1828 Dictionary Network
SIGN UP LOGIN
http://1828.mshaffer.com
Wednesday - July 30, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
Please signup today: We want to make this website a memorable experience, so please join our community — it's free and two ads on this page will disappear!

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: m

Please click on the partial definition to see the complete definition
ID Word Definition
33678 m M is the thirteenth letter of the English Alphabet, and a labial articulation, formed by a ...
33679 mab MAB, n. In northern mythology, the queen of the imaginary beings called fairies.1. A ...
33680 mac MAC, in names of Scotch and Irish origin, signifies son. [See Maid.]
33681 macao MACA'O, n. The name of a race of beautiful fowls of the parrot kind, under the genus Psittacus.
33682 macaroni MACARO'NI, n. [Gr. happy.] 1. A kind of biscuit made of flour, eggs, sugar and almonds, and ...
33683 macaronic MACARON'IC, a. Pertaining to or like a macaroni; empty; trifling; vain; affected.1. Consisting of ...
33684 macaroon MACAROON, the same as macaroni.
33685 macauco MACAU'CO, n. A name of several species of quadrupeds of the genus Lemur.
33686 macaw MACAW'
33687 maccabees MAC'CABEES, n. The name of two apocryphal books in the Bible.
33688 maccoboy MAC'COBOY, n. A kind of snuff.
33690 mace-ale MA'CE-ALE, n. Ale spiced with mace.
33691 mace-bearer MA'CE-BEARER, n. A person who carries a mace before men in authority.
33692 mace-reed MACE-REED, or REED-MACE, n. A plant of the genus Typha.
33689 mace MACE, n. An ensign of authority borne before magistrates. Originally, the mace was a club or ...
33693 macerate MAC'ERATE, v.t. [L. macero, from macer, thin, lean; maceo, to be thin or lean; Eng. meager, ...
33694 macerated MAC'ERATED, pp. Made thin or lean; steeped almost to solution.
33695 macerating MAC'ERATING, ppr. Making lean; steeping almost to solution; softening.
33696 maceration MACERA'TION, n. The act or the process of making thin or lean by wearing away, or by ...
33697 machiavelian MACHIAVE'LIAN, a. [from Machiavel, an Italian writer, secretary and historiographer to the ...
33698 machiavelism MACH'IAVELISM, n. The principles of Machiavel, or practice in conformity to them; political ...
33699 machicolation MACHICOLA'TION, n. In old castles,the pouring of hot substances through apertures in the upper part ...
33700 machinal MACH'INAL, a. [See Machine.] Pertaining to machines.
33701 machinate MACH'INATE, v.t. [L. machinor.] To plan; to contrive; to form a scheme.
33702 machinated MACH'INATED, pp. Planned; contrived.
33703 machinating MACH'INATING, ppr. Contriving; scheming.
33704 machination MACHINA'TION, n. The act of planning or contriving a scheme for executing some purpose, ...
33705 machinator MACH'INATOR, n. One that forms a scheme, or who plots with evil designs.
33706 machine MACHINE, n. [L. machina.] An artificial work, simple or complicated, that serves to apply or ...
33707 machinery MACHINERY, n. A complicated work, or combination of mechanical powers in a work, designed to ...
33708 machining MACHINING, a. Denoting the machinery of a poem. [Not used.]
33709 machinist MACH'INIST, n. A constructor of machines and engines, or one well versed in the principles of ...
33710 macigno MACIG'NO, n. A species of stone of two varieties, one of a grayish yellow color, the other of a ...
33711 macilency MAC'ILENCY, n. [See Macilent.] Leanness.
33712 macilent MAC'ILENT, a. [L. macilentus, from macer, lean, thin. See Macerate.] Lean; thin; having little ...
33714 mackerel-sky MACK'EREL-SKY, n. A sky streaked or marked like a mackerel.
33713 mackerel MACK'EREL, n. [L. macula, a spot; the spotted fish.]A species of fish of the genus Scomber, an ...
33715 macle MAC'LE, n. A name given to chiastolite or hollow spar.
33716 maclurite MACLU'RITE, n. A mineral of a brilliant pale green color, so called in honor of Maclure, the ...
33717 macrocosm MAC'ROCOSM, n. [Gr. great, and world.] The great world; the universe, or the visible system of ...
33718 macrology MACROL'OGY, n. [Gr. great, and discourse.] Long and tedious talk; prolonged discourse without ...
33719 mactation MACTA'TION, n. [L. macto, to kill.]The act of killing a victim for sacrifice.
33720 macula MAC'ULA, n. [L.] A spot, as on the skin, or on the surface of the sun or other luminous orb.
33721 maculate MAC'ULATE, v.t. [L. maculo.] To spot; to stain.MAC'ULATE
33722 maculated MAC'ULATED, a. Spotted.
33723 maculation MACULA'TION, n. The act of spotting a spot; a stain.
33724 macule MAC'ULE, n. A spot. [supra.] [Little used.]
33726 mad-cap MAD-CAP, a. [mad-caput or cap.] A violent, rash, hot-headed person; a madman.
33725 mad MAD, a. 1. Disordered in intellect; distracted; furious. We must bind our passions in chains, lest ...
33727 madam MAD'AM, n. An appellation or complimentary title given to married and elderly ladies, or chiefly ...
33728 madapple MAD'APPLE, n. A plant of the genus Solanum.
33729 madbrain MAD'BRAIN
33730 madbrained MAD'BRAINED, a. Disordered in mind; hot-headed; rash.
33731 madden MAD'DEN, v.t. mad'n. To make mad.MAD'DEN, v.i. To become mad; to act as if mad. They rave, recite ...
33732 maddened MAD'DENED, pp. Rendered mad.
33733 maddening MAD'DENING, ppr. Making mad or angry.
33734 madder MAD'DER, n. A plant of the genus Rubia, one species of which is much used in dyeing red. The root ...
33735 madding MAD'DING, ppr. of mad. Raging; furious.
33736 made MADE, n. An earthworm. [But this is the Eng.moth.]
33737 madefaction MADEFAC'TION, n. [L. madefacio.] The act of making wet.
33738 madefied MAD'EFIED, pp. Made wet.
33739 madefy MAD'EFY, v.t. [L. madefio.] To make wet or moist; to moisten. [Not much used.]
33740 madefying MAD'EFYING, ppr. Making moist or wet.
33741 madeira MADEIRA, n. A rich wine made on the isle of Madeira.
33742 mademoiselle MADEMOISELLE, n. A young woman, or the title given to one; miss; also, the puppet sent from the ...
33743 madheaded MAD'HEADED, n. Hot brained; rash.
33744 madhouse MAD'HOUSE, n. A house where insane persons are confined for cure or for restraint.
33745 madid MAD'ID, a. [L.madidus.] Wet; moist. [Not in use.]
33746 madly MAD'LY, adv. [from mad.] Without reason or understanding; rashly; wildly.1. With extreme folly ...
33747 madman MAD'MAN, n. A man raving or furious with disordered intellect; a distracted man.1. A man without ...
33748 madness MAD'NESS, n. [from mad.] Distraction; a state of disordered reason or intellect, in which the ...
33749 madona MADO'NA
33750 madonna MADON'NA, n. A term of compellation equivalent to madam. It is given to the virgin Mary.
33751 madrepore MAD'REPORE, n. A submarine substance of a stony hardness, resembling coral. It consists of ...
33752 madreporite MAD'REPORITE, n. A name given to certain petrified bones found in Normandy, in France, belonging ...
33753 madrier MADRIE'R, n. A thick plank armed with iron plates, with a cavity to receive the mouth of a petard, ...
33754 madrigal MAD'RIGAL, n. 1. A little amorous poem, sometimes called a pastoral poem, containing a certain ...
33755 madwort MAD'WORT, n. A plant of the genus Alyssum.
33756 maestoso MAESTO'SO, an Italian word signifying majestic, a direction in music to play the part with grandeur ...
33757 maffle MAF'FLE, v.i. To stammer. [Not in use.]
33758 magazine MAGAZINE, n.1. A store of arms, ammunition or provisions; or the building in which such store is ...
33759 magaziner MAGAZINER, n. One who writes for a magazine. [Little used.]
33760 mage MAGE, n. A magician. [Not used.]Magellanic clouds, whitish clouds, or appearances like clouds near ...
33761 maggot MAG'GOT, n.1. A worm or grub; particularly, the flyworm, from the egg of the large blue or green ...
33763 maggoty-headed MAG'GOTY-HEADED, a. Having a head full of whims.
33762 maggoty MAG'GOTY, a. Full of maggots.
33764 magi MA'GI, n. plu. [L.] Wise men or philosophers of the East.
33765 magian MA'GIAN, a. [L. magus.] Pertaining to the Magi, a sect of philosophers in Persia.MA'GIAN, n. One ...
33766 magianism MA'GIANISM, n. The philosophy or doctrines of the Magi.
33767 magic MAG'IC, n. [L. magia; Gr. a philosopher among the Persians.]1. The art or science of putting into ...
33768 magical MAG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to magic; used in magic; as a magic wand; magic art.1. Performed by ...
33769 magically MAG'ICALLY, adv. By the arts of magic; according to the rules or rites of magic; by enchantment.
33770 magician MAGI'CIAN, n. One skilled in magic; one that practices the black art; an enchanter; a necromancer; ...
33771 magisterial MAGISTE'RIAL, a. [See Magistrate.] Pertaining to a master; such as suits a master; ...
33772 magisterially MAGISTE'RIALLY, adv. With the air of a master; arrogantly; authoritatively.
33773 magisterialness MAGISTE'RIALNESS, n. The air and manner of a master; haughtiness; imperiousness; peremptoriness.
33774 magistery MAG'ISTERY, n. [L. magisterium.] Among chimists, a precipitate; a fine substance deposited by ...
33775 magistracy MAG'ISTRACY, a. [See Magistrate.] The office or dignity of a magistrate. Duelling is not only an ...
33776 magistral MAG'ISTRAL, a. Suiting a magistrate; authoritative.MAG'ISTRAL, n. A sovereign medicine or remedy.
33777 magistrality MAGISTRAL'ITY, n. Despotic authority in opinion.
33778 magistrally MAG'ISTRALLY, adv. Authoritatively; with imperiousness.
33779 magistrate MAG'ISTRATE, n. [L. magistratus, from magister, master; magis, major, and ster, Teutonic steora, a ...
33780 magistratic MAGISTRAT'IC, a. Having the authority of a magistrate.
33781 magistrature MAG'ISTRATURE, n. Magistracy. [Little used.]
33782 magnanimity MAGNANIM'ITY, n. [L. magnanimitas; magnus, great, and animus, mind.] Greatness of mind; that ...
33783 magnanimous MAGNAN'IMOUS, a. [L. magnanimus.]1. Great of mind; elevated in soul or in sentiment; brave; ...
33784 magnanimously MAGNAN'IMOUSLY, adv. With greatness of mind; bravely; with dignity and elevation of sentiment.
33785 magnesia MAGNE'SIA, n. s as z. [Gr. the lodestone.]1. A primitive earth, having for its base a metallic ...
33786 magnesian MAGNE'SIAN, a. Pertaining to magnesia, or partaking of its qualities.
33787 magnesite MAG'NESITE, n. Carbonated magnesia, or magnesia combined with silex. It occurs in amorphous ...
33788 magnesium MAGNE'SIUM, n. The undecomposable base of magnesia.
33789 magnet MAG'NET, n. [L. from Gr. Magnesia, in Asia Minor.] The lodestone; an ore of iron which has the ...
33790 magnetic MAGNET'IC
33791 magnetical MAGNET'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the magnet; possessing the properties of the magnet, or ...
33792 magnetically MAGNET'ICALLY, adv. By means of magnetism; by the power of attraction.
33793 magneticalness MAGNET'ICALNESS, n. The quality of being magnetic.
33794 magnetics MAGNET'ICS, n. The science or principles of magnetism.
33795 magnetiferous MAGNETIF'EROUS, a. Producing or conducting magnetism.
33796 magnetism MAG'NETISM, n. That branch of science which treats of the properties of the magnet, the power of ...
33797 magnetize MAG'NETIZE, v.t. To communicate magnetic properties to any thing; as, to magnetize a needle. Seven ...
33798 magnetized MAG'NETIZED, pp. Made magnetic.
33799 magnetizing MAG'NETIZING, ppr. Imparting magnetism to.
33800 magnifiable MAG'NIFIABLE, a. [See Magnify.] That may be magnified; worthy of being magnified or extolled.
33801 magnific MAGNIF'IC
33802 magnifical MAGNIF'ICAL, a. [L. magnificus.] Grand; splendid; illustrious.
33803 magnifically MAGNIFICALLY, adv. In a magnificent manner.
33804 magnificate MAGNIF'ICATE, v.t. To magnify or extol. [Not used.]
33805 magnificence MAGNIFICENCE, n. [L.magnificentia.] Grandeur of appearance; greatness and splendor of show or ...
33806 magnificent MAGNIF'ICENT, a. Grand in appearance; splendid; pompous. Man he made, and for him built ...
33807 magnificently MAGNIF'ICENTLY, adv. With splendor of appearance, or pomp of show. The minister was magnificently ...
33808 magnifico MAGNIF'ICO, n. A grandee of Venice.
33809 magnifier MAG'NIFIER, n. [from magnify.] One who magnifies; one who extols or exalts in praises.1. A glass ...
33810 magnify MAGNIFY, v.t. [L. magnifico; magnus, great, and facio, to make.]1. To make great or greater; to ...
33811 magnifying MAG'NIFYING, ppr. Enlarging apparent bulk or dimensions; extolling; exalting.
33812 magniloquence MAGNIL'OQUENCE, n. [L. magnus, great, and loquens, speaking.]A lofty manner of speaking; tumid, ...
33813 magnitude MAG'NITUDE, n. [L. magnitudo.] Extent of dimensions or parts; bulk; size; applied to things that ...
33814 magnolia MAGNO'LIA, n. The laurel-leafed tulip tree, of several species.
33815 magpie MAG'PIE, n. [L. pica, with mag.] A chattering bird of the genus Corvus.
33816 maguey MAG'UEY, a. A species of aloe in Mexico, which furnished the natives with timber for their ...
33817 mahogany MAHOG'ANY, n. A tree of the genus Swietenia, growing in the tropical climates of America. The ...
33818 mahometan MAHOM'ETAN
33819 mahound MA'HOUND, n. Formerly a contemptuous name for Mohammed and the devil, &c.
33821 maid-servant MA'ID-SERVANT, n. A female servant.
33820 maid MAID, n. A species of skate fish.
33822 maiden MA'IDEN, n.1. An unmarried woman, or a young unmarried woman; a virgin.2. A female servant.3. It ...
33823 maidenhair MA'IDENHAIR, n. A plant of the genus Adiantum.
33824 maidenhood MA'IDENHOOD, n.1. The state of being a maid or virgin; virginity. The modest lore of maidenhood.2. ...
33825 maidenlike MA'IDENLIKE, a. Like a maid; modest.
33826 maidenliness MA'IDENLINESS, n. The behavior that becomes a maid; modesty; gentleness.
33827 maidenlip MA'IDENLIP, n. A plant.
33828 maidenly MA'IDENLY, a. Like a maid; gentle; modest; reserved.MA'IDENLY, adv. In a maidenlike manner.
33829 maidhood MA'IDHOOD, n. Virginity.
33830 maidmarian MAIDMAR'IAN, n. A dance; so called from a buffoon dressed like a man.
33831 maidpale MA'IDPALE, a. Pale, like a sick girl.
33833 mail-coach MA'IL-COACH, n. A coach that conveys the public mails.
33832 mail MAIL, n. [L.macula.]1. A coat of steel net-work, formerly worn for defending the body against ...
33834 mailed MA'ILED, pp. Covered with a mail or with armor; inclosed and directed, as letters in a bundle.1. ...
33835 mailing MA'ILING, ppr. Investing with a coat of mail; inclosing in a wrapper and directing to a post ...
33836 maim MAIM, v.t.1. To deprive of the use of a limb, so as to render a person less able to defend himself ...
33837 maimed MA'IMED, pp. Crippled; disabled in limbs; lame.
33838 maimedness MA'IMEDNESS, n. A state of being maimed.
33839 maiming MA'IMING, ppr. Disabling by depriving of the use of a limb; crippling; rendering lame or ...
33841 main-keel MA'IN-KEEL, n. The principal keel, as distinguished from the false keel.
33842 main-land MA'IN-LAND, n. The continent; the principal land, as opposed to an isle.
33843 main-mast MA'IN-MAST, n. The principal mast in a ship or other vessel.
33844 main-sail MA'IN-SAIL, n. The principal sail in a ship. The main-sail of a ship or brig is extended by a ...
33845 main-sheet MA'IN-SHEET, n. The sheet that extends and fastens the main-sail.
33846 main-top MA'IN-TOP, n. The top of the main-mast of a ship or brig.
33847 main-yard MA'IN-YARD, n. The yard on which the main-sail is extended, supported by the main-mast.
33840 main MAIN, a. [L. magnus.]1. Principal; chief; that which has most power in producing an effect, or ...
33848 mainly MA'INLY, adv. Chiefly; principally. He is mainly occupied with domestic concerns.1. Greatly; to ...
33849 mainor MA'INOR, n. [ L. a manu, from the hand, or in the work.] The old law phrase, to be taken as a ...
33850 mainpernable MAINPERN'ABLE, a. That may be admitted to give surety by mainpernors; that may be mainprized.
33851 mainpernor MAINPERN'OR, n. In law, a surety for a prisoner's appearance in court at a day. Mainpernors ...
33852 mainprize MA'INPRIZE, n.1. In law, a writ directed to the sheriff, commanding him to take sureties for the ...
33853 mainswear MA'INSWEAR, v.i. To swear falsely; to perjure one's self.
33854 maintain MAINTA'IN, v.t. [L. manus and teneo.]1. To hold, preserve or keep in any particular state or ...
33855 maintainable MAINTA'INABLE, a. That may be maintained, supported, preserved or sustained.1. That may be ...
33856 maintained MAINTA'INED, pp. Kept in any state; preserved; upheld; supported; defended; vindicated.
33857 maintainer MAINTA'INER, n. One who supports, preserves, sustains or vindicates.
33858 maintaining MAINTA'INING, ppr. Supporting; preserving; upholding; defending; vindicating.
33859 maintenance MA'INTENANCE, n. Sustenance; sustentation; support by means of supplies of food, clothing and ...
33860 maister MAISTER, for master, is obsolete.
33861 maistress MAISTRESS, for mistress, is obsolete.
33862 maiz MAIZ, n. A plant of the genus Zea, the native corn of America, called Indian corn.
33863 maja MA'JA, n. A bird of Cuba, of a beautiful yellow color, whose flesh is accounted a delicacy.
33864 majestic MAJES'TIC, a. [from majesty.] August; having dignity of person or appearance; grand; princely. ...
33865 majestical MAJES'TICAL, a. Majestic. [Little used.]
33866 majestically MAJES'TICALLY, adv. With dignity; with grandeur; with a lofty air or appearance.
33867 majesty MAJ'ESTY, n. [L. majestas, from the root of magis, major, more, greater.]1. Greatness of ...
33869 major-domo MAJOR-DO'MO,n. [major and domus, house.] A man who holds the place of master of the house; a ...
33870 major-general MA'JOR-GENERAL, n. A military officer who commands a division or a number of regiments; the next ...
33868 major MA'JOR, a. [L.] Greater in number, quantity or extent; as the major part of the assembly; the ...
33871 majoration MAJORA'TION, n. Increase; enlargement. [Not used.]
33872 majority MAJOR'ITY, n.1. The greater number; more than half; as a majority of mankind; a majority of votes ...
33873 make MAKE, v.t. pret. and pp. made.1. To compel; to constrain. They should be made to rise at an early ...
33874 makebate MA'KEBATE, n. One who excites contention and quarrels.
33875 makeless MA'KELESS, a. Matchless; without a mate.
33876 makepeace MA'KEPEACE, n. A peace-maker; one that reconciles persons when are variance.
33877 maker MA'KER, n. The Creator. The universal Maker we may praise.1. One that makes, forms, shapes, or ...
33878 makeweight MA'KEWEIGHT, n. That which is thrown into a scale to make weight.
33879 maki MA'KI, n. An animal of the genus Lemur. The ring-tailed maki is of the size of a cat.The common ...
33880 making MA'KING, ppr. Forming; causing; compelling; creating; constituting.MA'KING, n. The act of ...
33881 mal MAL, or MALE, as a previx, in composition, denotes ill or veil, L. malus. [See Malady.]
33882 malachite MAL'ACHITE, n. [Gr. mallows, L. malva, soft, so names from its resembling the color of the leaf of ...
33883 malacolite MAL'ACOLITE, n. [Gr. mallows, from its color.]Another name for diopside, a variety of pyroxene.
33884 malacopterygeous MALACOPTERYG'EOUS, a. [Gr. soft, a point or feather.]Having bony rays of fins, not sharp or pointed ...
33885 malacostomous MALACOS'TOMOUS, a. [Gr. soft, and mouth.]Having soft jaws without teeth; as a fish.
33886 maladministration MALADMINISTRA'TION, n. [See Mal and Administer.] Bad management of public affairs; vicious or ...
33887 malady MAL'ADY, n. [L. malum; Eng. mellow, L. mollis.]1. Any sickness or disease of the human body; any ...
33888 malaga MAL'AGA, n. A species of wine imported from Malaga, in Spain.
33889 malanders MALAN'DERS, n. A dry scab on the pastern of a horse.
33890 malapert MAL'APERT, a. [mal and pert.] Saucy; quick, with impudence; sprightly, without respect or decency; ...
33891 malapertly MAL'APERTLY, adv. Saucily; with impudence.
33892 malapertness MAL'APERTNESS, n. Sauciness; impudent pertness or forwardness; sprightliness of reply without ...
33893 malapropos MALAPROPOS, adv. malap'ropo. Unsuitably.
33894 malar MA'LAR, a. [L. mala, the cheek.] Pertaining to the cheek.
33895 malate MAL'ATE, n. [L. malum, an apple.] A salt formed by the malic acid, the acid of apples, combined ...
33896 malaxate MAL'AXATE, v.t. To soften; to knead to softness.
33897 malaxation MALAXA'TION, n. The act of moistening and softening; or the forming of ingredients into a mass for ...
33898 malconformation MALCONFORMA'TION, n. Ill form; disproportion of parts.
33899 malcontent MAL'CONTENT, n. [mal and content.] A discontented subject of government; one who murmurs at the ...
33900 malcontented MALCONTENT'ED, a. Discontented with the laws or the administration of government; uneasy; ...
33901 malcontentedly MALCONTENT'EDLY, adv. With discontent.
33902 malcontentedness MALCONTENT'EDNESS, n. Discontentedness with the government; dissatisfaction; want of attachment to ...
33903 male MALE, a. [L. masculus, from mas,maris.]1. Pertaining to the sex that procreates young, and applied ...
33904 maledicency MALEDIC'ENCY, n. [L. maledicentia; male and dico.]Evil speaking; reproachful language; proneness to ...
33905 maledicent MAL'EDICENT, a. Speaking reproachfully; slanderous. [Little used.]
33906 malediction MALEDIC'TION, n. [L. maledictio; male, evil, and dico, to speak.]Evil speaking; denunciation of ...
33907 malefaction MALEFAC'TION, n. [L.male, evil, and facio, to do.]A criminal deed; a crime; an offense against the ...
33908 malefactor MALEFAC'TOR, n. [supra.] One who commits a crime; one guilty of violating the laws, in such a ...
33909 malefice MAL'EFICE, n. An evil deed; artifice; enchantment. [Not in use.]
33910 maleficiate MALEFI'CIATE, v.t. To bewitch. [Not in use.]
33911 maleficiation MALEFICIA'TION, n. A bewitching. [Not in use.]
33912 maleficience MALEFI'CIENCE, n. [L. maleficientia.]The doing of evil, harm or mischief.
33913 maleficient MALEFI'CIENT, a. Doing evil, harm or mischief.
33914 malengine MALEN'GINE, n. Guile; deceit. [Not in use.]
33915 malet MAL'ET, n. A little bag or budget; a portmanteau. [Not used.]
33916 malevolence MALEV'OLENCE, n. [L. malevolentia; malum, evil, and volens, volo, to will.] Ill will, personal ...
33917 malevolent MALEV'OLENT, a. Having an evil disposition towards another or others; wishing evil to others; ill ...
33918 malevolently MALEV'OLENTLY, adv. With ill will or enmity; with the wish or design to injure.
33919 malevolous MALEV'OLOUS, a. Malevolent. [Not in use.]
33920 malfeasance MALFE'ASANCE, n. Evil doing; wrong; illegal deed.
33921 malformation MALFORMA'TION, n. [mal and formation.] Ill or wrong formation; irregular or anomalous formation or ...
33922 malic MA'LIC, a. [L.malum, an apple.] Pertaining to apples; drawn from the juice of apples; as malic ...
33923 malice MAL'ICE, n. [L.malitia, from malus, evil.] Extreme enmity of heart, or malevolence; a disposition ...
33924 malicious MALI'CIOUS, a. Harboring ill will or enmity without provocation; malevolent in the extreme; ...
33925 maliciously MALI'CIOUSLY, adv. With malice; with extreme enmity or ill will; with deliberate intention to ...
33926 maliciousness MALI'CIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being malicious; extreme enmity or disposition to injure; ...
33927 malign MALIGN, a. mali'ne. [L. malignus, from malus, evil. See Malady.]1. Having a very evil disposition ...
33928 malignancy MALIG'NANCY, n. [See Malignant.] Extreme malevolence; bitter enmity; malice; as malignancy of ...
33929 malignant MALIG'NANT, a. [L. malignus,maligno, from malus, evil.]1. Malicious; having extreme malevolence ...
33930 malignantly MALIG'NANTLY, adv. Maliciously; with extreme malevolence.1. With pernicious influence.
33931 maligner MALIGNER, n. One who regards or treats another with enmity; a traducer; a defamer.
33932 malignity MALIG'NITY, n. [L. malignitas.] Extreme enmity, or evil dispositions of heart towards another; ...
33933 malignly MALIGNLY, adv. With extreme ill will.1. Unpropitiously; perniciously.
33934 malison MAL'ISON, n. Malediction. [Not in use.]
33935 malkin MALKIN, n. maw'kin. A mop; also, a low maid-servant.
33936 mall MALL, n. maul. [L. malleus.]1. A large heavy wooden beetle; an instrument for driving any thing ...
33937 mallard MAL'LARD, n. A species of duck of the genus Anas.
33938 malleability MALLEABIL'ITY, n. [from malleable.] That quality of bodies which renders them susceptible of ...
33939 malleable MAL'LEABLE, a. [L. malleus. See Mall.] That may be drawn out and extended by beating; capable of ...
33940 malleableness MAL'LEABLENESS, n. Malleability, which see.
33941 malleate MAL'LEATE, v.t. To hammer; to draw into a plate or leaf by beating.
33942 malleation MALLEA'TION, n. The act of beating into a plate or leaf, as a metal; extension by beating.
33943 mallet MAL'LET, n. [L.malleus.] A wooden hammer or instrument for beating, or for driving pins; ...
33944 mallow MALLOW, n. [L. malva; Gr. soft; Eng. mellow.]A plant of the genus Malva; so called form its ...
33945 malmsey MALM'SEY, n. [L. vinum arvisium.] The name of a species of grape, and also of a kind of wine.
33946 malpractice MALPRAC'TICE, n. [mal and practice.] Evil practice; illegal or immoral conduct; practice contrary ...
33948 malt-dust MALT'-DUST, n. The grains or remains of malt. Malt-dust is an enricher of barren land.
33947 malt MALT, n. Barley steeped in water, fermented and dried in a kiln, and thus prepared for brewing ...
33949 maltalent MAL'TALENT, n. Ill humor. [Not in use.]
33950 maltha MAL'THA, n. A variety of bitumen, viscid and tenacious, like pitch; unctuous to the touch and ...
33951 maltman MALTMAN
33952 maltreat MALTRE'AT, v.t. [mal and treat.] To treat ill; to abuse; to treat roughly, rudely, or with ...
33953 maltreated MALTRE'ATED, pp. Ill treated; abused.
33954 maltreating MALTRE'ATING, ppr. Abusing; treating unkindly.
33955 maltreatment MALTRE'ATMENT, n. Ill treatment; ill usage; abuse.
33956 maltster MALTSTER, n. A man whose occupation is to make malt.
33957 maltworm MALTWORM, n. [malt and worm.] A tipler.
33958 malvaceous MALVA'CEOUS, a. [L.malvaceus, from malva, mallows.] Pertaining to mallows.
33959 malversation MALVERSA'TION, n. [L. male, ill, and versor, to behave.]Evil conduct; improper or wicked behavior; ...
33960 mam MAM
33961 mamaluke MAM'ALUKE
33962 mameluke MAM'ELUKE, n. The military force of Egypt consisted of soldiers called Mamelukes, who were ...
33963 mamma MAMM`A, n. [L. mamma, the breast or pap, and mother.]A familiar word for mother,used by young ...
33964 mammal MAM'MAL, n. [L.mamma, the breast.] In zoology, an animal that suckles its young. [See Mammifer.]
33965 mammalian MAMMA'LIAN, a. Pertaining to the mammals.
33966 mammalogist MAMMAL'OGIST, n. One who treats of mammiferous animals.
33967 mammalogy MAMMAL'OGY, n. [L.mamma, breast, and discourse.]The science or doctrine of mammiferous animals. ...
33968 mammary MAM'MARY, a. [See Mamma.] Pertaining to the breasts or paps; as the mammary arteries and veins.
33969 mammee MAMMEE', n. A tree of the genus Mammea, of two species, both large evergreens produced in hot ...
33970 mammet MAM'MET, n. A puppet; a figure dressed.
33971 mammifer MAM'MIFER, n. [L. mamma, the breast, and fero, to bear.]An animal which has breasts for nourishing ...
33972 mammiferous MAMMIF'EROUS, a. [supra.] Having breasts and nourishing the young by the milk secreted by them.
33973 mammiform MAM'MIFORM, a. [L.mamma and form.]Having the shape or form of paps.
33974 mammillary MAM'MILLARY, a. [L. mamilla.] Pertaining to the paps; resembling a pap; an epithet applied to two ...
33975 mammillated MAM'MILLATED, a. Having small nipples, or little globes like nipples.
33976 mammoc MAM'MOC, n. A shapeless piece. [Not used.]MAM'MOC, v.t. To tear in pieces. [Not used.]
33977 mammodis MAM'MODIS, n. Coarse, plain India muslins.
33978 mammon MAM'MON, n. Riches; wealth; or the god or riches. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. Matt.6.
33979 mammonist MAM'MONIST, n. A person devoted to the acquisition of wealth; one whose affections are placed ...
33980 mammoth MAM'MOTH, n. This name has been given to a hugh quadruped, now extinct, whose bones are found on ...
33982 man-midwife MAN-MIDWIFE, n. A man who practices obstetrics.
33981 man MAN, n. plu. men. [Heb.species, kind, image, similitude.]1. Mankind; the human race; the whole ...
33983 manacle MAN'ACLE, n. [L. manica; from manus,the hand.] An instrument of iron for fastening the hands; ...
33984 manacled MAN'ACLED, pp. Hand-cuffed; shackled.
33985 manacling MAN'ACLING, ppr. Confining the hands; shackling.
33986 manage MAN'AGE, v.t.1. To conduct; to carry on; to direct the concerns of; as, to manage a farm; to ...
33987 manageable MAN'AGEABLE, a. Easy to be used or directed to its proper purpose; not difficult to be moved or ...
33988 manageableness MAN'AGEABLENESS, n. The quality of being easily used, or directed to its proper purpose; as the ...
33989 managed MAN'AGED, pp. Conducted; carried on; trained by discipline; governed; controlled; wielded.
33990 management MAN'AGEMENT, n. Conduct; administration; manner of treating, directing or carrying on; as the ...
33991 manager MAN'AGER, n. One who has the conduct or direction of any thing; as the manager of a theater; the ...
33992 managery MAN'AGERY, n. [from manage.] conduct; direction; administration.1. Husbandry; economy; ...
33993 managing MAN'AGING, ppr. Conducting; regulating; directing; governing; wielding.
33994 manakin MAN'AKIN, n. The name of a beautiful race of birds found in warm climates.
33995 manati MANA'TI
33996 manation MANA'TION, n. [L.manatio, from mano,to flow.]The act of issuing or flowing out. [Little used.]
33997 manatus MANA'TUS, n. The sea-cow, or fish-tailed walrus,an animal of the genus Trichechus, which grows to ...
33998 manchet MAN'CHET, n. A small loaf of fine bread. [Not used.]
33999 manchineel MANCHINEE'L, n. [L. mancanilla.] A tree of the genus Hippomane, growing in the West Indies to the ...
34000 mancipate MAN'CIPATE, v.t. [L. mancipo, from manceps,mancipium; manu capio, to take with the hand.] To ...
34001 mancipation MANCIPA'TION, n. Slavery; involuntary servitude. [Little used.]
34002 manciple MAN'CIPLE, n. [L. manceps; manu capio, supra.]A steward; an undertaker; a purveyor, particularly of ...
34003 mandamus MANDA'MUS, n. [L. mando, to command; mandamus, we command. The primary sense is to send.]In law, a ...
34004 mandarin MANDARIN, n. In China, a magistrate or governor of a province; also, the court language of China.
34005 mandatary MAN'DATARY
34006 mandate MAN'DATE, n. [L. mando, to command.]1. A command; an order, precept or injunction; a commission. ...
34007 mandator MANDA'TOR, a. [L.] A director.
34008 mandatory MAN'DATORY, n. [L. mando, to command.]1. A person to whom the pope has by his prerogative given a ...
34009 mandible MAN'DIBLE, n. [L. mando, to chew.] The jaw, the instrument of chewing; applied particularly to ...
34010 mandibular MANDIB'ULAR, a. Belonging to the jaw.
34011 mandil MAN'DIL, n. A sort of mantle. [Not in use.]
34012 mandilion MANDIL'ION, n. [supra.] A soldier's coat; a loose garment.
34013 mandlestone MAN'DLESTONE, n. Kernel-stone; almond-stone, called also amygdaloid; a name given to stones or ...
34014 mandment MANDMENT, for commandment, is not in use.
34015 mandolin MAN'DOLIN, n. A cithern or harp. [Not in use.]
34016 mandrake MAN'DRAKE, n. [L. mandragoras.] A plant of the genus Atropa, growing naturally in Spain, Italy and ...
34017 mandrel MAN'DREL, n. An instrument for confining in the lathe the substance to be turned.
34018 mandrill MAN'DRILL, n. A species of monkey.
34019 manducable MAN'DUCABLE, a. That can be chewed; fit to be eaten.
34020 manducate MAN'DUCATE, v.t. [L. mando.] To chew.
34021 manducated MAN'DUCATED, pp. Chewed.
34022 manducating MAN'DUCATING, ppr. Chewing; grinding with the teeth.
34023 manducation MANDUCA'TION, n. The act of chewing or eating.
34024 mane MANE, n. The hair growing on the upper side of the neck of a horse or other animal, usually ...
34025 maneater MAN'EATER, n. A human being that feeds on human flesh; a cannibal; an anthropophagite.
34026 maned MA'NED, a. Having a mane.
34027 manege MAN'EGE, n. A school for teaching horsemanship, and for training horses.
34028 manerial MANERIAL. [See Manorial.]
34029 manes MA'NES, n. plu. [L.] The ghost, shade or soul of a deceased person; and among the ancient pagans, ...
34030 maneuver MANEU'VER, n. [L. manus, the hand, and oeuvre, work, L. opera.]1. Management; dexterous movement, ...
34031 maneuvered MANEU'VERED, pp. Moved in position.
34032 maneuvering MANEU'VERING, ppr. Changing the position or order for advantageous attack or defense.
34033 manful MAN'FUL, a. [man and full.] Having the spirit of a man; bold; brave; courageous.1. Noble; ...
34034 manfully MAN'FULLY, adv. Boldly; courageously; honorably.
34035 manfulness MAN'FULNESS, n. Boldness; courageousness.
34036 mangaby MAN'GABY, n. A monkey with naked eyelids; the white-eyed monkey.
34037 manganese MAN'GANESE, n. A metal of a dusky white, or whitish gray color, very hard and difficult to fuse. ...
34038 manganesian MANGANE'SIAN, a. Pertaining to manganese; consisting of it or partaking of its qualities.
34039 manganesiate MANGANE'SIATE, n. A compound of manganesic acid, with a base.
34040 manganesic MANGANE'SIC, a. Obtained from manganese; as the manganesic acid.[Manganic is ill formed.]
34041 manganesious MANGANE'SIOUS, a. Manganesious acid is an acid with a minimum of oxygen.
34042 mangcorn MANG'CORN, n. A mixture of wheat and rye, or other species of grain. [Not used in America.]
34043 mange MANGE, n. The scab or itch in cattle, dogs and other beasts.
34044 mangel-wurzel MANGEL-WURZEL, n. The root of scarcity, a plant of the beet kind.
34046 manger-board MANGER-BOARD, n. The bulk-head on a ship's deck that separates the manger from the other part of ...
34045 manger MANGER, n. [L. mando.]1. A trough or box in which fodder is laid for cattle, or the place in which ...
34047 manginess MANGINESS, n. [from mangy.] Scabbiness; infection of the mange.
34048 mangle MAN'GLE, v.t.1. To cut with a dull instrument and tear, or to tear in cutting; to cut in a ...
34049 mangled MAN'GLED, pp. Torn in cutting; smoothed with a mangle.
34050 mangler MAN'GLER, n. One who tears in cutting; one who uses a mangle.
34051 mangling MAN'GLING, ppr. Lacerating in the act of cutting; tearing.
34052 mango MAN'GO, n. The fruit of the mango tree, a native of the East Indies, of the genus Mangifera. It ...
34053 mangonel MAN'GONEL, n. An engine formerly used for throwing stones and battering walls.
34054 mangonism MAN'GONISM, n. The art of setting off to advantage.
34055 mangonize MAN'GONIZE, v.t. To polish for setting off to advantage.
34056 mangostan MAN'GOSTAN
34057 mangosteen MANGOSTEE'N, n. A tree of the East Indies, of the genus Garcinia, so called from Dr. Garcin, who ...
34058 mangrove MAN'GROVE, n. A tree of the East and West Indies, otherwise called mangle, and of the genus ...
34059 mangy MANGY, a. [from mange.] Scabby; infected with the mange.
34060 manhater MAN'HATER, n. [man and hate.] One who hates mankind; a misanthrope.
34061 manhood MAN'HOOD, n. [man and hood.] The state of one who is a man, of an adult male, or one who is ...
34062 mania MA'NIA, n. [L. and Gr.] Madness.
34063 maniable MAN'IABLE, a. Manageable; tractable. [Not in use.]
34064 maniac MA'NIAC, a. [L. maniacus.] Mad; raving with madness; raging with disordered intellect.MA'NIAC, n. ...
34065 maniacal MANI'ACAL, a. Affected with madness.
34066 manichean MANICHE'AN, a. Pertaining to the Manichees.
34067 manicheism MAN'ICHEISM, n. [supra.] The doctrines taught, or system of principles maintained by the ...
34068 manichord MAN'ICHORD
34069 manicon MAN'ICON, n. A species of nightshade.
34070 manicordon MANICORD'ON, n. A musical instrument in the form of a spinet, whose strings, like those of the ...
34071 manifest MAN'IFEST, a. [L. manifestus.]1. Plain, open, clearly visible to the eye or obvious to the ...
34072 manifestation MANIFESTA'TION, n. The act of disclosing what is secret, unseen or obscure; discovery to the eye ...
34073 manifested MAN'IFESTED, pp. Made clear; disclosed; made apparent, obvious or evident.
34074 manifestible MANIFEST'IBLE, a. That may be made evident.
34075 manifesting MAN'IFESTING, ppr. Showing clearly; making evident; disclosing, displaying.
34076 manifestly MAN'IFESTLY, adv. Clearly; evidently; plainly; in a manner to be clearly seen or understood.
34077 manifestness MAN'IFESTNESS, n. Clearness to the sight or mind; obviousness.
34078 manifesto MANIFEST'O, n. [L. manifestus,manifest.] A public declaration, usually of a prince or sovereign, ...
34079 manifold MAN'IFOLD, a. [many and fold.] Of divers kinds; many in number; numerous; multiplied. O Lord, how ...
34080 manifolded MAN'IFOLDED, a. Having many doublings or complications; as a manifolded shield. [Not used.]
34081 manifoldly MAN'IFOLDLY, adv. In a manifold manner; in many ways.
34082 manifoldness MAN'IFOLDNESS, n. Multiplicity.
34083 maniglions MANIG'LIONS, n. In gunnery, two handles on the back of a piece of ordnance, after the German way ...
34084 manihoc MA'NIHOC
34085 manihot MA'NIHOT, n. A plant of the genus Jatropha, or Cassada plant. It has palmated leaves, with entire ...
34086 manikin MAN'IKIN, n. A little man.
34087 manil MAN'IL
34088 manilla MANIL'LA, n. [L. manus.] A ring or bracelet worn by persons in Africa.
34089 manioc MA'NIOC
34090 maniple MAN'IPLE, n. [L. manipulus,a handful. Qu.L. manus and the Teutonic full.]1. A handful.2. A small ...
34091 manipular MANIP'ULAR, a. Pertaining to the maniple.
34092 manipulation MANIPULA'TION, n. [L. manipulus, supra.] In general, work by hand; manual operation; as in mining, ...
34093 mankiller MAN'KILLER, n. [man and kill.] One who slays a man.
34094 mankilling MAN'KILLING, a. Used to kill men.
34095 mankind MANKIND, n. [man and kind.] This word admits the accent either on the first or second syllable; ...
34096 manless MAN'LESS, a. [man and less.] Destitute of men; not manned; as a boat. [Little used.]
34097 manlike MAN'LIKE, a. Having the proper qualities of a man.1. Of man's nature.
34098 manliness MAN'LINESS, n. [from manly.] The qualities of a man; dignity; bravery; boldness.
34099 manling MAN'LING, n. A little man.
34100 manly MAN'LY, a. [man and like.] Manlike; becoming a man; firm; brave; undaunted. Serene and manly, ...
34101 manna MAN'NA, n.1. A substance miraculously furnished as food for the Israelites in their journey ...
34102 manner MAN'NER, n. [L. manus, the hand.]1. Form; method; way of performing or executing. Find thou the ...
34103 mannerism MAN'NERISM, n. Adherence to the same manner; uniformity of manner.
34104 mannerist MAN'NERIST, n. An artist who performs his work in one unvaried manner.
34105 mannerliness MAN'NERLINESS, n. The quality of being civil and respectful in behavior; civility; complaisance.
34106 mannerly MAN'NERLY, a. Decent in external deportment; civil; respectful; complaisant; not rude or vulgar. ...
34107 manners MAN'NERS, n. plu. Deportment; carriage; behavior; conduct; course of life; in a moral sense. Evil ...
34108 mannish MAN'NISH, a. [from man.] Having the appearance of a man; bold; masculine; as a mannish ...
34109 manometer MANOM'ETER, n. [Gr. measure.] An instrument to measure or show the alterations in the rarity or ...
34110 manometrical MANOMET'RICAL, a. Pertaining to the manometer; made by the manometer.
34112 manor-house MAN'OR-HOUSE
34113 manor-seat MAN'OR-SEAT, n. The house belonging to a manor.
34111 manor MAN'OR, n. [L. maneo, to abide.] The land belonging to a lord or nobleman, or so much land as a ...
34114 manorial MANO'RIAL
34115 manpleaser MAN'PLEASER, n. [man and pleaser.] One who pleases men, or one who takes uncommon pains to gain ...
34116 manqueller MAN'QUELLER, n. [man and quell.] A mankiller; a manslayer; a murderer. [Not used.]
34117 manse MANSE, n. mans. [L. mansio, from maneo, to abide.]1. A house or habitation; particularly, a ...
34118 manservant MAN'SERVANT, n. A male servant.
34120 mansion-house MAN'SION-HOUSE, n. The house in which one resides; an inhabited house.
34119 mansion MAN'SION, n. [L. mansio, from maneo, to dwell.]1. Any place of residence; a house; a habitation. ...
34121 mansionary MAN'SIONARY, a. Resident; residentiary; as mansionary canons.
34122 mansionry MAN'SIONRY, n. A place of residence. [Not used.]
34123 manslaughter MAN'SLAUGHTER, n. [man and slaughter. See Slay.]1. In a general sense,the killing of a man or of ...
34124 manslayer MAN'SLAYER, n. One that has slain a human being. The Israelites had cities of refuge for ...
34125 manstealer MAN'STEALER, n. One who steals and sells men.
34126 manstealing MAN'STEALING, n. The act of stealing a human being.
34127 mansuete MAN'SUETE, a. [L.mansuetus.] Tame; gentle; not wild or ferocious. [Little used.]
34128 mansuetude MAN'SUETUDE, n. [L. mansuetudo.] Tameness; mildness; gentleness.
34129 manta MAN'TA, n. A flat fish that is very troublesome to pearlfishers.
34130 mantel MANTEL. [See Mantle.]
34131 mantelet MAN'TELET
34132 mantiger MANT'IGER, rather mantichor, or manticor, n. [L. manticora,mantichora.] A large monkey or baboon.
34134 mantle-piece MAN'TLE-PIECE
34135 mantle-shelf MAN'TLE-SHELF, n. The work over a fire-place, in front of the chimney.
34136 mantle-tree MAN'TLE-TREE, n. The piece of timber or stone in front of a chimney, over the fire-place, resting ...
34133 mantle MAN'TLE, n. [Gr. a cloke.]1. A kind of cloke or loose garment to be worn over other garments. The ...
34137 mantlet MANT'LET, n. [dim. of mantle.] A small cloke worn by women.1. In fortification, a kind of movable ...
34138 mantling MANT'LING, n. In heraldry,the representation of a mantle, or the drapery of a coat of arms.
34139 manto MAN'TO, n. A robe; a cloke.
34140 mantology MANTOL'OGY, n. [Gr. divination,and discourse.] The act or art of divination or prophesying. ...
34142 mantua-maker MAN'TUA-MAKER, n. One who makes gowns for ladies.
34141 mantua MAN'TUA, n. A lady's gown.
34143 manual MAN'UAL, a. [L. manualis, from manus, the hand.]1. Performed by the hand; as manual labor or ...
34144 manuary MAN'UARY, a. Done by the hand. [Not used.]
34145 manubial MANU'BIAL, a. [L. manubialis, from manubioe, spoils.]Belonging to spoils; taken in war. [Little ...
34146 manuduction MANUDUC'TION, n. [L. manus,hand, and ductio, a leading.]Guidance by the hand.
34147 manuductor MANUDUC'TOR, n. [L.manus,hand, and ductor, a leader.]An officer in the ancient church, who gave the ...
34148 manufactory MANUFAC'TORY, n. [See Manufacture.] A house or place where goods are manufactured.
34149 manufactural MANUFAC'TURAL, a. Pertaining or relating to manufactures.
34150 manufacture MANUFAC'TURE, n. [L. manus, hand, and facio, to make.]1. The operation of making cloth, wares, ...
34151 manufactured MANUFAC'TURED, pp. Made form raw materials into forms for use.
34152 manufacturer MANUFAC'TURER, n. One who works raw materials into wares suitable for use.1. One who employs ...
34153 manufacturing MANUFAC'TURING, ppr. Making goods and wares from raw materials.
34154 manumise MANUMISE, for manumit, not used.
34155 manumission MANUMIS'SION, n. [L. manumissio. See Manumit.]The act of liberating a slave from bondage, and ...
34156 manumit MAN'UMIT, v.t. [L.manumitto; manus,hand, and mitto, to send.]To release from slavery; to liberate ...
34157 manumitted MAN'UMITTED, pp. Released from slavery.
34158 manumitting MAN'UMITTING, ppr. Liberating from personal bondage.
34159 manurable MANU'RABLE, a. [from manure.] That may be cultivated. This, though the original sense, is rarely ...
34160 manurage MANU'RAGE, n. Cultivation. [Not used.]
34161 manurance MANU'RANCE, n. Cultivation. [Not used.]
34162 manure MANU'RE, v.t. [L.manus, hand, and ouvrer, to work, L. operor.]1. To cultivate by manual labor; to ...
34163 manured MANU'RED, pp. Dressed or overspread with a fertilizing substance.
34164 manurement MANU'REMENT, n. Cultivation; improvement. [Little used.]
34165 manurer MANU'RER, n. One that manures land.
34166 manuring MANU'RING, ppr. Dressing or overspreading land with manure; fertilizing.MANU'RING, n. A dressing ...
34167 manuscript MAN'USCRIPT, n. [L. manu scriptum, written with the hand.]A book or paper written with the hand or ...
34168 manutenency MANUTEN'ENCY, n. Maintenance. [Not in use.]
34170 many-cleft MANY-CLEFT', a. Multifid; having many fissures.
34171 many-colored MANY-COL'ORED, a. Having many colors or hues.
34172 many-cornered MANY-COR'NERED, a. Having many corners,or more than twelve; polygonal.
34173 many-flowered MANY-FLOW'ERED, a. Having many flowers.
34174 many-headed MANY-HEAD'ED, a. Having many heads; as a many-headed monster; many-headed tyranny.
34175 many-languaged MANY-LAN'GUAGED, a. Having many languages.
34176 many-leaved MANY-LE'AVED, a. Polyphyllous; having many leaves.
34177 many-mastered MANY-M`ASTERED, a. Having many masters.
34178 many-parted MANY-P`ARTED, a. Multipartite; divided into several parts; as a corol.
34179 many-peopled MANY-PE'OPLED, a. Having a numerous population.
34180 many-petaled MANY-PET'ALED, a. Having many petals.
34181 many-twinkling MANY-TWINK'LING, a. Variously twinkling or gleaming.
34182 many-valved MANY-VALV'ED, a. Multivalvular; having many valves.
34169 many MANY, a. men'ny.1. Numerous; comprising a great number of individuals. Thou shalt be a father of ...
34183 map MAP, n. [L. mappa, a cloth or towel, a Punic word.] A representation of the surface of the earth ...
34185 maple-sugar MAPLE-SU'GAR, n. Sugar obtained by evaporation from the juice of the rock maple.
34186 maple-tree MA'PLE-TREE, n. A tree of the genus Acer, of several species. Of the sap of the rock maple, sugar ...
34184 maple MA'PLE
34187 mappery MAP'PERY, n. [from map.] The art of planning and designing maps.
34188 mar M`AR, v.t. [L. marceo.]1. To injure by cutting off a part, or by wounding and making defective; ...
34189 maracan MAR'ACAN, n. A species of parrot in Brazil.
34190 maracock MAR'ACOCK, n. A plant of the genus Passiflora.
34191 maranatha MARANA'THA, n. The Lord comes or has come; a word used by the apostle Paul in expressing a curse. ...
34192 maranon MAR'ANON, n. The proper name of a river in South America, the largest in the world; most absurdly ...
34193 marasmus MARAS'MUS, n. [Gr. to cause to pine or waste away.]Atrophy; a wasting of flesh without fever or ...
34194 maraud MARAUD', v.i. [Heb. to rebel; L. cursus, curro.]To rove in quest of plunder; to make an excursion ...
34195 marauder MARAUD'ER, n. A rover in quest of booty or plunder; a plunderer; usually applied to small parties ...
34196 marauding MARAUD'ING, ppr. Roving in search of plunder.MARAUD'ING, n. A roving for plunder; a plundering by ...
34197 maravedi MARAVE'DI, n. A small copper coin of Spain, equal to three mills American money, less than a ...
34198 marble M`ARBLE, n. [L. marmor; Gr. white.]1. The popular name of any species of calcarious stone or ...
34200 marbled-hearted M`ARBLED-HE`ARTED, a. Having a heart like marble; hard hearted; cruel; insensible; incapable of ...
34199 marbled M`ARBLED, pp. Diversified in color; veined like marble.
34201 marbling M`ARBLING, ppr. Variegating in colors; clouding or veining like marble.M`ARBLING, n. The art or ...
34202 marcasite M`ARCASITE, n. A name which has been given to all sorts of minerals, to ores, pyrites, and ...
34203 marcasitic MARCASIT'IC, a. Pertaining to marcasite; of the nature of marcasite.
34204 marcescent MARCES'CENT, a. [L. marcescens, marcesco.]Withering; fading; decaying.
34205 marcessible MARCES'SIBLE, a. That may wither; liable to decay.
34206 march M`ARCH, n. [L. Mars, the god of war.]The third month of the year.M`ARCH, v.i. To border on; to be ...
34207 marcher M`ARCHER, n. The lord or officer who defended the marches or borders of a territory.
34208 marches M`ARCHES, n. plu. Borders; limits; confines; as lord of the marches.
34209 marching M`ARCHING, ppr. Moving or walking in order or in a stately manner.M`ARCHING, n. Military movement; ...
34210 marchioness M`ARCHIONESS, n. The wife or widow of a marquis; or a female having the rank and dignity of a ...
34211 marchpane M`ARCHPANE, n. [L. panis, bread.] A kind of sweet bread or biscuit. [Not used.]
34212 marcid M`ARCID, a. [L. marcidus, from marceo, to pine.]Pining; wasted away; lean; withered.
34213 marcor M`ARCOR, n. [L.] The state of withering or wasting; leanness; waste of flesh. [Little used.]
34214 mare MARE, n. The female of the horse,or equine genus of quadrupeds.A kind or torpor or stagnation ...
34215 mareca MAR'ECA, n. A species of duck in South America.
34216 marena MARE'NA, n. A kind of fish somewhat like a pilchard.
34217 mareschal M`ARESCHAL, n. m`arshal. The chief commander of an army.
34218 margarate M`ARGARATE, n. [L. margarita, a pearl, from the Greek.]In chimistry, a compound of margaric acid ...
34219 margaric MARGAR'IC, a. [supra.] Pertaining to pearl. The margaric acid is obtained by digesting soap made ...
34220 margarin M`ARGARIN
34221 margarine M`ARGARINE, n. A peculiar pearl-like substance, extracted from hog's lard; called also margarite ...
34222 margarite M`ARGARITE, n. A pearl.1. Margaric acid.2. A mineral of a grayish white color found in Tyrol.
34223 margay M`ARGAY, n. An American animal of the cat kind.
34224 margin M`ARGIN, n. [L. margo.]1. A border; edge; brink; verge; as the margin of a river or lake.2. The ...
34225 marginal M`ARGINAL, a. Pertaining to a margin.1. Written or printed in the margin; as a marginal note or ...
34226 marginally M`ARGINALLY, adv. In the margin of a book.
34227 marginated M`ARGINATED, a. Having a margin.
34228 margode M`ARGODE, n. A bluish gray stone, resembling clay in external appearance, but so hard as to cut ...
34229 margot M`ARGOT, n. A fish of the perch kind, found in the waters of Carolina.
34230 margrave M`ARGRAVE, n. Originally, a lord or keeper of the marches or borders; now a title of nobility in ...
34231 margraviate MARGRA'VIATE, n. The territory or jurisdiction of a margrave.
34232 mariets MAR'IETS, n. A kind of violet, [violae marianae.]
34233 marigenous MARIG'ENOUS, a. [L. mare, the sea, and gigno, to produce.]Produced in or by the sea.
34234 marigold MAR'IGOLD, n. A plant of the genus Calendula, bearing a yellow flower. There are several plants ...
34235 marikin MAR'IKIN, n. A species of monkey having a mane.
34236 marinate MAR'INATE, v.t. To salt or pickle fish, and then preserve them in oil or vinegar. [Little used.]
34237 marine MARINE, a. [L. marinus, from mare,the sea.]1. Pertaining to the sea; as marine productions or ...
34238 mariner MAR'INER, n. [L. mare,the sea.] A seaman or sailor; one whose occupation is to assist in ...
34239 mariput MAR'IPUT, n. The zoril, an animal of the skunk tribe.
34240 marish MAR'ISH, n. [L. mare.] Low ground, wet or covered with water and coarse grass; a fen; a bog; a ...
34241 marital MAR'ITAL, a. [L. maritus.] Pertaining to a husband.
34242 maritime MAR'ITIME, a. [L. maritimus, from mare, the sea.]1. Relating or pertaining to the sea or ocean; as ...
34243 marjoram M`ARJORAM, n. A plant of the genus Origanum, of several species. The sweet marjoram is peculiarly ...
34244 mark M`ARK, n. [L. mercor, the primary sense of which is to go, to pass; Gr. to pass; Eng. fair, and ...
34245 markable M`ARKABLE, a. Remarkable. [Not in use.]
34246 marked M`ARKED, pp. Impressed with any note or figure of distinction; noted; distinguished by some ...
34247 marker M`ARKER, n. One who puts a mark on any thing.1. One that notes or takes notice.
34249 market-bell M`ARKET-BELL, n. The bell that gives notice of the time or day of market.
34250 market-cross M`ARKET-CROSS, n. A cross set up where a market is held.
34251 market-day M`ARKET-DAY, n. The day of a public market.
34252 market-folks M`ARKET-FOLKS, n. People that come to the market.
34253 market-house M`ARKET-HOUSE, n. A building for a public market.
34254 market-maid M`ARKET-MAID, n. A woman that brings things to market.
34255 market-man M`ARKET-MAN, n. A man that brings things to market.
34256 market-place M`ARKET-PLACE, n. The place where provisions or goods are exposed to sale.
34257 market-price M`ARKET-PRICE
34258 market-rate M`ARKET-RATE, n. The current price of commodities at any given time.
34259 market-town M`ARKET-TOWN, n. A town that has the privilege of a stated public market.
34260 market-woman M`ARKET-WOMAN, n. A woman that brings things to market or that attends a market for selling any ...
34248 market M`ARKET, n. [L. mercatus, from mercor,to buy.]1. A public place in a city or town, where ...
34261 marketable M`ARKETABLE, n. That may be sold; salable.1. Current in market; as marketable value.
34262 marksman M`ARKSMAN, n. [Mark and man.] One that is skillful to hit a mark; he that shoots well.1. One who, ...
34263 marl M`ARL, n. [L. marga.] A species of calcarious earth, of different composition, being united with ...
34264 marlaceous MARLA'CEOUS, a. Resembling marl; partaking of the qualities of marl.
34266 marline-spike M`ARLINE-SPIKE, n. A small iron like a large spike, used to open the bolt rope when the sail is to ...
34265 marline M`ARLINE, n. A small line composed of two strands little twisted,and either tarred or white; used ...
34267 marling M`ARLING, n. The act of winding a small line about a rope, to prevent its being galled.
34268 marlite M`ARLITE, n. A variety of marl.
34269 marlitic MARLIT'IC, a. Partaking of the qualities of marlite.
34270 marlpit M`ARLPIT, n. A pit where marl is dug.
34271 marly M`ARLY, a. Consisting in or partaking of marl.1. Resembling marl.2. Abounding with marl.
34272 marmalade M`ARMALADE, n. [L. melo, mel.] The pulp of quinces boiled into a consistence with sugar, or a ...
34273 marmalite M`ARMALITE, n. [Gr. to shine.] A mineral of a pearly or metallic luster; a hydrate of magnesia.
34274 marmoraceous MARMORA'CEOUS, a. Pertaining to or like marble. [See Marmorean, the more legitimate word.]
34275 marmorated M`ARMORATED, a. [L. marmor, marble.] Covered with marble. [Little used.]
34276 marmoration MARMORA'TION, n. A covering or incrusting with marble. [Little used.]
34277 marmorean MARMO'REAN, a. [L. marmoreus.] Pertaining to marble.1. Made of marble.
34278 marmose M`ARMOSE, n. An animal resembling the opossum, but less. Instead of a bag, this animal has two ...
34279 marmoset M`ARMOSET, n. A small monkey.
34280 marmot M`ARMOT, n. A quadruped of the genus Arctomys, allied to the murine tribe. It is about the size of ...
34281 maroon MAROON', n. A name given to free blacks living on the mountains in the West India isles.MAROON', ...
34282 marque M`ARQUE
34283 marquetry M`ARQUETRY, n. Inlaid work; work inlaid with variegations of fine wood, shells, ivory and the ...
34284 marquis M`ARQUIS, n. A title of honor in Great Britain, next to that of duke. Originally, the marquis was ...
34285 marquisate M`ARQUISATE, n. The seigniory, dignity, or lordship of a marquis.
34286 marrer M`ARRER, n. [from mar.] One that mars, hurts or impairs.
34287 marriable MARRIABLE, for marriageable. [Not used.]
34289 marriage-articles MAR'RIAGE-ARTICLES, n. Contract or agreement on which a marriage is founded.
34288 marriage MAR'RIAGE, n. [L.mas, maris.] The act of uniting a man and woman for life; wedlock; the legal ...
34290 marriageable MAR'RIAGEABLE, a. Of an age suitable for marriage; fit to be married. Young persons are ...
34291 married MAR'RIED, pp. [from marry.] United in wedlock.1. a. Conjugal; connubial; as the married state.
34293 marrow-bone MAR'ROW-BONE, n. A bone containing marrow,or boiled for its marrow.1. The bone of the knee; in ...
34292 marrow MAR'ROW, n. 1. A soft oleaginous substance contained in the cavities of animal bones.2. The ...
34294 marrowfat MAR'ROWFAT, n. A kind of rich pea.
34295 marrowish MAR'ROWISH, a. Of the nature of marrow.
34296 marrowless MAR'ROWLESS, a. Destitute of marrow.
34297 marrowy MAR'ROWY, a. Full of marrow; pithy.
34298 marry MAR'RY, v.t. [L. mas, maris, a male; L. vir, a husband, a lord or master.]1. To unite in wedlock or ...
34299 mars M`ARS, n. In mythology, the god of war; in modern usage, a planet; and in the old chimistry, a term ...
34301 marsh-elder M`ARSH-EL'DER, n. The gelder rose, a species of Viburnum.
34302 marsh-mallow M`ARSH-MAL'LOW, n. A plant of the genus Althaea.
34303 marsh-marigold M`ARSH-MAR'IGOLD, n. A plant of the genus Caltha.
34304 marsh-rocket M`ARSH-ROCK'ET, n. A species of water cresses.
34300 marsh M`ARSH, n. A tract of low land, usually or occasionally covered with water, or very wet and miry, ...
34305 marshal M`ARSHAL, n. 1. The chief officer of arms, whose duty it is to regulate combats in the lists.2. ...
34306 marshaled M`ARSHALED, pp. Arranged in due order.
34307 marshaler M`ARSHALER, n. One who disposes in due order.
34308 marshaling M`ARSHALING, ppr. Arranging in due order.
34309 marshalsea M`ARSHALSEA, n. In England, the prison in Southwark, belonging to the marshal of the king's ...
34310 marshalship M`ARSHALSHIP, n. The office of a marshal.
34311 marshy M`ARSHY, a. [from marsh.] Wet; boggy; fenny.1. Produced in marshes; as a marshy weed.
34312 mart M`ART, n. [from market.] A place of sale or traffick. It was formerly applied chiefly to markets ...
34313 martagon M`ARTAGON, n. A kind of lily.
34314 martel M`ARTEL, v.t. To strike.
34315 marten MARTEN. [See Martin.]
34316 martial M`ARTIAL, a. [L. martialis; Mars, the god of war.]1. Pertaining to war; suited to war; as martial ...
34317 martialism M`ARTIALISM, n. Bravery; martial exercises. [Not in use.]
34318 martialist M`ARTIALIST, n. A warrior; a fighter. [Not used.]
34319 martin M`ARTIN, n. [L. murus.] A bird of the genus Hirundo, which forms its nest in buildings. It was ...
34320 martinet M`ARTINET
34321 martinets M`ARTINETS, n. In ships, martinets are small lines fastened to the leech of a sail, to bring it ...
34322 martingal M`ARTINGAL, n.1. A strap or thong fastened to the girth under a horse's belly, and at the other ...
34323 martinmas M`ARTINMAS, n. [Martin and mass.] The feast of St. Martin, the eleventh of November.
34324 martlet M`ARTLET, n. In military language, a strict disciplinarian; so called from an officer of that ...
34325 martyr M`ARTYR, n. [Gr. a witness.] One who, by his death, bears witness to the truth of the gospel. ...
34326 martyrdom M`ARTYRDOM, n. The death of a martyr; the suffering of death on account of one's adherence to the ...
34327 martyrize M`ARTYRIZE, v.t. To offer as a martyr. [Little used.]
34328 martyrological MARTYROLOG'ICAL, a. Registering or registered in a catalogue or martyrs.
34329 martyrologist MARTYROL'OGIST, n. A writer of martyrology, or an account of martyrs.
34330 martyrology MARTYROL'OGY, n. [Gr. a witness, and discourse.] A history or account of martyrs with their ...
34331 marvel M`ARVEL, n. [L. mirabilis, wonderful, from miror; demiror, mora, delay, and perhaps morior; Eng. ...
34332 marveling M`ARVELING, ppr. Wondering.
34333 marvelous M`ARVELOUS, a.1. Wonderful; strange; exciting wonder or some degree of surprise. This is the ...
34334 marvelously M`ARVELOUSLY, adv. Wonderfully; strangely; in a manner to excite wonder or surprise.
34335 marvelousness M`ARVELOUSNESS, n. Wonderfulness; strangeness.
34336 mary-bud MA'RY-BUD, n. The marigold.
34337 mascle M`ASCLE, n. m`asl. In heraldry, a lozenge, as it were perforated.
34338 masculine M`ASCULINE, a. [L. masculinus, from masculus, mas.]1. Having the qualities of a man; strong; ...
34339 masculinely M`ASCULINELY, adv. Like a man.
34340 masculineness M`ASCULINENESS, n. The quality or state of being manly; resemblance of man in qualities; as in ...
34341 mash MASH, n. [L. mastico.]1. A mixture or mass of ingredients, beaten or blended together in a ...
34342 mashed MASH'ED, pp. Beat into a mass; bruised; crushed; mixed into a mash.
34344 mashing-tub MASH'ING-TUB, n. A tub for containing the mash in breweries.
34343 mashing MASH'ING, ppr. Beating into a mass; bruising; crushing.
34345 mashy MASH'Y, a. Produced by crushing or bruising.
34347 mask-house M`ASK-HOUSE, n. A place for masquerades.
34346 mask M`ASK, n.1. A cover for the face; that which conceals the face, especially a cover with apertures ...
34348 masked M`ASKED, pp. Having the face covered; concealed; disguised.1. a. In botany, personate.
34349 masker M`ASKER, n. One that wears a mask; one that plays the fool at a masquerade.
34350 maskery M`ASKERY, n. The dress or disguise of a masker.
34351 masking M`ASKING, ppr. Covering with a mask; concealing.
34352 maslin MASLIN. [See Meslin.]
34353 mason MA'SON, n. ma'sn.1. A man whose occupation is to lay bricks and stones, or to construct the walls ...
34354 masonic MASON'IC, a. Pertaining to the craft or mysteries of free masons.
34355 masonry MA'SONRY, n.1. The art or occupation of a mason.2. The work or performance of a mason; as when we ...
34356 masora MAS'ORA, n. [Heb.] A Hebrew work on the bible, by several Rabbins.
34357 masoretic MASORET'IC, a. [Heb. to deliver, whence masora, tradition, whence the Masorites, the adherents to ...
34358 masorite MAS'ORITE, n. One of the writers of the Masora.
34359 masquerade MASQUERA'DE, n.1. A nocturnal assembly of persons wearing masks, and amusing themselves with ...
34360 masquerader MASQUERA'DER, n. A person wearing a mask; one disguised.
34361 masquerading MASQUERA'DING, ppr. Assembling in masks for diversion.
34362 mass M`ASS, n. [L. massa, a mass; Gr. to beat or pound.]1. A lump; a body of matter concreted, ...
34363 massacer MAS'SACER
34364 massacre MAS'SACRE, n.1. The murder of an individual, or the slaughter of numbers of human beings, with ...
34365 massacrer MAS'SACRER, n. One who massacres. [A very bad word.]
34366 masser M`ASSER, n. A priest who celebrates mass.
34367 masseter MAS'SETER, n. [Gr. to chew.] A muscle which raises the under jaw.
34368 massicot MAS'SICOT
34369 massiness M`ASSINESS
34370 massive M`ASSIVE
34371 massiveness M`ASSIVENESS, n. [See Massy, Massive.] The state of being massy; great weight or weight with ...
34372 massy M`ASSY, a. Heavy; weighty; ponderous; bulky and heavy; as a massy shield; a massy rock. The ...
34373 mast M`AST, n. A long, round piece of timber, elevated or designed to be raised perpendicularly or ...
34374 masted M`ASTED, a. Furnished with a mast or masts.
34376 master-hand M`ASTER-HAND, n. The hand of a man eminently skillful.
34377 master-jest M`ASTER-JEST, n. Principal jest.
34378 master-key M`ASTER-KEY, n. The key that opens many locks, the subordinate keys of which open only one each.
34379 master-lode M`ASTER-LODE, n. In mining, the principal vein of ore.
34380 master-piece M`ASTER-PIECE, n. A capital performance; any thing done or made with superior or extraordinary ...
34381 master-sinew M`ASTER-SINEW, n. A large sinew that surrounds the hough of a horse, and divides it from the bone ...
34382 master-string M`ASTER-STRING, n. Principal string.
34383 master-stroke M`ASTER-STROKE, n. Capital performance.
34384 master-tooth M`ASTER-TOOTH, n. A principal tooth.
34385 master-touch M`ASTER-TOUCH, n. Principal performance.
34386 master-work M`ASTER-WORK, n. Principal performance.
34387 master-wort M`ASTER-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Imperatoria.
34375 master M`ASTER, n. [L. magister, compounded of the root of magis, major, greater.]1. A man who rules, ...
34388 masterdom M`ASTERDOM, n. Dominion, rule. [Not used.]
34389 masterful M`ASTERFUL, a. Having the skill of a master; also, imperious; arbitrary.
34390 masterless M`ASTERLESS, a. Destitute of a master or owner.1. Ungoverned; unsubdued.
34391 masterly M`ASTERLY, a. Formed or executed with superior skill; suitable to a master; most excellent; ...
34392 mastership M`ASTERSHIP, n. Dominion; rule; supreme power.1. Superiority; preeminence. Where noble youths for ...
34393 mastery M`ASTERY, n. Dominion; power of governing or commanding. If divided by mountains, they will fight ...
34394 mastful M`ASTFUL, a. [from mast.] Abounding with mast, or fruit of oak, beech and other forest trees; as ...
34395 mastic MAS'TIC
34396 masticate MAS'TICATE, v.t. [L. mastico.] To chew; to grind with the teeth and prepare for swallowing and ...
34397 masticated MAS'TICATED, pp. Chewed.
34398 masticating MAS'TICATING, ppr. Chewing; breaking into small pieces with the teeth.
34399 mastication MASTICA'TION, n. The act or operation of chewing solid food, breaking it into small pieces, and ...
34400 masticatory MAS'TICATORY, a. Chewing; adapted to perform the office of chewing food.MAS'TICATORY, n. A ...
34401 mastich MAS'TICH, n. [L. mastiche.]1. A resin exuding from the mastic-tree, a species of Pistacia, and ...
34402 masticot MAS'TICOT, n. Calcined white lead; yellow oxyd of lead. Lead exposed to the air while melting, is ...
34403 mastiff M`ASTIFF, n. plu. mastiffs. Mastives is irregular. [Low L. mastivus.] A large species of dog, ...
34404 mastless M`ASTLESS, a. Having no mast; as a vessel.1. Bearing no mast; as a mastless oak or beech.
34405 mastlin MASTLIN. [See Meslin.]
34406 mastodon MAS'TODON, n. [Gr. mamilla, and tooth.] A genus of mammiferous animals resembling the elephant, ...
34407 mastoid MAS'TOID, a. [Gr. the nipple or breast, and form.]Resembling the nipple or breast; as the mastoid ...
34408 mastress MASTRESS, for mistress, is not used.
34409 masty M`ASTY, a. Full of mast; abounding with acorns, &c.
34410 mat MAT, n. [L. matta.]1. A texture of sedge, rushes, flags, husks, straw, or other material, to be ...
34411 matachin MAT'ACHIN, n. An old dance.
34412 matadore MAT'ADORE, n. One of the three principal cards in the game of omber and quadrille, which are ...
34413 match MATCH, n.1. Some very combustible substance used for catching fire from a spark, as hemp, flax, ...
34414 matchable MATCH'ABLE, a. Equal; suitable; fit to be joined.1. Correspondent. [Little used.]
34415 matched MATCH'ED, pp. Equaled; suited; placed in opposition; married.
34416 matching MATCH'ING, ppr. Equaling; suiting; setting in opposition; uniting in marriage.
34417 matchless MATCH'LESS, a. Having no equal; as matchless impudence; a matchless queen; matchless love or ...
34418 matchlessly MATCH'LESSLY, adv. In a manner or degree not to be equaled.
34419 matchlessness MATCH'LESSNESS, n. The state or quality of being without an equal.
34420 matchlock MATCH'LOCK, n. Formerly, the lock of a musket which was fired by a match.
34421 matchmaker MATCH'MAKER, n. One who makes matches for burning.1. One who contrives or effects a union by ...
34422 mate MATE, n.1. A companion; an associate; one who customarily associates with another. Young persons ...
34423 mateless MA'TELESS, a. Having no mate or companion.Materia Medica, a general name for every substance used ...
34424 material MATE'RIAL, a. [L. materia, matter.]1. Consisting of matter; not spiritual; as material substance; ...
34425 materialism MATE'RIALISM, n. The doctrine of materialists; the opinion of those who maintain that the soul of ...
34426 materialist MATE'RIALIST, n. One who denies the existence of spiritual substances, and maintains that the soul ...
34427 materiality MATERIAL'ITY, n. Material existence; corporeity; not spirituality.1. Importance; as the ...
34428 materialize MATE'RIALIZE, v.t. To reduce to a state of matter; also, to regard as matter.
34429 materially MATE'RIALLY, adv. In the state of matter.1. Not formally; substantially. An ill intention may ...
34430 materiate MATE'RIATE
34431 materiated MATE'RIATED, . [L. materiatus.] Consisting of matter. [Little used.]
34432 materiation MATERIA'TION, n. The act of forming matter. [Not used.]
34433 maternal MATERN'AL, a. [L. maternus, from mater, mother.] Motherly; pertaining to a mother; becoming a ...
34434 maternity MATERN'ITY, n. The character or relation of a mother.
34435 matfelon MAT'FELON, n. A plant of the genus Centaurea,knap-weed.
34436 math MATH, n. A mowing; as in aftermath.
34437 mathematic MATHEMAT'IC
34438 mathematical MATHEMAT'ICAL, a. [L. mathematicus.] Pertaining to mathematics; as mathematical knowledge; ...
34439 mathematically MATHEMAT'ICALLY, adv. According to the laws or principles of mathematical science.1. With ...
34440 mathematician MATHEMATI'CIAN, n. One versed in mathematics.
34441 mathematics MATHEMAT'ICS, n. [L. mathematica, from Gr. to learn.] The science of quantity; the science which ...
34442 mathemeg MATH'EMEG, n. A fish of the cod kind, inhabiting Hudson's bay.
34443 mathes MATH'ES, n. An herb.
34444 mathesis MATH'ESIS, n. The doctrine of mathematics.
34445 matin MAT'IN, a. [L. matutinus.] Pertaining to the morning; used in the morning; as a matin ...
34446 matins MAT'INS, n. Morning worship or service; morning prayers or songs. The vigils are celebrated before ...
34447 matrass MAT'RASS, n. [L. mitto.] A cucurbit; a chimical vessel in the shape of an egg, or with a tapering ...
34448 matress MAT'RESS, n. A quilted bed; a bed stuffed with hair, moss or other soft material, and quilted.
34449 matrice MA'TRICE
34450 matricidal MAT'RICIDAL, a. Pertaining to matricide.
34451 matricide MAT'RICIDE, n. [L. matricidium; mater, mother, and coedo, to slay.]1. The killing or murder of a ...
34452 matriculate MATRIC'ULATE, v.t. [L. matricula, a roll or register, from matrix.]To enter or admit to membership ...
34453 matriculation MATRICULA'TION, n. The act of registering a name and admitting to membership.
34454 matrimonial MATRIMO'NIAL, a.1. Pertaining to marriage; connubial; nuptial; hymeneal; as matrimonial rights or ...
34455 matrimonially MATRIMO'NIALLY, adv. According to the manner or laws of marriage.
34456 matrimonious MATRIMO'NIOUS, a. Matrimonial. [Little used.]
34457 matrimony MAT'RIMONY, n. [L. matrimonium, from mater, mother.] Marriage; wedlock; the union of man and woman ...
34458 matrix MA'TRIX, n. [L. matrix, from mater, mother.]1. The womb; the cavity in which the fetus of an ...
34459 matron MAT'RON, n. [L. matrona; from mater, mother.]An elderly married woman, or an elderly lady.
34460 matronal MAT'RONAL, a. [L. matronalis.] Pertaining to a matron,suitable to an elderly lady or to a married ...
34461 matronize MAT'RONIZE, v.t. To render matronlike.
34462 matronlike MAT'RONLIKE, a. Having the manners of an elderly woman; grave; sedate; becoming a matron.
34463 matronly MAT'RONLY, a. Elderly; advanced in years.
34464 matross MATROSS', n. Matrosses are soldiers in a train of artillery, who are next to the gunners and ...
34465 mattamore MAT'TAMORE, n. In the east, a subterranean repository for wheat.
34466 matter MAT'TER, n. [L. materia; Heb. to measure; L. metior.]1. Substance excreted from living animal ...
34467 matterless MAT'TERLESS, a. Void of matter.
34468 mattery MAT'TERY, a. Purulent; generating pus; as a mattery cough.
34469 mattock MAT'TOCK, n. A tool to grub up weeds or roots; a grubbing hoe.
34470 mattress MATTRESS. [See Matress, a more correct orthography.]
34471 maturant MAT'URANT, n. [L. maturo, from maturus, mature, ripe.]In pharmacy, a medicine or application to a ...
34472 maturate MAT'URATE, v.t. [L. maturo, to hasten, from maturus, ripe.]To ripen; to hasten or promote ...
34473 maturation MATURA'TION, n. The process of ripening or coming to maturity; ripeness.1. The process of ...
34474 maturative MAT'URATIVE, a. Ripening; conducing to ripeness.1. Conducing to suppuration, or the formation of ...
34475 mature MATU'RE, a. [L. maturus; meto.]1. Ripe; perfected by time or natural growth; as a man of mature ...
34476 matured MATU'RED, pp. Ripened; advanced to perfection; prepared.
34477 maturely MATU'RELY, adv. With ripeness; completely.1. With full deliberation. A prince entering on war, ...
34478 matureness MATU'RENESS, n. Ripeness; a state of perfection or completeness; as the maturity of age or of ...
34479 maturing MATU'RING, ppr. Ripening; being in or coming to a complete state.
34480 maturity MATU'RITY
34481 matutinal MAT'UTINAL
34482 matutine MAT'UTINE, a. [L. matutinus.] Pertaining to the morning.
34483 matweed MAT'WEED, n. A plant of the genus Lygeum.
34484 maudlin MAUD'LIN, a. [corrupted from Magdelen, who is drawn by painters with eyes swelled and red with ...
34485 mauger MAU'GER, adv. In spite of; in opposition to; not withstanding; used only in burlesque. This, ...
34486 maukin MAUKIN. [See Malkin.]
34487 maul MAUL, n. [L. malleus. See Mall.] A heavy wooden hammer; written also mall.MAUL, v.t. To beat and ...
34488 maunch MAUNCH, n. A loose sleeve. [Not used.]
34489 maund MAUND, n. A handbasket; a word used in Scotland.MAUND
34490 maunder MAUND'ER, v.t. and i. To mutter; to murmur; to grumble; to beg.MAUND'ER, n. A beggar.
34491 maunderer MAUND'ERER, n. A grumbler.
34492 maundering MAUND'ERING, n. Complaint.
34493 maundy-thursday MAUNDY-THURSDAY, n. The Thursday in passion week, or next before Good Friday.
34494 mausolean MAUSOLE'AN, a. Pertaining to a mausoleum; monumental.
34495 mausoleum MAUSOLE'UM, n. A magnificent tomb, or stately sepulchral monument.
34496 mauther MAU'THER, n. A foolish young girl. [Not used.]
34497 mavis MA'VIS, n. A bird, a species of Turdus.
34498 maw MAW, n.1. The stomach of brutes; applied to the stomach of human beings in contempt only.2. The ...
34499 mawk MAWK, n. A maggot; a slattern. [Not in use.]
34500 mawkingly MAWK'INGLY, adv. Slatternly; sluttishly.
34501 mawkish MAWK'ISH, a. Apt to cause satiety or lothing. So sweetly mawkish, and so smoothly dull.
34502 mawkishness MAWK'ISHNESS, n. Aptness to cause lothing.
34503 mawky MAWK'Y, a. Maggoty. [Local.]
34504 mawmet MAW'MET, n. [from Mahomet.] A puppet; anciently, an idol.
34505 mawmetry MAW'METRY, n. The religion of Mohammed; also, idolatry.
34506 mawmish MAW'MISH, a. [from maw, or mawmet.] Foolish; silly; idle; nauseous.
34507 mawworm MAW'WORM, n. A worm that infests the stomach.
34508 maxillar MAX'ILLAR
34509 maxillary MAX'ILLARY, a. [L. maxillaris, from maxilla, the jaw-bone; probably from the root of mash.] ...
34511 maxim-monger MAX'IM-MONGER, n. One who deals much in maxims.
34510 maxim MAX'IM, n. [L. maximum, literally the greatest.]1. An established principle or proposition; a ...
34512 maximum MAX'IMUM, n. [L.] In mathematics, the greatest number or quantity attainable in any given case; ...
34514 may-apple MA'Y-APPLE, n. A plant of the genus Podophyllum.
34515 may-bloom MA'Y-BLOOM, n. The hawthorn.
34516 may-bug MA'Y-BUG, n. A chaffer.
34517 may-bush MA'Y-BUSH, n. A plant of the genus Crataegus.
34518 may-day MA'Y-DAY, n. The first day of May.
34519 may-dew MA'Y-DEW, n. The dew of May, which is said to whiten linen, and to afford by repeated ...
34520 may-duke MA'Y-DUKE, n. A variety of the common cherry.
34521 may-flower MA'Y-FLOWER, n. A plant; a flower that appears in May.
34522 may-fly MA'Y-FLY, n. An insect or fly that appears in May.
34523 may-game MA'Y-GAME, n. Sport or diversion; play, such as is used on the first of May.
34524 may-lady MA'Y-LADY, n. The queen or lady of May, in old May-games.
34525 may-lily MA'Y-LILY, n. The lily of the valley, of the genus Convallaria.
34526 may-morn MA'Y-MORN, n. Freshness; vigor.
34527 may-pole MA'Y-POLE, n. A pole to dance round in May; a long pole erected.
34528 may-weed MA'Y-WEED, n. A plant of the genus Anthemis.
34513 may MAY, n. [L. Maius.]1. The fifth month of the year, beginning with January, but the third, ...
34529 mayhem MAYHEM. [See Maim.]
34530 maying MA'YING, n. The gathering of flowers on May-day.
34531 mayor MA'YOR, n. [L. miror.] The chief magistrate of a city, who, in London and York, is called lord ...
34532 mayoralty MA'YORALTY, n. The office of a mayor.
34533 mayoress MA'YORESS, n. The wife of a mayor.
34534 mazagan MAZ'AGAN, n. A variety of the common bean, [vicia faba.]
34535 mazard MAZ'ARD, n. [probably from the root of marsh.]1. The jaw. [Not used.]2. A kind of cherry.MAZ'ARD, ...
34536 mazarine MAZARINE, n. A deep blue color.1. A particular way of dressing fowls.2. A little dish set in a ...
34537 maze MAZE, n.1. A winding and turning; perplexed state of things; intricacy; a state that embarrasses. ...
34538 mazedness MA'ZEDNESS, n. Confusion; astonishment.
34539 mazer MA'ZER, n. A maple cup.
34540 mazological MAZOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to mazology.
34541 mazologist MAZOL'OGIST, n. One versed in mazology.
34542 mazology MAZOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a breast, and discourse.] The doctrine of history of mammiferous animals.
34543 mazy MA'ZY, a. Winding; perplexed with turns and windings; intricate; as mazy error. To run the ring ...
34544 me ME, pron. pers.; the objective case of I, answering to the oblique cases of ego, in Latin. [L. ...
34545 meacock ME'ACOCK, n. An uxorious, effeminate man. [Not used.]ME'ACOCK, a. Lame; timorous; cowardly. ...
34546 mead MEAD, n. [L. madeo, to be wet.] A fermented liquor consisting of honey and water, sometimes ...
34548 meadow-ore MEAD'OW-ORE, n. In mineralogy, conchoidal bog iron ore.
34549 meadow-rue MEAD'OW-RUE, n. A plant of the genus Thalictrum.
34550 meadow-saffron MEAD'OW-SAFFRON, n. A plant of the genus Colchicum.
34551 meadow-saxifrage MEAD'OW-SAXIFRAGE, n. A plant of the genus Peucedanum.
34552 meadow-sweet MEAD'OW-SWEET, n. A plant of the genus Spiraea.
34553 meadow-wort MEAD'OW-WORT, n. A plant.
34547 meadow MEADOW, n. med'o. A tract of low land. In America, the word is applied particularly to the low ...
34554 meadowy MEAD'OWY, a. Containing meadow.
34555 meager ME'AGER, a. [L. macer; Gr. small; allied to Eng. meek.]1. Thin; lean; destitute of flesh or having ...
34556 meagerly ME'AGERLY, adv. Poorly; thinly.
34557 meagerness ME'AGERNESS, n. Leanness; want of flesh.1. Poorness; barrenness; want of fertility or richness.2. ...
34558 meak MEAK, n. A hook with a long handle.
34560 meal-man MEA'L-MAN, n. A man that deals in meal.
34561 meal-time ME'AL-TIME, n. The usual time of eating meals.
34559 meal MEAL, n.1. A portion of food taken at one time; a repast. It is customary in the U. States to eat ...
34562 mealiness ME'ALINESS, n. The quality of being mealy; softness or smoothness to the touch.
34564 mealy-mouthed ME'ALY-MOUTHED, a. Literally,having a soft mouth; hence,unwilling to tell the truth in plain ...
34565 mealy-mouthedness MEALY-MOUTH'EDNESS, n. Inclination to express the truth in soft words, or to disguise the plain ...
34563 mealy ME'ALY, a. Having the qualities of meal; soft; smooth to the feel.1. Like meal; farinaceous; ...
34566 mean MEAN, a. [L. communis, vulgus, minor and minuo.]1. Wanting dignity; low in rank or birth; as a man ...
34567 meander MEAN'DER, n. [the name of a winding river in Phrygia.]1. A winding course; a winding or turning in ...
34568 meandering MEAN'DERING, ppr. or a. Winding in a course, passage or current.
34569 meandrian MEAN'DRIAN, a. Winding; having many turns.
34570 meaning ME'ANING, ppr. Having in mind; intending; signifying.ME'ANING, n. That which exists in the mind, ...
34571 meanly ME'ANLY, adv. [See Mean.] Moderately; not in a great degree. In the reign of Domitian, poetry was ...
34572 meanness ME'ANNESS, n. Want of dignity or rank; low state; as meanness of birth or condition. Poverty is ...
34573 meant MEANT, pret. and pp. of mean.
34574 mear MEAR. [See Mere.]
34575 mease ME'ASE, n. [from the root of measure.] The quantity of 500; as a mease of herrings. [Not used in ...
34576 measle MEASLE, n. mee'zl. A leper. [Not in use.]
34577 measled MEASLED, a. mee'zled. [See Measles.]Infected or spotted with measles.
34578 measles MEASLES, n. mee'zles; with a plural termination.1. A contagious disease of the human body,usually ...
34579 measly MEASLY, a. mee'zly. Infected with measles or eruptions.
34580 measurable MEASURABLE, a. mezh'urable. [See Measure.]1. That may be measured; susceptible of mensuration or ...
34581 measurableness MEASURABLENESS, n. mezh'urableness. The quality of admitting mensuration.
34582 measurably MEASURABLY, adv. mezh'urably. Moderately; in a limited degree.
34583 measure MEASURE, n. mezh'ur. [L. mensura, from mensus, with a casual n, the participle of metior, to ...
34584 measured MEASURED, pp. mezh'ured. Computed or ascertained by a rule; adjusted; proportioned; passed over.1. ...
34585 measureless MEASURELESS, a. mezh'urless. Without measure; unlimited; immeasurable.
34586 measurement MEASUREMENT, n. mezh'urment. The act of measuring; mensuration.
34587 measurer MEASURER, n. mezh'urer. One who measures; one whose occupation or duty is to measure commodities ...
34588 measuring MEASURING, ppr. mezh'uring. Computing or ascertaining length, dimensions, capacity or amount.1. ...
34590 meat-offering ME'AT-OFFERING, n. An offering consisting of meat or food.
34589 meat MEAT, n.1. Food in general; any thing eaten for nourishment, either by man or beast. And God said, ...
34591 meated ME'ATED, a. Fed; fattened. [Not used.]
34592 meathe MEATHE, n. Liquor or drink. [Not used.]
34593 meaty ME'ATY, a. Fleshy, but not fat. [Local.]
34594 meawl MEAWL. [See Mewl.]
34595 meazling ME'AZLING, ppr. Falling in small drops; properly mizzling, or rather mistling, from mist.
34596 mechanic MECHAN'IC
34597 mechanical MECHAN'ICAL, a. [L. mechanicus; Gr. a machine.]1. Pertaining to machines, or to the art of ...
34598 mechanically MECHAN'ICALLY, adv. According to the laws of mechanism, or good workmanship.1. By physical force ...
34599 mechanicalness MECHAN'ICALNESS, n. The state of being mechanical, or governed by mechanism.
34600 mechanician MECHANI'CIAN, n. One skilled in mechanics.
34601 mechanics MECHAN'ICS, n. That science which treats of the doctrines of motion. It investigates the forces by ...
34602 mechanism MECH'ANISM, n. The construction of a machine, engine or instrument, intended to apply power to a ...
34603 mechanist MECH'ANIST, n. The maker of machines, or one skilled in mechanics.
34604 mechlin MECH'LIN, n. A species of lace, made at Mechlin.
34605 mechoacan MECHO'ACAN, n. White jalap, the root of an American species of Convolvulus, from Mechoacan, in ...
34606 meconiate MECO'NIATE, n. A salt consisting of meconic acid and a base.
34607 meconic MECON'IC, a. Meconic acid is an acid contained in opium.
34608 meconite MEC'ONITE, n. A small sandstone; ammite.
34609 meconium MECO'NIUM, n. [Gr. poppy.]1. The juice of the white poppy, which has the virtues of opium.2. The ...
34610 medal MED'AL, n. [L. metallum, metal.] An ancient coin, or a piece of metal in the form of a coin, ...
34611 medallic MEDAL'LIC, a. Pertaining to a medal or to medals.
34612 medallion MEDAL'LION, n. A large antique stamp or medal.1. The representation of a medallion.
34613 medallist MED'ALLIST, n. A person that is skilled or curious in medals.
34614 meddle MED'DLE, v.i.1. To have to do; to take part; to interpose and act in the concerns of others, or in ...
34615 meddler MED'DLER, n. One that meddles; one that interferes or busies himself with things in which he has ...
34616 meddlesome MED'DLESOME, a. Given to meddling; apt to interpose in the affairs of others; officiously ...
34617 meddlesomeness MED'DLESOMENESS, n. Officious interposition in the affairs of others.
34618 meddling MED'DLING, ppr. Having to do; touching; handling; officiously interposing in other men's ...
34619 medial ME'DIAL, a. [L. medius, middle.] Mean; noting a mean or average.Medial alligation, is a method of ...
34620 mediant ME'DIANT, n. In music, an appellation given to the third above the key-note, because it divides the ...
34621 mediate ME'DIATE, a. [L. medius, middle.] Middle; being between the two extremes. Anxious we hover in a ...
34622 mediately ME'DIATELY, adv. By means or by a secondary cause,acting between the first cause and the effect. ...
34623 mediation MEDIA'TION, n. [L. medius, middle.]1. Interposition; intervention; agency between parties at ...
34624 mediator MEDIA'TOR, n. One that interposes between parties at variance for the purpose of reconciling ...
34625 mediatorial MEDIATO'RIAL, a. Belonging to a mediator; as mediatorial office or character. [Mediatory is not ...
34626 mediatorship MEDIA'TORSHIP, n. The office of a mediator.
34627 mediatress MEDIA'TRESS
34628 mediatrix MEDIA'TRIX, n. A female mediator.
34629 medic MED'IC, n. A plant of the genus Medicago. The sea-medic is of the same genus; the medic vetch is ...
34630 medicable MED'ICABLE, a. [See Medical.] That may be cured or healed.
34631 medical MED'ICAL, a. [L. medicus, from medcor, to heal; Gr. cure.]1. Pertaining to the art of healing ...
34632 medically MED'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of medicine; according to the rules of the healing art, or for the ...
34633 medicament MED'ICAMENT, n. [L.medicamentum.] Any thing used for healing diseases or wounds; a medicine; a ...
34634 medicamental MEDICAMENT'AL, a. Relating to healing applications; having the qualities of medicaments.
34635 medicamentally MEDICAMENT'ALLY, adv. After the manner of healing applications.
34636 medicaster MED'ICASTER, n. A quack.
34637 medicate MED'ICATE, v.t. [L. medico.] To tincture or impregnate with healing substances, or with any thing ...
34638 medicated MED'ICATED, pp. Prepared or furnished with any thing medicinal.
34639 medicating MED'ICATING, ppr. Impregnating with medical substances; preparing with any thing medicinal.
34640 medication MEDICA'TION, n. The act or process of impregnating with medicinal substances; the infusion of ...
34641 medicinable MEDIC'INABLE, a. Having the properties of medicine; medicinal. [The latter is the word now used.]
34642 medicinal MEDIC'INAL, . [L. medicinalis.] Having the property of healing or of mitigating disease; adapted ...
34643 medicinally MEDIC'INALLY, adv. In the manner of medicine; with medicinal qualities.1. With a view to healing; ...
34644 medicine MED'ICINE, n. [L. medicina, from medeor, to cure; vulgarly and improperly pronounced med'sn.]1. ...
34645 mediety MEDI'ETY, n. [L.medietas; from L.medius, middle.]The middle state or part; half; moiety. [Little ...
34646 medin ME'DIN, n. A small coin.
34647 mediocral MEDIO'CRAL, a. [L. mediocris.] Being of a middle quality; indifferent; ordinary; as mediocral ...
34648 mediocrist ME'DIOCRIST, n. A person of middling abilities. [Not used.]
34649 mediocrity MEDIOC'RITY, n. [L.mediocritas, from mediocris, middling; medius,middle.]1. A middle state or ...
34650 meditate MED'ITATE, v.i. [L. meditor.]1. To dwell on any thing in thought; to contemplate; to study; to ...
34651 meditated MED'ITATED, pp. Planned; contrived.
34652 meditating MED'ITATING, ppr. Revolving in the mind; contemplating; contriving.
34653 meditation MEDITA'TION, n. [L.meditatio.] Close or continued thought; the turning or revolving of a subject ...
34654 meditative MED'ITATIVE, a. Addicted to meditation.1. Expressing meditation or design.
34655 mediterrane MEDITERRA'NE
34656 mediterranean MEDITERRA'NEAN
34657 mediterraneous MEDITERRA'NEOUS, a. [L.medius, middle, and terra, land.]1. Inclosed or nearly inclosed with land; ...
34658 medium ME'DIUM, n. plu.mediums; media not being generally, though sometimes used. [L.] In philosophy, the ...
34659 medlar MED'LAR, n. [L. mespilus.] A tree and a genus of trees, called Mespilus; also, the fruit of the ...
34660 medle MED'LE, v.t. To mix; not used,but hence,
34661 medley MED'LEY, n. A mixture; a mingled and confused mass of ingredients; used often or commonly with ...
34662 medullar MEDUL'LAR
34663 medullary MED'ULLARY, a. [L. medullaris, from medulla, marrow.]Pertaining to marrow; consisting of marrow; ...
34664 medullin MEDUL'LIN, n. [L. medulla.] The pith of the sunflower, which has neither taste nor smell. It is ...
34665 meed MEED, n.1. Reward; recompense; that which is bestowed or rendered in consideration of merit. ...
34666 meek MEEK, a. [L. mucus; Eng. mucilage; Heb. to melt.]1. Mild of temper; soft; gentle; not easily ...
34667 meeken MEE'KEN, v.t. mee'kn. To make meek; to soften; to render mild.
34668 meekly MEE'KLY, adv. Mildly; gently; submissively; humbly; not proudly or roughly. And this mis-seeming ...
34669 meekness MEE'KNESS, n. Softness of temper; mildness; gentleness; forbearance under injuries and ...
34671 meer-schaum MEER-SCHAUM, n. A hydrate of magnesia combined with silex. It occurs in beds in Natolia,and when ...
34670 meer MEER, a. Simple; unmixed; usually written mere.MEER, n. A lake; a boundary. [See Mere.]
34672 meered MEE'RED, a. Relating to a boundary. [See Mere.]
34673 meet MEET, a. [L. convenio.] Fit; suitable; proper; qualified; convenient; adapted, as to a use or ...
34674 meeter MEE'TER, n. One that meets another; one that accosts another.
34676 meeting-house MEE'TING-HOUSE, a. A place of worship; a church.
34675 meeting MEE'TING, ppr. Coming together; encountering; joining; assembling.MEE'TING, n. A coming together; ...
34677 meetly MEE'TLY, adv. [from meet.] Fitly; suitably; properly.
34678 meetness MEE'TNESS, n. [from meet.] Fitness; suitableness; propriety.
34679 megacosm MEG'ACOSM, n. [Gr. great, and world.] The great world.
34680 megalonyx MEGALON'YX, n. [Gr. great, and a nail.] An animal now extinct, whose bones have been found in ...
34681 megalopolis MEGALOP'OLIS, n. [Gr. great, and city.] A chief city; a metropolis. [Not in use.]
34682 megatherium MEGATHE'RIUM
34683 megathery MEGATH'ERY , n. [Gr. great, and a wild beast.] A quadruped now extinct, but whose remains have ...
34684 megrim ME'GRIM, n. [ L. hemicrania, half the head.] Properly, a pain in the side of the head; hence, a ...
34685 meine MEINE, v.t. To mingle.MEINE
34686 meionite MEIONITE, n. [Gr. less; from its low pyramids.]pyramidical feldspar, of a grayish white color. It ...
34687 meiosis MEIO'SIS, n. [Gr.] Diminution; a rhetorical figure, a species of hyperbole, representing a thing ...
34688 melampode MEL'AMPODE, n. [Gr. blackfoot.] The black hellebore.
34689 melanage MELANAGE, n. melanj'. A mixture. [Not English.]
34690 melanagogue MELANAGOGUE, n. melan'agog. [Gr. black, and to drive.]A medicine supposed to expel black bile or ...
34691 melancholic MEL'ANCHOLIC, a. [See Melancholy.]1. Depressed in spirits; affected with gloom; dejected; ...
34692 melancholily MEL'ANCHOLILY, adv. With melancholy.
34693 melancholiness MEL'ANCHOLINESS, n. State of being melancholy; disposition to indulge gloominess of mind.
34694 melancholious MELANCHO'LIOUS, a. Gloomy. [Not in use.]
34695 melancholist MEL'ANCHOLIST, n. One affected with melancholy.
34696 melancholize MEL'ANCHOLIZE, v.i. To become gloomy in mind.MEL'ANCHOLIZE, v.t. To make melancholy.[This verb is ...
34697 melancholy MEL'ANCHOLY, n. [Gr. black, and bile; L. melancholia.]1. A gloomy state of mind, often a gloomy ...
34698 melanite MEL'ANITE, n. [Gr. black.] A mineral, a variety of garnet, of a velvet black or grayish black, ...
34699 melanitic MELANIT'IC, a. Pertaining to melanite.
34700 melanteri MEL'ANTERI, n. [Gr. black.] Salt or iron, or iron in a saline state, mixed with inflammable ...
34701 melanure MEL'ANURE
34702 melanurus MELANU'RUS, n. A small fish of the Mediterranean.
34703 melasses MEL`ASSES, n. sing. [Gr. black, or honey.] The sirup which drains from Muscovado sugar when ...
34704 melilot MEL'ILOT, n. A plant of the genus Trifolium.
34705 meliorate ME'LIORATE, v.t. [L.melior,better.] To make better; to improve; as, to meliorate fruit by ...
34706 meliorated ME'LIORATED, pp. Made better; improved.
34707 meliorating ME'LIORATING, ppr. Improving; advancing in good qualities. The pure and benign light of revelation ...
34708 melioration MELIORA'TION, n. The act or operation of making better; improvement.
34709 meliority MELIOR'ITY, n. The state of being better. [Not in use.]
34710 mell MELL, v.i. To mix; to meddle. [Not in use.]MELL, n. [L.mel.] Honey. [Not English.]
34711 mellate MEL'LATE, n. [L. mel, honey.] A combination of the mellitic acid with a base.
34712 melliferous MELLIF'EROUS, a. [L. mel, honey, and fero, to produce.] Producing honey.
34713 mellification MELLIFICA'TION, n. [L. mellifico.] The making or production of honey.
34714 mellifluence MELLIF'LUENCE, n. [L. mel, honey, and fluo, to flow.]A flow of sweetness, or a sweet smooth flow.
34715 mellifluent MELLIF'LUENT
34716 mellifluous MELLIF'LUOUS, a. Flowing with honey; smooth; sweetly flowing; as a mellifluous voice.
34717 mellit MEL'LIT, n. In farriery, a dry scab on the heel of a horse's fore foot,cured by a mixture of honey ...
34718 mellite MEL'LITE, n. [L.mel.] Honey stone; a mineral of a honey color,found only in very minute regular ...
34719 mellitic MELLIT'IC, a. Pertaining to honey stone.
34720 mellow MEL'LOW, a. [L. mollis, malus.]1. Soft with ripeness; easily yielding to pressure; as a mellow ...
34721 mellowness MEL'LOWNESS, n. Softness; the quality of yielding easily to pressure; ripeness, as of fruit.1. ...
34722 mellowy MEL'LOWY, a. Soft, unctuous.
34723 melocotone MELOCOTO'NE, n. [L. malum cotoneum, quince-apple. Cotomeum is probably our cotton, and the fruit ...
34724 melodious MELO'DIOUS, a. [See Melody.] Containing melody; musical; agreeable to the ear by a sweet ...
34725 melodiously MELO'DIOUSLY, adv. In a melodious manner; musically.
34726 melodiousness MELO'DIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being agreeable to the ear by a sweet succession of sounds; ...
34727 melodize MEL'ODIZE, v.t. To make melodious.
34728 melodrame MEL'ODRAME, n. [Gr. a song, and drama.] A dramatic performance in which songs are intermixed.
34729 melody MEL'ODY, n. [Gr. a limb, or a song, an ode; L. melos.]An agreeable succession of sounds; a ...
34731 melon-thistle MEL'ON-THISTLE, n. A plant of the genus Cactus.
34730 melon MEL'ON, n. [L. melo; Gr. an apple; L. mollis.] The name of certain plants and their fruit, as the ...
34732 melrose MEL'ROSE, n. [mel and rose.] Honey of roses.
34733 melt MELT, v.t. [Eng.smelt,smalt. We have in these words decisive evidence that s, in smelten, &c. is a ...
34734 melted MELT'ED, pp. Dissolved; made liquid; softened; discouraged.
34735 melter MELT'ER, n. One that melts any thing.
34736 melting MELT'ING, ppr. Dissolving; liquefying; softening; discouraging.1. a. Tending to soften; ...
34737 meltingly MELT'INGLY, adv. In a manner to melt of soften.1. Like something melting.
34738 meltingness MELT'INGNESS, n. The power of melting or softening.
34739 melwel MEL'WEL, n. A fish.
34740 member MEM'BER, n. [L. membrum.]1. A limb of animal bodies, as a leg, an arm, an ear, a finger, that is, ...
34741 membered MEM'BERED, a. Having limbs.
34742 membership MEM'BERSHIP, n. The state of being a member.1. Community; society.
34743 membranaceous MEMBRANA'CEOUS, a. Belonging to a membrane; consisting of membranes; as a membraneous covering. ...
34744 membrane MEM'BRANE, n. [L. membrana.] In anatomy, a thin, white, flexible skin, formed by fibers interwoven ...
34745 membraneous MEMBRA'NEOUS
34746 membraniform MEMBRA'NIFORM, a. Having the form of a membrane or of parchment.
34747 membranous MEM'BRANOUS
34748 memento MEMENT'O, n. [L. memini. See Memory.] A hint, suggestion; notice or memorial to awaken memory; ...
34749 memoir MEM'OIR, n. A species of history written by a person who had some share in the transactions ...
34750 memorable MEM'ORABLE, a. [L.memorabilis. See Memory.]Worthy to be remembered; illustrious; celebrated; ...
34751 memorably MEM'ORABLY, adv. In a manner worthy to be remembered.
34752 memorandum MEMORAND'UM, n. plu. memorandums or memoranda. [L.]A note to help the memory. I entered a ...
34753 memorative MEM'ORATIVE, a. Adapted or tending to preserve the memory of any thing.
34754 memorial MEMO'RIAL, a. [L.memorialis. See Memory.]1. Preservative of memory. There high in air memorial of ...
34755 memorialist MEMO'RIALIST, n. One who writes a memorial.1. One who presents a memorial to a legislative or any ...
34756 memorialize MEMO'RIALIZE, v.t. To present a memorial to; to petition by memorial.
34757 memorist MEM'ORIST, n. One who causes to be remembered. [Not used.]
34758 memorize MEM'ORIZE, v.t. To record; to commit to memory by writing. They neglect to memorize their conquest ...
34759 memory MEM'ORY, n. [L. memoria; Gr. to remember, from mind, or the same root. See Mind.]1. The faculty ...
34760 memphian MEMPH'IAN, a. [from Memphis, the ancient metropolis of Egypt, said to be altered from Menuf, Memf. ...
34761 men MEN, plu. of man. Two or more males, individuals of the human race.1. Males of bravery. We will ...
34762 menace MEN'ACE, v.t. [L. minor.]1. To threaten; to express or show a disposition or determination to ...
34763 menaced MEN'ACED, pp. Threatened.
34764 menacer MEN'ACER, n. One that threatens.
34765 menachanite MEN'ACHANITE, n. An oxyd of titanium, or mineral of a grayish or iron black color, occurring in ...
34766 menachanitic MENACHANIT'IC, a. Pertaining to menachanite.
34767 menacing MEN'ACING, ppr. Threatening; declaring a disposition or determination to inflict evil.1. a. ...
34768 menage MEN'AGE, n. A collection of brute animals.
34769 menagery MEN'AGERY, n. A yard or place in which wild animals are kept, or a collection of wild animals.
34770 menagogue MENAGOGUE, n. men'agog. [Gr. menstrua, and to drive.]A medicine that promotes the menstrual flux.
34771 menail ME'NAIL, n. A domestic servant.
34772 mend MEND, v.t. [L. emendo, menda, a fault, spot or blemish.]1. To repair, as a breach; to supply a ...
34773 mendable MEND'ABLE, a. Capable of being mended.
34774 mendacious MENDA'CIOUS, a. [L. mendax.] Lying; false. [Little used.]
34775 mendacity MENDAC'ITY, n. [L.mendax, false, lying.] Falsehood.[The proper signification of this word would be ...
34776 mended MEND'ED, pp. Repaired; made better; improved.
34777 mender MEND'ER, n. One who mends or repairs.
34778 mendicancy MEND'ICANCY, a. [L. medicans.] Beggary; a state of begging.
34779 mendicant MEND'ICANT, a. [L. mendicans, from mendico, to beg; allied to L.mando, to command, demand.]1. ...
34780 mendicate MEND'ICATE, v.t. To beg, or practice begging. [Not used.]
34781 mendicity MENDIC'ITY,n. [L.mendicitas.] The state of begging; the life of a beggar.
34782 mendment MENDMENT, for amendment. [Not in use.]
34783 mends MENDS, for amends, not used.
34784 menhaden MENHA'DEN, n. A species of fish.
34785 menial ME'NIAL, a.1. Pertaining to servants or domestic servants; low; mean. The women attendants perform ...
34786 menilite MEN'ILITE, n. A mineral substance found at Menil Montant near Paris, of the nature of silex, of a ...
34787 meniscus MENIS'CUS, n. plu. meniscuses. [Gr. a little moon.]A lens convex on one side, and concave on the ...
34788 menispermate MENISPERM'ATE, n. A compound of menispermic acid and a salifiable base.
34789 menispermic MENISPERM'IC, a. The menispermic acid is obtained from the seeds of the menispermum cocculus.
34790 meniver MEN'IVER, n. A small white animal in Russia, or its fur which is very fine.
34791 menology MENOL'OGY, n. [Gr. month, and discourse.]1. A register of months.2. In the Greek church, ...
34792 menow MEN'OW, n. A small fresh water fish, the minnow.
34793 menpleaser MEN'PLEASER, n. One who is solicitous to please men, rather than to please God, by obedience to ...
34794 mensal MEN'SAL, a. [L. mensalis, from mensa, a table.]Belonging to the table; transacted at table. [Little ...
34795 menstrual MEN'STRUAL, a. [L. menstrualis, from mensis, month.]1. Monthly; happening once a month; as the ...
34796 menstruant MEN'STRUANT, a. Subject to monthly flowings.
34797 menstruous MEN'STRUOUS, a. [L. menstruus, from mensis, a month.]1. Having the monthly flow or discharge; as a ...
34798 menstruum MEN'STRUUM, n. plu. menstruums. [from L. mensis, month. The use of this word is supposed to have ...
34799 mensurability MENSURABIL'ITY, n. [from mensurable.] Capacity of being measured.
34800 mensurable MEN'SURABLE, a. [L. mensura, measure. The n is probably casual, and the word is the same as ...
34801 mensural MEN'SURAL, a. Pertaining to measure.
34802 mensurate MEN'SURATE, v.t. [L.mensura,measure.]To measure. [Little used.]
34803 mensuration MENSURA'TION, n. The act, process or art of measuring, or taking the dimensions of any thing.1. ...
34804 mental MEN'TAL, a. Pertaining to the mind; intellectual; as mental faculties; mental operations; mental ...
34805 mentally MEN'TALLY, adv. Intellectually; in the mind; in thought or meditation; in idea.
34806 mention MEN'TION, n. [L. mentio, from Gr. to put in mind; L. moneo and mind.] A hint; a suggestion; a ...
34807 mentioned MEN'TIONED, pp. Named; stated.
34808 mentioning MEN'TIONING, ppr. Naming; uttering.
34809 mentorial MENTO'RIAL, a. [from Mentor,the friend and adviser of Ulysses.]Containing advice or admonition.
34810 meny ME'NY, n. [See Menial.] A retinue or family of servants; domestics.
34811 mephitic MEPHIT'IC, a. [L. mephitis, an ill smell.] Offensive to the smell; foul; poisonous; noxious; ...
34812 mephitis MEPH'ITIS
34813 mephitism MEPH'ITISM, n. Foul, offensive or noxious exhalations from dissolving substances, filth or other ...
34814 mercantante MERCANTAN'TE, n. A foreign trader. [Not in use.]
34815 mercantile MER'CANTILE, a. [L. mercans, mercor, to buy.]1. Trading; commercial; carrying on commerce; as ...
34816 mercat MER'CAT, n. [L. mercatus.] Market; trade. [Not in use.]
34817 mercenarily MER'CENARILY, adv. In a mercenary manner.
34818 mercenariness MER'CENARINESS, n. [from mercenary.]Venality; regard to hire or reward.
34819 mercenary MER'CENARY, a. [L. mercenarius, from merces, reward, wages, mercor, to guy.]1. Venal; that may be ...
34820 mercer MER'CER, n. [L. merx, wares, commodities.]One who deals in silks.
34821 mercership MER'CERSHIP, n. The business of a mercer.
34822 mercery MER'CERY, n. The commodities or goods in which a mercer deals; trade of mercers.
34823 merchand MER'CHAND, v.i. To trade. [Not used.]
34824 merchandise MER'CHANDISE, n.1. The objects of commerce; wares, goods, commodities, whatever is usually bought ...
34825 merchandry MER'CHANDRY, n. Trade; commerce. [Not in use.]
34826 merchant MER'CHANT, n. [L.mercor,to buy.]1. A man who trafficks or carries on trade with foreign ...
34827 merchantable MER'CHANTABLE, a. Fit for market; such as is usually sold in market or such as will bring the ...
34828 merchantlike MER'CHANTLIKE, a. Like a merchant.
34829 merchantman MER'CHANTMAN, n. A ship or vessel employed in the transportation of goods, as distinguished from a ...
34830 merciable MER'CIABLE, a. Merciful. [Not in use.]
34831 merciful MER'CIFUL, a. [from mercy.] Having or exercising mercy; compassionate; tender; disposed to pity ...
34832 mercifully MER'CIFULLY, adv. With compassion or pity; tenderly; mildly.
34833 mercifulness MER'CIFULNESS, n. Tenderness towards offenders; willingness to forbear punishment; readiness to ...
34834 mercify MER'CIFY, v.t. To pity. [Not in use.]
34835 merciless MER'CILESS, a. Destitute of mercy; unfeeling; pitiless; hard-hearted; cruel; as a merciless ...
34836 mercilessly MER'CILESSLY, adv. In a manner void of mercy or pity; cruelly.
34837 mercilessness MER'CILESSNESS, n. Want of mercy or pity.
34838 mercurial MERCU'RIAL, a. [L. mercurialis.]1. Formed under the influence of Mercury; active; sprightly; full ...
34839 mercurialist MERCU'RIALIST, n. One under the influence of Mercury, or one resembling Mercury in variety of ...
34840 mercuriate MERCU'RIATE, n. A combination of the oxyd of mercury with another substance.Mercuric acid, a ...
34841 mercurification MERCURIFICA'TION, n. In metallurgic chimistry,the process or operation of obtaining the mercury ...
34842 mercurify MERCU'RIFY, v.t. To obtain mercury from metallic minerals, which it is said may be done by a large ...
34843 mercury MER'CURY, n. [L. Mercurius. In mythology, Mercury is the god of eloquence and of commerce, called ...
34845 mercy-seat MER'CY-SEAT, n. The propitiatory; the covering of the ark of the covenant among the Jews. This ...
34844 mercy MER'CY, n. [L. misericordia.]1. That benevolence, mildness or tenderness of heart which disposes a ...
34846 merd MERD, n. [L. merda.] Ordure; dung.
34847 mere MERE, a. [L. merus.] This or that only; distinct from any thing else. From mere success nothing ...
34848 merely ME'RELY, adv. Purely; only; solely; thus and no other way; for this and no other purpose. Price ...
34849 meretricious MERETRI'CIOUS, a. [L. meretricius, from meretrix, a prostitute.]1. Pertaining to prostitutes; such ...
34850 meretriciously MERETRI'CIOUSLY ,adv. In the manner of prostitutes; with deceitful enticements.
34851 meretriciousness MERETRI'CIOUSNESS, n. The arts of a prostitute; deceitful enticements.
34852 merganser MERGAN'SER, n. [L. mergo, to dive.] A water fowl of the genus Mergus; called also goosander.
34853 merge MERGE, v.t. [L. mergo.] To immerse; to cause to be swallowed up. The plaintiff became the ...
34854 merger MERG'ER, n. [L. mergo, to merge.] In law, a merging or drowning of a less estate in a greater; as ...
34855 meridian MERID'IAN, n. [L. meridies.]1. In astronomy and geography, a great circle supposed to be drawn or ...
34856 meridional MERID'IONAL, a. Pertaining to the meridian.1. Southern.2. Southerly; having a southern ...
34857 meridionality MERIDIONAL'ITY, n. The state of being in the meridian.1. Position in the south; aspect towards ...
34858 meridionally MERID'IONALLY, adv. In the direction of the meridian.
34860 merit-monger MER'IT-MONGER, n. One who advocates the doctrine of human merit,as entitled to reward, or depends ...
34859 merit MER'IT, n. [L. meritum, from mereo, to earn or deserve.]1. Desert; goodness or excellence which ...
34861 meritable MER'ITABLE, a. Deserving of reward. [Not in use.]
34862 merited MER'ITED, pp. Earned; deserved.
34863 meriting MER'ITING, ppr. Earning; deserving.
34864 meritorious MERITO'RIOUS, a. Deserving of reward or of notice, regard, fame or happiness, or of that which ...
34865 meritoriously MERITO'RIOUSLY, adv. In such a manner as to deserve reward.
34866 meritoriousness MERITO'RIOUSNESS, n. The state or quality of deserving a reward or suitable return.
34867 meritory MER'ITORY, a. Deserving of reward. [Not used.]
34868 merle MERLE, n. [L.merula.] A blackbird.
34869 merlin MER'LIN, n. A species of hawk of the genus Falco.
34870 merlon MER'LON, n. In fortification, that part of a parapet which lies between two embrasures.
34871 mermaid MER'MAID, n. [L.mare, the sea, and maid.] A marine animal, said to resemble a woman in the upper ...
34872 merops ME'ROPS, n. A genus of birds called bee-eaters.
34873 merrily MER'RILY, adv. [from merry.] With mirth; with gayety and laughter; jovially. [See Mirth and ...
34874 merrimake MER'RIMAKE, n. [merry and make.] A meeting for mirth; a festival; mirth.MER'RIMAKE, v.i. To be ...
34875 merriment MER'RIMENT, n. Mirth; gayety with laughter or noise; noisy sports; hilarity; frolick.
34876 merriness MER'RINESS, n. Mirth; gayety with laughter.
34878 merry-andrew MERRY-AN'DREW, n. A buffoon; a zany; one whose business is to make sport for others.
34879 merry-making MER'RY-MAKING, a. Producing mirth. Mirth, music,merry-making melody Speed the light hours no more ...
34880 merry-meeting MER'RY-MEETING, n. A festival; a meeting for mirth.
34881 merry-thought MER'RY-THOUGHT, n. The forked bone of a fowl's breast, which boys and girls break by pulling each ...
34877 merry MER'RY, a.1. Gay and noisy; jovial; exhilarated to laughter. Man is the merriest species of the ...
34882 mersion MER'SION, n. [L. mersio, from mergo, to dive or sink.]The act of sinking or plunging under water. ...
34883 mesaraic MESARA'IC, a. [Gr. middle, and intestines.] The same as mesenteric; pertaining to the mesentery.
34884 meseems MESEE'MS, verb impersonal. [me and seems.] It seems to me. It is used also in the past tense, ...
34885 mesenteric MESENTER'IC, a. [See Mesentery.] Pertaining to the mesentery; as mesenteric glands or arteries.
34886 mesentery MES'ENTERY, n. [Gr. middle, and intestine.] A fatty membrane placed in the middle of the ...
34887 mesh MESH, n.1. The opening or space between the threads of a net.2. The grains or wash of a ...
34888 meshy MESH'Y, a. Formed like net-work; reticulated.
34889 meslin MES'LIN, n. [L. miscellaneus, from misceo, to mix.]A mixture of different sorts of grain; in ...
34890 mesne MESNE, a. meen. In law, middle; intervening; as a mesne lord, that is, a lord who holds land of a ...
34891 mesocolon MES'OCOLON, n. [Gr. middle, and colon.]In anatomy, that part of the mesentery, which, having ...
34892 mesoleucys MESOLEU'CYS, n. [Gr. middle, and white.]A precious stone with a streak of white in the middle.
34893 mesolite MES'OLITE, n. A mineral of the zeolite family.
34894 mesologarithm MESOLOG'ARITHM, n. [Gr. middle, and logarithm.]A logarithm of the co-sines and co-tangents.The ...
34895 mesomelas MESOM'ELAS, n. [Gr. middle, and black.] A precious stone with a black vein parting every color in ...
34896 mesotype MES'OTYPE, n. [Gr. middle, and form, type.] Prismatic zeolite; a mineral divided into three ...
34897 mesprise MESPRISE, n. Contempt; a French word. [Not in use.]
34898 mess MESS, n. [L. mensa.]1. A dish or a quantity of food prepared or set on a table at one time; as a ...
34899 message MES'SAGE, n. [L. missus, mitto, to send.]1. Any notice, word or communication, written or verbal, ...
34900 messager MES'SAGER
34901 messenger MES'SENGER, n.1. One who bears a message or an errand; the bearer of a verbal or written ...
34902 messiah MESSI'AH, a. [Heb. anointed.] Christ, the anointed; the Savior of the world. I know that when ...
34903 messiahship MESSI'AHSHIP, n. The character, state or office of the Savior. Josephus--whose prejudices were ...
34904 messieurs MES'SIEURS, n. [plu. of monsieur, my lord.] Sirs; gentlemen.
34905 messuage MESS'UAGE, n. In law, a dwelling house and adjoining land, appropriated to the use of the ...
34906 mestee MESTEE', n. A person of a mixed breed.
34907 met MET, pret. and pp. of meet.
34908 metabasis METAB'ASIS, n. [Gr. from beyond, and to go.] In rhetoric, transition; a passing from one thing to ...
34909 metabola METAB'OLA, n. [Gr. beyond, and a casting.] In medicine, a change of air, time or disease. [Little ...
34910 metacarpal METACARP'AL, a. [from metacarpus.] Belonging to the metacarpus.
34911 metacarpus METACARP'US, n. [Gr. beyond, and the wrist.] In anatomy, the part of the hand between the wrist ...
34912 metachronism METACH'RONISM, n. [Gr. beyond, and time.] An error in chronology, by placing an event after its ...
34913 metage ME'TAGE, n. [from mete.] Measurement of coal; price of measuring.
34914 metagrammatism METAGRAM'MATISM, n. [Gr. beyond, and a letter.]Anagrammatism, or metagrammatism, is a transposition ...
34915 metal METAL, n. met'l. [L. metallum.] A simple, fixed, shining, opake body or substance, insoluble in ...
34916 metalepsis METALEP'SIS, n. [Gr. participation; beyond, and to take.]In rhetoric, the continuation of a trope ...
34917 metaleptic METALEP'TIC, a. Pertaining to a metalepsis or participation; translative.1. Transverse; as the ...
34918 metaleptically METALEP'TICALLY, adv. By transposition.
34919 metallic METAL'LIC, a. [L. metallicus.] Pertaining to a metal or metals; consisting of metal; partaking of ...
34920 metalliferous METALLIF'EROUS, a. [L. metallum, metal, and fero, to produce.]Producing metals.
34921 metalliform METAL'LIFORM, a. Having the form of metals; like metal.
34922 metalline MET'ALLINE, a. Pertaining to a metal; consisting of metal.1. Impregnated with metal; as metalline ...
34923 metallist MET'ALLIST, n. A worker in metals, or one skilled in metals.
34924 metallization METALLIZA'TION, n. The act or process of forming into a metal; the operation which gives to a ...
34925 metallize MET'ALLIZE, v.t. To form into metal; to give to a substance its proper metallic properties.
34926 metallography METALLOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. metal, and description.] An account of metals, or a treatise on metallic ...
34927 metalloid MET'ALLOID, n. A name sometimes applied to the metallic bases of the alkalies and earths.
34928 metalloidal METALLOID'AL, a. Having the form or appearance of a metal.
34929 metallurgic MET'ALLURGIC, a. [See Metallurgy.] Pertaining to metallurgy, or the art of working metals.
34930 metallurgist MET'ALLURGIST, n. One whose occupation is to work metals, or to purify, refine and prepare metals ...
34931 metallurgy MET'ALLURGY, n. [Gr. metal, and work.] The art of working metals, comprehending the whole process ...
34932 metalman MET'ALMAN, n. A worker in metals; a coppersmith or tinman.
34933 metamorphic METAMORPH'IC
34934 metamorphose METAMORPH'OSE, v.t. [Gr. over, beyond, and form.] To change into a different form; to transform; ...
34935 metamorphoser METAMORPH'OSER, n. One that transforms or changes the shape.
34936 metamorphosic METAMORPH'OSIC, a. [See Metamorphose.]Changing the form; transforming.
34937 metamorphosing METAMORPH'OSING, ppr. Changing the shape.
34938 metamorphosis METAMORPH'OSIS, n. Change of form or shape; transformation; particularly, a change in the form of ...
34939 metamorphostical METAMORPHOS'TICAL, a. Pertaining to or effected by metamorphosis.
34940 metaphor MET'APHOR, n. [Gr. to transfer, over, to carry.] A short similitude; a similitude reduced to a ...
34941 metaphoric METAPHOR'IC
34942 metaphorical METAPHOR'ICAL, a. Pertaining to metaphor; comprising a metaphor; not literal; as a metaphorical ...
34943 metaphorically METAPHOR'ICALLY, adv. In a metaphorical manner; not literally.
34944 metaphorist MET'APHORIST, n. One that makes metaphors.
34945 metaphrase MET'APHRASE, n. [Gr. over, according to or with, and phrase.]A verbal translation; a version or ...
34946 metaphrast MET'APHRAST, n. A person who translates from one language into another, word for word.
34947 metaphrastic METAPHRAS'TIC, a. Close or literal in translation.
34948 metaphysic METAPHYS'IC
34949 metaphysical METAPHYS'ICAL, a. s as z. [See Metaphysics.]1. Pertaining or relating to metaphysics.2. According ...
34950 metaphysically METAPHYS'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of metaphysical science.
34951 metaphysician METAPHYSI'CIAN, n. s as z. One who is versed in the science of metaphysics.
34952 metaphysics METAPHYS'ICS, n. s as z. [Gr. after, and physics. It is said that this name was given to the ...
34953 metaplasm MET'APLASM, n. [Gr. transformation; over, and to form.]In grammar, a transmutation or change made ...
34954 metastasis METAS'TASIS, n. [Gr. mutation; over, and to place.] A translation or removal of a disease form one ...
34955 metatarsal METATAR'SAL, a. [from metatarsus.] Belonging to the metatarsus.
34956 metatarsus METATAR'SUS, n. [Gr. beyond, and tarsus.] The middle of the foot, or part between the ankle and the ...
34957 metathesis METATH'ESIS, n. [Gr. over, and to set.]1. Transposition; a figure by which the letters or ...
34958 mete METE, v.t. [L. metior; Heb. to measure.] To measure; to ascertain quantity, dimensions or capacity ...
34959 metempsychose METEMP'SYCHOSE, v.t. To translate from one body to another, as the soul.
34960 metempsychosis METEMPSYCHO'SIS, n. [Gr. beyond, and animation, life; to animate.]Transmigration; the passing of ...
34961 metemptosis METEMP'TOSIS, n. [Gr. after, and to fall.] In chronology,the solar equation necessary to prevent ...
34962 meteor ME'TEOR, n. [Gr. sublime, lofty.]1. In a general sense, a body that flies or floats in the air, ...
34963 meteoric METEOR'IC, a Pertaining to meteors; consisting of meteors.1. Proceeding from a meteor; as meteoric ...
34964 meteorize ME'TEORIZE, v.i. To ascend in vapors. [Not used.]
34965 meteorolite MET'EOROLITE
34966 meteorologic METEOROLOG'IC
34967 meteorological METEOROLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the atmosphere and its phenomena. A meteorological table or ...
34968 meteorologist METEOROL'OGIST
34969 meteorology METEOROL'OGY, n. [Gr. lofty, and discourse.] The science which treats of the atmosphere and its ...
34970 meteoromancy METEOROM'ANCY
34971 meteoroscopy METEOROS'COPY, n. [Gr. lofty, and to view.] That part of astronomy which treats of sublime ...
34972 meteorous METE'OROUS, a. Having the nature of a meteor.
34973 meter ME'TER, n. [from mete.] One who measures; used in compounds, as in coal-meter, land-meter.ME'TER, ...
34974 meterolite MET'EROLITE, n. A meteoric stone; a stone or solid compound of earthy and metallic matter which ...
34975 meterologist METEROL'OGIST, n. A person skilled in meteors; one who studies the phenomena of meteors, or keeps ...
34976 meteromancy METEROM'ANCY, n. [Gr. a meteor, and divination.] A species of divination by meteors, chiefly by ...
34977 metewand ME'TEWAND, n. [mete and wand.] A staff or rod of a certain length, used as a measure.
34978 meteyard ME'TEYARD, n. A yard, staff or rod, used as a measure. [We now use yard.]
34979 metheglin METHEG'LIN, n. A liquor made of honey and water boiled and fermented, often enriched with spices.
34980 methinks METHINKS, v. impers. pp. methought. [me and think.] It seems to me; it appears to me; I think. Me ...
34981 method METH'OD, n. [L. methodus; Gr. with, and way.]1. A suitable and convenient arrangement of things, ...
34982 methodic METHOD'IC
34983 methodical METHOD'ICAL, a. Arranged in convenient order; disposed in a just and natural manner, or in a ...
34984 methodically METHOD'ICALLY, adv. In a methodical manner; according to natural or convenient order.
34985 methodism METH'ODISM, n. The doctrines and worship of the sect of christians called Methodists.
34986 methodist METH'ODIST, n. One that observes method.1. One of a sect of christians, founded by Morgan, or ...
34987 methodistic METHODIS'TIC, a. Resembling the Methodists; partaking of the strictness of Methodists.
34988 methodize METH'ODIZE, v.t. To reduce to method; to dispose in due order; to arrange in a convenient manner. ...
34989 methought METHOUGHT, pret. of methinks. It seemed to me; I thought.
34990 metic ME'TIC, n. [Gr. house.] In ancient Greece, a sojourner; a resident stranger in a Grecian city or ...
34991 meticulous METIC'ULOUS, a. [L. Feticulosus.] Timid. [ Not used.]
34992 metonymic METONYM'IC
34993 metonymical METONYM'ICAL, a. [See Metonymy.] Used by way of metonymy, by putting one word for another.
34994 metonymically METONYM'ICALLY, adv. By putting one word for another.
34995 metonymy MET'ONYMY, n. [Gr. over, beyond, and name.] In rhetoric, a trope in which one word is put for ...
34996 metope METOPE, n. met'opy. [Gr. with, near or by, and an aperture or hollow.] In architecture, the space ...
34997 metoposcopist METOPOS'COPIST, n. [infra.] One versed in physiognomy.
34998 metoposcopy METOPOS'COPY, n. [Gr. the forehead, and to view.] The study of physiognomy; the art of discovering ...
34999 metre METRE. [See Meter.]
35000 metrical MET'RICAL, a. [L. metricus.]1. Pertaining to measure, or due arrangement or combination of long ...
35001 metrology METROL'OGY, n. [Gr. measure, and discourse.]1. A discourse on measures or mensuration; the ...
35002 metropolis METROP'OLIS, n. [L. from Gr. mother, and city. It has no plural.]Literally, the mother-city, that ...
35003 metropolitan METROPOL'ITAN, a. Belonging to a metropolis, or to the mother church; residing in the chief ...
35004 metropolite METROP'OLITE, a. A metropolitan. [Not used.]
35005 metropolitic METROPOL'ITIC
35006 metropolitical METROPOLIT'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a metropolis; chief or principal of cities; archiepiscopal.
35007 mettle METTLE, n. met'l. [usually supposed to be corrupted from metal. L. animus, animosus.] Spirit; ...
35008 mettled MET'TLED, a. High spirited; ardent; full of fire.
35009 mettlesome MET'TLESOME, a. Full of spirit; possessing constitutional ardor; brisk; fiery; as a mettlesome ...
35010 mettlesomeness MET'TLESOMENESS, n. The state of being high spirited.
35011 mew MEW, n. A seafowl of the genus Larus; a gull.MEW, n. A cage for birds; an inclosure; a place of ...
35012 mewing MEW'ING, ppr. Casting the feathers or skin; crying.
35013 mewl MEWL, v.i. [L. mugio, to low.] To cry or squall, as a child.
35014 mewler MEWL'ER, n. One that squalls or mewls.
35015 mezereon MEZE'REON, n. A plant of the genus Daphne; the spurge olive.
35016 mezzo MEZZO, in music, denotes middle, mean.
35017 mezzorelievo MEZZORELIE'VO, n. Middle relief.
35018 mezzotinto MEZZOTINT'O, n. [L. tinctus, painted.] A particular manner of engraving or representation of ...
35019 miasm MI'ASM
35020 miasma MIAS'MA, n. [Gr. to pollute.] Infecting substances floating in the air; the effluvia or fine ...
35021 miasmatic MIASMAT'IC, a. Pertaining to miasma; partaking of the qualities of noxious effluvia.
35022 mica MI'CA, n. [L. mica, a grain or particle; mico, to shine.] A mineral of a foliated structure, ...
35023 micaceous MICA'CEOUS, a. Pertaining to mica; resembling mica or partaking of its properties.
35024 micarel MIC'AREL, n. A species of argillaceous earth; a mineral of a brownish or blackish red color, ...
35025 mice MICE, plu. of mouse.
35026 michaelite MI'CHAELITE, n. A subvariety of siliceous sinter, found in the isle of St. Michael.
35027 michaelmas MICH'AELMAS, n. The feast of St. Michael, a festival of the Romish church, celebrated Sept.29; ...
35028 miche MICHE, v.i.1. To lie hid; to skulk; to retire or shrink from view.2. To pilfer.
35029 micher MICH'ER, n. One who skulks, or creeps out of sight; a thief.
35030 michery MICH'ERY, n. Theft, cheating.
35031 miching MICH'ING, ppr. Retiring; skulking; creeping from sight; mean; cowardly. [Vulgar.]
35032 mickle MICK'LE, a. Much; great. [Obsolete,but retained in the Scottish language.]
35033 mico MI'CO, n. A beautiful species of monkey.
35034 microcosm MIC'ROCOSM, n. [Gr. small, and world.] Literally, the little world; but used for man, supposed to ...
35035 microcosmical MICROCOS'MICAL, a. Pertaining to the microcosm.
35036 microcoustic MICROCOUS'TIC, n. [Gr. small, and to hear.] An instrument to augment small sounds, and assist in ...
35037 micrography MICROG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. small, and to describe.] The description of objects too small to be ...
35038 micrometer MICROM'ETER, n. [Gr. small, and measure.] An instrument for measuring small objects or spaces, by ...
35039 microphone MIC'ROPHONE, n. [Gr. small, and sound.] An instrument to augment small sounds; a microcoustic.
35040 microscope MIC'ROSCOPE, n. [Gr. small, and to view.] An optical instrument consisting of lenses or ...
35041 microscopic MICROSCOP'IC
35042 microscopical MICROSCOP'ICAL, a. Made by the aid of a microscope; as microscopic observation.1. Assisted by a ...
35043 microscopically MICROSCOP'ICALLY, adv. By the microscope; with minute inspection.
35044 micturition MICTURI'TION, n. [L. micturio.] The act of making water, or passing the urine.
35046 mid-course MID-COURSE, n. The middle of the course or way.
35047 mid-day MID'-DAY, a. Being at noon; meridional; as the mid-day sun.MID'-DAY, n. The middle of the day; ...
35045 mid MID, a. [L. medius.]1. Middle; at equal distance from extremes; as the mid hour of night.2. ...
35048 mida MI'DA, n. [Gr.] A worm, or the beanfly.
35049 middest MID'DEST, a. superl. of mid. Among the middest crowd. [Not used.]
35051 middle-aged MID'DLE-AGED, a. Being about the middle of the ordinary age of man. A middle-aged man is so ...
35052 middle-earth MID'DLE-EARTH, n. The world.
35050 middle MIDDLE, a. mid'l. [L. medius.]1. Equally distant from the extremes; as the middle point of a line ...
35053 middlemost MID'DLEMOST, a. Being in the middle, or nearest the middle of a number of things that are near the ...
35054 middling MID'DLING, a. Of middle rank, state, size or quality; about equally distant from the extremes; ...
35055 midge MIDGE, n. A gnat or flea. [Not used.]
35056 midland MID'LAND, a. Being in the interior country; distant from the coast or sea shore; as midland towns ...
35057 midleg MID'LEG, n. Middle of the leg.
35058 midmost MID'MOST, a. Middle; as the midmost battles.
35059 midnight MID'NIGHT, n. The middle of the night; twelve o'clock at night.MID'NIGHT, a. Being in the middle ...
35060 midriff MID'RIFF, n. In anatomy, the diaphragm; the muscle which divides the trunk into two cavities, the ...
35061 midsea MID'SEA, n. The Mediterranean sea.
35062 midship MID'SHIP, a. Being or belonging to the middle of a ship; as a midship beam.
35063 midshipman MID'SHIPMAN, n. In ships of war, a kind of naval cadet, whose business is to second the orders of ...
35064 midships MID'SHIPS, adv. In the middle of a ship; properly amidships.
35065 midst MIDST, n. [contracted from middest, the superlative of mid.]The middle. There is nothing said or ...
35066 midstream MID'STREAM, n. The middle of the stream.
35067 midsummer MID'SUMMER, n. The middle of summer; the summer solstice, about the 21st of June.
35068 midward MID'WARD, adv. Midst. [Not in use.]
35069 midway MID'WAY, n. The middle of the way or distance. Paths indirect, or in the midway faint.MID'WAY, a. ...
35070 midwife MID'WIFE, n. [supposed by Junius and Skinner to be meedwife, a woman that has a reward. This is ...
35071 midwifery MID'WIFERY, n. The art or practice of assisting women in childbirth; obstetrics.1. Assistance at ...
35072 miemite MI'EMITE, n. Granular miemite is a sub-variety of magnesian limestone, first found at Miemo, in ...
35073 mien MIEN, n. Look; air; manner; external appearance; carriage; as a lofty mien; a majestic mien.
35074 miff MIFF, n. A slight degree of resentment. [Colloquial.]
35075 miffed MIF'FED, a. Slightly offended.
35076 might MIGHT, n. pret. of may. Had power or liberty. He might go, or might have gone.1. It sometimes ...
35077 mightily MI'GHTILY, adv. [from mighty.] With great power, force of strength; vigorously; as, to strive ...
35078 mightiness MI'GHTINESS, n. Power; greatness; highth of dignity. How soon this mightiness meets misery!1. A ...
35079 mighty MI'GHTY, a. Having great bodily strength or physical power; very strong or vigorous; as a mighty ...
35080 migniard MIGNIARD, a. Soft; dainty; delicate; pretty.
35081 mignonette MIGNONETTE
35082 migonet MIG'ONET, n. An annual flower or plant of the genus Reseda, having the scent of raspberries.
35083 migrate MI'GRATE, v.i. [L. migro.] To pass or remove from one country or from one state to another, with a ...
35084 migrating MI'GRATING, ppr. Removing from one state to another for a permanent residence. The people of the ...
35085 migration MIGRA'TION, n. [L. migratio.] The act of removing from one kingdom or state to another, for the ...
35086 migratory MI'GRATORY, a. Removing or accustomed to remove from one state or country to another for permanent ...
35087 milch MILCH, a. Giving milk; as a milch cow. It is now applied only to beasts.
35089 mild-spirited MILD-SPIR'ITED, a. Having a mild temper.
35088 mild MILD, a. [The primary sense is soft or smooth, L. mollis, Eng. mellow.]1. Soft; gently and ...
35090 mildew MIL'DEW, n. [L. melligo, from mel, honey.]1. Honey dew; a thick, clammy, sweet juice, found on the ...
35091 mildewed MIL'DEWED, pp. Tainted or injured by mildew.
35092 mildewing MIL'DEWING, ppr. Tainting with mildew.
35093 mildly MILDLY, adv. Softly; gently; tenderly; not roughly or violently; moderately; as, to speak mildly; ...
35094 mildness MILDNESS, n. Softness; gentleness; as the mildness of words or speech; mildness of voice.1. ...
35095 mile MILE, n. [L. mille passus, a thousand paces; passus being dropped in common usage.] A measure of ...
35096 mileage MI'LEAGE, n. Fees paid for travel by the mile.
35097 milestone MI'LESTONE, n. A stone set to mark the distance or space of a mile.
35098 milfoil MIL'FOIL, n. [L. millefolium, a thousand leaves.]A plant of the genus Achillea; yarrow.
35099 miliary MIL'IARY, a. [L.milium, millet.]1. Resembling millet seeds; as a miliary eruption; miliary glands. ...
35100 milice MILICE,for militia, is not in use.
35101 miliolite MIL'IOLITE, n. Fossil remains of the Miliola, a genus of univalve shells.
35102 militancy MIL'ITANCY, n. Warfare. [Little used.]
35103 militant MIL'ITANT, a. [L. militans, milito, to fight.]1. Fighting; combating; serving as a soldier.2. The ...
35104 militarily MIL'ITARILY, adv. In a soldierly manner.
35105 military MIL'ITARY, a. [L. militaris, from miles, a soldier; milito, to fight.]1. Pertaining to soldiers or ...
35106 militate MIL'ITATE, v.i. [L. milito.] To militate against, is to oppose; to be or to act in ...
35107 militia MILI'TIA, n. [L. from miles, a soldier; Gr. war, to fight, combat, contention. The primary sense ...
35109 milk-trefoil MILK-TRE'FOIL, n. A plant, the cytisus.
35108 milk MILK, n.1. A white fluid or liquor, secreted by certain glands in female animals, and drawn from ...
35110 milken MILK'EN, a. Consisting of milk. [Not used.]
35111 milker MILK'ER, n. One that milks.
35112 milkiness MILK'INESS, n. Qualities like those of milk; softness.
35113 milkmaid MILK'MAID, n. A woman that milks or is employed in the dairy.
35114 milkman MILK'MAN, N. A man that sells milk or carries milk to market.
35115 milkpail MILK'PAIL, n. A pail which receives the milk drawn from cows.
35116 milkpan MILK'PAN, n. A pan in which milk is set.
35117 milkporridge MILK'PORRIDGE
35118 milkpottage MILK'POTTAGE, n. A species of food composed of milk or milk and water, boiled with meal or flour.
35119 milkscore MILK'SCORE, n. An account of milk sold or purchased in small quantities, scored or marked.
35120 milksop MILK'SOP, n. A soft, effeminate, feeble-minded man.
35121 milktooth MILK'TOOTH, n. The fore tooth of a foal, which is cast within two or three years.
35122 milkwhite MILK'WHITE, a. White as milk.
35123 milkwoman MILK'WOMAN, n. A woman that sells milk.
35125 milky-way MILK'Y-WAY, n. The galaxy; a broad luminous path or circle in the heavens, supposed to be the ...
35124 milky MILK'Y, a. Made of milk.1. Resembling milk; as milky sap or juice.2. Yielding milk; as milky ...
35126 mill MILL, n. [L. mille, a thousand.] A money of account of the United States, value the tenth of a ...
35127 millcog MILL'COG, n. The cog of a mill wheel.
35128 milldam MILL'DAM, n. A dam or mound to obstruct a water course, and raise the water to an altitude ...
35129 millenarian MILLENA'RIAN, a. Consisting of a thousand years; pertaining to the millenium.MILLENA'RIAN, n. A ...
35130 millenary MIL'LENARY, a. Consisting of a thousand.
35131 millenial MILLEN'IAL, a. Pertaining to the millenium, or to a thousand years; as millenial period; millenial ...
35132 millenist MIL'LENIST, n. One who holds to the millenium. [Not used.]
35133 millenium MILLEN'IUM, n. [L. mille, a thousand, and annus, year.]A thousand years; a word used to denote the ...
35134 milleped MIL'LEPED, n. [L.mille, a thousand, and pes, foot.] The wood-louse, an insect having many feet, a ...
35135 millepore MIL'LEPORE, n. [L. mille, a thousand, and porus, a pore.]A genus of lithophytes or polypiers of ...
35136 milleporite MIL'LEPORITE, n. Fossil millepores.
35137 miller MIL'LER, n. [from mill.] One whose occupation is to attend a grist-mill.1. An insect whose wings ...
35138 millers-thumb MIL'LER'S-THUMB, n. A small fish found in small streams.
35139 millesimal MILLES'IMAL, a. [L. millesimus, from mille, a thousand.]Thousandth; consisting of thousandth parts; ...
35140 millet MIL'LET, n. [L. milium.] A plant of the genus Milium, of several species, one of which is ...
35141 millhorse MILL'HORSE, n. A horse that turns a mill.
35142 milliary MIL'LIARY, a. [L. milliarium, a milestone.]Pertaining to a mile; denoting a mile; as a milliary ...
35143 milligram MIL'LIGRAM, n. [L. mille, a thousand, and Gr. a gram.]In the system of French weights and ...
35144 milliliter MIL'LILITER, n. [L. mille, a thousand, and liter.]A French measure of capacity containing the ...
35145 millimeter MILLIM'ETER, n. [L. mille, a thousand, and metrum, a measure.]A French lineal measure containing ...
35146 milliner MIL'LINER, n. [Johnson supposes this word to be Milaner, form Milan, in Italy.] A woman who makes ...
35147 millinery MIL'LINERY, n. The articles made or sold by milliners, as head-dresses, hats or bonnets, laces, ...
35148 million MILLION, n. mil'yun. [L. mille, a thousand.]1. The number of ten hundred thousand, or a thousand ...
35149 millionary MILL'IONARY, a. Pertaining to millions; consisting of millions; as the millionary chronology of ...
35150 millioned MILL'IONED, a. Multiplied by millions. [Not used.]
35151 millionth MILL'IONTH, a. The ten hundred thousandth.
35152 millpond MILL'POND, n. A pond or reservoir of water raised for driving a mill wheel.
35153 millrace MILL'RACE, n. The current of water that drives a mill wheel, or the canal in which it is conveyed.
35154 millrea MILLRE'A
35155 millree MILLREE', n. A coin of Portugal of the value of $1.24 cents.
35156 millstone MILL'STONE, n. A stone used for grinding grain.
35157 milt MILT, n.1. In anatomy, the spleen, a viscus situated in the left hypochondrium under the ...
35158 milter MILT'ER, n. A male fish.
35159 miltwort MILT'WORT, n. A plant of the genus Asplenium.
35160 mime MIME, n. A buffoon. [See Mimic.]1. A kind of dramatic farce.MIME, v.i. To mimic, or play the ...
35161 mimer MI'MER, n. A mimic. [See Mimic.]
35162 mimesis MIME'SIS, n. [Gr.] In rhetoric, imitation of the voice or gestures of another.
35163 mimetic MIMET'IC, a. [Gr.] Apt to imitate; given to aping or mimicry.
35164 mimic MIM'IC
35165 mimical MIM'ICAL, a. [L. mimus, mimicus; Gr. to imitate.]1. Imitative; inclined to imitate or to ape; ...
35166 mimick MIM'ICK, v.t. To imitate or ape for sport; to attempt to excite laughter or derision by acting or ...
35167 mimicry MIM'ICRY, n. Ludicrous imitation for sport or ridicule.
35168 mimographer MIMOG'RAPHER, n. [Gr.] A writer of farces.
35169 mina MI'NA, n. [L. mina.] A weight or denomination of money. The mina of the Old Testament was valued ...
35170 minacious MINA'CIOUS, a. [L. minax, from minor, to threaten.]Threatening; menacing.
35171 minacity MINAC'ITY, n. [L. minax.] Disposition to threaten. [Little used.]
35172 minaret MIN'ARET, n. A small spire or steeple, or spire-like ornament in Saracen architecture.
35173 minatory MIN'ATORY, a. Threatening; menacing.
35175 mince-pie MINCE-PIE
35174 mince MINCE, v.t. mins. [L. minuo, to diminish; L. minor, smaller; minuo, to diminish; Gr. small, ...
35177 minced-pie MINCED-PIE, n. A pie made with minced meat and other ingredients, baked in paste.
35176 minced MIN'CED, pp. Cut or chopped into very small pieces.
35178 mincing MIN'CING, ppr. Cutting into small pieces; speaking or walking affectedly.
35179 mincingly MIN'CINGLY, adv. In small parts; not fully.
35181 mind-stricken MIND-STRICKEN, a. Moved; affected in mind. [Not used.]
35180 mind MIND, n. [L. reminiscor; L. mens; Gr. memory, mention, to remember, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence; ...
35182 minded MINDED, a. Disposed; inclined. If men were minded to live virtuously. Joseph was minded to put her ...
35183 mindedness MINDEDNESS, n. Disposition; inclination towards any thing; as heavenly mindedness.
35184 mindfilling MINDFILLING, a. Filling the mind.
35185 mindful MINDFUL, a. Attentive; regarding with care; bearing in mind; heedful; observant. I promise to be ...
35186 mindfully MINDFULLY, adv. Attentively; heedfully.
35187 mindfulness MINDFULNESS, n. Attention; regard; heedfulness.
35188 minding MINDING, ppr. Regarding; heeding.MINDING, n. Regard.
35189 mindless MINDLESS, a. Inattentive; heedless; forgetful; negligent; careless. Cursed Athens, mindless of thy ...
35191 mine-digger MI'NE-DIGGER, n. One that digs mines.
35190 mine MINE, a. called sometimes a pronominal adj. [L. meus.]My; belonging to me. It was formerly used ...
35192 miner MI'NER, n. One that digs for metals and other fossils.1. One who digs canals or passages under ...
35193 mineral MIN'ERAL, n. [Low L. minera, a matrix or vein of metals, whence mineralia; all from mine.]A body ...
35194 mineralist MIN'ERALIST, n. One versed or employed in minerals.
35195 mineralization MINERALIZA'TION, n. [See Mineralize.]1. The process of forming an ore by combination with another ...
35196 mineralize MIN'ERALIZE, v.t. [from mineral] In mineralogy, to combine with a metal in forming an ore or ...
35197 mineralized MIN'ERALIZED, pp. Deprived of its usual properties by being combined with another substance or ...
35198 mineralizer MIN'ERALIZER, n. A substance which mineralizes another or combines with it in an ore, and thus ...
35199 mineralogical MINERALOG'ICAL, a. [See Mineralogy.] Pertaining to the science of minerals; as a mineralogical ...
35200 mineralogically MINERALOG'ICALLY, adv. In mineralogy.
35201 mineralogist MINERAL'OGIST, n. One who is versed in the science of minerals, or one who treats or discourses of ...
35202 mineralogy MINERAL'OGY, n. [mineral and Gr. discourse.] The science which treats of the properties of mineral ...
35203 mingle MIN'GLE, v.t.1. To mix; to blend; to unite in one body; as, to mingle liquors of different ...
35204 mingled MIN'GLED, pp. Mixed; united promiscuously.
35205 mingledly MIN'GLEDLY, adv. Confusedly.
35206 mingler MIN'GLER, n. One that mingles.
35207 mingling MIN'GLING, ppr. Mixing; uniting without order.
35208 miniard MIN'IARD, a. Soft; dainty. [Little used.]
35209 miniardize MIN'IARDIZE, v.t. To render soft, delicate or dainty.
35210 miniate MIN'IATE, v.t. [L. minium, vermillion.] To paint or tinge with vermillion.
35211 miniature MIN'IATURE, n.1. A painting in water colors on vellum, ivory or paper, with points or dots; ...
35212 minikin MIN'IKIN, a. Small; diminutive; used in slight contempt.MIN'IKIN, n. A small sort of pins.1. A ...
35213 minim MIN'IM, n.1. A little man or being; a dwarf.2. One of a certain reformed order of Franciscans or ...
35214 minimum MIN'IMUM, n. [L.] The least quantity assignable in a given case.
35215 minimus MIN'IMUS, n. [L.] A being of the smallest size.
35216 mining MI'NING, ppr. Digging into the earth, as for fossils and minerals; sapping.1. a. Designating the ...
35217 minion MIN'ION, a. [infra.] Fine; trim; dainty. [Not used.]
35218 minioning MIN'IONING, n. Kind treatment.
35219 minionlike MIN'IONLIKE
35220 minionly MIN'IONLY, adv. Finely; daintily.
35221 minionship MIN'IONSHIP, n. State of being a minion.
35222 minious MIN'IOUS, n. [from L. minium.] Of the color of red lead or vermillion.
35223 minish MIN'ISH, v.t. [L. minuo, to lessen.]To lessen; to diminish. [See Diminish.]
35224 minister MIN'ISTER, n. [L.]1. Properly, a chief servant; hence, an agent appointed to transact or manage ...
35225 ministered MIN'ISTERED, pp. Served; afforded; supplied.
35226 ministerial MINISTE'RIAL, a. Attending for service; attendant; acting at command. Enlight'ning spirits and ...
35227 ministerially MINISTE'RIALLY, adv. In a ministerial manner or character.
35228 ministering MIN'ISTERING, ppr. Attending and serving as a subordinate agent; serving under superior authority. ...
35229 ministery MINISTERY. [See Ministry.]
35230 ministral MIN'ISTRAL, a. Pertaining to a minister. [Little used.]
35231 ministrant MIN'ISTRANT, a. Performing service as a minister; attendant on service; acting under command. ...
35232 ministration MINISTRA'TION, n. [L. ministratio.] The act of performing service as a subordinate agent; agency; ...
35233 ministress MIN'ISTRESS, n. A female that ministers.
35234 ministry MIN'ISTRY, n. [L. ministerium.] The office, duties or functions of a subordinate agent of any ...
35235 ministryship MINISTRYSHIP, for ministry,is little used and hardly proper.
35236 minium MIN'IUM, n. [L.] The red oxyd of lead, produced by calcination. Lead exposed to air while melting ...
35237 mink MINK, n. An American quadruped of the genus Mustela, an amphibious animal that burrows in the ...
35238 minnoc MINNOC, used by Shakespeare, is supposed by Johnson to be the same as minx.
35239 minnow MIN'NOW
35240 minor MI'NOR, a. [L. minuo, to diminish. See Mince.]1. Less; smaller; sometimes applied to the bulk or ...
35241 minorate MI'NORATE, v.t. To diminish. [Not used.]
35242 minoration MINORA'TION, n. A lessening; diminution.
35243 minorite MI'NORITE, n. A Franciscan friar.
35244 minority MINOR'ITY, n. [L. minor.]1. The state of being under age. [See Minor.]2. The smaller number; as ...
35245 minotaur MIN'OTAUR, n. [L.. minotaurus; from man, which must have been in early ages a Latin word, and ...
35246 minow MIN'OW, n. A very small fish, a species of Cyprinus.
35247 minster MIN'STER, n. A monastery; an ecclesiastical convent or fraternity; but it is said originally to ...
35248 minstrel MIN'STREL, n. A singer and musical performer on instruments. Minstrels were formerly poets as ...
35249 minstrelsy MIN'STRELSY, n. The arts and occupations of minstrels; instrumental music.1. A number of ...
35250 mint MINT, n. [L. moneta.]1. The place where money is coined by public authority. In Great Britain, ...
35251 mintage MINT'AGE, n. That which is coined or stamped.1. The duty paid for coining.
35252 minter MINT'ER, n. A coiner; also, an inventor.
35253 mintman MINT'MAN, n. A coiner; one skilled in coining or in coins.
35254 mintmaster MINT'M`ASTER, n. The master or superintendent of a mint.1. One who invents or fabricates.
35255 minuend MIN'UEND, n. [L. minuendus, minuo, to lessen.]In arithmetic, the number form which another number ...
35256 minuet MIN'UET,n.1. A slow graceful dance, consisting of a coupee, a high step and a balance.2. A tune ...
35257 minum MIN'UM, n.1. A small kind of printing types; now written minion.2. A note of slow time containing ...
35259 minute-book MIN'UTE-BOOK, n. A book of short hints.
35260 minute-glass MIN'UTE-GLASS, n. A glass, the sand of which measures a minute.
35261 minute-guns MIN'UTE-GUNS, n. Guns discharged every minute.
35262 minute-hand MIN'UTE-HAND, n. The hand that points to the minutes on a clock or watch.
35263 minute-watch MIN'UTE-WATCH, n. A watch that distinguishes minutes of time, or on which minutes are marked.
35258 minute MINU'TE, a. [L. minutus.]1. Very small,little or slender; of very small bulk or size; small in ...
35264 minutely MINU'TELY, adv. [from minute.] To a small point of time, space or matter; exactly; nicely; as, to ...
35265 minuteness MINU'TENESS, n. Extreme smallness, fineness or slenderness; as the minuteness of the particles of ...
35266 minutiae MINU'TIAE, n. [L.] The smaller particulars.
35267 minx MINX, n. A pert, wanton girl.1. A she-puppy.
35268 miny MI'NY, a. [from mine.] Abounding with mines.1. Subterraneous.
35269 mirable MI'RABLE, a. Wonderful. [Not in use.]
35271 miracle-monger MIR'ACLE-MONGER, n. An impostor who pretends to work miracles.
35270 miracle MIR'ACLE, n. [L. miraculum, from miror, to wonder.]1. Literally, a wonder or wonderful thing; but ...
35272 miraculous MIRAC'ULOUS, a. Performed supernaturally, or by a power beyond the ordinary agency of natural ...
35273 miraculously MIRAC'ULOUSLY, adv. By miracle; supernaturally.AEneas, wounded as he was, could not have engaged ...
35274 miraculousness MIRAC'ULOUSNESS, n. The state of being effected by miracle or by supernatural agency.
35275 mirador MIRADOR, n. [L. miror.] A balcony or gallery commanding an extensive view.
35277 mire-crow MIRE-CROW, n. The sea-crow or pewit gull, of the genus Larus.
35276 mire MIRE, n. Deep mud; earth so wet and soft as to yield to the feet and to wheels.MIRE, v.t. To ...
35278 miriness MI'RINESS, n. [from miry.] The state of consisting of deep mud.
35279 mirk MIRK, a. Dark. [See Murky.]
35280 mirksome MIRK'SOME, a. Dark; obscure. [See Murky.]
35281 mirksomeness MIRK'SOMENESS, n. Obscurity. [See Murky.]
35283 mirror-stone MIR'ROR-STONE, n. A bright stone.
35282 mirror MIR'ROR, n. [L. miror, to admire.]1. A looking glass; any glass or polished substance that forms ...
35284 mirth MIRTH, n. merth. Social merriment; hilarity; high excitement of pleasurable feelings in company; ...
35285 mirthful MIRTH'FUL, a. Merry; jovial; festive. The feast was served, the bowl was crown'd, To the king's ...
35286 mirthless MIRTH'LESS, a. Without mirth or hilarity.
35287 miry MI'RY, a. [from mire.] Abounding with deep mud; full of mire; as a miry road; a miry lane.1. ...
35288 mis MIS, a prefix, denotes error, or erroneous, wrong, from the verb miss, to err, to go wrong.
35289 misacceptation MISACCEPTA'TION, n. The act of taking or understanding in a wrong sense.
35290 misadventure MISADVEN'TURE, n. Mischance; misfortune; ill luck; an unlucky accident.1. In law, homicide by ...
35291 misadventured MISADVEN'TURED, a. Unfortunate.
35292 misadvised MISADVI'SED, a. [See Advise.] Ill advised; ill directed.
35293 misaffect MISAFFECT', v.t. To dislike.
35294 misaffected MISAFFECT'ED, a. Ill disposed.
35295 misaffirm MISAFFIRM', v.t. To affirm incorrectly.
35296 misaimed MISA'IMED, a. Not rightly aimed or directed.
35297 misalledge MISALLEDGE, v.t. misallej'. To state erroneously.
35298 misallegation MISALLEGA'TION, n. Erroneous statement.
35299 misalliance MISALLI'ANCE, n. Improper association.
35300 misallied MISALLI'ED, a. Ill allied or associated.
35301 misanthrope MIS'ANTHROPE
35302 misanthropic MISANTHROP'IC
35303 misanthropical MISANTHROP'ICAL, a. Hating or having a dislike to mankind.
35304 misanthropist MISAN'THROPIST, n. [Gr. to hate, and man.] A hater of mankind.
35305 misanthropy MISAN'THROPY, n. Hatred or dislike to mankind; opposed to philanthropy.
35306 misapplication MISAPPLICA'TION, n. A wrong application; an application to a wrong person or purpose.
35307 misapplied MISAPPLI'ED, pp. Applied to a wrong person or purpose.
35308 misapply MISAPPLY', v.t. To apply to a wrong person or purpose; as to misapply a name or title; to misapply ...
35309 misapplying MISAPPLY'ING, ppr. Applying to a wrong person or purpose.
35310 misapprehend MISAPPREHEND', v.t. To misunderstand; to take in a wrong sense.
35311 misapprehended MISAPPREHEND'ED, pp. Not rightly understood.
35312 misapprehending MISAPPREHEND'ING, ppr. Misunderstanding.
35313 misapprehension MISAPPREHEN'SION, n. A mistaking or mistake; wrong apprehension of one's meaning or of a fact.
35314 misascribe MISASCRI'BE, v.t. To ascribe falsely or erroneously.
35315 misassign MISASSIGN, v.t. [See Assign.] To assign erroneously.
35316 misattend MISATTEND', v.t. To disregard.
35317 misbecome MISBECOME, v.t. misbecum'. [See Become.]Not to become; to suit ill; not to befit. Thy father will ...
35318 misbecoming MISBECOM'ING, ppr. or a. Unseemly; unsuitable; improper; indecorous.
35319 misbecomingness MISBECOM'INGNESS, n. Unbecomingness; unsuitableness.
35320 misbegot MISBEGOT'
35321 misbegotten MISBEGOT'TEN, ppr. or a. Unlawfully or irregularly begotten.
35322 misbehave MISBEHA'VE, v.i. To behave ill; to conduct one's self improperly.
35323 misbehaved MISBEHA'VED, a. Guilty of ill behavior; ill bred; rude.
35324 misbehavior MISBEHA'VIOR, n. misbeha'vyor. Ill conduct; improper, rude or uncivil behavior.
35325 misbelief MISBELIE'F, n. Erroneous belief; false religion.
35326 misbelieve MISBELIE'VE, v.t. To believe erroneously.
35327 misbeliever MISBELIE'VER, n. One who believes wrongly; one who holds a false religion.
35328 misbelieving MISBELIE'VING, a. Believing erroneously; irreligious.
35329 misbeseem MISBESEE'M, v.t. To suit ill.
35330 misbestow MISBESTOW, v.t. To bestow improperly.
35331 misborn MIS'BORN, a. Born to evil.
35332 miscalculate MISCAL'CULATE, v.t. To calculate erroneously.
35333 miscalculated MISCAL'CULATED, pp. Erroneously calculated.
35334 miscalculating MISCAL'CULATING, ppr. Committing errors in calculation.
35335 miscalculation MISCALCULA'TION, n. Erroneous calculation.
35336 miscall MISCALL', v.t. To call by a wrong name; to name improperly.
35337 miscalled MISCALL'ED, pp. Misnamed.
35338 miscalling MISCALL'ING, ppr. Misnaming.
35339 miscarriage MISCAR'RIAGE, n. Unfortunate event of an undertaking; failure. When a counselor, to save himself, ...
35340 miscarry MISCAR'RY, v.i. To fail of the intended effect; not to succeed; to be unsuccessful; to suffer ...
35341 miscarrying MISCAR'RYING, ppr. Failing of the intended effect; suffering abortion. Hos.9.
35342 miscast MISC`AST, v.t. To cast or reckon erroneously.MISC`AST, pp. Erroneously cast or reckoned.MISC`AST, ...
35343 miscasting MISC`ASTING, ppr. Casting or reckoning erroneously.
35344 miscellanarian MISCELLANA'RIAN, a. [See Miscellany.] Belonging to miscellanies; of miscellanies. Miscellanarian ...
35345 miscellane MIS'CELLANE, n. [L. miscellaneus.] A mixture of two or more sorts of grain; now called meslin.
35346 miscellaneous MISCELLA'NEOUS, a. [L. miscellaneus, from misceo, to mix.] Mixed; mingled; consisting of several ...
35347 miscellaneousness MISCELLA'NEOUSNESS, n. The state of being mixed; composition of various kinds.
35348 miscellany MIS'CELLANY, n. [L.miscellanea, from misceo, to mix.]1. A mass or mixture of various kinds; ...
35349 miscenter MISCEN'TER, v.t. To place amiss. [Not in use.]
35350 mischance MISCH`ANCE, n. Ill luck; ill fortune; misfortune; mishap; misadventure. It is a man's unhappiness, ...
35351 mischaracterize MISCHAR'ACTERIZE, v.t. [See Character.] To characterize falsely or erroneously; to give a wrong ...
35352 mischarge MISCH`ARGE, v.t. To mistake in charging, as an account.MISCH`ARGE, n. A mistake in charging, as ...
35354 mischief-maker MIS'CHIEF-MAKER, n. One who makes mischief; one who excites or instigates quarrels or enmity.
35355 mischief-making MIS'CHIEF-MAKING, a. Causing harm; exciting enmity or quarrels.
35353 mischief MIS'CHIEF, n.1. Harm; hurt; injury; damage; evil, whether intended or not. A new law is made to ...
35356 mischievous MIS'CHIEVOUS, a. Harmful; hurtful; injurious; making mischief; of persons; as a mischievous man or ...
35357 mischievously MIS'CHIEVOUSLY, adv. With injury, hurt, loss or damage. We say, the law operates mischievously.1. ...
35358 mischievousness MIS'CHIEVOUSNESS, n. Hurtfulness; noxiousness.1. Disposition to do harm, or to vex or annoy; as ...
35359 mischna MISCH'NA, n. A part of the Jewish Talmud. [See Mishna.]
35360 mischoose MISCHOOSE, v.t. mischooz'. To choose wrong; to make a wrong choice.
35361 mischosen MISCHO'SEN, pp. Chosen by mistake.
35362 miscible MIS'CIBLE, a. [L. misceo, to mix.]That may be mixed. Oil and water are not miscible.
35363 miscitation MISCITA'TION, n. A wrong citation; erroneous quotation.
35364 miscite MISCI'TE, v.t. To cite erroneously or falsely.
35365 misclaim MISCLA'IM, n. A mistaken claim or demand.
35366 miscomputation MISCOMPUTA'TION, n. Erroneous computation; false reckoning.
35367 miscompute MISCOMPU'TE, v.t. To compute or reckon erroneously.
35368 misconceit MISCONCE'IT
35369 misconceive MISCONCE'IVE, v.t. or i. To receive a false notion or opinion of any thing; to misjudge; to have ...
35370 misconceived MISCONCE'IVED, pp. Wrongly understood; mistaken.
35371 misconceiving MISCONCE'IVING, ppr. Mistaking; misunderstanding.
35372 misconception MISCONCEP'TION, n. Erroneous conception; false opinion; wrong notion or understanding of a thing. ...
35373 misconduct MISCON'DUCT, n. Wrong conduct; ill behavior; ill management.
35374 misconducted MISCONDUCT'ED, pp. Ill managed; badly conducted.
35375 misconducting MISCONDUCT'ING, ppr. Mismanaging; misbehaving.
35376 misconjecture MISCONJEC'TURE, n. A wrong conjecture or guess.MISCONJEC'TURE, v.t. or i. To guess wrong.
35377 misconstruction MISCONSTRUC'TION, n. Wrong interpretation of words or things; a mistaking of the true meaning; as ...
35378 misconstrue MISCON'STRUE, v.t. To interpret erroneously either words or things. It is important not to ...
35379 misconstrued MISCON'STRUED, pp. Erroneously interpreted.
35380 misconstruer MISCON'STRUER, n. One who makes a wrong interpretation.
35381 misconstruing MISCON'STRUING, ppr. Interpreting wrongly.
35382 miscorrect MISCORRECT', v.t. To correct erroneously; to mistake in attempting to correct another. He passed ...
35383 miscorrected MISCORRECT'ED, pp. Mistaken in the attempt to correct.
35384 miscounsel MISCOUN'SEL, v.t. To advise wrong.
35385 miscount MISCOUNT', v.t. To count erroneously; to mistake in counting.MISCOUNT', v.i. To make a wrong ...
35386 miscreance MIS'CREANCE
35387 miscreancy MIS'CREANCY, n. [See Miscreant.] Unbelief; false faith; adherence to a false religion.
35388 miscreant MIS'CREANT, n. [L. credens, credo.]1. An infidel, or one who embraces a false faith.2. A vile ...
35389 miscreate MISCREA'TE
35390 miscreated MISCREA'TED, a. Formed unnaturally or illegitimately; deformed.
35391 misdate MISDA'TE, n. A wrong date.MISDA'TE, v.i. To date erroneously.
35392 misdeed MISDEE'D, n. An evil deed; a wicked action. Evils which our own misdeeds have wrought.
35393 misdeem MISDEE'M, v.t. To judge erroneously; to misjudge; to mistake in judging.
35394 misdemean MISDEME'AN, v.t. To behave ill.
35395 misdemeanor MISDEME'ANOR, n. Ill behavior; evil conduct; fault; mismanagement.1. In law, an offense of a less ...
35396 misdesert MISDESERT', n. Ill desert.
35397 misdevotion MISDEVO'TION, n. False devotion; mistaken piety. [Little used.]
35398 misdiet MISDI'ET, n. Improper diet or food. [Not used.]
35399 misdirect MISDIRECT', v.t. To give a wrong direction to; as to misdirect a passenger.1. To direct to a ...
35400 misdirected MISDIRECT'ED, pp. Directed wrong, or to a wrong person or place.
35401 misdirecting MISDIRECT'ING, ppr. Directing wrong, or to a wrong person or place.
35402 misdisposition MISDISPOSI'TION, n. Disposition to evil. [Not in use.]
35403 misdistinguish MISDISTIN'GUISH, v.t. To make wrong distinctions.
35404 misdo MISDO, v.t. [See Do.] To do wrong; to do amiss; to commit a crime or fault.
35405 misdoer MISDOER, n. One who does wrong; one who commits a fault or crime.
35406 misdoing MISDOING, ppr. Doing wrong; committing a fault or crime.MISDOING, n. A wrong done; a fault or ...
35407 misdoubt MISDOUBT, v.t. misdout'. [See Doubt.] To suspect of deceit or danger. [An ill formed word and ...
35408 misdoubtful MISDOUBT'FUL, a. Misgiving. [Not used.]
35409 mise MISE, n. meze. [L. mitto.]1. In law, an issue to be tried at the grand assize.2. Expense; ...
35410 misemploy MISEMPLOY', v.t. To employ to no purpose, or to a bad purpose; as, to misemploy time, power, ...
35411 misemployed MISEMPLOY'ED, pp. Used to no purpose, or to a bad one.
35412 misemploying MISEMPLOY'ING, ppr. Using to no purpose, or to a bad one.
35413 misemployment MISEMPLOY'MENT, n. Ill employment; application to no purpose, or to a bad purpose.
35414 misentry MISEN'TRY, n. An erroneous entry or charge, as of an account.
35415 miser MI'SER, n. s as z. [L. miser, miserable.] A miserable person; one wretched or afflicted.1. A ...
35416 miserabale MIS'ERABALE, a. s as z. [L. miser, miserabilis.]1. Very unhappy from grief, pain, calamity, ...
35417 miserableness MIS'ERABLENESS, n. State of misery; poorness.
35418 miserably MIS'ERABLY, adv. Unhappily; calamitously. The fifth was miserably stabbed to death.1. Very poorly ...
35419 miserly MI'SERLY, a. [See Miser.] Very covetous; sordid; niggardly; parsimonious.
35420 misery MIS'ERY, n. s as z. [L. miseria.]1. Great unhappiness; extreme pain of body or mind. A man suffers ...
35421 misestimate MISES'TIMATE, v.t. To estimate erroneously.
35422 misfall MISFALL', v.t. To befall, as ill luck; to happen to unluckily.
35423 misfare MISFA'RE, n. Ill fare; misfortune.
35424 misfashion MISFASH'ION, v.t. To form wrong.
35425 misfeasance MISFE'ASANCE, n. misfe'zance. In law, a trespass; a wrong done.
35426 misform MISFORM', v.t. To make of an ill form; to put in an ill shape.
35427 misfortune MISFOR'TUNE, n. Ill fortune; ill luck; calamity; an evil or cross accident; as loss of property at ...
35428 misfortuned MISFOR'TUNED, a. Unfortunate.
35429 misgive MISGIVE, v.t. misgiv'. [See Give.] To fill with doubt; to deprive of confidence; to fail; usually ...
35430 misgiving MISGIV'ING, ppr. Filling with doubt or distrust; failing.MISGIV'ING, n. A failing of confidence; ...
35431 misgotten MISGOT'TEN, a. Unjustly obtained.
35432 misgovern MISGOV'ERN, v.t. To govern ill; to administer unfaithfully. Solyman charged him bitterly that he ...
35433 misgovernance MISGOV'ERNANCE, n. Ill government; disorder; irregularity.
35434 misgoverned MISGOV'ERNED, pp. Ill governed; badly administered.1. Rude; unrestrained; as rude, misgoverned ...
35435 misgovernment MISGOV'ERNMENT, n. Ill administration of public affairs.1. Ill management in private affairs.2. ...
35436 misgraff MISGR`AFF, v.t. To graft amiss.
35437 misground MISGROUND', v.t. To found erroneously.
35438 misguidance MISGUI'DANCE, n. Wrong direction; guidance into error.
35439 misguide MISGUI'DE, v.t. To lead or guide into error; to direct ill; as, to misguide the understanding or ...
35440 misguided MISGUI'DED, pp. Let astray by evil counsel or wrong direction; as a misguided prince.
35441 misguiding MISGUI'DING, ppr. Giving wrong direction to; leading into error.
35442 misgum MIS'GUM
35443 misgurn MIS'GURN, n. An anguilliform fish about the size of a common eel.
35444 mishap MISHAP', n. Ill chance; evil accident; ill luck; misfortune. Secure from worldly chances and ...
35445 mishappen MISHAP'PEN, v.i. To happen ill.
35446 mishear MISHE'AR, v.t. To mistake in hearing.
35447 mishna MISH'NA, n. A collection or digest of Jewish traditions and explanations of Scripture.
35448 mishnic MISH'NIC, a. Pertaining or relating to the Mishna.
35449 misimprove MISIMPROVE, v.t. misimproov'. To improve to a bad purpose; to abuse; as, to misimprove time, ...
35450 misimproved MISIMPROVED, pp. Used to a bad purpose.
35451 misimprovement MISIMPROVEMENT, n. misimproov'ment. Ill use or employment; improvement to a bad purpose.
35452 misinfer MISINFER', v.t. To draw a wrong inference.
35453 misinform MISINFORM', v.t. To give erroneous information to; to communicate an incorrect statement of facts.
35454 misinformation MISINFORMA'TION, n. Wrong informations; false account or intelligence received.
35455 misinformed MISINFORM'ED, pp. Wrongly informed.
35456 misinformer MISINFORM'ER, n. One that gives wrong information.
35457 misinforming MISINFORM'ING, ppr. Communicating erroneous information to.
35458 misinstruct MISINSTRUCT', v.t. To instruct amiss.
35459 misinstruction MISINSTRUC'TION, n. Wrong instruction.
35460 misintelligence MISINTEL'LIGENCE, n. Wrong information; disagreement.
35461 misinterpret MISINTER'PRET, v.t. To interpret erroneously; to understand or to explain in a wrong sense.
35462 misinterpretation MISINTERPRETA'TION, n. The act of interpreting erroneously.
35463 misinterpreted MISINTER'PRETED, a. Erroneously understood or explained.
35464 misinterpreter MISINTER'PRETER, n. One who interprets erroneously.
35465 misinterpreting MISINTER'PRETING, ppr. Erroneously interpreting.
35466 misjoin MISJOIN', v.t. To join unfitly or improperly.
35467 misjoined MISJOIN'ED, pp. Improperly united.
35468 misjoining MISJOIN'ING, ppr. Joining unfitly or improperly.
35469 misjudge MISJUDGE, v.t. misjudg'. To mistake in judging of; to judge erroneously.MISJUDGE, v.i. misjudg'. ...
35470 misjudged MISJUDG'ED, pp. Judged erroneously.
35471 misjudging MISJUDG'ING, ppr. Judging erroneously of; forming a wrong opinion or inference.
35472 misjudgment MISJUDG'MENT, n. A wrong or unjust determination.
35473 miskin MIS'KIN, n. A little bagpipe.
35474 miskindle MISKIN'DLE, v.t. To kindle amiss; to inflame to a bad purpose.
35475 mislaid MISLA'ID, pp. Laid in a wrong place, or place not recollected; lost.
35476 mislay MISLA'Y, v.t. To lay in a wrong place. The fault is generally mislaid upon nature.1. To lay in a ...
35477 mislayer MISLA'YER, n. One that lays in a wrong place; one that loses.
35478 mislaying MISLA'YING, ppr. Laying in a wrong place, or place not remembered; losing.
35479 misle MISLE, v.i. mis'l. [from mist, and properly mistle.]To rain in very fine drops, like a thick mist.
35480 mislead MISLE'AD, v.t. pret. and pp. misled. [See Lead.]To lead into a wrong way or path; to lead astray; ...
35481 misleader MISLE'ADER, n. One who leads into error.
35482 misleading MISLE'ADING, ppr. Leading into error; causing to err; deceiving.
35483 misled MISLED', pp. of mislead. Let into error; led a wrong way. --To give due light To the misled and ...
35484 misletoe MISLETOE, n. mis'lto. A plant or shrub that grows on trees. It is of the genus Viscum. The berry ...
35485 mislike MISLI'KE, v.t. To dislike; to disapprove; to have aversion to; as, to mislike a man or an ...
35486 misliked MISLI'KED, pp. Disliked; disapproved.
35487 misliker MISLI'KER, n. One that dislikes.
35488 misliking MISLI'KING, ppr. Disliking; disapproving.
35489 mislin MISLIN, [See Meslin.]
35490 mislive MISLIVE, v.i.. misliv'. To live amiss. [Not used.]
35491 misluck MISLUCK', n. Ill luck; misfortune.
35492 misly MIS'LY, a. [See Misle and Mist.] Raining in very small drops.
35493 mismanage MISMAN'AGE, v.t. To manage ill; to administer improperly; as, to mismanage public ...
35494 mismanaged MISMAN'AGED, pp. Ill managed or conducted.
35495 mismanager MISMAN'AGER, n. One that manages ill.
35496 mismanaging MISMAN'AGING, ppr. Managing ill.
35497 mismanagment MISMAN'AGMENT, n. Ill or improper management; ill conduct; as the mismanagement of public or ...
35498 mismark MISM`ARK, v.t. To mark with the wrong token; to mark erroneously.
35499 mismarked MISM`ARKED, pp. Wrongly marked.
35500 mismarking MISM`ARKING, ppr. Marking erroneously.
35501 mismatch MISMATCH', v.t. To match unsuitably.
35502 mismatched MISMATCH'ED, pp. Unsuitably matched; ill joined.
35503 mismatching MISMATCH'ING, ppr. Matching in an unsuitable manner.
35504 misname MISNA'ME, v.t. To call by the wrong name.
35505 misnamed MISNA'MED, pp. Called by a wrong name.
35506 misnaming MISNA'MING, ppr. Calling by a wrong name.
35507 misnomer MISNO'MER,n. In law, the mistaking of the true name of a person; a misnaming. [Misnosmer, as ...
35508 misobedience MISOBE'DIENCE, n. Erroneous obedience or disobedience. [Not used.]
35509 misobserve MISOBSERVE, v.t. misobzerv'. To observe inaccurately; to mistake in observing.
35510 misogamist MISOG'AMIST, n. [Gr. to hate, and marriage.] A hater of marriage.
35511 misogynist MISOG'YNIST, n. [Gr. to hate, and woman.] A woman hater. [Unusual.]
35512 misogyny MISOG'YNY, n. [supra.] Hatred of the female sex.
35513 misopinion MISOPIN'ION, n. Erroneous opinion.
35514 misorder MISOR'DER, v.t. To order ill; to manage erroneously.1. To manage ill; to conduct badly.MISOR'DER, ...
35515 misorderly MISOR'DERLY, a. Irregular; disorderly.
35516 mispell MISPELL, MISPEND, &c. [See Miss-spell, Miss-spend.]
35517 mispend MISPELL, MISPEND, &c. [See Miss-spell, Miss-spend.]
35518 mispersuade MISPERSUA'DE, v.t. To persuade amiss, or to lead to a wrong notion.
35519 mispersuasion MISPERSUA'SION, n. A false persuasion; wrong notion or opinion.
35520 mispikel MISPIK'EL, n. Arsenical pyrite; an ore of arsenic, containing this metal in combination with iron, ...
35521 misplace MISPLA'CE, v.t. To put in a wrong place; as, the book is misplaced.1. To place on an improper ...
35522 misplaced MISPLA'CED, pp. Put in a wrong place, or on an improper object.
35523 misplacing MISPLA'CING, ppr. Putting in a wrong place, or on a wrong object.
35524 misplead MISPLE'AD, v.i. To err in pleading.
35525 mispleading MISPLE'ADING, ppr. Making a mistake in pleading.MISPLE'ADING, n. A mistake in pleading.
35526 mispoint MISPOINT', v.t. To point improperly; to err in punctuation.
35527 misprint MISPRINT', v.t. To mistake in printing; to print wrong.MISPRINT', n. A mistake in printing; a ...
35528 misprinted MISPRINT'ED, pp. Erroneously printed.
35529 misprinting MISPRINT'ING, ppr. Printing wrong.
35530 misprise MISPRI'SE
35531 misprision MISPRISION, n. misprizh'un. [supra.] Neglect; contempt.1. In law, any high offense under the ...
35532 misprize MISPRI'ZE, v.t.1. To mistake.2. To slight or undervalue. O for those vanish'd hours, so much ...
35533 misproceeding MISPROCEE'DING, n. Wrong or irregular proceeding.
35534 misprofess MISPROFESS', v.t. To make a false profession; to make pretensions to skill which is not possessed.
35535 mispronounce MISPRONOUNCE, v.t. mispronouns'. To pronounce erroneously; as, to mispronounce a word, a name, ...
35536 mispronunciation MISPRONUNCIA'TION, n. A wrong or improper pronunciation.
35537 misproportion MISPROPO'RTION, v.t. To err in proportioning one thing to another; to join without due proportion.
35538 misproud MISPROUD', v. Vitiously proud. [Not used.]
35539 misquotation MISQUOTA'TION, n. An erroneous quotation; the act of quoting wrong.
35540 misquote MISQUO'TE, v.t. To quote erroneously; to cite incorrectly.
35541 misquoted MISQUO'TED, pp. Incorrectly quoted or cited.
35542 misquoting MISQUO'TING, ppr. Quoting or citing erroneously.
35543 misrate MISRA'TE, v.t. To rate erroneously; to estimate falsely.
35544 misrecital MISRECI'TAL, n. An inaccurate recital.
35545 misrecite MISRECI'TE, v.t. To recite erroneously.
35546 misrecited MISRECI'TED, pp. Recited incorrectly.
35547 misreciting MISRECI'TING, ppr. Reciting erroneously.
35548 misreckon MISRECK'ON, v.t. To reckon or compute wrong.
35549 misreckoned MISRECK'ONED, pp. Reckoned or computed erroneously.
35550 misreckoning MISRECK'ONING, ppr. Reckoning wrong; and as a noun, an erroneous computation.
35551 misrelate MISRELA'TE, v.t. To relate falsely or inaccurately.
35552 misrelated MISRELA'TED, pp. Erroneously related or told.
35553 misrelating MISRELA'TING, ppr. Relating or telling erroneously.
35554 misrelation MISRELA'TION, n. Erroneous relation or narration.
35555 misremember MISREMEM'BER, v.t. To mistake in remembering; not to remember correctly.
35556 misremembered MISREMEM'BERED, pp. Inaccurately recollected.
35557 misremembering MISREMEM'BERING, ppr. Remembering inaccurately.
35558 misreport MISREPORT, v.t. To report erroneously; to give an incorrect account of.MISREPORT, n. An erroneous ...
35559 misreported MISREPORTED, pp. Incorrectly reported.
35560 misreporting MISREPORTING, ppr. Reporting incorrectly.
35561 misrepresent MISREPRESENT', v.t. To represent falsely or incorrectly; to give a false or erroneous ...
35562 misrepresentation MISREPRESENTA'TION, n. The act of giving a false or erroneous representation.1. A false or ...
35563 misrepresented MISREPRESENT'ED, pp. Falsely or erroneously represented.
35564 misrepresenter MISREPRESENT'ER, n. One who gives a false or erroneous account.
35565 misrepresenting MISREPRESENT'ING, ppr. Giving a false or erroneous representation.[Note. This word is so ...
35566 misrepute MISREPU'TE, v.t. To have in wrong estimation.
35567 misreputed MISREPU'TED, pp. or a. Erroneously reputed.
35568 misrule MISRU'LE, n. Disorder; confusion; tumult from insubordination. Enormous riot and misrule--1. ...
35569 misruly MISRU'LY, a. Unruly; ungovernable; turbulent.
35570 miss MISS, n.1. The title of a young woman or girl; as little masters and misses.2. A kept mistress; a ...
35571 missal MIS'SAL, n. The Romish mass-book.
35572 missay MISSA'Y, v.t. To say wrong; to slander. [Little used.]MISSA'Y, v.i. To speak ill.
35573 missaying MISSA'YING, n. Wrong expression.
35574 misseem MISSEE'M, v.i. To make a false appearance.1. To misbecome.