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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: z

Please click on the partial definition to see the complete definition
ID Word Definition
62893 z Z, the last letter of the English Alphabet, is a sibilant articulation, and is merely a vocal S. It ...
62894 zabaism ZABAISM. [See Sabianism.]
62895 zaccho ZACCHO, n. The lowest part of the pedestal of a column.
62896 zaffer ZAFFER, n. The residuum of cobalt, after the sulphur, arsenic and other volatile matters have been ...
62897 zany ZANY, n. A merry andrew; a buffoon.
62898 zapote ZAPOTE, n. In Mexico, the generic name of fruits which are roundish and contain a hard stone; the ...
62899 zarnich ZARNICH, n. [See Arsenic.] The name of a genus of fossils, which are inflammable, of a plain ...
62900 zea ZEA, n. The generic name of maiz.
62901 zeal ZEAL, n. [Gr., L.] Passionate ardor in the pursuit of any thing. In general, zeal is an eagerness ...
62902 zealot ZEALOT, n. Zelot. One who engages warmly in any cause, and pursues his object with earnestness and ...
62903 zealotical ZEALOTICAL, a. Ardently zealous. [Little used.]
62904 zealous ZEALOUS, a. Zelus. Warmly engaged or ardent in the pursuit of an object.Being thus saved himself, ...
62905 zealously ZEALOUSLY, adv. Zelusly. With passionate ardor; with eagerness.It is good to be zealously affected ...
62906 zealousness ZEALOUSNESS, n. Zelusness. The quality of being zealous; zeal.
62907 zebra ZEBRA, n. An animal of the genus Equus, beautifully marked with stripes; a native of Africa.
62908 zebu ZEBU, n. A variety of the common ox, with a hump on the shoulders. It is found in the East Indies ...
62909 zechin ZECHIN, n. A Venetian gold coin; usually written sequin, which see. If named from Zecha, the place ...
62910 zedoary ZEDOARY, n. A medicinal root, belonging to a plant growing in the East Indies, whose leaves ...
62911 zeine ZEINE, n. A substance of a yellowish color, soft, insipid, and elastic, procured from the seeds of ...
62912 zemindar ZEMINDAR, n. [from zem, zemin, land.] In India, a feudatory or landholder who governs a district of ...
62913 zemindary ZEMINDARY, n. The jurisdiction of a zemindar.
62914 zend ZEND, n. A language that formerly prevailed in Persia.
62915 zendavesta ZENDAVESTA, n. Among the Persees, a sacred book ascribed to Zoroaster, and reverenced as a bible, ...
62916 zenith ZENITH, n. That point in the visible celestial hemisphere, which is vertical to the spectator, and ...
62917 zeolite ZEOLITE, n. [Gr., to boil, to foam; stone.] A mineral, so named by Cronstedt from its intumescence ...
62918 zeolitic ZEOLITIC, a. Pertaining to zeolite; consisting of zeolite, or resembling it.
62919 zeolitiform ZEOLITIFORM, a. Having the form of zeolite.
62920 zephyr ZEPHYR, n. [L., Gr.] The west wind; and peotically, any soft, mild, gentle breeze. The poets ...
62921 zerda ZERDA, n. An animal of the canine genus, found in the desert of Zaara, beyond mount Atlas. It is ...
62922 zero ZERO, n. Cipher; nothing. The point of a thermometer from which it is graduated. Zero, in the ...
62923 zest ZEST, n. 1. A piece of orange or lemon peel, used to give flavor to liquor; or the fine thin oil ...
62924 zeta ZETA, n. 1. A Greek letter.2. A little closet or chamber, with pipes running along the walls, to ...
62925 zetetic ZETETIC, a. [Gr., to seek.] That seeks; that proceeds by inquiry. The zetetic method in ...
62926 zeugma ZEUGMA, n. [Gr., to join. See Yoke.] A figure in grammar by which an adjective or verb which agrees ...
62927 zibet ZIBET, n. [See Civet.] AN animal of the genus Viverra; the ash-gray weasel, striated with black ...
62928 zigzag ZIGZAG, a. Having short turns.ZIGZAG, n. Something that has short turns or angles.ZIGZAG, v.t. To ...
62929 zimome ZIMOME, ZYMOME, n. [Gr.] One of the constituents of gluten.
62930 zink ZINK, n. [G. The common orthography, zine, is erroneous.] A metal of a brilliant white color, with ...
62931 zinkiferous ZINKIFEROUS, a. [zink and L. Fero.] Producing zink; as zinkiferous ore.
62932 zinky ZINKY, a. Pertaining to zink, or having its appearance.Some effervesce with acids, some not, though ...
62933 zircon ZIRCON, n. Called also jargon of Ceylon, a mineral originally found in Ceylon, in the sands of ...
62934 zirconia ZIRCONIA, n. A peculiar earth obtained from the gem zircon; a fine white powder.
62935 zirconite ZIRCONITE, n. A variety of the zircon.
62936 zirconium ZIRCONIUM, n. The metallic basis of zirconia.
62937 zivolo ZIVOLO, n. A bird resembling the yellow hammer, and by some considered as the same species.
62938 zizel ZIZEL, n. The suslik or earless marmot, a small quadruped found in Poland and the south of Russia.
62939 zocco ZOCCO, ZOCLE, ZOCCOLO, n. [L., a sock.] A square body under the base of a pedestal, &c. Serving for ...
62940 zoccolo ZOCCO, ZOCLE, ZOCCOLO, n. [L., a sock.] A square body under the base of a pedestal, &c. Serving for ...
62941 zocle ZOCCO, ZOCLE, ZOCCOLO, n. [L., a sock.] A square body under the base of a pedestal, &c. Serving for ...
62942 zodiac ZODIAC, n. [L, Gr., an animal.] A broad circle in the heavens, containing the twelve signs through ...
62943 zodiacal ZODIACAL, a. Pertaining to the zodiac.Zodiacal light, a luminous track or space in the heavens, ...
62944 zoisite ZOISITE, n. [from Van Zois, its discoverer.] A mineral regarded as a variety of epidote. It occurs ...
62945 zone ZONE, n. [L., Gr.] 1. A girdle.An embroiderd zone surrounds her waist.2. In geography, a division ...
62946 zoned ZONED, a. Wearing a zone.
62947 zonnar ZONNAR, n. A belt or girdle, which the Christians and Jews in the Levat are obliged to wear, to ...
62948 zoographer ZOOGRAPHER, n. [See Zoography.] One who describes animals, their forms and habits.
62949 zoographical ZOOGRAPHICAL, a. Pertaining to the description of animals.
62950 zoography ZOOGRAPHY, n. [Gr., an animal; to describe.] A description of animals, their forms and habits. [But ...
62951 zoolite ZOOLITE, n. [Gr., an animal; stone.] An animal substance petrified or fossil.
62952 zoological ZOOLOGICAL, a. [from zoology.] Pertaining to zoology, or the science of animals.
62953 zoologically ZOOLOGICALLY, adv. According to the principles of zoology.
62954 zoologist ZOOLOGIST, n. [from zoology.] One who is well versed in the natural history of animals, or who ...
62955 zoology ZOOLOGY, n. [Gr., an animal; discourse.] A treatise on animals, or the science of animals; that ...
62956 zoonic ZOONIC, a. [Gr., an animal.] Pertaining to animals; as the zoonic acid, obtained from animal ...
62957 zoonomy ZOONOMY, n. [Gr., an animal; law.] The laws of animal life, or the science which treats of the ...
62958 zoophite ZOOPHITE. [See Zoophyte.]
62959 zoophoric ZOOPHORIC, a. [Gr., an animal; to bear.] The zoophoric column is one which supports the figure of ...
62960 zoophorus ZOOPHORUS, n. [supra.] In ancient architecture, the same with the frieze in modern architecture; a ...
62961 zoophyte ZOOPHYTE, n. [Gr., an animal; a plant.] In natural history, a body supposed to partake of the ...
62962 zoophytological ZOOPHYTOLOGICAL, a. Pertaining to zoophytology.
62963 zoophytology ZOOPHYTOLOGY, n. [zoophyte, Gr., discourse.] The natural history of zoophytes.
62964 zootomist ZOOTOMIST, n. [See Zootomy.] One who dissects the bodies of brute animals; a comparative anatomist.
62965 zootomy ZOOTOMY, n. [Gr., an animal; to cut.] Anatomy; particularly, the dissecting of bodies of beasts or ...
62966 zoril ZORIL, n. A fetid animal of the weasel kind, found in South America.
62967 zuffolo ZUFFOLO, n. [L.] A little flute or flageolet, especially that which is used to teach birds.
62968 zumate ZUMATE, n. [See Zumic.] A combination of the zumic acid and a salifiable base.
62969 zumic ZUMIC, a. [Gr., ferment.] The zumic acid is procured from many accescent vegetable substances.
62970 zumological ZUMOLOGICAL, a. [See Zumology.] Pertaining to zumology.
62971 zumologist ZUMOLOGIST, n. One who is skilled in the fermentation of liquors.
62972 zumology ZUMOLOGY, n. [Gr., ferment; to ferment; discourse.] A treatise on the fermentation of liquors, or ...
62973 zumosimeter ZUMOSIMETER, n. [Gr., fermentation; to measure.] An instrument proposed by Swammerdam for ...
62974 zurlite ZURLITE, n. A newly discovered Vesuvian mineral, whose primitive form is a cube, or according to ...
62975 zygodactylous ZYGODACTYLOUS, a. [Gr., to join; a finger.] Having the toes disposed in pairs; distinguishing an ...
62976 zygomatic
62977 zymome ZIMOME, ZYMOME, n. [Gr.] One of the constituents of gluten.
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undergone

UNDERGONE, pp. undergawn'. Borne; suffered; sustained; endured. Who can tell how many evils and pains he has undergone?

About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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What is reissue? Patent law states "On taking up an application for examination or a patent in a reexamination proceeding, the examiner shall make a thorough study thereof and shall make a thorough investigation of the available prior art relating to the subject matter of the claimed invention." This means that prior art could disqualify your application for a patent.
Patent Searching 101: A Patent Search Tutorial Inventors and entrepreneurs who are looking to cut costs frequently want to do their own search. This is a wise first move, but you really need to be careful. It is quite common for inventors to search and find nothing even when there are things that could and would be found by a professional searcher. So while it makes sense to do your own search first, be careful relying on your own search to justify spending the thousands of dollars you will need to spend to ultimately obtain a patent. In other words, nothing in this article should be interpreted as me suggesting that inventors can or should forgo a professional patent search. There is simply no comparison between an inventor done patent search and a patent search done by a pro. Having said that, every inventor should spend time searching and looking if for no other reason than to familiarize themselves with the prior art. Of course, if you can find something that is too close on your own you save time and money and can move on to whatever invention/project is next. Another thing you MUST know about when you use Google Patent Search is that there are also some holes in the database. I have specifically looked for patents I know to exist and cannot always find them. I have heard the same experience from other patent attorneys and agents. Additionally, the most recent patents are not available on Google. What this means is you cannot only rely on Google, but you still must use Google. The Google database covers patents that are issued all the way back to US Patent No. 1. This scope is much broader than either Free Patents or the USPTO . So while you might not find everything, while it is difficult to specifically narrow your search, you still really need to check yourself using the Google database to see if there are old references that might be on point. In this case there are not many to choose from. Many times, however, the list will contain hundreds or even thousands of patents depending upon the popularity of the term or phrase selected. For example, if you search "SPEC/thermos", you will find hundreds of patents that use this word in the specification. In fact, at the time this sample search was conducted (March 16, 2012) no fewer than 970 US patents have the word "thermos" in the specification, and that is only for patents issued since 1976. So what should you do now? If you find too many patents, rework the specification field search. For example, if your search were "SPEC/thermos and SPEC/beverage" you get down to 200 US patents. Ultimately, upon receiving manageable results, just click on several of the patents. The key, however, is to start off broad and then narrow your way down to those that are the most likely relevant references. Also remember that it is critically important to figure out what things are called. I cannot stress this enough. You need to use different names and labels. You will find that patent attorneys typically call certain features by a select few names. These names are not always obvious, but once you figure out what the industry calls something you are far more likely to find relevant patents.
Patenting and USPTO Patent Applications - What is a patent? What kinds of patents are there? What is the USPTO? Some people may confuse patents, copyrights, and trademarks. Although there may be some similarities, they are different and serve different purposes. Read What Do I Need? or Understanding Intellectual Property if you need to understand the differences better. Patents and trademarks are both issued by the USPTO.
Patent Attorney Directed Search Going through a lawyer to search patents will cost the least amount of time and the most money. Patent attorneys employ professional researchers. You hire the attorney, and the attorney gets someone to conduct the search. Then the attorney adds a mark-up to the search bill, sometimes as much as several hundred percent. Many lawyers cloak this in the term handling fee. To save this extra expense, some inventors hire their own researcher or do the search themselves. Most patent attorneys don't render an opinion based on a search conducted by anyone other than their own searcher. However, you can tell a lawyer that if they won't accept the work of your search firm, or searches done by yourself, you will go elsewhere where such work would be acceptable. If you're paying the bills, and you're willing to take the risk, the lawyer shouldn't have a problem. Now, if the search results show no prior art in my field of invention, you don't need an attorney to tell me the coast is clear. Conversely, if a search reveals prior art that's spot on your invention, you don't need an attorney to tell me my idea has been done before. You might, on the other hand, hire an attorney to help end-run an existing patent through the use of language in the application. If you hire a lawyer, get a quote in advance. The fee will be based on how all-encompassing you want the search to be.
Meaning of Novel, Nonobvious, and Useful New and Novel: For a United States patent the invention must never have been made public in any way, anywhere in the world, a year before the date on which an application for a patent is filed. Original and Nonobvious: An invention involves an inventive step if, when compared with what is already known, it would not be obvious to someone with a good knowledge and experience of the subject, for example, if you just make cosmetic changes that is obvious. Useful: This means that the invention must take the practical form of an apparatus or device, it has to do something.

Learn more about U.S. patents:

Patent # 7,654,321 ()
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