree or second order; not primarily or ...
48816 secondariness SEC'ONDARINESS, n. The state of being secondary.
48817 secondary SEC'ONDARY, a. [L. secundarius, from secundus.] 1. Succeeding next in order to the ...
48818 seconded SEC'ONDED, pp. Supported; aided.
48819 seconder SEC'ONDER, n. One that supported what another attempts, or what he affirms, or hat he moves or ...
48820 secondly SEC'ONDLY, adv. In the second place.
48821 secrecy SE'CRECY, n. [from secret.] 1. Properly, a state of separation; hence, concealment ...
48822 secret SE'CRET, a. [L. secretus. This is given as the participle of secerno, but is radically a ...
48823 secretariship SEC'RETARISHIP, n. The office of a secretary.
48824 secretary SEC'RETARY, n. [L. secretus, secret;originally a confident, one entrusted with secrets.] ...
48825 secrete SECRE'TE, v.t. 1. To hide; to conceal; to remove from observation or the knowledge of ...
48826 secreted SECRE'TED, pp. Concealed; secerned.
48827 secreting SECRE'TING, ppr. Hiding; secerning.
48828 secretion SECRE'TION, n. 1. The act of secerning; the act of the producing from the blood ...
48829 secretist SE'CRETIST, n. A dealer in secrets. [Not in use.]
48830 secretitious SECRETI'TIOUS, a. Parted by an animal in secretion.
48831 secretly SE'CRETLY, adv. 1. Privately; privily; not openly; without the knowledge of others; ...
48832 secretness SE'CRETNESS, n. 1. The state of being hid or concealed. 2. The quality of ...
48833 sect SECT, n. [L. Sp. secta; from L. seco, to cut off, to separate.] 1. A body or number of ...
48834 sectarian SECTA'RIAN, a. [L. secrarius.] Pertaining to a sect or sects; as sectarian principles or ...
48835 sectarianism SECTA'RIANISM, n. The disposition to dissent from the established church or predominant religion, ...
48836 sectarism SECT'ARISM, n. Sectarianism. [Little used.]
48837 sectarist SECT'ARIST, n. A secretary. [Not much used.]
48838 sectary SECT'ARY, n. 1. A person who separates from an established church, or from the ...
48839 sectator SECTA'TOR, n. A follower; a disciple; an adherent to a sect. [Not now used.]
48840 sectile SECT'ILE, a. [L. sectilus, from seco, to cut.] A sectile mineral is one that is midway between ...
48841 section SEC'TION, n. [L. sectio; seco, to cut off.] 1. The act of cutting or of separating by ...
48842 sectional SEC'TIONAL, A. Pertaining to a section or distinct part of a larger body or territory.
48843 sector SECT'OR, n. [L. seco, to cut.] 1. In geometry, a part of a circle comprehended between ...
48844 secular SEC'ULAR, a. [L. secularis, from seculum, the world or an age.] 1. Pertaining to the ...
48845 secularity SECULAR'ITY, n. Worldiness; supreme attention to the things of the present life.
48846 secularization SECULARIZA'TION, n. [foom secularize.] the act of converting a regular person, place or benefice ...
48847 secularize SEC'ULARIZE, v. t. 1. To make secular; to convert from spiritual appropriation to ...
48848 secularized SEC'ULARIZED, pp. Converted from regular to secular.
48849 secularizing SEC'ULARIZING, ppr. Converting from regular or monastic to secular.
48850 secularly SEC'ULARLY, adv. In a worldy manner.
48851 secularness SEC'ULARNESS, n. A secular disposition; worldliness; worldly mindedness.
48852 secundine SEC'UNDINE, n. Secundines, in the plural, as generally used, are the several coats or membranes ...
48853 secure SECU'RE, a. [L. securus.] 1. Free from danger of being taken by an enemy; that may ...
48854 secured SECU'RED, pp. Effectually guarded or protected; made certain; put beyond hazard; effectually ...
48855 securely SECU'RELY, adv. 1. Without danger; safely; as, to pass a river on ice securely. But ...
48856 securement SECU'REMENT, n. Security; protection. [Not used.]
48857 secureness SECU'RENESS, n. Confidence of safety; exemption from fear; hence, want of vigilance or caution.
48858 securer SECU'RER, n. He or that which secures or protects.
48859 securiform SECU'RIFORM, a. [L. securis, an ax or hatchet, and form.] In botany, having the form of an ax or ...
48860 security SECU'RITY, n. [L. securitas.] 1. Protection; effectual defense or saftey from danger of ...
48861 sedan SEDAN', n. [L. sedeo; like L. esseda] A portable chair or cover vehicle for carrying a single ...
48862 sedate SEDA'TE, a. [L. sedatus, from sedo, to calm or appease, that is, to set, to cause to subside.] ...
48863 sedately SEDA'TELY, adv. Calmly; without agitation of mind.
48864 sedateness SEDA'TENESS, n. Calmness of mind, manner or countenance; freedom from agitation; a settled state; ...
48865 sedation SEDA'TION, n. The act of calming. [Not in use.]
48866 sedative SEDATIVE, a. [L. sedo, to calm.] In medicine, moderating muscular action or animal energy.
48867 sedentarily SED'ENTARILY, adv. [from sedentary.] The state of being sedentary, or living without much ...
48868 sedentariness SED'ENTARINESS, n. The state of being sedentary.
48869 sedentary SED'ENTARY, a. [L. sedentarius, from sedens, sedeo, to sit.] 1. Accustomed to sit much, ...
48870 sedge SEDGE, n. [L. seco, to cut; that is sword grass, like L. gladiolus.] 1. A narrow flag, ...
48871 sedged SEDG'ED, a. Composed of flags or sedge.
48872 sedgy SEDG'Y, a. Overgrown with sedge. On the gentle Severn's sedgy bank. Shak.
48873 sediment SED'IMENT, n. [L. sedimentum, from sedeo, to settle.] The matter which subsides to the bottom of ...
48874 sedition SEDI''TION, n. [L. seditio. The sense of this word is the contrary of that which is naturally ...
48875 seditionary SEDI''TIONARY, n. An inciter or promoter of sedition.
48876 seditious SEDI''TIOUS, a. [L. seditiosus.] 1. Pertaining to sedition; partaking of the nature of ...
48877 seditiously SEDI''TIOUSLY, adv. With tumultious opposition to law; in a manner to violate the public peace.
48878 seditiousness SEDI''TIOUSNESS, n. The disposition to excite popular commotion in opposition to law; or the act ...
48879 seduce SEDU'CE, v. t. [L. seduco; se, from, and duco, to lead.] 1. To draw aside or entice ...
48880 seducement SEDU'CEMENT, n. 1. The act of seducing; seduction. 2. The means employed to ...
48881 seducer SEDU'CER, n. 1. One that seduces; one that by temptation or arts, entices another to ...
48882 seducible SEDU'CIBLE, a. Capable of being drawn aside from the path of rectitude; corruptible.
48883 seducing SEDU'CING, ppr. Enticing from the path of virtue or chastity.
48884 seduction SEDU'CTION, n. [L. seductio.] 1. The act of seducing or of enticing from the path of ...
48885 seductive SEDUC'TIVE, a. Tending to lead astray; apt to mislead by flattering appearances.
48886 sedulity SEDU'LITY, n. [L. sedulitas. See Sedulous.] Diligent and assiduous application to business; ...
48887 sedulous SED'ULOUS, a. [L. sedulus, from the root of sedeo, to sit; as assiduous from assideo.] ...
48888 sedulously SED'ULOUSLY, adv. Assiduously; industriously; diligently; with constant or continued application.
48889 sedulousness SED'ULOUSNESS, n. Assiduity; assiduousness; steady diligence; continued industry or effort.
48890 sedused SEDU'SED, pp. Drawn or enticed from virtue; corrupted; depraved.
48891 see SEE, n. 1. The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop.
48893 seed-bud SEE'D-BUD, n. [seed and bud.] The germ, germen or rudiment of the fruit in embryo.
48894 seed-cake SEE'D-CAKE, n. [seed and cake.] A sweet cake containing aromatic seeds.
48895 seed-coat SEE'D-COAT, n. In botany, the aril or outer coat of a seed.
48896 seed-leaf SEE'D-LEAF, n. In botany, the primary leaf. The seed-leaves are the cotyledons or lobes of a seed ...
48897 seed-lip SEE'D-LIP, n. A vessle in which a sower carries the seed to be dispersed.
48898 seed-lobe SEE'D-LOBE, n. The lobe of a seed; a cotyledon, which see.
48899 seed-lop SEE'D-LOP,
48900 seed-pearl SEE'D-PEARL, n. [seed and pearl.] Small grains of pearl.
48901 seed-plat SEE'D-PLAT, n. [seed and plat.]
48902 seed-time SEE'D-TIME, n. [seed and time] The season proper for sowing. While the earth ...
48903 seed-vessel SEE'D-VESSEL, n. In botany, the pericarp which contains the seeds.
48892 seed SEED, n. 1. The substance, animal or vegetable, which nature prepares for the ...
48904 seedling SEE'DLING, n. A young plant or root just sprung from the seed.
48905 seedness SEE'DNESS, N. Seed-time. [Not in use.]
48906 seedsman SEE'DSMAN, n. [seed and man.] A person who deals in seeds; also, a sower.
48907 seedy SEE'DY, a. [from seed.] 1. Abounding with seeds. 2. Having a peculiar ...
48908 seeing SEE'ING, ppr. [from see.] Perceiving by the eye; knowing; understanding; observing; ...
48910 seek-sorrow SEE'K-SORROW, n. [seek and sorrow.] One that contrives to give himself vexation. [Little used.]
48909 seek SEEK, v.t. pret and pp. sought, pronounced sawt. [L. sequor, to follow; for to seek is to go ...
48911 seeker SEEKER, n. 1. One that seeks; an inquirer; as a seeker of truth. 2. One of a ...
48912 seel SEEL, v. t. To close the eyes; a term of falconry, from the practice of the closing the eyes of a ...
48913 seelily SEE'LILY, adv. In a silly manner. Obs.
48914 seeling SEE'LING,
48915 seely SEE'LY, a. [from seel.] 1. Lucky; fortunate. Obs. 2. Silly; foolish; ...
48916 seem SEEM, v. i. 1. To appear; to make or have a show or semblance. Thou ...
48917 seemer SEE'MER, n. One that carries an appearance or semblance. Hence we shall see If ...
48918 seeming SEE'MING, ppr. 1. Appearing; having the appearance or semblance, whether real or not. ...
48919 seemingly SEE'MINGLY, adv. In appearance; in show; in semblance. This the father ...
48920 seemingness SEE'MINGNESS, n. Fair appearance; plausibility.
48921 seemless SEE'MLESS, a. Unseemly; unfit; indecorous. Obs.
48922 seemliness SEE'MLINESS, n. [from seemly.] Comliness; grace; fitness; propriety; decency; decorum. ...
48923 seemly SEE'MLY, a. Becoming; fit; suited to the object, occasion, purpose or character; suitable. ...
48924 seemlyhead SEE'MLYHEAD, [See Head and Hood.] Comely or decent appearance. Obs.
48925 seen SEEN, pp. of see. 1. Beheld; observed; understood. 2. a. Versed; skilled. ...
48927 seer-wood SEER-WOOD, [See Sear, and Sear-wood, dry wood.]
48926 seer SEER, n. [from see.] 1. One who sees; as a seer of visions. 2. A prophet; a ...
48928 seethe SEETHE, v. t. pret. seethed, sod; pp. seethed, sodden. [Heb. to seethe, to boil, to swell, to be ...
48929 seethed SEE'THED, pp. Boiled; decoated.
48930 seether SEE'THER, n. A boiler; a pot for boiling things.
48931 seething SEE'THING, ppr. Boiling; decoating.
48932 seg SEG, n. Sedge. [Not in use.]
48933 seghol SEG'HOL, n. a Hebrew vowel-point, or short vowel.
48934 segholate SEG'HOLATE, a. Marked with a seghol.
48935 segment SEG'MENT, n. [L. segmentum, from seco, to cut off.] 1. In geometry, that part of the ...
48936 segnity SEG'NITY, n. [from L. segnis.] Sluggishness; dullness; inactivity. [Not used.]
48937 segregate SEG'REGATE, v. t. [L. segrego; se, from, and grex, flock.] To separate from others; to set ...
48938 segregated SEG'REGATED, pp. Separated; parted from others.
48939 segregating SEG'REGATING, ppr. Separating.
48940 segregation SEGREGA'TION, n. Separation from others; a parting.
48941 sehat-fish SEH'AT-FISH, n. A fish, a species of Silurus, having a long slimy body destitute of scales, and ...
48942 seigneurial SEIGNEURIAL, a. 1. Pertaining to the lord of a manor; manorial. 2. Vested ...
48943 seignior SEIGNIOR, n. [L. senior, elder.] A lord; the lord of a manor; but used also in the sout of ...
48944 seigniorage SEIGNIORAGE, n. A royal right or prerogative of the king of England, by which he claims an ...
48945 seigniorial SEIGNIO'RIAL, the same as seigneurial.
48946 seigniorize SEIGNIORIZE, v.t. To lord it over. [Little used.]
48947 seigniory SEIGNIORY, n. 1. A lordship; a manor. 2. The power or authority of a lord; ...
48948 sein SEIN, n. [L. sagena.] A large net for catching fish. The seins used for taking shad in the ...
48949 seiner SE'INER, n. A fisher with a sein or net. [Not much used.]
48950 seity SE'ITY, n. [L. se, one's self.] Something peculiar to a man's self. [Not well authorized.]
48951 seize SEIZE, v.t. 1. To fall or rush upon suddenly and lay hold on; or to gripe or grasp ...
48952 seized SE'IZED, pp. Suddenly caught or grasped; taken by force; invaded suddenly; taken possession of; ...
48953 seizer SE'IZER, n. One that seizes.
48954 seizing SE'IZING, ppr. Falling on and grasping suddenly; laying hold on suddenly; taking possession by ...
48955 seizor SE'IZOR, n. One who seizes.
48956 seizure SE'IZURE, n. 1. The act of seizing; the act of laying hold on suddenly; as the seizure ...
48957 sejant SE'JANT, a. In heraldry, sitting, like a great cat with the fore feet straight; applied to a lion ...
48958 sejugous SEJU'GOUS, a. [L. sejigus; sex, six, and jugum, yoke.] In botany, a sejugous leaf is a pinnate ...
48959 sejunction SEJUNC'TION, n. [l. sejunctio; se, from, and jungo, to join.] The act of disjoining; a ...
48960 sejungible SEJUNG'IBLE, a. [supra.] That may be disjoined. [Little used.]
48961 seke SEKE, for sick, oblolete. [See Sick.]
48962 selcouth SEL'COUTH, a. Rarely known; unusual; uncommon. Obs.
48963 seldom SEL'DOM, adv. [Sel probably signifies separate, distinct, coinciding with L. solus.] Rarely; not ...
48964 seldomness SEL'DOMNESS, n. Rareness; uncommonness; infrequency.
48965 seldshown SELD'SHOWN, a. Rarely shown or exhibited. [Not in use.]
48966 select SELECT', v. t. [L. selectus, from seligo; se, from, and lego, to pick, cull or gather.] to ...
48967 selected SELECT'ED, pp. Chosen and taken by preference from among a number; picked; culled.
48968 selectedly SELECT'EDLY, adv. With care in selection.
48969 selecting SELECT'ING, ppr. Choosing and taking from a number; picked; culled.
48970 selection SELEC'TION, n. [L. selectio.] 1. The act of choosing and taking from among a number; ...
48971 selective SELECT'IVE, a. Selecting; tending to select. [Unusual.]
48972 selectman SELECT'MAN, n. [select and man.] In New England, a town officer chosen anually to manage the ...
48973 selectness SELECT'NESS, n. The state of being select or well chosen.
48974 selector SELECT'OR, n. [L.] One that selects or chooses from among a number.
48975 seleniate SELE'NIATE, n. a compound of selenic acid with a base.
48976 selenic SELEN'IC, a. Pertaining to selenium, or extracted from it; as selenic acid.
48977 selenite SEL'ENITE, n. [Gr. the moon; so called on account of its reflecting the the moon's light with ...
48978 selenitic SELENIT'IC, a. Pertaining to selenite; resembling it, or partaking of its nature or properties.
48979 selenitical SELENIT'ICAL,
48980 selenium SELE'NIUM, n. [supra.] A new elementary body or substance, extracted from the pyrite of Fahlun ...
48981 seleniuret SELENIU'RET, n. A newly discovered mineral, of a shining lead gray color, with granular ...
48982 selenographic SELENOGRAPH'IC, a. [infra.] Belonging to selenography.
48983 selenographical SELENOGRAPH'ICAL,
48984 selenography SELENOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. the moon; to describe.] A desciption of the moon and its phenomena; a ...
48986 self-abased SELF-ABA'SED, a. [self and abase.] Humbled by conscious guilt or shame.
48987 self-abasement SELF-ABA'SEMENT, n. Humiliation or abasement proceeding from consciouness of inferiority, guilt ...
48988 self-abasing SELF-ABA'SING, a. Humbling by the consciouness of guilt or by shame.
48989 self-abuse SELF-ABU'SE, n. [selfand abuse.] The abuse of one's own person or powers.
48990 self-accusing SELF-ACCU'SING, a. [self and accuse.] Accusing one's self; as a self-accusing look.
48991 self-activity SELF-ACTIV'ITY, n. [self and activity.] Self-motion, or the power of moving one's self without ...
48992 self-admiration SELF-ADMIRA'TION, n. Admiration of one's self.
48993 self-admiring SELF-ADMI'RING, a. Admiring one's self.
48994 self-affairs SELF-AFFA'IRS, n. plu. [self and affair.] One's own private business.
48995 self-affrighted SELF-AFFRIGHTED, a. [self and affright.] Frightened at one's self.
48996 self-applause SELF-APPLAUSE, n. self-applauz'. Applause of one's self.
48997 self-approving SELF-APPROVING, a. That approves of one's own conduct.
48998 self-assumed SELF-ASSU'MED, a. Assumed by one's own act and without authority.
48999 self-banished SELF-BAN'ISHED, a. [self and banish.] Exiled voluntarily.
49000 self-begotten SELF-BEGOT'TEN, a. [self and beget.] Begotten by one's own powers.
49001 self-cenceited SELF-CENCE'ITED, a. Vain; having a high or overweening opinion of one's own person or merits.
49002 self-centered SELF-CEN'TERED, a. [self and center.] Centered in itself. The earth ...
49003 self-charity SELF-CHAR'ITY, n. [self and charity.] Love of one's self.
49004 self-communicative SELF-COMMU'NICATIVE, a. [self and communicative.] Imparted or communicated by its own powers.
49005 self-conceit SELF-CONCE'IT, n. [self and conceit.] A high opinion of one's self; vanity.
49006 self-conceitedness SELF-CONCE'ITEDNESS, n. Vanity; an overweening opinion of one's own person or accomplishments.
49007 self-confidence SELF-CON'FIDENCE, n. [self and confidence.] Confidence in one's own judgement or ability; ...
49008 self-confident SELF-CON'FIDENT, a. Confident of one's own strength or powers; relying on the correctness of ...
49009 self-confiding SELF-CONFI'DING, a. Confiding in one's own judgement or powers, without other aid.
49010 self-conscious SELF-CON'SCIOUS, a. [self and conscious.] Conscious in one's self.
49011 self-considering SELF-CONSID'ERING, a. [self and consider.] Considering in one's own mind; deliberating.
49012 self-consuming SELF-CONSU'MING, a. [self and consume.] That consumes itself.
49013 self-contradiction SELF-CONTRADIC'TION, n. [self and contradiction.] the art of contradicting itself; repugnancy in ...
49014 self-contradictory SELF-CONTRADICT'ORY, a. Contradicting itself.
49015 self-convicted SELF-CONVICT'ED, a. [self and convict.] Convited by one's own consciouness, knowledge or avowal.
49016 self-conviction SELF-CONVIC'TION, n. Conviction proceeding from one's own consciouness, knowledge or confession.
49017 self-created SELF-CREA'TED, a. Created by one's self; not formed or constituted by another.
49018 self-deceit SELF-DECE'IT, n. [self and deceit.] Deception respecting one's self, or that originates from ...
49019 self-deceived SELF-DECE'IVED, a. [self and deceive.] Deceived or mislead respecting one's self by one's own ...
49020 self-deception SELF-DECEP'TION, n. [supra.] Deception concerning one's self proceeding from one's own mistake.
49021 self-deceving SELF-DECE'VING, a. Deceiving one's self.
49022 self-defense SELF-DEFENSE, n. self-defens'. [self and defense.] The act of defending one's own person, ...
49023 self-delusion SELF-DELU'SION, n. [self and delusion.] The delusion of one's self; or respesting one'self.
49024 self-denial SELF-DENI'AL, n. [self and denial.] The denial of one's self; the forbearing to gratify one's ...
49025 self-dependent SELF-DEPEND'ENT, a. Depending on one's self.
49026 self-depending SELF-DEPEND'ING,
49027 self-destruction SELF-DESTRUC'TION, n. [self and destruction.] The desruction of one's self; voluntary ...
49028 self-destructive SELF-DESTRUC'TIVE, a. Tending to the destruction of one's self.
49029 self-determination SELF-DETERMINA'TION, n. [self and determination.] Determination by one's own mind; or ...
49030 self-determining SELF-DETERM'INING, a. Determining by or of itself; determining or deciding without extraneous ...
49031 self-devoted SELF-DEVO'TED, a. [self and devote.] Devoted in person, or voluntarily devoted in person.
49032 self-devotement SELF-DEVO'TEMENT, n. The devoting of one's person and services voluntarily to any difficult or ...
49033 self-devouring SELF-DEVOUR'ING, a. [self and devour.] Devouring one's self and itself.
49034 self-diffusive SELF-DIFFU'SIVE, a. [self and diffusive.] Having power to diffuse itself; that diffuses itself.
49035 self-enjoyment SELF-ENJOY'MENT, n. [self and enjoyment.] Internal satisfaction or pleasure.
49036 self-esteem SELF-ESTEE'M, n. [self and esteem.] The esteem or good opinion of one's self.
49037 self-estimation SELF-ESTIMA'TION, n. The esteem or good opinion of one's self.
49038 self-evidence SELF-EV'IDENCE, n. [self and evidence.] Evidence or certainty resulting from a proposition ...
49039 self-evident SELF-EV'IDENT, a. Evident without proof or reasoning; that produces certainty or clear conviction ...
49040 self-evidently SELF-EV'IDENTLY, adv. By means of self-evidence.
49041 self-exaltation SELF-EXALTA'TION, n. The exaltation of one's self.
49042 self-exalting SELF-EXALT'ING, a. Exalting one's self.
49043 self-examination SELF-EXAMINA'TION, n. [self and examination.] An examination or scrutiny into one's own ...
49044 self-existence SELF-EXIST'ENCE, n. [self and existence.] Inherent existence; the existence possossed by virtue ...
49045 self-existent SELF-EXIST'ENT, A. Existing by its own nature or essense, independent of any other cause. God is ...
49046 self-exusing SELF-EXU'SING, a. Excusing one's self.
49047 self-flattering SELF-FLAT'TERING, a. [self and flatter.] Flattering one's self.
49048 self-flattery SELF-FLAT'TERY, n. Flattery of one's self.
49049 self-glorious SELF-GLORIOUS, a. [self and glorious.] Springing from vain glory or vanity; vain; boastful.
49050 self-harming SELF-H'ARMING, a. [self and harm.] Injuring or hurting one's self or itself.
49051 self-heal SELF'-HEAL, n. [self and heal.] A plant of the genus Sanicula, and another of the genus ...
49052 self-healing SELF-HE'ALING, a. Having the power or property of healing itself. The self-healing power of ...
49053 self-homicide SELF-HOM'ICIDE, n. [self and homicide.] The killing of one's self.
49054 self-idolized SELF-I'DOLIZED, a. Idolized by one's self.
49055 self-imparting SELF-IMP'ARTING, a. [self and impart.] Inparting by its own powers and will.
49056 self-imposture SELF-IMPOS'TURE, n. [self and imposture.] Imposture practiced on one's self.
49057 self-interest SELF-IN'TEREST, n. [self and interest.] Private interest; the interest or advantage of one's ...
49058 self-interested SELF-IN'TERESTED, a. Having self-interest; particularly concerned for one's self.
49059 self-justifier SELF-JUS'TIFIER, n. One who excuses or justifies himself.
49060 self-kindled SELF-KIN'DLED, a. [self and kindle.] Kindled of itself, or without extraneous aid or power.
49061 self-knowing SELF-KNOWING, a. [self and know.] Knowing of itself, or without communication from another.
49062 self-knowledge SELF-KNOWL'EDGE, n. The knowledge of one's own real character, abilities, worth or demerit.
49063 self-love SELF-LOVE, n. [self and love.] The love of one's own person or happiness.
49064 self-loving SELF-LOV'ING, a. Loving one's self.
49065 self-motion SELF-MO'TION, n. [self and motion.] Motion given by inherent powers, without external impulse; ...
49066 self-moved SELF-MOVED, a. [self and move.] Moved by inherent power without the aid of extraneous influence.
49067 self-moving SELF-MOVING, a. Moving or exiting to action by ingerent power, without the impulse of another ...
49068 self-murder SELF-MUR'DER, n. [self and murder.] The murder of one's self; suicide.
49069 self-neglecting SELF-NEGLECT'ING, n. [self and neglect.] A neglecting of one's self. Self-love ...
49070 self-opinion SELF-OPIN'ION, n. [self and opinion.] One's own opinion.
49071 self-opinioned SELF-OPIN'IONED, a. Valuing one's own opinion highly.
49072 self-partiality SELF-PARTIAL'ITY; n. [self and partiality.] That partiality by which a man overrates his own ...
49073 self-pleasing SELF-PLE'ASING, a. [self and please.] Pleasing one's self; gratifying one's own wishes.
49074 self-praise SELF-PRAISE, n. [self and praise.] The praise of one's self; self-applause.
49075 self-preference SELF-PREF'ERENCE, n. [self and preference.] The preference of one's self to others.
49076 self-preservation SELF-PRESERVA'TION, n. [self and preservation.] The preservation of one's self from destruction ...
49077 self-repellency SELF-REPEL'LENCY, n. [self and repellency.] The inherent power of repulsion in a body.
49078 self-repelling SELF-REPEL'LING, a. [self and repel.] Repelling by its own inherent power.
49079 self-reproved SELF-REPROVED, a. [self and reprove.] Reproved by consciousness or one's own sense of guilt.
49080 self-reproving SELF-REPROVING, a. Reproving by consciouness.SELF-REPROVING, n. The act of reproving by a ...
49081 self-restrained SELF-RESTRA'INED, a. [self an restrain.] Restrained by itself, or by one's own power or will; ...
49082 self-restraining SELF-RESTRA'INING, a. Restraining or controlling itself.
49083 self-same SELF'-SAME, a. [self and same.] Numerically the same; the very same; identical.
49084 self-slaughter SELF-SLAUGHTER, n. self-slau'ter. [self and slaughter.] The slaughter of one's self.
49085 self-subdued SELF-SUBDU'ED, a. [self and subdue.] Subdued by one's own power or means.
49086 self-subversive SELF-SUBVER'SIVE, a. Overturning or subverting itself.
49087 self-sufficiency SELF-SUFFI''CIENCY, n. [self and sufficiency.] An overweening opinion of one's own strength or ...
49088 self-sufficient SELF-SUFFI''CIENT, a. Having full confidence in one's own strength, abilities or endowments; ...
49089 self-tormenter SELF-TORMENT'ER, n. One who torments himself.
49090 self-tormenting SELF-TORMENT'ING, a. [self and torment.] Tormenting one's self; as self-tormenting sin.
49091 self-valuing SELF-VAL'UING, a. Esteeming one's self.
49092 self-will SELF-WILL', n. [self and will.] One's own will; obstinacy.
49093 self-willed SELF-WILL'ED, a. Governed by one's own will; not yielding to the will or wishes of others; not ...
49094 self-wrong SELF-WRONG', n. [self and wrong.] Wrong done by a person to himself.
48985 self SELF, a. or pron. plu. selves; used chiefly in composition. 1. In old authors, this ...
49095 selfconsciouness SELF'CON'SCIOUNESS, n. Consciouness within one's self.
49096 selfdenying SELF'DENY'ING, a. Denying one's self; a forbearing to indulge one's one appetites or desires.
49097 selfish SELF'ISH, a. Regarding one's own interest chiefly or soley; influenced in actions by a view to ...
49098 selfishly SELF'ISHLY, adv. The exclusive of a person to his own interest or happiness; or that supreme ...
49099 selfness SELF'NESS, n. Self-love; selfishness. [Not in use.]
49100 sell SELL, for self; and sells for selves. [Scot.]SELL, n. [L. sella.] A saddle, and a throne. ...
49101 sellander SEL'LANDER, n. A dry scab in a horses hough or pastern.
49102 seller SELL'ER, n. The person that sells; a vender.
49103 selling SELL'ING, ppr. 1. Transferring the property of a thing for a price or equivalent in ...
49104 selvedge SELV'EDGE, n. The edgr of a cloth, where it is closed by complication the threads; a woven ...
49105 selvedged SELV'EDGED, a. Having a selvedge.
49106 selves SELVES, plu. of self.
49107 semblable SEM'BLABLE, a. Like; similar; resembles.
49108 semblably SEM'BLABLY, adv. In like manner. [Not in use.]
49109 semblance SEM'BLANCE, n. 1. Likeness; resemblance; actual similitude; as the semblance of worth; ...
49110 semblant SEM'BLANT, n. Show; figure; resemblance. [Not in use.]SEM'BLANT, a. Like; resembling. [Not in ...
49111 semblative SEM'BLATIVE, a. Resembling; fit; suitable; according to. And all is semblativea ...
49112 semble SEM'BLE, v. t. To imitate; to represent or make similar. Where sembling art may ...
49114 semi-acidified SEMI-ACID'IFIED, a. or pp. Half acidified. [See Acidified.]
49115 semi-amplexicaul SEMI-AMPLEX'ICAUL, a. [L. semi, amplexus, or amplector, to embrace, and caulis, stem.] In ...
49116 semi-annual SEMI-AN'NUAL, a. [semi and annual.] Half yearly.
49117 semi-annually SEMI-AN'NUALLY, adv. Every half year.
49118 semi-annular SEMI-AN'NULAR, a. [L. semi and annulus, a ring.] Having the figure of a half circle; that is, ...
49119 semi-aperture SEMI-AP'ERTURE, n. [semi and aperture.] The half of an aperture.
49120 semi-arian SEMI-A'RIAN, n. [See Arian.] In ecclesiastical history, the Semi-arians were a branch of the ...
49121 semi-arianism SEMI-A'RIANISM, n. The doctrines or tenets of the Semi-arians. The semi-arianism of modern times ...
49122 semi-barbarian SEMI-BARBA'RIAN, a. [semi and barbarian.] Half savage; partially civilized.
49123 semi-castrate SEMI-CAS'TRATE, v. t. To deprive of one testicle.
49124 semi-castration SEMI-CASTRA'TION, n. Half castration; deprivation of one testicle.
49125 semi-columnar SEMI-COLUM'NAR, a. [semi and columnar.] Like a half column; flat on one side and round on the ...
49126 semi-compact SEMI-COM'PACT, a. [semi and compact.] Half compact; imperfectly indurated.
49127 semi-crustaceous SEMI-CRUSTA'CEOUS, a. [semi and crustaceous.] Half crustaceous.
49128 semi-cylindric SEMI-CYLIN'DRIC, a. [semi and cylindric.] Half cylindrical.
49129 semi-cylindrical SEMI-CYLIN'DRICAL,
49130 semi-deistical SEMI-DEIS'TICAL, a. Half deistical; bordering on deism.
49131 semi-diameter SEMI-DIAM'ETER, n. [semi and diameter.] Half the diameter; a right line or the length of a right ...
49132 semi-diapason SEMI-DIAPA'SON, n. [semi and diapason.] In music, an imperfect octave, or an octave diminished ...
49133 semi-diapente SEMI-DIAPEN'TE, n. An imperfect fifth; a hemi-diapente.
49134 semi-diaphaneity SEMI-DIAPHANE'ITY, n. [See Semidiaphanous.] Half or imperfect transparency. [Little used.] ...
49135 semi-diaphanous SEMI-DIAPH'ANOUS, a. [semi and diaphanous.] Half or imperfecty transparent. [Instead of this, ...
49136 semi-diatessaron SEMI-DIATES'SARON, n. [semi and diatessaron.] In music, an imperfect or defective fourth.
49137 semi-ditone SEM'I-DITONE, n. [semi and It. ditono.] In music, a lesser third, having its terms as 6 to 5; a ...
49138 semi-double SEM'I-DOUBLE, n. [semi and double.] In the Romish breviary, an office celebrated with less ...
49139 semi-fluid SEMI-FLU'ID, a. [semi and fluid.] Imperfectly fluid.
49140 semi-formed SEM'I-FORMED, a. [semi and formed.] Half formed; imperfectly formed; as semi-formed crystals.
49141 semi-indurated SEMI-IN'DURATED, a. [semi and indurated.] Imperfectly indurated or hardened.
49142 semi-lapidified SEMI-LAPID'IFIED, a. [semi and lapidified.] Imperfectly changed into stone.
49143 semi-lenticular SEMI-LENTIC'ULAR, a. [semi and lenticular.] Half lenticular or convex; imperfectly resembling a ...
49144 semi-metal SEM'I-METAL, n. [semi and metal.] An imperfect metal, or rather a metal that is not malleable, ...
49145 semi-metallic SEMI-METAL'LIC, a. Pertaining to a semi-metal, or partaking of its noture and qualities.
49146 semi-opa-cous SEMI-OPA-COUS,
49147 semi-opake SEMI-OPA'KE, a. [L. semi and opacus.] Half transparent only.
49148 semi-opal SEM'I-OPAL, n. A variety of opal.
49149 semi-orbiclar SEMI-ORBIC'LAR, a. [semi and orbicular.] Having the shape of a half orb or sphere.
49150 semi-ordinate SEMI-OR'DINATE, n. [semi and ordinate.] In conic sections, a line drawn at right angles to and ...
49151 semi-osseous SEMI-OS'SEOUS, a. [semi and osseous.] Half as hard as bone.
49152 semi-ovate SEMI-O'VATE, a. [semi and ovate.] Half egg-shaped.
49153 semi-oxygenated SEMI-OX'YGENATED, a. Half saturated with oxygen.
49154 semi-palmate SEMI-PAL'MATE, a. [semi and palmate.] Half palmated or webbed.
49155 semi-palmated SEMI-PAL'MATED,
49156 semi-pelagian SEMI-PELA'GIAN, n.In ecclesiastical history, the Semi-pelagians are persons who retain some ...
49157 semi-pelagianism SEMI-PELA'GIANISM, n. The doctrines or tenets of the Semi-pelagians, supra.
49158 semi-pellucid SEMI-PELLU'CID, a. [semi and pellucid.] Half clear, or imperfectly transparent; as a ...
49159 semi-pellucidity SEMI-PELLUCID'ITY, n. The quality or state of being imperfecty transparent.
49160 semi-perspicuous SEMI-PERSPIC'UOUS, a. [semi and perspicuous.] Half transparent; imperfectly clear.
49161 semi-phlogisticate SEMI-PHLOGIS'TICATED, a. [semi and phlogisticated.] Partially impregnated with phlogiston.
49162 semi-primigenous SEMI-PRIMIG'ENOUS, a. [semi and primigenous.] In geology, of a middle nature between substances ...
49163 semi-proof SEM'I-PROOF, n. [semi and proof.] Half proof evidence from the testimony of a single witness. ...
49164 semi-protolite SEMI-PRO'TOLITE, n. [semi and Gr. first and stone.] A species of fossil of a middle nature ...
49165 semi-quadrate SEMI-QUAD'RATE, n. [L. semi and quadratus, or quartus, fourth.] An aspect of the SEMI-QUAR'TILE, ...
49166 semi-quintile SEMI-QUIN'TILE, n. [L. semi and quintilis.] An aspect of the planets, when distant from each ...
49167 semi-savage SEMI-SAV'AGE, a. [semi and savage.] Half savage; half barbarian.SEMI-SAV'AGE, n. One who is ...
49168 semi-sextile SEMI-SEX'TILE, n. [semi and sextile.] An aspect of the planets, when they are distant from each ...
49169 semi-spheric SEMI-SPHER'IC, A. [semi and spherical.] Having the figure of a half sphere.
49170 semi-spherical SEMI-SPHER'ICAL,
49171 semi-spheroidal SEMI-SPHEROID'AL, a. [semi and spheroidal.] Formed like a half spheroid.
49172 semi-transept SEMI-TRAN'SEPT, n. [semi and transept; L. trans and septum.] the half of a transept or cross ...
49173 semi-transparency SEMI-TRANSPA'RENCY, n. Imperfect transparency; partial opakeness.
49174 semi-transparent SEMI-TRANSPA'RENT, a. [semi and transparent.] Half or imperfectly transparent.
49175 semi-vitreous SEMI-VIT'REOUS, a. Partially vitreous.
49176 semi-vitrification SEMI-VITRIFICA'TION, n. [semi and vitrification.] 1. The state of being imperfectly ...
49177 semi-vitrified SEMI-VITRIFIED, a. [SeeVitrify.] Half or imperfectly vitrified; partially converted into glass.
49178 semi-vocal SEM'I-VOCAL, a. [semi and vocal.] Pertaining to a semi-vowel; Half vocal; imperfectly sounding.
49179 semi-vowel SEM'I-VOWEL, n. [semi and vowel.] In grammar, a half vowel, or an articulation which is ...
49113 semi SEM'I, L. semi, In composition, signifies half.
49180 semibreve SEM'IBREVE, [semi and breve; formerly written semibref.] In music, a note of half the duration of ...
49181 semicircle SEM'ICIRCLE, n. [semi and circle.] 1. The half of a circle; the part of a circle ...
49182 semicircled SEM'ICIRCLED, a. Having the form of a half circle.
49183 semicircular SEM'ICIRCULAR,
49184 semicolon SEM'ICOLON, n. [semi and colon.] In grammar, and punctuation, the point [;] the mark of pause to ...
49185 semific SEMIF'IC, a. [L. semen, seed and facio, to make.] Forming or producing seed.
49186 semifloret SEM'IFLORET, n. [semi and floret.] A half floret, which is tubulous at the beginning, like a ...
49187 semiflosculous SEMIFLOS'CULOUS, a. [semi and L. flosculous, a little flower. Semifloscular is also used, but is ...
49188 semilunar SEMILU'NAR, a. [L. semi, and luna, moon.] Resembling in form a half moon.
49189 semilunary SEMILU'NARY,
49190 seminal SEM'INAL, a. [L. seminalis, from semen, seed; from the root of sow.] 1. Pertaining to ...
49191 seminality SEMINAL'ITY, n. The nature of seed; or the power of being produced.
49192 seminarist SEM'INARIST, n. [from seminary.] A Romish priest educated in a seminary.
49193 seminary SEM'INARY, n. [L. seminarium, from semen, seed; semino, to sow.] 1. A seed-plant; ...
49194 seminate SEM'INATE, v. t. [L. semino] To sow; to spread; to propagate.
49195 semination SEMINA'TION, n. [L. seminatio.] 1. The act of sowing. 2. In botany, the ...
49196 semined SEM'INED, a. Thick covered, as with seeds.
49197 seminiferous SEMINIF'EROUS, a. [L. semen, seed, and fero, to produce.] Seed-bearing; producing seed.
49198 seminifical SEMINIF'ICAL,
49199 seminification SEMINIFICA'TION, n. Propagation from the seed or seminal parts.
49200 semiped SEM'IPED, n. [semi and L. pes, a foot.] A half foot in poetry.
49201 semipedal SEMIPE'DAL, a. Containing a half foot.
49202 semiquaver SEM'IQUAVER, n. [semi and quaver.] In music, a note of half the duration of the quaver; the ...
49203 semitertian SEMITER'TIAN, a. [semi and tertian.] Compounded of a tertian and a quotidian ague.SEMITER'TIAN, ...
49204 semitone SEM'ITONE, n. [semi and tone.] In music, half a tone; an interval of sound, as between mi and fa ...
49205 semitonic SEMITON'IC, a. Pertaining to a semitone; consisting of a simitone.
49206 sempervirent SEMPERVI'RENT, a. [L. semper, always and virens, flourishing.] Always fresh; evergreen.
49207 sempervive SEMP'ERVIVE, n. [L. semper, always, and vivus, alive.] A plant.
49208 sempiternal SEMPITERN'AL, a. [L. sempiternus; semper, always, and eternus, eternal.] 1. Eternal ...
49209 sempiternity SEMPITERN'ITY, n. [L. sempiternitas.] Future duration without end.
49210 semster SEM'STER, n. A seamster; a man who uses a needle. [Not in use.]
49211 sen SEN, adv. This word is usedby some of our common people for since. It seems to be a contraction ...
49212 senary SEN'ARY, a. [L. seni, senarius.] Of six; belonging to six; containing six.
49214 senate-house SEN'ATE-HOUSE, n. A house in which a senate meets, or a place of public council.
49213 senate SEN'ATE, n. [L. senatus, from senex, old.] 1.An a assembly or council of senators; a ...
49215 senator SEN'ATOR, n. 1. A mimber of a senate. In Rome one of the qualifications of a senator was ...
49216 senatorial SENATO'RIAL, a. 1. Pertaining to a senate; becoming a senator; as senatorial robes; ...
49217 senatorially SENATO'RIALLY, adv. In the manner of a senate; with dignity or solemnity.
49218 senatorship SEN'ATORSHIP, n. The office or dignity of a senator.
49219 send SEND, v. t. pret. and pp. sent. 1. In a general sense, to throw, cast or thrust; to ...
49220 sendal SEN'DAL, n. A light thin stuff of silk or thread. [Not in use.]
49221 sender SEND'ER, n. One that sends.
49222 senega SEN'EGA, n. A plant called rattlesnake root, of the genus Polygala.
49223 seneka SEN'EKA,
49224 senescence SENES'CENCE, n. [L. senesco, from senex, old. See Senate.] The state of growing old; decay by ...
49225 seneschal SEN'ESCHAL, n. A steward; an officer in the houses of princes and dignitaries, who has the ...
49226 sengreen SEN'GREEN, n. A plant, the houseleek, of the genus Sempervivium.
49227 senile SE'NILE, a. [L. senilis.] Pertaining to old age; proceeding from age.
49228 senility SENIL'ITY, n. Old age. [Not much used.]
49229 senior SENIOR, a. see'nyor. [L. senior, comp. of senex, old.] Elder or older; but as an adjective, it ...
49230 seniority SENIOR'ITY, n. 1. Eldership; superior age; priority of birth. He is the elder brother, ...
49231 senna SEN'NA, n. The leaf of the cassia senna, a native of the east, used as a cathartic.
49232 sennight SENNIGHT, n. sen'nit. [contracted from sevennight, as fortnight from fourteennight.] The space ...
49233 senocular SENOC'ULAR, a. [L. seni, six, and oculus, the eye.] Having six eyes. Most ...
49234 sensated SENS'ATED, a. [See Sense.] Perceived by the senses. [Not used.]
49235 sensation SENSA'TION, n. [from L. sensus, sentio, to perceive. See Sense.] The perception of external ...
49236 sense SENSE, n. [from L. sensus, from sentio, to feel or perceive.] 1. The faculty of the ...
49237 sensed SENS'ED, pp. Perceived by the senses. [Not in use.]
49238 senseful SENSEFUL, a. sens'ful. Reasonable; judicious. [Not in use.]
49239 senseless SENSELESS, a. sens'less. 1. Wanting the faculty of perception. The body when dead is ...
49240 senselessly SENSELESSLY adv. sens'lessly. In a senseless manner; stupidly; unreasonably; as a man ...
49241 senselessness SENSELESSNESS, n. sens'lessness. Unreasonableness; folly; stupidity; absurdity.
49242 sensibility SENSIBIL'ITY, n. 1. Susceptibility of impressions; the capacity for feeling or ...
49243 sensible SENS'IBLE, a. 1. Having the capacity of receiving impressions from external objects; ...
49244 sensibleness SENS'IBLENESS, n. 1. Possibility of being perceived by the senses; as the sensibleness ...
49245 sensibly SENS'IBLY, adv. 1. In a manner to be perceived by the senses; perceptibly to the ...
49247 sensitive-plant SENS'ITIVE-PLANT, n. A plant of the genus Mimosa [mimic,] so called from the sensibility of its ...
49246 sensitive SENS'ITIVE, a. [L. sensitivus, from sensus, sentio.] 1. Having sense or feeling, or ...
49248 sensitively SENS'ITIVELY, adv. In a sensitive manner.
49249 sensorial SENS'ORIAL, a. Pertaining to the sensory or sensorium; as sensorial faculties; sensorial motion ...
49250 sensorium SENSO'RIUM, n. [from L. senus, sentio.]
49251 sensory SENS'ORY,
49252 sensual SENSUAL, a. [from L. sensus.] Pertaining to the senses, as distinct from the mind or ...
49253 sensualist SENSU'ALIST, n. Aperson given to the indulgence of the appetites or senses; one who places his ...
49254 sensuality SENSUAL'ITY, n. Devotedness o the gratification of the bodily appetites; free indulgence in ...
49255 sensualize SENS'UALIZE, v. t. To make sensual; to subject to the love of sensual pleasure; to debase by ...
49256 sensually SENS'UALLY, adv. In a sensual manner.
49257 sensuous SENS'UOUS, a. [from sense.] Tender; pathetic. [Not in use.]
49258 sent SENT, pret. and pp. of send.
49259 sentence SEN'TENCE, n. [from L. sententia, from sentio, to think.] 1. In law, a judgement ...
49260 sentential SENTEN'TIAL, a. 1. Comprising sentences. 2. Pertaining to a sentence or ...
49261 sententious SENTEN'TIOUS, a. 1. Abounding with sentences, axioms and maxims; short and energetic; ...
49262 sententiously SENTEN'TIOUSLY, adv. In short expressive periods; with striking brevity. ...
49263 sententiousness SENTEN'TIOUSNESS, n. Pithiness of sentences; brevity with strength. The Medea I ...
49264 sentient SENTIENT, a. sen'shent. [L. sentiens, sentio.] That perceives; having the faculty of perception. ...
49265 sentiment SEN'TIMENT, n. [from L. sentio, to feel, perceive or think.] 1. Properly. a thought ...
49266 sentimental SENTIMENT'AL, a. 1. Abounding with sentiment, or just opinions or reflections; as a ...
49267 sentimentalist SENTIMENT'ALIST, n. One that affects sentiment, fine feeling or exquisite sensibility.
49268 sentimentality SENTIMENTAL'ITY, n. Affectation of fine feeling or exqisite sensibility.
49269 sentinel SENT'INEL, n. [from L. sentio, to perceive.] In military affairs, a soildier sent to watch or ...
49271 sentry-box SEN'TRY-BOX, n. A box to cover a sentinel at his post, and shelter him from the weather.
49270 sentry SEN'TRY, n. 1. [See Sentinel.] 2. Guard; watch; the duty of a sentines. ...
49272 sepal SE'PAL, n. [from L. sepio.] In botany, the small leaf or part of a calyx.
49273 separability SEPARABIL'ITY, n. [from separable.] The quality of being separable, or of admitting separation ...
49274 separable SEP'ARABLE, a. That may be separated, disjoined, disunited or rent; as the separable parts of ...
49275 separableness SEP'ARABLENESS, n. The quality of being capable of separation or disunion. ...
49276 separate SEP'ARATE, v. t. [L. separo.] 1. To disunite; to divide; to sever; to part, in almost ...
49277 separated SEP'ARATED, pp. Divided; parted; disunited; disconnected.
49278 separately SEP'ARATELY, adv. In a separate or unconnected state; apart; distinctly; singly. The opinions of ...
49279 separateness SEP'ARATENESS, n. The state of being separate.
49280 separation SEPARA'TION, n. [L. separatio.] 1. The act of separating, severing or disconnecting; ...
49281 separatist SEP'ARATIST, n. One that withdraws from an established church, to which he has belonged; a ...
49282 separator SEP'ARATOR, n. One that divides or disjoins; a divider.
49283 separatory SEP'ARATORY, a. That separates; as separatory ducts. [Little used.]SEP'ARATORY, n. A chimical ...
49284 sepatating SEP'ATATING, ppr. Dividing; disjoining; putting or driving asunder; disconecting; decompsing.
49285 sepawn SEPAWN', n. A species of food consisting of mial of maiz boiled in water. It is in New York
49286 sepiment SEP'IMENT, n. [L. sepimentum, from sepio, to inclose.] A hedge; a fence; something that ...
49287 sepin SEPIN', and Pennsylvania what hasty-pudding is in New England.
49288 sepose SEPO'SE, v.t. sepo'ze. [L. sepono, sepositus.] To set apart. [Not in use.]
49289 seposition SEPOSI''TION, n. The act of setting apart; segregation. [Not in use.]
49290 sepoy SE'POY, n. A native of India, employed as a soldier in the service of European powers.
49291 seps SEPS, n. [L. from Gr. Cuvier.] A species of venomous eft or lizard. A genus of lizards, the ...
49292 sept SEPT, n. [L. prosapia; or Heb. See Class Sb. No. 23.] A clan, race or family, proceeding from a ...
49293 septangular SEPTAN'GULAR, a. [L. septem, seven, and angulus, angle.] Having seven angles or sides.
49294 septaria SEPTA'RIA, n. [L. septa, partitions.] A name given to nodules or spheroidal mass of calcarios ...
49295 september SEPTEM'BER, n. [L. septem, seven.] The seventh month from march, which was formerly the first ...
49296 septempartite SEPTEM'PARTITE, a. Divided into seven parts.
49297 septenary SEP'TENARY, a. [L. septenarius, from septem, seven.] Consisting of seven; as a sepenary ...
49298 septennial SEPTEN'NIAL, a. [L. septennis; septem, seven, and annus, year.] 1. Lasting or ...
49299 septentrion SEPTEN'TRION, n. [L. septentrio.] The north or northern regions.SEPTEN'TRION, [L. ...
49300 septentrional SEPTEN'TRIONAL From cold septerion blasts.
49301 septentrionality SEPTENTRIONAL'ITY, n. Northerliness. [A bad word.]
49302 septentrionate SEPTEN'TRIONATE, v.i. To tend northerly. [This word septentrion and its derivatives are hardly ...
49303 septfoil SEPT'FOIL, n. [L. septem and folium; seven leaved.] A plant of the genus Tormentilla.
49304 septic SEP'TIC, a. [Gr. to putrefy.]
49305 septical SEP'TICAL,
49306 septicity SEPTIC'ITY, n. Tendency to putrefaction.
49307 septilateral SEPTILAT'ERAL, a. [L. septem, seven and latus, side.] Having seven sides; as a septilateral ...
49308 septinsular SEPTIN'SULAR, a. [L. septum, seven, and insula, isle.] Consisting of seven isles; as the ...
49309 septuagenary SEPTUAG'ENARY, a. [L. septuagenarius, from septuaginta, seventy.] Consisting of ...
49310 septuagesima SEPTUAGES'IMA, n. [L. septuagesimus, seventieth.] THe third Sunday before Lent, or before ...
49311 septuagesimal SEPTUAGES'IMAL, a. [supra.] Cosisting of seventy. Our abriged and ...
49312 septuagint SEP'TUAGINT, n. [L. septuaginta, seventy; septem, seven, and some word signifying ten.] A Greek ...
49313 septuary SEP'TUARY, n. [L. septum, seven.] Something composed of seven; a week. [Little used.]
49314 septuple SEP'TUPLE, a. [Low L. septuplex; septum, seven. and plico, to fold.] Seven fold; seven times as ...
49315 sepulcher SEP'ULCHER, n. [from L. sepulchrum, from sepelio, to bury, which seems to be formed with a prefix ...
49316 sepulchral SEPUL'CHRAL, a. [L. sepulchralis, from sepulchrum.] Pertaining to burial, to grave, or to ...
49317 sepulture SEP'ULTURE, n. Burial; internment; the act of depositing the dead body of a human being in the ...
49318 sequacious SEQUA'CIOUS, a. [L. sequax, from sequor, to follow. See Seek.] 1. Following; attendant. ...
49319 sequaciousness SEQUA'CIOUSNESS, n. State of being sepuacious; disposition to follow.
49320 sequacity SEQUAC'ITY, n. [supra.] 1.A following, or disposition to follow. 2. ...
49321 sequel SE'QUEL, n. [L. sequor, to follow.] 1. That which follows; a succeeding part; as the ...
49322 sequence SE'QUENCE, n. [L. sequens, sequor.] 1. A following, or that which follows; aconsequent. ...
49323 sequent SE'QUENT, a. [supra.] 1. Following; succeeding. 2. Consequential. [Little ...
49324 sequester SEQUES'TER, v.t. [L. sequestro, to sever or separate, to put int the hands of and indifferent ...
49325 sequestered SEQUES'TERED, pp. Seized asnd detained for a time, to satisfy a demand; separated; also, being in ...
49326 sequestrable SEQUES'TRABLE, a. That may be seqestered or separated; subject or liable to sequestration.
49327 sequestrate SEQUES'TRATE, v. t. To seqester. [It is less used than seqester, but exactly synonymous.]
49328 sequestration SEQUESTRA'TION, n. 1. The act of taking a thing from parties contending for it, and ...
49329 sequestrator SEQUESTRA'TOR, n. 1. One that sequesters property, or takes the possession of it for a ...
49330 sequin SE'QUIN, n. A gold coin of Venice and Turkey, of different value in different places. At Venice, ...
49331 seraglio SERAGLIO, n. seral'yo. The palace of the Grand Seignior or Turkish sultan, or the palace of a ...
49332 seraph SER'APH, n. plu. seraphs; but sometimes the Hebrew plural, seraphim, is used. [from Heb. to ...
49333 seraphic SERAPH'IC, a.
49334 seraphical SERAPH'ICAL, 1. Pertaining to a seraph; angelic; sublime; as seraphic purity; seraphic ...
49335 seraphim SER'APHIM, n. [the Hebrew plural of seraph.] Angels of the highest order in the celestial ...
49336 seraskier SERAS'KIER, n. A Turkish commander or general of land forces.
49337 serass SERASS' n. A fowl of the East Indies, of the crane kind.
49338 sere SERE, a. Dry; withered; usually written sear, which see.SERE, n. A claw or talon. [Not in ...
49339 serenade SERENA'DE, n. [from L. serenus, clear, serene.] 1. Properly, music performed in a ...
49340 serenata SERENA'TA, n. A vocal piece of music on an armorous subject.
49341 serene SERE'NE, a. [L. serenus; Heb. Ch. Syr. Ar. to shine. Class Sr. No. 2. 23.47.] 1. ...
49342 serenely SERE'NELY, adv. 1. Calmly; quietly. The setting sun now shown ...
49343 sereneness SERE'NENESS, n. The state of being serene; serenity.
49344 serenitude SEREN'ITUDE, n. Calmness. [Not in use.]
49345 serenity SEREN'ITY, n. [L. serenitas.] 1. Clearness and calmness; as the serenity of the air or ...
49346 serf SERF, n. [L. servus.] A servant or slave employed in husbandry, and in some countries, attached ...
49348 serge-maker SERGE-MAKER, n. A manufacturer of serges.
49347 serge SERGE, n. A wollen quilted stuff manufactured in a loom with four treddles, after the manner of ...
49349 sergeant SERGEANT, n. s'arjent. [L. serviens, serving, for so was this word written in Latin.] ...
49350 sergeantry SERGEANTRY, n. s'arjentry. In england, sergeantry is of two kinds; grand sergeantry and petit ...
49351 sergeantship SERGEANTSHIP, n. s'argentship. The office of a sergeant.
49352 sericeous SERI''CEOUS, a. [L. sericus, from sericum, silk.] Pertaining to silk; consisting of silk; silky. ...
49353 series SE'RIES, n. [L. this word probably belongs to the Shemetic, the primary sense of which is to ...
49354 serin SER'IN, n. A songbird of Italy and Germany.
49355 serious SE'RIOUS, a. [L. serius.] 1. Grave in manner or disposition; solemn; not light, gay or ...
49356 seriously SE'RIOUSLY, adv. Gravely; solemnly; in earnest; without levity. One of the first duties of a ...
49357 seriousness SE'RIOUSNESS, n. 1. Gravity of manner or of mind; solemnity. He spoke with great ...
49358 sermocination SERMOCINA'TION, n. Speech-making. [Not used.]
49359 sermocinator SERMOCINA'TOR, n. One that makes sermons or speeches. [Not in use.]
49360 sermon SER'MON, n. 1. A discourse delivered in public by a licensed clergymen for the purpose ...
49361 sermoning SER'MONING, n. Discourse; instruction; advice. [Not in use.]
49362 sermonize SER'MONIZE, v. i. 1. To preach. 2. To inculate rigid rules. 3. To ...
49363 sermonizer SER'MONIZER, n. One that composes sermons.
49364 sermonizing SER'MONIZING, ppr. Preaching; inculating rigid precepts; composing sermons.
49365 sermountain SER'MOUNTAIN, n. A plant of the genus Laserpitium; laserwort; seseli.
49366 seroon SEROON, n. 1. A seroon of almonds is the quantity of two hudred pounds; of anise seed, ...
49367 serosity SEROS'ITY, In medicine, the watery part of the blood.
49368 serotine SER'OTINE, n. A species of bat.
49369 serous SE'ROUS, a. 1. Thin; watery; like whey; used of that part of the blood which separates ...
49371 serpent-cucumber SERPENT-CUCUMBER, n. A plant of the genus Trichosanthes.
49372 serpent-eater SER'PENT-EATER, n. A fowl of Africa that devours serpents.
49373 serpent-fish SER'PENT-FISH, n. A fish of the genus Taenia, resembling a snake, but of a red color.
49370 serpent SER'PENT, n. [L. serpens, creeping; serpo, to creep.] 1. An animal of the order of ...
49374 serpentaria SERPENTA'RIA, n. A plant, called also snake root; a species of Aristolochia.
49375 serpentarius SERPENTA'RIUS, n. A constellation in the northern hemisphere, containing seventy-four stars.
49377 serpentine-stone SER'PENTINE-STONE, either shades and spots resembling a serpent's skin. Serpentine is often ...
49376 serpentine SER'PENTINE, a. [L. serpentinus, from serpens.] 1. Resembling a serpent; usually, ...
49378 serpentize SER'PENTIZE, v.t. To wind; to turn or bend, first in one direction and then in opposite; to ...
49379 serpents-tongue SER'PENTS-TONGUE, n. A plant of the genus Ophioglossum.
49380 serpet SER'PET, n. A basket. [Not in use.]
49381 serpiginous SERPIG'INOUS, a. [L. from serpo, to creep.] A kind of herpes or tetter; called in popular ...
49382 serprntine SER'PRNTINE, n. A species of talck or magnesian stone, usually of an obscure green color,
49383 serpulite SER'PULITE, n. Petrified shells or fossil remains of the genus Serpula.
49384 serr SERR, v.t. To crowd, press or drive together. [ Not in use.]
49385 serrate SER'RATE, [L. serratus, from serro, to saw; serra, a saw.] Jagged; notched; indented on the
49386 serrated SER'RATED, edge, like a saw. In botany, having sharp notches about the edge, pointing towards the ...
49387 serration SERRA'TION, n. Formation in the shape of a saw.
49388 serrature SER'RATURE, n. An indenting or indenture in the edge of any thing, like those of a saw.
49389 serrous SER'ROUS, a. Like the teeth of a saw; irregular. [Little used.]
49390 serrulate SER'RULATE, a. Finely serrate; having very minute teeth or notches.
49391 serry SER'RY, v.t. To crowd; to press together. [Not in use.]
49392 serum SE'RUM, n. [L.] 1. The thin transparent part of the blood. 2. The thin part ...
49393 serval SER'VAL, n. An animal of the feline genus, resembling the lynx in form and size, and the panther ...
49394 servant SERV'ANT, [L. servans, from servo, to keep or hold; properly one that waits, that is, stops, ...
49395 serve SERVE, v.t. serv. [L. servio. This verb is supposed to be from the noun servus, a servant or ...
49396 served SERV'ED, pp. Attended; waited on; worshiped; levied.
49397 service SERV'ICE, n. [From L. servitium.] 1. In a general sense, labor of body or of body and ...
49398 serviceable SERV'ICEABLE, a. 1. That does service; that promotes happiness, interest, advantage or ...
49399 serviceableness SERV'ICEABLENESS, n. 1. Usefulness of promoting good of any kind; beneficialness. ...
49400 servient SERV'IENT, a. [L. serviens.] Subordinate. [Not in use.]
49401 servile SERV'ILE, a. [L. servilis, from servio, to serve.] 1. Such as pertains to a servant or ...
49402 servilely SERV'ILELY, adv. 1. Meanly; slavishly; with base submission or obsequiousness. ...
49403 servileness SERV'ILENESS, n.
49404 servility SERVIL'ITY, 1. Slavery; the condition of a slave or bondman. To be a ...
49406 serving-maid SERV'ING-MAID, n. A female servant; a menial.
49407 serving-man SERV'ING-MAN, n. A male servant; a menial.
49405 serving SERV'ING, ppr. Working for; acting in subordination to; yielding obedience to; worshiping; also, ...
49408 servitor SERV'ITOR, n. [From L. servio, to serve.] 1. A servant; an attendant. 2. One ...
49409 servitorship SERV'ITORSHIP, n. The office of a servitor.
49410 servitude SERV'ITUDE, n. [L. servitudo or servitus. See Serve.] 1. The condition of a slave; ...
49411 sesame SES'AME, n. [L. sesama.] Oily grain; a genus of annual herbaceous plants, from the
49412 sesamum SES'AMUM, seeds of which an oil is expressed. One species of it is cultivated in Carolina, and ...
49413 sesban SES'BAN, n. A plant; a species of AEschynomene or Bastard sensitive plant.
49414 seseli SES'ELI, n. [L. Gr. seselis.] A genus of plants; meadow saxifrage; hartwort.
49415 sesqipedal SESQIP'EDAL, a. [L. sesqui, one and a half, and pedalis, from pes, a foot.]
49416 sesquiduplicate SESQUIDU'PLICATE, a. [L. sesqui, supra, and duplicatis, double.] Designating the ratio of two ...
49417 sesquilter SESQUIL'TER, a. [L. from sesqui, half as much more, and alter, other.]
49418 sesquilteral SESQUIL'TERAL, 1. In geometry, designating a ratio where one quantity or number contains ...
49419 sesquipedalian SESQUIPEDA'LIAN, Containing a foot and a half; as a sesquipedalian pigmy. Addison uses ...
49420 sesquiplicate SESQUIP'LICATE, a. [L. sesqui, one and a half, and plicatus, plico, to fold.] Designating the ...
49421 sesquitertian SESQUITER'TIAN, a. [L. sesqui, one and a half, and tertius, third.] Designating the
49422 sesquitertional SESQUITER'TIONAL, ratio of one and one third.
49423 sesquitone SES'QUITONE, n. In music, a minor third, or interval of three semitones.
49424 sess SESS, n. [L. sessio.] A tax. [Little used or not at all. See Assessment.]
49425 sessile SES'SILE, a. [L. sessilis. See Set.] In botany, sitting on the stem. A sessile leaf issues ...
49426 session SES'SION, n. [L. sessio, from sedeo. See Set.] 1. A sitting or being placed; as the ...
49427 sesterce SES'TERCE, n. [L. sestertius.] A Roman coin or denomination of money, in value the fourth part ...
49429 set-foil SET-FOIL. [See Sept-foil.]
49430 set-off SET'-OFF, n. [set and off.] The act of admitting one claim to counterbalance another. In a ...
49428 set SET, v.t. pret. pp. set. [L. sedo; to compose, as a book, to dispose or put in order, to ...
49431 setaceous SETA'CEOUS, a. [L. seta, a bristle.] 1. Bristly; set with strong hairs; consisting of ...
49432 setiform SE'TIFORM, a. [L. seta, a bristle, and form.] Having the form of a bristle.
49433 seton SE'TON, n. [l. seta, a bristle.] In surgery, a few horsehairs or small threads, or a twist of ...
49434 setous SE'TOUS, a. [L. setosus, from seta, a bristle.] In botany, bristly; having the surface set with ...
49435 settee SETTEE', n. [from set.] 1. A long seat with a back to it. A vessel with one ...
49437 setter-wort SET'TER-WORT, n. A plant, a species of Helleborus.
49436 setter SET'TER, n. 1. One that sets; as a setter on, or inciter; a setter up; a setter forth, ...
49439 setting-dog SET'TING-DOG, n. A setter; a dog trained to find and start birds for sportsmen.
49438 setting SET'TING, ppr. Placing; putting; fixing; studding; appointing; sinking below the horizon, ...
49440 settle SET'TLE, n. [L. sedile. See Set.] A seat or bench; something to sit on.SET'TLE, v.t. [from ...
49441 settled SET'TLED, pp. Placed; established; determined; composed; adjusted.
49442 settledness SET'TLEDNESS, n. The state of being settled; confirmed state. [Little used.]
49443 settlement SET'TLEMENT, n. 1. The act of settling, the state of being settled. 2. The ...
49444 settling SET'TLING, ppr. Placing; fixing; establishing; regulating; adjusting; planting or colonizing; ...
49445 setwall SET'WALL, n. [set and wall.] A plant. The garden setwall is a species of Valeriana.
49446 seven SEVEN, a. sev'n [L. septem.] Four and three; one more than six or less than eight. Seven days ...
49447 sevenfold SEV'ENFOLD, a. [seven and fold.] Repeated seven times; doubled seven times; increased to seven ...
49448 sevennight SEV'ENNIGHT, n. [seven and night.] A week; the period of seven days and nights; or the time from ...
49449 sevenscore SEV'ENSCORE, n. [seven and score, twenty notches or marks.] Seven times twenty, that is, a ...
49450 seventeen SEV'ENTEEN, a. [seven-ten.] Seven and ten.
49451 seventeenth SEV'ENTEENTH, a. [from seventeen.] The ordinal of seventeen; the seventh after the tenth. ...
49452 seventh SEV'ENTH, a. 1. The ordinal of seven; the first after the sixth. On ...
49453 seventhly SEV'ENTHLY, adv. In the seventh place.
49454 seventieth SEV'ENTIETH, a. [from seventy.] The ordinal of seventy; as a man in the seventieth year of his ...
49455 seventy SEV'ENTY, a. [Gr. ten.] Seven times ten. That he would accomplish seventy ...
49456 sever SEV'ER, v.t. [There may be a doubt whether sever is derived from the Latin separo. Heb. Ch. Syr. ...
49457 several SEV'ERAL, a. [from several.] 1. Separate; distinct; not common to two or more; as a ...
49458 severality SEVERAL'ITY, n. Each particular singly taken; distinction. [Not in use.]
49459 severalize SEV'ERALIZE, v.t. To distinguish. [Not in use.]
49460 severally SEV'ERALLY, adv. Separately; distinctly; apart from others. Call the men severally by name. ...
49461 severalty SEV'ERALTY, n. A state of separation from the rest, or from all others. An estate in severalty, ...
49462 severance SEV'ERANCE, n. Separation; the act of dividing or disuniting. The sevrance of a jointure is make ...
49463 severe SEVE'RE, a. [L. severus.] 1. Rigid; harsh; not mild or indulgent; as severe words; ...
49464 severely SEVE'RELY, adv. 1. Harshly; sharply; as, the chide one severely. 2. ...
49465 severite SEV'ERITE, n. A mineral found near St. Sever, in France, occurring in small masses, white without ...
49466