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Friday - October 31, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: o

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ID Word Definition
37560 o O is the fifteenth letter, and the fourth vowel in the English Alphabet. The shape of this letter ...
37561 oaf OAF, n. [said to be a corruption of ouph or elf, a fairy or demon, and to denote a foolish child ...
37562 oafish OAFISH, a. Stupid; dull; doltish. [Little used.]
37563 oafishness OAFISHNESS, n. Stupidity; dullness; folly. [Little used.]
37565 oak-apple OAK-APPLE, n. A kind of spungy excrescence on oak leaves or tender branches, &c. produced in ...
37564 oak OAK, n. [It is probably that the first syllable, oak, was originally an adjective expressing some ...
37566 oaken OAKEN, a. o'kn.1. Made of oak or consisting of oak; as an oaken plank or bench; an oaken bower.2. ...
37567 oakenpin OAKENPIN, n. An apple; so called from its hardness.
37568 oakling OAKLING, n. A young oak.
37569 oakum OAKUM, n. The substance of old ropes untwisted and pulled into loose hemp; used for caulking the ...
37570 oaky OAKY, a. [from oak.] Hard; firm; strong.
37571 oar OAR, n. An instrument for rowing boats, being a piece of timber round or square at one end, and ...
37572 oary OARY, a. Having the form or use of an oar; as the swan's oary feet.
37573 oast OAST,
37575 oat-thistle OAT-THISTLE, n. A plant. [Not used.]
37574 oat OAT, n. A plant of the genus Avena, and more usually, the seed of the plant. The word is commonly ...
37576 oatcake OATCAKE, n. A cake made of the meal of oats.
37577 oaten OATEN, a. o'tn. 1. Made of oatmeal; as oaten cakes.2. Consisting of an oat straw or stem; as an ...
37578 oath OATH, n. A solemn affirmation or declaration, made with an appeal to God for the truth of what is ...
37579 oathable OATHABLE, a. Capable of having an oath administered to. [Not used.]
37580 oathbreaking OATHBREAKING, n. The violation of an oath; perjury.
37581 oatmalt OATMALT, n. Malt made of oats.
37582 oatmeal OATMEAL, n. 1. Meal of oats produced by grinding or pounding.2. A plant. [Not used.]
37583 ob OB, a Latin preposition, signifies primarily, in front, before, and hence against, towards; as in ...
37584 obambulate OBAM'BULATE, v.i. [L. obambulo.] To walk about. [Not used.]
37585 obambulation OBAMBULA'TION, n. A walking about. [Not used.]
37586 obbligato OBBLIGA'TO, an. A term in music, signifying on purpose for the instrument named.
37587 obcordate OBCORD'ATE, a. [L. from ob and cor, the heart.]In botany, shaped like a heart, with the apex ...
37588 obdormition OBDORMI'TION, n. [L. obdormio, to sleep.] Sleep; sound sleep. [Little used.]
37589 obduce OBDU'CE, v.t. [L. obduco; ob and duco, to lead.] To draw over, as a covering. [Little used.]
37590 obduct OBDUCT', v.t. [L. obduco.] To draw over; to cover. [Not in use.]
37591 obduction OBDUC'TION, n. [L. obductio.] The act of drawing over, as a covering; the act of laying over. ...
37592 obduracy OB'DURACY, n. [See Obdurate.] Invincible hardness of heart; impenitence that cannot be subdued; ...
37593 obdurate OB'DURATE, a. [L. obduro, to harden; ob and duro.]1. Hardened in heart; inflexibly hard; ...
37594 obdurately OB'DURATELY, adv. Stubbornly; inflexibly; with obstinate impenitence.
37595 obdurateness OB'DURATENESS, n. Stubbornness; inflexible persistence in sin.
37596 obduration OBDURA'TION, n. The hardening of the heart; hardness of heart; stubbornness.
37597 obdure OBDU'RE, v.t. [L. obduro.] 1. To harden; to render obstinate in sin. [Little used.]2. To ...
37598 obdured OBDU'RED, pp. or a. Hardened; inflexible; impenitent.
37599 obduredness OBDU'REDNESS, n. Hardness of heart; stubbornness. [Little used.]
37600 obedience OBE'DIENCE, n. [L. obedientia. See Obey.]Compliance with a command, prohibition or known law and ...
37601 obedient OBE'DIENT, a. [L. obediens.] Submissive to authority; yielding compliance with commands, orders ...
37602 obediential OBEDIEN'TIAL, a. According to the rule of obedience; in compliance with commands; as obediential ...
37603 obediently OBE'DIENTLY, adv. With obedience; with due submission to commands; with submission or compliance ...
37604 obeisance OBE'ISANCE, n. [L. obedio.]A bow or courtesy; an act of reverence made by an inclination of the ...
37605 obeliscal OBELIS'CAL, a. In the form of an obelisk.
37606 obelisk OB'ELISK, n. [L. obeliscus; Gr. a spit.]1. A truncated, quadrangular and slender pyramid ...
37607 obequitate OBEQ'UITATE, v.i. [L. obequito; ob and equito, to ride; equus, a horse.] To ride about. [Not ...
37608 obequitation OBEQUITA'TION, n. The act of riding about. [Not used.]
37609 oberration OBERRA'TION, n. [L. oberro; ob and erro, to wander.] The act of wandering about. [Little used.]
37610 obese OBE'SE, a. [L. obesus.] Fat; fleshy. [Little used.]
37611 obeseness OBE'SENESS,
37612 obesity OBES'ITY, n. [L. obesitas.] Fatness; fleshiness; incumbrance of flesh.
37613 obey OBEY, v.t. [L. obedio; Gr.]1. To comply with the commands, orders or instructions of a superior, ...
37614 obeyed OBEYED, pp. Complied with; performed; as a command; yielded to.
37615 obeyer OBEYER, n. One who yields obedience.
37616 obeying OBEYING, ppr. Complying with commands; submitting to.
37617 obfirm OBFIRM, obferm',
37618 obfirmate OBFIRMATE, obferm'ate. v.t. To make firm; to harden in resolution. [Not used.]
37619 obfuscate OBFUS'CATE, v.t. [L. ob and fusco, to obscure.] To darken; to obscure.
37620 obfuscated OBFUS'CATED, pp. Darkened in color.
37621 obfuscation OBFUS'CATION, n. The act of darkening or rendering obscure; a clouding.Obfuscations of the cornea.
37622 obit OB'IT, n. [L. obiit, obivit; ob and eo, to go.] Properly, death; decease; hence, funeral ...
37623 obitual OBIT'UAL, a. [L. obeo, to die; obitus, death.] Pertaining to obits, or the days when funeral ...
37624 obituary OBIT'UARY, n. 1. A list of the dead, or a register of obitual anniversary days, when service is ...
37626 object-glass OB'JECT-GLASS, n. In a telescope or microscope, the glass placed at the end of a tube next the ...
37625 object OB'JECT, n. [L. objectum, objectus. See the Verb.]1. That about which any power or faculty is ...
37627 objectable OBJECT'ABLE, a. That may be opposed.
37628 objection OBJEC'TION, n. [L. objectio.]1. The act of objecting.2. That which is presented in opposition; ...
37629 objectionable OBJEC'TIONABLE, a. Justly liable to objections; such as may be objected against.
37630 objective OBJECT'IVE, a. 1. Belonging to the object; contained in the object.Objective certainty, is when ...
37631 objectively OBJECT'IVELY, adv. 1. In the manner of an object; as a determinate idea objectively in the ...
37632 objectiveness OBJECT'IVENESS, n. The state of being an object.Is there such a motion or objectiveness of ...
37633 objector OBJECT'OR, n. One that objects; one that offers arguments or reasons in opposition to a ...
37634 objurgate OBJUR'GATE, v.t. [L. objurgo; ob and jurgo, to chide.] To chide; to reprove. [Not used.]
37635 objurgation OBJURGA'TION, n. [L. objurgatio.] The act of chiding by way of censure; reproof; reprehension. ...
37636 objurgatory OBJUR'GATORY, a. Containing censure or reproof; culpatory. [Little used.]
37637 oblada OBLA'DA, n. A fish of the sparus kind, variegated with longitudinal lines, and having a large ...
37638 oblate OBLA'TE, a. [L. oblatur, offero; ob and fero, to bear.]Flattened or depressed at the poles; as an ...
37639 oblateness OBLA'TENESS, n. The quality or state of being oblate.
37640 oblation OBLA'TION, n. [L. oblatio, from offero; ob and fero, to bear or bring.]Any thing offered or ...
37641 oblectate OBLEC'TATE, v.t. [L. oblecto.] To delight; to please highly. [Not used.]
37642 oblectation OBLECTA'TION, n. The act of pleasing highly; delight.
37643 obligate OB'LIGATE, v.t. [L. obligo; ob and ligo, to bind.]To bind, as one's self, in a moral and legal ...
37644 obligated OB'LIGATED, pp. Bound by contract or promise.
37645 obligating OB'LIGATING, ppr. Bound by covenant, contract, promise or bond.
37646 obligation OBLIGA'TION, n. [L. obligatio.]1. The binding power of a vow, promise, oath or contract, or of ...
37647 obligato OBLIGATO. [See Obbligato.]
37648 obligatory OB'LIGATORY, a. Binding in law or conscience; imposing duty; requiring performance or forbearance ...
37649 oblige OBLI'GE, v.t. pronounced as written, not oblege. [L. obligo; ob and ligo, to bind.]1. To ...
37650 obliged OBLI'GED, pp. Bound in duty or in law; compelled; constrained; favored; indebted.
37651 obligee OBLIGEE', n. The person to whom another is bound, or the person to whom a bond is given.
37652 obligement OBLI'GEMENT, n. Obligation. [Little used.]
37653 obliger OBLI'GER, n. One that obliges.
37654 obliging OBLI'GING, ppr.1. Binding in law or conscience; compelling; constraining.2. Doing a favor to.No ...
37655 obligingly OBLI'GINGLY, adv. With civility; kindly; complaisantly.
37656 obligingness OBLI'GINGNESS, n.1. Obligation. [Little used.]2. Civility; complaisance; disposition to exercise ...
37657 obligor OBLIGOR', n. The person who binds himself or gives his bond to another.
37658 oblike OBLI'KE, a. obli'ke. [L. obliquus;.]1. Deviating from a right line; not direct; not ...
37659 obliquation OBLIQUA'TION, n. [L. obliquo, from obliquus, oblique.]1. Declination from a strait line or ...
37660 oblique OBLI'QUE,
37661 obliquely OBLI'QUELY, adv. 1. In a line deviating from a right line; not directly; not ...
37662 obliqueness OBLI'QUENESS, n. Obliquity.
37663 obliquity OBLIQ'UITY, n. [L. obliquitas.]1. Deviation from a right line; deviation from parallelism or ...
37664 obliterate OBLIT'ERATE, v.t. [L. oblitero; ob and litera, letter.]1. To efface; to erase or blot out any ...
37665 obliterated OBLIT'ERATED, pp. Effaced; erased; worn out; destroyed.
37666 obliterating OBLIT'ERATING, ppr. Effacing; wearing out; destroying.
37667 obliteration OBLITERA'TION, n. The act of effacing; effacement; a blotting out or wearing out; extinction.
37668 oblivion OBLIV'ION, n. [L. oblivio.]1. Forgetfulness; cessation of remembrance.Among our crimes oblivion ...
37669 oblivious OBLIV'IOUS, a. [L. obliviosus.]1. Causing forgetfulness.The oblivious calm of indifference.Behold ...
37670 oblocutor OB'LOCUTOR, n. A gainsayer. [Not in use.]
37672 oblong-ovate OBLONG-OVATE, a. In botany, between oblong and ovate, but inclined to the latter.
37671 oblong OB'LONG, a. [L. oblongus.] Longer than broad.OB'LONG, n. A figure or solid which is longer than ...
37673 oblongish OB'LONGISH, a. Somewhat oblong.
37674 oblongly OB'LONGLY, a. In an oblong form.
37675 oblongness OB'LONGNESS, n. The state of being longer than broad.
37676 obloquious OBLO'QUIOUS, a. [See Obloquy.] Containing obloquy; reproachful. [Little used.]
37677 obloquy OB'LOQUY, n. [L. obloquor; ob and loquor, to speak.]1. Censorious speech; reproachful language; ...
37678 obluctation OBLUCTA'TION, n. [L. obluctor; ob and luctor, to struggle.]A struggling or striving against; ...
37679 obmutescence OBMUTES'CENCE, n. [L. obmutesco, to be silent.]1. Loss of speech; silence,2. A keeping silence.
37680 obnoxious OBNOX'IOUS, a. [L. obnoxius; ob and noxius, hurtful, from noceo.]1. Subject; answerable.The ...
37681 obnoxiously OBNOX'IOUSLY, adv. 1. In a state of subjection or liability.2. Reprehensibly; odiously; ...
37682 obnoxiousness OBNOX'IOUSNESS, n.1. Subjection or liableness to punishment.2. Odiousness; offensiveness. The ...
37683 obnubilate OBNU'BILATE, v.t. [L. obnubilor; ob and nubilo; nubes, mist, cloud.] To cloud; to obscure.
37684 obnubilation OBNUBILA'TION, n. The act or operation of making dark or obscure.
37685 obole OB'OLE, n. [L. obolus.] In pharmacy, the weight of ten grains or half a scruple.
37686 obolus OB'OLUS, n. [L. from G.] A small silver coin of Athens, the sixth part of a drachma, about two ...
37687 obovate OBO'VATE, a. In botany, inversely ovate; having the narrow end downward; as an obovate leaf.
37688 obreption OBREP'TION, n. [L. obrepo; ob and repo, to creep.]The act of creeping on with secrecy or by ...
37689 obreptitious OBREPTI'TIOUS, a. [supra.] Done or obtained by surprise; with secrecy or by concealment of the ...
37690 obscene OBSCE'NE, a. [L. obscaenus.]1. Offensive to chastity and delicacy; impure; expressing or ...
37691 obscenely OBSCE'NELY, adv. In a manner offensive to chastity or purity; impurely; unchastely.
37692 obsceneness OBSCE'NENESS,
37693 obscenity OBSCEN'ITY, n. [L. obscaenitas.]1. Impurity in expression or representation; that quality in ...
37694 obscuration OBSCURA'TION, n. [L. obscuratio.] 1. The act of darkening.2. The state of being darkened or ...
37695 obscure OBSCU'RE, a. [L. obscurus.]1. Dark; destitute of light.Whoso curseth his father or mother, his ...
37696 obscurely OBSCU'RELY, adv.1. Darkly; not clearly; imperfectly; as an object obscurely seen; obscurely ...
37697 obscureness OBSCU'RENESS,
37698 obscurity OBSCU'RITY, n. [L. obscuritas.]1. Darkness; want of light.We wait for light, but behold ...
37699 obsecrate OB'SECRATE, v.t. [L. obsecro.] To beseech; to intreat; to supplicate; to pray earnestly.
37700 obsecration OBSECRA'TION, n.1. Intreaty; supplication.2. A figure of rhetoric, in which the orator implores ...
37701 obsequent OB'SEQUENT, a. [L. obsequens.] Obedient; submissive to. [Little used.]
37702 obsequies OB'SEQUIES, n. plu. [L. obsequium, complaisance, from obsequor, to follow.]Funeral rites and ...
37703 obsequious OBSE'QUIOUS, a. [from L. obsequium, complaisance, from obsequor, to follow; ob and sequor.]1. ...
37704 obsequiously OBSE'QUIOUSLY, adv. 1. With ready obedience; with prompt compliance.They rise and with respectful ...
37705 obsequiousness OBSE'QUIOUSNESS, n. 1. Ready obedience; prompt compliance with the orders of a superior.2. ...
37706 observable OBSERV'ABLE, a. s as z. [See Observe.]1. That may be observed or noticed.2. Worthy of ...
37707 observably OBSERV'ABLY, adv. s as z. In a manner worthy of note.
37708 observance OBSERV'ANCE, n. s as z.1. The act of observing; the act of keeping or adhering to in practice; ...
37709 observanda OBSERVAND'A, n. plu. s as z. [L.] Things to be observed.
37710 observant OBSERV'ANT, a. s as z.1. Taking notice; attentively viewing or noticing; as an observant spectator ...
37711 observation OBSERVA'TION, n. s as z. [L. observatio. See Observe.]1. The act of observing or taking notice; ...
37712 observator OBSERVA'TOR, n. s as z.1. One that observes or takes notice.2. A remarker.
37713 observatory OBSERV'ATORY, n s as z.A place or building for making observations on the heavenly bodies; as the ...
37714 observe OBSERVE, v.t. obzerv'. [L. observo; ob and servo, to keep or hold. The sense is to hold in view, ...
37715 observed OBSERV'ED, pp. s as z. 1. Noticed by the eye or the mind.2. Kept religiously; celebrated; ...
37716 observer OBSERV'ER, n. s as z.1. One who observes; one that takes notice; particularly, one who looks to ...
37717 observing OBSERV'ING, ppr. s as z.1. Taking notice by the eye or the intellect.2. Remarking.3. Keeping; ...
37718 observingly OBSERV'INGLY, adv. s as z. Attentively; carefully; with close observation.
37719 obsess OBSESS', v.t. [L. obsideo, obsessus; ob and sedeo, to sit.] To besiege. [Not used.]
37720 obsession OBSESS'ION, n. [L. obsessio.] The act of besieging; the first attack of Satan antecedent to ...
37721 obsidian OBSID'IAN, n. A mineral of two kinds, translucent and transparent. The translucent has a velvet ...
37722 obsidional OBSID'IONAL, a. [L. obsidionalis; ob and sedeo, to sit.] Pertaining to a siege.
37723 obsignate OB'SIGNATE, v.t. [L. obsigno; ob and signo, to seal.] To seal up; to ratify. [Little used.]
37724 obsignation OBSIGNA'TION, n. The act of sealing; ratification by sealing; confirmation.
37725 obsignatory OBSIG'NATORY, a. Ratifying; confirming by sealing.
37726 obsolescent OBSOLES'CENT, a. [L. obsolesco, to go out of use.]Going out of use; passing into desuetude.All the ...
37727 obsolete OBSOLE'TE, a. [L. obsoletus.]1. Gone into disuse; disused; neglected; as an obsolete word; an ...
37728 obsoleteness OBSOLE'TENESS, n. 1. The state of being neglected in use; a state of desuetude.2. In botany, ...
37729 obstacle OB'STACLE, n. [L. obsto, to withstand; ob and sto.]That which opposes; any thing that stands in ...
37730 obstancy OB'STANCY, n. [L. obstantia; ob and sto.] Opposition; impediment; obstruction. [Not used.]
37731 obstetric OBSTET'RIC, a. [L. obstetrix, a midwife; ob and sto, to stand before.]Pertaining to midwifery, or ...
37732 obstetricate OBSTET'RICATE, v.i. [See Obstetric.] To perform the office of a midwife. [Little ...
37733 obstetrication OBSTETRICA'TION, n. 1. The act of assisting as a midwife.2. The office of a midwife.
37734 obstetrician OBSTETRI'CIAN, n. One skilled in the art of assisting women in parturition.
37735 obstetrics OBSTET'RICS, n. The art of assisting women in parturition; midwifery.
37736 obstinacy OB'STINACY, n. [L. obstinatio, from obsto, to stand against, to oppose; ob and sto.]1. A ...
37737 obstinate OB'STINATE, a. [L. obstinatus.] 1. Stubborn; pertinaciously adhering to an opinion or purpose; ...
37738 obstinately OB'STINATELY, adv. Stubbornly; pertinaciously; with fixedness of purpose not to be shaken, or not ...
37739 obstinateness OB'STINATENESS, n. Stubbornness; pertinacity in opinion or purpose; fixed determination.
37740 obstipation OBSTIPA'TION, n. [L. obstipo; ob and stipo, to crowd.]1. The act of stopping up; as a passage.2. ...
37741 obstreperous OBSTREP'EROUS, a. [L. obstreperus, from obstrepo, to roar; ob and strepo.]Loud; noisy; clamorous; ...
37742 obstreperously OBSTREP'EROUSLY, adv. Loudly; clamorously; with tumultuous noise.
37743 obstreperousness OBSTREP'EROUSNESS, n. Loudness; clamor; noisy turbulence.
37744 obstriction OBSTRIC'TION, n. [L. obstrictus, obstringo; ob and stringo, to strain.]Obligation; bond.
37745 obstruct OBSTRUCT', v.t. [L. obstruo; ob and struo, to set.]1. To block up; to stop up or close; as a way ...
37746 obstructed OBSTRUCT'ED, pp.1. Blocked up; stopped; as a passage.2. Hindered; impeded; as progress.3. ...
37747 obstructer OBSTRUCT'ER, n. One that obstructs or hinders.
37748 obstructing OBSTRUCT'ING, ppr. Blocking up; stopping; impeding; interrupting.
37749 obstruction OBSTRUC'TION, n. [L. obstructio.]1. The act of obstructing.2. Obstacle; impediment; any thing ...
37750 obstructive OBSTRUCT'IVE, a. Presenting obstacles; hindering; causing impediment.OBSTRUCT'IVE, n. Obstacle; ...
37751 obstruent OB'STRUENT, a. [L. obstruens.] Blocking up; hindering.OB'STRUENT, n. Any thing that obstructs ...
37752 obstupefaction OBSTUPEFAC'TION, n. [L. obstupefacio.] The act of making stupid or insensible. [See ...
37753 obstupefactive OBSTUPEFAC'TIVE, a. [L. obstupefacio.] Stupefying; rendering insensible, torpid or inert. ...
37754 obtain OBTA'IN, v.t. [L. obtineo; ob and teneo, to hold.]1. To get; to gain; to procure; in a general ...
37755 obtainable OBTA'INABLE, a. That may be obtained; that may be procured or gained.
37756 obtained OBTA'INED, pp. Gained; procured; acquired.
37757 obtainer OBTA'INER, n. One who obtains.
37758 obtaining OBTA'INING, ppr. Gaining; procuring; acquiring.
37759 obtainment OBTA'INMENT, n. The act of obtaining.
37760 obtend OBTEND', v.t. [L. obtendo; ob and tendo; literally, to stretch against or before.]1. To oppose; ...
37761 obtenebration OBTENEBRA'TION, n. [from L. ob and tenebrae, darkness.]A darkening; act of darkening; darkness.In ...
37762 obtension OBTEN'SION, n. The act of obtending. [Not used.]
37763 obtest OBTEST', v.t. [L. obtestor; ob and testor, to witness. To beseech; to supplicate. Obtest his ...
37764 obtestation OBTESTA'TION, n.1. Supplication; entreaty.2. Solemn injunction.
37765 obtesting OBTEST'ING, ppr. Beseeching; supplicating.
37766 obtrectation OBTRECTA'TION, n. [L. obtrectatio, from obtrecto; ob and tracto.]Slander; detraction; calumny. ...
37767 obtrude OBTRU'DE, v.t. [L. obltrudo; ob and trudo, Eng. to thrust.]1. To thrust in or on; to throw, crowd ...
37768 obtruded OBTRU'DED, pp. Thrust in by force or unsolicited.
37769 obtruder OBTRU'DER, n. One who obtrudes.
37770 obtruding OBTRU'DING, ppr. Thrusting in or on; entering uninvited.
37771 obtruncate OBTRUN'CATE, v.t. [L. obtrunco; ob and trunco, to cut off.]To deprive of a limb; to lop. [Little ...
37772 obtruncation OBTRUNCA'TION, n. The act of lopping or cutting off. [Little used.]
37773 obtrusion OBTRU'SION, n. s as z. [L. obtrudo, obtrusus.]The act of obtruding; a thrusting upon others by ...
37774 obtrusive OBTRU'SIVE, a. Disposed to obtrude any thing upon others; inclined to intrude or thrust one's self ...
37775 obtrusively OBTRU'SIVELY, adv. By way of obtrusion or thrusting upon others, or entering unsolicited.
37776 obtund OBTUND', v.t. [L. obtundo; ob and tundo, to beat.]To dull; to blunt; to quell; to deaden; to ...
37777 obturation OBTURA'TION, n. [L. obturatus, from obturo, to stop up.]The act of stopping by spreading over or ...
37778 obturator OB'TURATOR, n. In anatomy, the obturators are muscles which rise from the outer and inner side of ...
37779 obtusangular OBTUSANG'ULAR, a. [obtuse and angular.]Having angles that are obtuse, or larger than right angles.
37780 obtuse OBTU'SE, a. [L. obtusus, from obtundo, to beat against.]1. Blunt; not pointed or acute. Applied ...
37781 obtusely OBTU'SELY, adv. 1. Without a sharp point.2. Dully; stupidly.
37782 obtuseness OBTU'SENESS, n.1. Bluntness; as the obtuseness of an edge or a point.2. Dullness; want of quick ...
37783 obtusion OBTU'SION, n. s as z. 1. The act of making blunt.2. The state of being dulled or blunted; as the ...
37784 obumbrate OBUM'BRATE, v.t. [L. obumbro; ob and umbra, a shade.]To shade; to darken; to cloud. [Little ...
37785 obumbration OBUMBRA'TION, n. The act of darkening or obscuring.
37786 obvention OBVEN'TION, n. [L. obvenio, ob and venio, to come.]Something occasional; that which happens not ...
37787 obversant OBVERS'ANT, a. [L. obversans, obversor; ob and versor, to turn.]Conversant; familiar. [Not used.]
37788 obverse OBVERSE, a. obvers'. In botany, having the base narrower than the top; as a leaf.
37789 obvert OBVERT', v.t. [L. obverto; ob and verto, to turn.] To turn towards.
37790 obverted OBVERT'ED, pp. Turned towards.
37791 obverting OBVERT'ING, ppr. Turning towards.
37792 obviate OB'VIATE, v.t. [L. obvius; ob and via, way.]Properly, to meet in the way; to oppose; hence, to ...
37793 obviated OB'VIATED, pp. Removed, as objections or difficulties.
37794 obviating OB'VIATING, ppr. Removing, as objections in reasoning or planning.
37795 obvious OB'VIOUS, a. [L. obvus. See the Verb.]1. Meeting; opposed in front.I to the evil turn my obvious ...
37796 obviously OB'VIOUSLY, adv. 1. Evidently; plainly; apparently; manifestly. Men do not always pursue what is ...
37797 obviousness OB'VIOUSNESS, n. State of being plain or evident to the eye or the mind.
37798 obvolute OB'VOLUTE,
37799 obvoluted OB'VOLUTED, a. [L. obvolutus, obvolvo; ob and volvo, to roll.] In botany, obvolute foliation is ...
37800 occasion OCCA'SION, n. s as z. [L. occasio, from oceido, to fall; ob and cado.]1. Properly, a falling, ...
37801 occasionable OCCA'SIONABLE, a. s as z. That may be caused or occasioned. [Little used.]
37802 occasional OCCA'SIONAL, a. s as z.1. Incidental; casual; occurring at times, but not regular or systematic; ...
37803 occasionally OCCA'SIONALLY, adv. s as z. According to incidental exigence; at times, as convenience requires ...
37804 occasioned OCCA'SIONED, pp. s as z. Caused incidentally; caused; produced.
37805 occasioner OCCA'SIONER, n. s as z. One that causes or produces, either incidentally or otherwise.He was the ...
37806 occasioning OCCA'SIONING, ppr. s as z. Causing incidentally or otherwise.
37807 occasive OCCA'SIVE, a. Falling; descending; western; pertaining to the setting sun.Amplitude is ortive or ...
37808 occecation OCCECA'TION, n. [L. occaecatio; ob and caeco, to blind.]The act of making blind. [Little used.]
37809 occident OC'CIDENT, n. [L. occidens, occido, to fall; ob and cade.]The west; the western quarter of the ...
37810 occidental OCCIDENT'AL, a. [L. occidentalis.] Western; opposed to oriental; pertaining to the western ...
37811 occiduous OCCID'UOUS, a. [L. occido, occiduus.] Western. [Little used.]
37812 occipital OCCIP'ITAL, a. [from L. occiput, the back part of the heat; ob and caput.]Pertaining to the back ...
37813 occiput OC'CIPUT, n. [L. ob and caput, head.] The hinder part of the head, or that part of the skull ...
37814 occision OCCIS'ION, n. s as z. [L. occisio, from occido, to kill; ob and caedo.]A killing; the act of ...
37815 occlude OCCLU'DE, v.t. [L. occludo; ob and cludo, claudo, to shut.]To shut up; to close. [Little used.]
37816 occluse OCCLU'SE, a. [L. occlusus.] Shut; closed. [Little used.]
37817 occlusion OCCLU'SION, n. s as z. [L. occlusio.] a shutting up; a closing.[This is an elegant word, though ...
37818 occult OCCULT', a. [L. occultus, occulo; ob and celo, to conceal.]Hidden from the eye or understanding; ...
37819 occultation OCCULTA'TION, n. [L. occultatio.]1. a hiding; also, the time a star or planet is hid from our ...
37820 occulted OCCULT'ED, a. Hid; secret. [Not used.]
37821 occultness OCCULT'NESS, n. the state of being concealed from view; secretness.
37822 occupancy OC'CUPANCY, n. [L. occupo, to take or seize; ob and capio, to seize.]1. The act of taking ...
37823 occupant OC'CUPANT, n.1. He that occupies or takes possession; he that has possession.2. In law, one that ...
37824 occupate OC'CUPATE, v.t. [L. occupo.] To hold; to possess; to take up. [Not used.]
37825 occupation OCCUPA'TION, n. [L. occupatio.] 1. The act of taking possession.2. Possession; a holding or ...
37826 occupier OC'CUPIER, n.1. One that occupies or takes possession.2. One who holds possession.3. One who ...
37827 occupy OC'CUPY, v.t. [L. occupo; ob and capio, to seize or take.]1. To take possession. The person who ...
37828 occupying OC'CUPYING, ppr. Taking or keeping possession; employing.
37829 occur OCCUR', v.i. [L. occurro; ob and curro, to run.]1. Primarily, to meet; to strike against; to ...
37830 occurrence OCCUR'RENCE, n. 1. Literally, a coming or happening; hence, any incident or accidental event; ...
37831 occurrent OCCUR'RENT, n. Incident; any thing that happens. Obs.
37832 occursion OCCUR'SION, n. [L. occursio, from occurro, to meet.] A meeting of bodies; a clash.
37833 ocean OCEAN, n. o'shun. [L. oceanus; Gr.; Heb. to encompass, whence a circle. This is probably an ...
37834 oceanic OCEANIC, a. oshean'ic. Pertaining to the ocean.
37835 ocellated O'CELLATED, a. [L. ocellatus, from ocellus, a little eye.]1. Resembling an eye.2. Formed with ...
37836 ocelot O'CELOT, n. the Mexican panther.
37837 ocher O'CHER, n. [L. ochra; Gr. from pale.]A variety of clay deeply colored by the oxyd of iron. Its ...
37838 ocherous O'CHEROUS, a. 1. Consisting of ocher; as ocherous matter.2. Resembling ocher; as an ocherous ...
37839 ochimy OCH'IMY, n. [corrupted from alchimy.] A mixed base metal.
37840 ochlocracy OCHLOC'RACY, n. [Gr. the people or a multitude, and to govern.]A form of government in which the ...
37841 ochrey O'CHREY, a. Partaking of ocher. [Not used.]
37842 ochroits OCH'ROITS, n. Cerite.
37843 ocra O'CRA, n. A viscous vegetable substance in the West Indies, used in soups, &c.It is obtained by ...
37844 octachord OC'TACHORD, n. an instrument or system of eight sounds.
37845 octagon OC'TAGON, n. [Gr. eight and angle.]1. In geometry, a figure of eight sides and eight angles. ...
37846 octagonal OCTAG'ONAL, a. Having eight sides and eight angles.
37847 octahedral OCTAHE'DRAL, a. [See octahedron.] Having eight equal sides.
37848 octahedrite OCTAHE'DRITE, n. Pyramidical ore of titanium.
37849 octahedron OCTAHE'DRON, n. [Gr. eight and a base.]In geometry, a solid contained by eight equal and ...
37850 octander OCTAN'DER, n. [Gr. eight, and a male.] In botany, a plant having eight stamens.
37851 octandrian OCTAN'DRIAN, n. Having eight stamens.
37852 octangular OCTAN'GULAR, a. [L. octo, eight, and angular.] Having eight angles.
37853 octant OC'TANT, n. [L. octans, an eighth part, from octo, eight.]In astronomy, that aspect of two planets ...
37854 octave OC'TAVE, a. [infra.] Denoting eight.OC'TAVE, n. [L. octavus, eighth.]1. The eighth day after a ...
37855 octavo OCTA'VO, n. [L. octavus, eighth.] A book in which a sheet is folded into eight leaves. The word ...
37856 octennial OCTEN'NIAL, a. [L. octo, eight, and annus, year.]1. Happening every eighth year.2. Lasting eight ...
37857 octile OC'TILE, n. The same as octant, supra.
37858 october OCTO'BER, n. [L. from octo, eighth; the eighth month of the primitive Roman year which began in ...
37859 octodecimal OCTODEC'IMAL, a. [L. octo, eight, and decem, ten.]In crystallography, designating a crystal whose ...
37860 octodentate OCTODEN'TATE, a. [L. octo, eight, and dentatus, toothed.] Having eight teeth.
37861 octofid OC'TOFID, a. [L. octo, eight, and findo, to cleave.]In botany, cleft or separated into eight ...
37862 octogenary OC'TOGENARY, a. [L. octogenarius, from octogeni, eighty.] Of eighty years of age.OC'TOGENARY, n. ...
37863 octolocular OCTOLOC'ULAR, a. [L. octo, eight, and locus, place.] In botany, having eight cells for seeds.
37864 octonary OC'TONARY, a. [L. octonarius.] Belonging to the number eight.
37865 octonocular OCTONOC'ULAR, a. [L. octo, eight, and oculus, eye.] Having eight eyes.
37866 octopetalous OCTOPET'ALOUS, a. [Gr. eight and a petal.] Having eight petals or flower-leaves.
37867 octoradiated OCTORA'DIATED, a. [L. octo, eight, and radius, ray.] Having eight rays.
37868 octospermous OCTOSPERM'OUS, a. [Gr. eight, and seed.] Containing eight seeds.
37869 octostyle OC'TOSTYLE, n. [Gr. eight, and style.] In ancient architecture, the face of an edifice adorned ...
37870 octosyllable OCTOSYL'LABLE, a. [L. octo, eight, and syllaba, syllable.] Consisting of eight syllables.
37871 octuple OC'TUPLE, a. [L. octuplus; octo, eight, and plico, to fold.] Eight-fold.
37872 ocular OC'ULAR, a. [L. ocularius, from oculus, eye.]Depending on the eye; known by the eye; received by ...
37873 ocularly OC'ULARLY, adv. By the eye, sight or actual view.
37874 oculate OC'ULATE, a. [L. oculatus.] Furnished with eyes; knowing by the eye.
37875 oculiform OC'ULIFORM, a. [L. oculus, eye, and forma, form.]In the form of an eye; resembling the eye in ...
37876 oculist OC'ULIST, n. [from L. oculus, the eye.] One skilled in diseases of the eyes, or one who professes ...
37877 odd ODD, a. 1. Not even; not divisible into equal numbers; as one, three, five, seven, &c.Good luck ...
37878 oddity ODD'ITY, n.1. Singularity; strangeness; as the oddity of dress, manners or shape; oddity of ...
37879 oddly ODD'LY, adv.1. Not evenly. [Little used.]2. Strangely; unusually; irregularly; singularly; ...
37880 oddness ODD'NESS, n.1. The state of being not even.2. Singularity; strangeness; particularity; ...
37881 odds ODDS, n. s as z. [It is used both in the singular and plural.]1. Inequality; excess of either ...
37882 ode ODE, n. [L. ode; Gr.] A short poem or song; a poetical composition proper to be set to music or ...
37883 odious O'DIOUS, a. [L. odiosus, from odi, I hated, Eng. hate.]1. Hateful; deserving hatred. It ...
37884 odiously O'DIOUSLY, adv.1. Hatefully; in a manner to deserve or excite hatred.2. Invidiously; so as to ...
37885 odiousness O'DIOUSNESS, n.1. Hatefulness; the quality that deserves or may excite hatred; as the odiousness ...
37886 odium O'DIUM, n. [L.]1. Hatred; dislike. This measure brought a general odium on his government.2. ...
37887 odontalgic ODONTAL'GIC, a. [Gr. a tooth, and pain.] Pertaining to the tooth-ache.ODONTAL'GIC, n. A remedy ...
37888 odontalgy ODONTAL'GY, n. Tooth-ache.
37889 odor O'DOR, n. [L.] Smell; scent; fragrance; a sweet or an offensive smell; perfume.
37890 odorament O'DORAMENT, n. [L. odoramentum.] A perfume; a strong scent.
37891 odorate O'DORATE, a. [L. odoratus.] Scented; having a strong scent, fetid or fragrant.
37892 odorating O'DORATING, a. Diffusing odor or scent; fragrant.
37893 odoriferous ODORIF'EROUS, a. [L. odoriferus; odor and fero, to bear.]1. Giving scent; diffusing fragrance; ...
37894 odoriferousness ODORIF'EROUSNESS, n. The quality of diffusing scent; fragrance; sweetness of scent.
37895 odorous O'DOROUS, a. Sweet of scent; fragrant.
37896 odorousness O'DOROUSNESS, n. Fragrance; the quality of diffusing scent, or of exciting the sensation of smell.
37897 oeconomical OECONOMICAL, OECONOMY, OEDEMATOUS, OESOPHAGUS. [See Economical, Economy, Edematous, Esophagus.]
37898 oeconomy OECONOMICAL, OECONOMY, OEDEMATOUS, OESOPHAGUS. [See Economical, Economy, Edematous, Esophagus.]
37899 oedematous OECONOMICAL, OECONOMY, OEDEMATOUS, OESOPHAGUS. [See Economical, Economy, Edematous, Esophagus.]
37900 oeiliad OEILIAD, n. A glance; a wink.
37901 oer O'ER, contracted from over, which see.
37902 oesophagus OECONOMICAL, OECONOMY, OEDEMATOUS, OESOPHAGUS. [See Economical, Economy, Edematous, Esophagus.]
37903 of OF, prep. ov. [Gr.]1. From or out of; proceeding from, as the cause, source, means, author or ...
37904 off OFF, a. auf. Most distant; as the off horse in a team.
37905 offal OF'FAL, n.1. Waste meat; the parts of an animal butchered which are unfit for use or rejected.2. ...
37906 offend OFFEND', v.t. [L. offendo; of and fendo, obs. to strike, hit, meet, or thrust against. We use the ...
37907 offended OFFEND'ED, pp. Displeased.
37908 offender OFFEND'ER, n. One that offends; one that violates any law, divine or human; a criminal; a ...
37909 offending OFFEND'ING, ppr. Displeasing; making angry; causing to stumble; committing sin.
37910 offendress OFFEND'RESS, n. A female that offends.
37911 offense OFFENSE, n. offens'. [L. offensus, offensa.]1. Displeasure; anger, or moderate anger. He gave ...
37912 offenseful OFFENSEFUL, a. offens'ful. Giving displeasure; injurious. [Not used.]
37913 offenseless OFFENSELESS, a. offens'less. Unoffending; innocent; inoffensive.
37914 offensive OFFENS'IVE, a. 1. Causing displeasure or some degree of anger; displeasing. All sin is offensive ...
37915 offensively OFFENS'IVELY, adv.1. In a manner to give displeasure; as language offensively harsh or ...
37916 offensiveness OFFENS'IVENESS, n. 1. The quality that offends or displeases; as the offensiveness of rude ...
37917 offer OF'FER, v.t. [L. offero; ob and fero, to bring.]1. Literally, to bring to or before; hence, to ...
37918 offerable OF'FERABLE, a. That may be offered.
37919 offered OF'FERED, pp. Presented for acceptance or rejection; presented in worship or devotion; immolated; ...
37920 offerer OF'FERER, n. One that offers; one that sacrifices or dedicates in worship.
37921 offering OF'FERING, ppr. Presenting; proposing; sacrificing; bidding; presenting to the eye or ...
37922 offertory OF'FERTORY, n. The act of offering, or the thing offered. [Little used.]1. Offertory was ...
37923 offerture OF'FERTURE, n. Offer; proposal. [Not used.]
37924 office OF'FICE, n. [L. officium; ob and facio, to make or do.]1. A particular duty, charge or trust ...
37925 officer OF'FICER, n. A person commissioned or authorized to perform any public duty. Officers are civil, ...
37926 officered OF'FICERED, pp. Furnished with officers.
37927 official OFFI'CIAL, a. 1. Pertaining to an office or public trust. The secretary is engaged in official ...
37928 officially OFFI'CIALLY, adv. By the proper officer; by virtue of the proper authority; in pursuance of the ...
37929 officialty OFFI'CIALTY, n. The charge or office of an official.
37930 officiate OFFI'CIATE, v.t.1. To act as an officer in his office; to transact the appropriate business of an ...
37931 officiating OFFI'CIATING, ppr. Performing the appropriate duties of an office; performing the office of ...
37932 officinal OFFIC'INAL, a. [L. officina, a shop.]Used in a shop or belonging to it. Officinal drugs, ...
37933 officious OFFI'CIOUS, a. [L. officiosus.] 1. Kind; obliging; doing kind offices.Yet not to earth are those ...
37934 officiously OFFI'CIOUSLY, adv.1. Kindly; with solicitous care.Let thy goats officiously be nurs'd.2. With ...
37935 officiousness OFFI'CIOUSNESS, n. 1. Eagerness to serve; usually, an excess of zeal to serve others, or improper ...
37936 offing OFF'ING, n. [from off.] That part of the sea which is at a good distance from the shore, or at a ...
37937 offscouring OFF'SCOURING, n. [off and scour.] That which is scoured off; hence, refuse; rejected matter; that ...
37938 offset OFF'SET, n. [off and set.]1. A shoot; a sprout from the roots of a plant.2. In surveying, a ...
37939 offspring OFF'SPRING, n. [off and spring. 1. A child or children; a descendant or descendants, however ...
37940 offuscate OFFUSCATE, OFFUSCATION. [See Obfuscate, Obfuscation.]
37941 offuscation OFFUSCATE, OFFUSCATION. [See Obfuscate, Obfuscation.]
37942 offward OFF'WARD, adv. [off and ward.] Leaning off, as a ship on shore.
37943 oft OFT, adv. Often; frequently; not rarely. It was formerly used in prose and may be so used still; ...
37944 often OFTEN, adv. of'n. comp. oftener; superl. oftenset. Frequently; many times; not seldom.OFTEN, a. ...
37945 oftenness OFTENNESS, n. of'nness. Frequency. [Not used.]
37946 oftentimes OFTENTIMES, adv. of'ntimes. [often and times.] Frequently; often; many times.
37947 ofttimes OFT'TIMES, adv. [oft and times.] Frequently; often.
37948 og OG. [See Ogee.]
37949 ogdoastich OGDOAS'TICH, n. [Gr. eighth, and a verse.] A poem of eight lines. [Little used.]
37950 ogee OGEE', n. 1. In architecture, a molding consisting of two members, the one concave, the other ...
37951 ogganition OGGANI'TION, n. [L. obgannio, ogganio, to growl.]The murmuring of a dog; a grumbling or snarling. ...
37952 ogham O'GHAM, n. A particular kind of stenography or writing in cipher practiced by the Irish.
37953 ogive OGIVE, n. o'jiv. In architecture, an arch or branch of the Gothic vault, which passing diagonally ...
37954 ogle O'GLE, v.t. [L. oculus. See Eye.]To view with side glances, as in fondness or with design to ...
37955 ogler O'GLER, n. One that ogles.
37956 ogling O'GLING, ppr. Viewing with side glances.O'GLING, n. The act of viewing with side glances.
37957 oglio OGLIO, now written olio, which see.
37958 ogre O'GRE,
37959 ogress O'GRESS, n. An imaginary monster of the East.O'GRESS, n. In heraldry, a cannon ball of a black ...
37960 oh OH, exclam. Denoting surprise, pain, sorrow or anxiety.
37962 oil-nut OIL'-NUT, n. The butternut of North America.OIL'-NUT,
37961 oil OIL, n. It seems to be named from its inflammability, for aelan, is to kindle, and to oil; hence ...
37963 oiled OIL'ED, pp. Smeared or anointed with oil.
37964 oiler OIL'ER, n. One who deals in oils and pickles.
37965 oiliness OIL'INESS, n. The quality of being oily; unctuousness; greasiness; a quality approaching that of ...
37966 oiling OIL'ING, ppr. Smearing or anointing with oil.
37967 oilman OIL'MAN, n. One who deals in oils and pickles.
37969 oily-grain OILY-GRAIN, n. A plant.
37970 oily-palm OILY-PALM, n. A tree.
37968 oily OIL'Y, a. 1. Consisting of oil; containing oil; having the qualities of oil; as oily matter or ...
37971 oint OINT, v.t. [L. ungo, like joindre from jungo.]To anoint; to smear with an unctuous substance.They ...
37972 ointed OINT'ED, pp. Anointed; smeared with an oily or greasy matter.
37973 ointing OINT'ING, ppr. Anointing.
37974 ointment OINT'MENT, n. Unguent; any soft, unctuous substance or compound, used for smearing, particularly ...
37975 oisanite OIS'ANITE, n. Pyramidical ore of titanium.
37976 oke OKE, n. An Egyptian and Turkish weight, equal to about two pounds and three quarters, English ...
37977 oker OKER. [See Ocher.]
37978 olate OLATE, v.t. [L. To lay waste, alone.]1. To deprive of inhabitants; to make desert. The earth was ...
37980 old-fashioned OLD-FASH'IONED, a. formed according to obsolete fashion or custom; as an old-fashioned ...
37981 old-wife OLD-WIFE, n. 1. A contemptuous name for an old prating woman. 1Tim. 4.2. A fish of the genus ...
37979 old OLD, a.1. Advanced far in years or life; having lived beyond the middle period, or rather towards ...
37982 olden OLDEN, a. Old; ancient. [Used in poetry.]
37983 oldness OLDNESS, n.1. Old age; an advanced state of life or existence; as the oldness of a man, of an ...
37984 oleaginous OLEAG'INOUS, a. [L. oleaginus, from oleum, oil.] Having the qualities of oil; oily; unctuous.
37985 oleaginousness OLEAG'INOUSNESS, n. Oiliness.
37986 oleander OLEAN'DER, n. a plant of the genus Nerium the rose-bay or South sea rose; a beautiful shrub with ...
37987 oleaster OLEAS'TER, n. [L. from olea, the olive tree.]A plant of the genus Elaeagnus; the wild olive.
37988 oleate O'LEATE, n. A compound of oleic acid with a salifiable base.
37989 olefiant OLEF'IANT, a. [L. oleo, olfacio.] Olefiant gas is a compound of one prime of carbon and one of ...
37990 oleic O'LEIC, a. [from oil.] The oleic acid is obtained from a soap made by digesting hog's lard in ...
37991 oleosaccharum OLEOSAC'CHARUM, n. A mixture of oil and sugar.
37992 oleose O'LEOSE,
37993 oleous O'LEOUS, a. [L. olcosus.] Oily. [Little used.]
37994 oleraceous OLERA'CEOUS, a. [L. oleracceus, from olus, oleris, pot-herbs.]Pertaining to pot-herbs; of the ...
37995 olfact OLFACT', v.t. [L. olfacto, olfacio; oleo, to smell, and facio, to make.]To smell; used in ...
37996 olfactory OLFACT'ORY, a. [L. olfacio, supra.] Pertaining to smelling; having the sense of smelling; as ...
37997 oliban OL'IBAN,
37998 olibanum OLIBA'NUM, n. [The word signifies then frankincense, and it is so named from its whiteness.]A ...
37999 olid OL'ID,
38000 olidous OL'IDOUS, a. [L. olidus, from oleo, to smell.] Fetid; having a strong disagreeable smell. ...
38001 oligarchal OLIGARCH'AL,
38002 oligarchical OLIGARCH'ICAL, a. [See Oligrachy.] Pertaining to oligrachy, or government by a few.
38003 oligist OL'IGIST,'IC, a. [Gr. least.] Oligist iron, so called, is a crystallized tritoxyd of iron.
38004 oligrachy OL'IGRACHY, n. [Gr. few, and rule.]A form of government in which the supreme power is placed in a ...
38005 olio O'LIO, n. [L. olla, a pot.]1. A mixture; a medley.2. A miscellany; a collection of various ...
38006 olitory OL'ITORY, a. [L. olitor, a gardener, from olus, pot-herbs.]Belonging to a kitchen garden; as ...
38007 olivaceous OLIVA'CEOUS, a. [from L. oliva, olive.] Of the color of the olive.
38008 olivaster OLIVAS'TER, n. [L. oliva, olive.] Of the color of the olive, tawny.
38010 olive-yard OL'IVE-YARD, n. An inclosure or piece of ground in which olives are cultivated. Ex.23.
38009 olive OL'IVE, n. [L. oliva, from olea, an olive tree; Gr. See Oil]A plant or tree of the genus Olea. ...
38011 olived OL'IVED, a. Decorated with olive trees.
38012 olivenite OL'IVENITE, n. An ore of copper.
38013 olivin OL'IVIN,
38014 olivine OL'IVINE, n. [from olive.] A subspecies of prismatic chrysolite of a brownish green, often ...
38015 olympean OLYM'PEAN, a. Pertaining to Olympus; or to Olympis, a town in Greece.Olympic games, or Olympics, ...
38016 olympiad OLYM'PIAD, n. [L. Olympias; Gr. from Olympus, a mountain of Macedonia.]A period of four years ...
38017 omber OM'BER,
38018 ombre OM'BRE, n. [L. homo.]A game at cards, borrowed from the Spaniards, usually played by three ...
38019 ombrometer OMBROM'ETER, n. [Gr. rain, and measure.]A machine or instrument to measure the quantity of rain ...
38020 omega OME'GA, n. [Gr. great O.] The name of the last letter of the Greek alphabet, as Alpha, A, is the ...
38021 omelet OM'ELET, n. A kind of pancake or fritter made with eggs and other ingredients.
38022 omen O'MEN, n. [L. omen; Heb. an augur.]A sign or indication of some future event; a prognostic. ...
38023 omened O'MENED, a. Containing an omen or prognostic.
38024 omentum OMENT'UM, n. [L.] In anatomy, the caul or epiploon; a membranaceous covering of the bowels, being ...
38025 omer OMER
38026 ominate OM'INATE, v.t. [L. ominor, from omen.] To presage; to foreshow; to foretoken. [Little ...
38027 omination OMINA'TION, n. A foreboding; a presaging; prognostic. [Little used.]
38028 ominous OM'INOUS, a. [L. ominosus.]1. Foreboding or presaging evil; indicating a future evil event; ...
38029 ominously OM'INOUSLY, adv. With good or bad omens.
38030 ominousness OM'INOUSNESS, n. The quality of being ominous.
38031 omissible OMIS'SIBLE, a. [L. omissus. See Omit.] That may be omitted.
38032 omission OMIS'SION, n. [L. omissio, from omitto, omissus.]1. Neglect or failure to do something which a ...
38033 omissive OMIS'SIVE, a. Leaving out.
38034 omit OMIT', v.t. [L. omitto; ob and mitto, to send.]1. To leave, pass by or neglect; to fail or ...
38035 omittance OMIT'TANCE, n. Forbearance; neglect. [Not used.]
38036 omitted OMIT'TED, pp. Neglected; passed by; left out.
38037 omitting OMIT'TING, ppr. Neglecting or failing to do or use; passing by; leaving out.
38038 omnifarious OMNIFA'RIOUS, a. [Low L. omnifarius.] Of all varieties, forms or kinds.
38039 omniferous OMNIF'EROUS, a. [L. omnifer; omnis, all, and fero, to bear.] All-bearing; producing all kinds.
38040 omnific OMNIF'IC, a. [L. omnis, all, and facio, to make.] All-creating.Thou deep, peace! said then th' ...
38041 omniform OM'NIFORM, a. [L. omnis, all, and forma, form.] Having every form or shape.
38042 omniformity OMNIFORM'ITY, n. The quality of having every form.
38043 omnigenous OMNIG'ENOUS, a. [L. omnigenus; omnis, all, every, and genus, kind.] Consisting of all kinds.
38044 omniparity OMNIPAR'ITY, n. [L. omnis, all, and par, equal.] General equality.
38045 omnipercipience OMNIPERCIP'IENCE, n. [L. omnis, and percipiens, perceiving.] Perception of every thing.
38046 omnipercipient OMNIPERCIP'IENT, a. Perceiving every thing.
38047 omnipotence OMNIP'OTENCE,'OTENCY, n. [L. omnipotens; omnis, all, and potens, powerful.]1. Almighty power; ...
38048 omnipotent OMNIP'OTENT, a. [supra.] 1. Almighty; possessing unlimited power; all powerful. The being that ...
38049 omnipotently OMNIP'OTENTLY, adv. With almighty power.
38050 omnipresence OMNIPRES'ENCE, n. s as z. [L. omnis, and presens, present.]Presence in every place at the same ...
38051 omnipresent OMNIPRES'ENT, a. Present in all places at the same time; ubiquitary; as the omnipresent Jehovah.
38052 omnipresential OMNIPRESEN'TIAL, a. Implying universal presence.
38053 omniscience OMNIS'CIENCE,
38054 omnisciency OMNIS'CIENCY, n. [L. omnis, all, and scientia, knowledge.]The quality of knowing all things at ...
38055 omniscient OMNIS'CIENT, a. Having universal knowledge or knowledge of all things; infinitely knowing; ...
38056 omniscious OMNIS'CIOUS, a. [L. omnis, all, and scio, to know.] All-knowing. [Not used.]
38057 omnium OM'NIUM, n. [L. omnis, all.] The aggregate of certain portions of different stocks in the public ...
38058 omnivorous OMNIV'OROUS, a. [L. omnivorus; omnis, all, and voro, to eat.]All-devouring; eating every thing ...
38059 omoplate OM'OPLATE, n. [Gr. shoulder, and broad.] The shoulder blade or scapula.
38060 omphacine OM'PHACINE, a. [Gr. from unripe fruit.]Pertaining to or expressed from unripe fruit. Omphacine ...
38061 omphacite OM'PHACITE, n. A mineral of a pale leek green color, massive or disseminated, and in narrow ...
38062 omphalic OM'PHALIC, n. [Gr. the navel.] Pertaining to the navel.
38063 omphalocele OMPHAL'OCELE, n. [L. navel, and tumor.] A rupture at the navel.
38064 omphalopter OM'PHALOPTER,
38065 omphaloptic OMPHALOP'TIC, n. [Gr. navel, and optic.]An optical glass that is convex on both sides; commonly ...
38066 omphalotomy OMPHALOT'OMY, n. [Gr. the navel, and to cut.]The operation of dividing the navel string.
38067 omy O'MY, a. Mellow; as land.
38068 on ON, pre. [L. in; Gr. Hence they denote nearness, closeness or contiguity, and from meeting the ...
38069 onager ON'AGER, n. [L.] The wild ass.
38070 onanism O'NANISM, n. [from Onan, in Scripture.] The crime of self-pollution.
38071 once ONCE, adv. wuns. [from one.]1. One time.Trees that bear mast are fruitful but once in two ...
38073 one-berry ONE-BERRY, n. wun'-berry. A plant of the genus Paris; true love.
38074 one-eyed ONE-EYED, a wun'-eyed. Having one eye only.
38072 one ONE, a. wun. [L. unus; Gr.]1. Single in number; individual; as one man; one book. There is one ...
38075 oneirocritic ONEIROCRIT'IC, n. [Gr. a dream, and discerning.]An interpreter of dreams; one who judges what is ...
38076 oneirocritical ONEIROCRIT'ICAL,
38077 oneiromancy ONEIROM'ANCY, n. [Gr. a dream, and divination.] Divination by dreams.
38078 onement ONEMENT, n. wun'ment. State of being one. [Not in use.]
38079 oneness ONENESS, n. wun'ness. [from one.] Singleness in number; individuality; unity; the quality of ...
38080 onerary ON'ERARY, a. [L. onerarius, from onus, a load; onero, to load.]Fitted or intended for the carriage ...
38081 onerate ON'ERATE, v.t. [L. onero, from onus, a burden.] To load; to burden.
38082 oneration ONERA'TION, n. The act of loading.
38083 onerous ON'EROUS, a. [L. onerosus, from onus, a load.1. Burdensome; oppressive.2. In Scots law, being ...
38084 onion ONION, n. un'yun. A plant of the genus Allium; and particularly, its bulbous root, much used as an ...
38085 onirocritic ONIROCRIT'IC, a. Having the power of interpreting dreams or pretending to judge of future events ...
38086 onkotomy ONKOT'OMY, n. [Gr. tumor, and to cut.]In surgery, the opening of a tumor or abscess.
38087 only ONLY, a. 1. Single; one along; as, John was the only man present.2. This and no other. This is ...
38088 onomancy ON'OMANCY, n. [Gr. name, and divination.] Divination by the letters of a name.Destinies were ...
38089 onomantic ONOMAN'TIC,
38090 onomantical ONOMAN'TICAL, a. Predicting by names, or the letters composing names.
38091 onomatope ON'OMATOPE,
38092 onomatopy ON'OMATOPY, n. [Gr. name, and to make.]1. In grammar and rhetoric, a figure in which words are ...
38093 onset ON'SET, n. [on and set.]1. A rushing or setting upon; a violent attack; assault; a storming; ...
38094 onslaught ONSLAUGHT, n. on'slaut. [on and slay.] Attack; storm; onset. [Not used.]
38095 ontologic ONTOLOG'IC
38096 ontological ONTOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Ontology.] Pertaining to the science of being in general and its ...
38097 ontologist ONTOL'OGIST, n. One who treats of or considers the nature and qualities of being in general.
38098 ontology ONTOL'OGY, n. [Gr. from and discourse.]That part of the science of metaphysics which investigates ...
38099 onward ON'WARD, adv. [L. versus.]1. Toward the point before or in front; forward; progressively; in ...
38100 onycha ON'YCHA, n. [from Gr.] Supposed to be the odoriferous shell of the onyxfish, or the onyx. Ex. ...
38101 onyx ON'YX, n. [Gr. a nail. L. onyx.] A semi-pellucid gem with variously colored zones or veins, a ...
38102 oolite O'OLITE, n. [Gr. an egg, and stone, from its resemblance to the roes of fish.]Egg-stone, a variety ...
38103 ooze OOZE, v.i. ooz. [The origin of this word is not easily ascertained. Heb. See Issue.]To flow ...
38104 oozing OOZ'ING, ppr. Flowing gently; percolating.
38105 oozy OOZ'Y, a. Miry; containing soft mud; resembling ooze; as the oozy bed of a river.
38106 opacate O'PACATE, v.t. [L. opaco.] To shade; to darken; to obscure; to cloud. [Not used.]
38107 opacity OPAC'ITY, n. [L. opacitas.] 1. Opakeness; the quality of a body which renders it impervious to ...
38108 opacous OPA'COUS, a. [L. opacus.]1. Not pervious to the rays of light; not transparent.2. Dark; obscure. ...
38109 opacousness OPA'COUSNESS, n. Imperviousness to light.
38110 opah O'PAH, n. A fish of a large kind with a smooth skin found on the coast of Guinea.
38111 opake OPA'KE, a. [L. opacus.] 1. Impervious to the rays of light; not transparent. [This is the word ...
38112 opakeness OPA'KENESS, n. The quality of being impervious to light; want of transparency; opacity.
38113 opal O'PAL, n. [L. opalus or opalum.] A stone of the silicious genus, and of several varieties. It is ...
38114 opalescence OPALES'CENCE, n. A colored shining luster reflected from a single spot in a mineral. It is ...
38115 opalescent OPALES'CENT, a. Resembling opal; reflecting a colored luster from a single spot.
38116 opaline O'PALINE, a. Pertaining to or like opal.
38117 opalize O'PALIZE, v.t. To make to resemble opal; as opalized wood.
38118 opaque OPAQUE. [See Opake.]
38119 opaqueness OPAQUENESS. [See Opakeness.]
38120 ope OPE, a. Open. Obs.OPE, v.t. To open; used only in poetry, and probably a contracted word.
38121 open OPEN, a o'pn.1. Unclosed; not shut; as, the gate is open; an open door or window; an open book; ...
38122 opened OPENED, pp. o'pned. Unclosed; unbarred; unsealed; uncovered; revealed; disclosed; made plain; ...
38123 opener OPENER, n. o'pner.1. One that opens or removed any fastening or covering.2. One that explains; ...
38124 openeyed OPENEYED, a. o'pneyed. Watchful; vigilant.
38125 openhanded OPENHANDED, a. o'pnhanded. Generous; liberal; munificent.
38126 openhearted OPENHE'ARTED, a. o'pnharted. Candid; frank; generous.
38127 openheartedly OPENHE'ARTEDLY, adv. With frankness; without reserve.
38128 openheartedness OPENHE'ARTEDNESS, n. Frankness; candor; sincerity; munificence; generosity.
38129 opening OPENING, ppr. o'pning. Unclosing; unsealing; uncovering; revealing; interpreting.OPENING, n. ...
38130 openly OPENLY, adv. o'pnly.1. Publicly; not in private; without secrecy; as, to avow our sins and follies ...
38131 openmouthed OPENMOUTHED, a. o'pnmouthed. Greedy; ravenous; clamorous; as an open-mouthed lion.
38132 openness OPENNESS, n. o'pnness.1. Freedom from covering or obstruction; as the openness of a country.2. ...
38133 opera OP'ERA, n. [L. opera, work, labor.]A dramatic composition set to music and sung on the stage, ...
38134 operable OP'ERABLE, a. Practicable. [Not used.]
38135 operant OP'ERANT, a. [See Operate.] Having power to produce an effect. [Not used. We now use ...
38136 operate OP'ERATE, v.i. [L. operor; Heb. signifies to be strong, to prevail.]1. To act; to exert power or ...
38137 operatical OPERAT'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the opera; a word used by musicians.
38138 operating OP'ERATING, ppr. Acting; exerting agency or power; performing some manual act in surgery.
38139 operation OPERA'TION, n. [L. operatio.]1. The act or process of operating; agency; the exertion of power, ...
38140 operative OP'ERATIVE, a. 1. Having the power of acting; exerting force, physical or moral; having or ...
38141 operator OP'ERATOR, n.1. He or that which operates; he or that which produces an effect.2. In surgery, the ...
38142 operculate OPER'CULATE,
38143 operculated OPER'CULATED, a. [L. operculatur, from operio, to cover.] In botany, having a lid or cover, as a ...
38144 operculiform OPER'CULIFORM, a. [L. operculum, a lid, and form.] Having the form of a lid or cover.
38145 operose OPERO'SE, a. [L. operosus, from opera, operor.]Laborious; attended with labor; tedious.
38146 operoseness OPERO'SENESS, n. the state of being laborious.
38147 opetide O'PETIDE, n. [ope and tide.] The ancient time of marriage, from Epiphany to Ash Wednesday.
38148 ophidian OPHID'IAN, a. [Gr. a serpent.] Pertaining to serpents; designating an order of vertebral animals ...
38149 ophidion OPHID'ION, n. [Gr. a serpent.] a fish of the anguilliform kind, resembling the common eel, but ...
38150 ophiologic OPHIOLOG'IC,
38151 ophiological OPHIOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to ophiology.
38152 ophiologist OPHIOL'OGIST, n. One versed in the natural history of serpents.
38153 ophiology OPHIOL'OGY, n. [Gr. serpent, and discourse.]That part of natural history which treats of serpents, ...
38154 ophiomancy OPHIOM'ANCY, n. [Gr. a serpent, and divination.]In antiquity, the art of divining or predicting ...
38155 ophiomorphous OPHIOMORPH'OUS, a. [Gr. form.] Having the form of a serpent.
38156 ophiophagous OPHIOPH'AGOUS, a. [Gr. a serpent, to eat.] Eating or feeding on serpents.
38157 ophite O'PHITE, n. [Gr. a serpent.] Pertaining to a serpent.O'PHITE, a. [Gr. a serpent, whence a stone ...
38158 ophithalmic OPHITHAL'MIC, a. [See Ophthalmy.] Pertaining to the eye.
38159 ophiuchus OPHIU'CHUS, n. [Gr. a serpent, and to have.]A constellation in the northern hemisphere.
38160 ophthalmoscopy OPHTHALMOS'COPY, n. [Gr. the eye, and to view.]A branch of physiognomy which deduces the knowledge ...
38161 ophthalmy OPH'THALMY, n. [Gr. from the eye.]A disease of the eyes; an inflammation of the membranes which ...
38162 opiate O'PIATE, n. [from opium.]1. Primarily, a medicine of a thicker consistence than syrup, prepared ...
38163 opifcicer OPIFC'ICER, n. [L. opifex; opus, work, and facio, to do.]One who performs any work. [Not used.]
38164 opinable OPI'NABLE, a. [L. opinor.] That may be thought. [Not used.]
38165 opination OPINA'TION, n. Act of thinking; opinion. [Not used.]
38166 opinative OPIN'ATIVE, a. Stiff in opinion. [Not used.]
38167 opinator OPINA'TOR, n. One fond of his own opinions; one who holds an opinion. [Not in use.]
38168 opine OPI'NE, v.i. [L. opinor.] To think; to suppose. Obs.
38169 opined OPI'NED, pp. Thought; conceived. obs.
38170 opiner OPI'NER, n. One who thinks or holds an opinion. Obs.
38171 opiniaster OPINIAS'TER,
38172 opiniastrous OPINIAS'TROUS,
38173 opiniate OPIN'IATE, v.t. To maintain one's opinion with obstinacy. Obs.
38174 opiniated OPIN'IATED, a. Unduly attached to one's own opinions.
38175 opiniater OPINIA'TER, a. Stiff in opinion; obstinate. Obs.
38176 opiniative OPIN'IATIVE, a. 1. Very stiff in adherence to preconceived notions.2. Imagined; not proved.
38177 opiniativeness OPIN'IATIVENESS, n. Undue stiffness in opinion.
38178 opiniator OPINIA'TOR, n. One unduly attached to his own opinion. Obs.
38179 opiniatre OPINIA'TRE, a. Unduly attached to one's own opinion, or stiff in adhering to it. Obs.
38180 opiniatry OPIN'IATRY, n. Unreasonable attachment to one's own notions; obstinacy in opinions. Obs.
38181 opining OPI'NING, ppr. Thinking. Obs.OPI'NING, n. Opinion; notion. Obs.
38182 opinion OPINION, n. opin'yon. [L. opinio, from opinor, to thing, Gr., L. suppono.]1. The judgment which ...
38183 opinionate OPIN'IONATE,
38184 opinionated OPIN'IONATED, a. Stiff in opinion; firmly or unduly adhering to one's own opinion; obstinate in ...
38185 opinionately OPIN'IONATELY, adv. Obstinately; conceitedly.
38186 opinionative OPIN'IONATIVE, a. Fond of preconceived notions; unduly attached to one's own opinions.
38187 opinionatively OPIN'IONATIVELY, adv. With undue fondness for one's own opinions; stubbornly.
38188 opinionativeness OPIN'IONATIVENESS, n. Excessive attachment to one's own opinions; obstinacy in opinion.
38189 opinioned OPIN'IONED, a. Attached to particular opinions; conceited.
38190 opinionist OPIN'IONIST, n. One fond of his own notions, or one unduly attached to his own opinions.
38191 opisthodome OPIS'THODOME, n. [Gr. that is behind, and house.]In Greece, a part or place in the back part of a ...
38192 opium O'PIUM, n. [L. opium; Gr. from juice.]Opium is the inspissated juice of the capsules of the ...
38193 ople-tree O'PLE-TREE, n. [L. opulus.] The witch-hazel. Obs.
38194 opobalsam OPOBAL'SAM, n. [L. Gr. juice, and balsamum.]The balm or balsam of Gilead. It has a yellowish or ...
38195 opodeldoc OPODEL'DOC, n.1. The name of a plaster, said to have been invented by Mindererus; but in modern ...
38196 opopanax OPO'PANAX, n. [L.; Gr. juice, and a plant.]A gum-resin of a tolerably firm texture, brought in ...
38197 opossum OPOS'SUM, n. A quadruped of the genus Didelphis. It has a prehensile tail, like some of the ...
38198 oppidan OP'PIDAN, n. [L. oppidanus, from oppidum a city or town.]1. An inhabitant of a town. [Not ...
38199 oppignerate OPPIG'NERATE, v.t. [L. oppignero; ob and pignero, to pledge, from pignus, pledge.] To pledge; to ...
38200 oppilate OP'PILATE, v.t. [L. oppilo; ob and pilo, to drive.]To crown together; to fill with obstructions.
38201 oppilation OPPILA'TION, n. The act of filling or crowding together; a stopping by redundant matter; ...
38202 oppilative OP'PILATIVE, a. Obstructive.
38203 oppleted OPPLE'TED, a. [L. oppletus.] Filled; crowded. [Not in use.]
38204 oppone OPPO'NE, v.t. [L. oppono; ob and pono, to put.] To oppose. [Not used.]
38205 opponency OPPO'NENCY, n. [See Opponent.] The opening of an academical disputation; the proposition of ...
38206 opponent OPPO'NENT, a. [L. opponens, oppono; ob and pono, to set, put or lay, that is, to thrust against; ...
38207 opportune OPPORTU'NE, a. [L. opportunus; ob and porto, to bear or bring; probably from the root of fero or ...
38208 opportunely OPPORTU'NELY, adv. Seasonably; at a time favorable for the purpose. It has been applied to place, ...
38209 opportunity OPPORTU'NITY, n. [L. opportunitas.]1. Fit or convenient time; a time favorable for the purpose; ...
38210 opposal OPPO'SAL, n. s as z. Opposition. [Not used.]
38211 oppose OPPO'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. oppono, opposui. The change of n into s is unusual. Two different ...
38212 opposed OPPO'SED, pp. s as z.1. To act adversely; with against; as, a servant opposed against the act. ...
38213 opposeless OPPO'SELESS, a. Not to be opposed; irresistible. [Not in use.]
38214 opposer OPPO'SER, n.1. One that opposes; an opponent in party, in principle, in controversy or argument. ...
38215 opposite OP'POSITE, a. [L. oppositus.]1. Standing or situated in front; facing; as an edifice opposite to ...
38216 oppositely OP'POSITELY, adv.1. In front; in a situation to face each other.2. Adversely; against each ...
38217 oppositeness OP'POSITENESS, n. The state of being opposite or contrary.
38218 oppositifolious OPPOSITIFO'LIOUS, a. [L. oppositus and folium, a leaf.]In botany, opposite to the leaf; as an ...
38219 opposition OPPOSI'TION, n. [L. oppositio.] 1. Situation so as to front something else; a standing over ...
38220 oppositionist OPPOSI'TIONIST, n. One that belongs to the party opposing the administration.
38221 oppositive OPPOS'ITIVE, a. that may be put in opposition.
38222 oppress OPPRESS', v.t. [L. appressus, from opprimo; ob and premo, to press.]1. To load or burden with ...
38223 oppressed OPPRESS'ED, pp. burdened with unreasonable impositions; overpowered; overburdened; depressed.
38224 oppressing OPPRESS'ING, ppr. Overburdening.
38225 oppression OPPRES'SION, n.1. The act of oppressing; the imposition of unreasonable burdens, either in taxes ...
38226 oppressive OPPRESS'IVE, a.1. Unreasonably burdensome; unjustly severe; as oppressive taxes; oppressive ...
38227 oppressively OPPRESS'IVELY, adv. In a manner to oppress; with unreasonable severity.
38228 oppressiveness OPPRESS'IVENESS, n. The quality of being oppressive.
38229 oppressor OPPRESS'OR, n. One that oppresses; one that imposes unjust burdens on others; one that harasses ...
38230 opprobrious OPPRO'BRIOUS, a. [See Opprobrium.]1. Reproachful and contemptuous; scurrilous; as opprobrious ...
38231 opprobriously OPPRO'BRIOUSLY, adv. With reproach mingled with contempt; scurrilously.
38232 opprobriousness OPPRO'BRIOUSNESS, n. Reproachfulness mingled with contempt; scurrility.
38233 opprobrium OPPRO'BRIUM, n. [L. ob and probrum, disgrace.]Reproach mingled with contempt or disdain.
38234 oppugn OPPUGN, v.t oppu'ne. [L. oppugno; ob and pugno, to fight, from pugnus, the fist.]To attack; to ...
38235 oppugnancy OPPUG'NANCY, n. Opposition; resistance.
38236 oppugnation OPPUGNA'TION, n. Opposition; resistance.
38237 oppugned OPPUGNED, pp. oppu'ned. Opposed; resisted.
38238 oppugner OPPUGNER, n. oppu'ner. One who opposes or attacks; that which opposes.
38239 oppugning OPPUGNING, ppr. oppu'ning. Attacking; opposing.
38240 opsimathy OPSIM'ATHY, n. [Gr. late and to learn.] Late education; education late in life. [Little used.]
38241 opsonation OPSONA'TION, n. [L. obsono, to cater.] A catering; a buying of provisions. [Not used.]
38242 optable OP'TABLE, a. [L. optabilis, from opto, to desire.] Desirable. [Not used.]
38243 optation OPTA'TION, n. [L. optatio.] A desiring; the expression of a wish.
38244 optative OP'TATIVE, a. [L. optativus, from opto, to desire or wish.]Expressing desire or wish. The ...
38245 optic OP'TIC,'TICAL, a. [Gr. from to see, the eye.]1. Relating or pertaining to vision or sight.2. ...
38246 optician OPTI'CIAN, n.1. A person skilled in the science of optics.2. One who makes or sells optic glasses ...
38247 optics OP'TICS, n. The science which treats of light and the phenomena of vision.
38248 optimacy OP'TIMACY, n. [L. optimates, grandees, from optimus, best.] The body of nobles; the nobility.
38249 optimism OP'TIMISM, n. [L. optimus, best.] The opinion or doctrine that every thing in nature is ordered ...
38250 optimity OPTIM'ITY, n. The state of being best.
38251 option OP'TION, n. [L. optio, from opto, to wish or desire.]1. The power of choosing; the right of ...
38252 optional OP'TIONAL, a.1. Left to one's wish or choice; depending on choice or preference. It is optional ...
38253 opulence OP'ULENCE, n. [L. opulentia, from opes, wealth.] Wealth; riches; affluence. [Opulency is little ...
38254 opulent OP'ULENT, a. [L. opulentus.] Wealthy; rich; affluent; having a large estate or property.
38255 opulently OP'ULENTLY, adv. Richly; with abundance or splendor.
38256 opuscule OPUS'CULE, n. [L. opusculum.] A small work.
38257 or OR, a termination of Latin nouns, is a contraction of vir, a man, or from the same radix. The same ...
38258 orach OR'ACH,
38259 oracle OR'ACLE, n. [L. oraculum, from oro, to utter.]1. Among pagans, the answer of a god or some person ...
38260 oracular ORAC'ULAR,
38261 oracularly ORAC'ULARLY,
38262 oraculous ORAC'ULOUS, a. 1. Uttering oracles; as an oracular tongue.The oraculous seer.2. Grace; ...
38263 oraculously ORAC'ULOUSLY,adv.1. In the manner of an oracle.2. Authoritatively; positively.
38264 oraculousness ORAC'ULOUSNESS, n. The state of being oracular.
38265 oraison OR'AISON, n. [L. oratio.] Prayer; verbal supplication or oral worship; now written orison.
38266 oral O'RAL, a. [L. os, oris, the mouth.] Uttered by the mouth or in words; spoken, not written; as ...
38267 orally O'RALLY, adv. By mouth; in words, without writing; as traditions derived orally from ancestors.
38268 orang-outang ORANG-OU'TANG, n. The satyr or great ape (Simia satyrus,) an animal with a flat face and deformed ...
38270 orange-musk OR'ANGE-MUSK, n. A species of pear.
38271 orange-peel OR'ANGE-PEEL, n. The rind of an orange separated from the fruit.
38272 orange-tawny OR'ANGE-TAWNY, a. Of the color of an orange.
38273 orange-wife OR'ANGE-WIFE, n. A woman that sells oranges.
38269 orange OR'ANGE, n. [L. aurantium; so named from aurum, gold, which the orange resembles in color.]The ...
38274 orangery OR'ANGERY, n. A plantation of orange trees.
38275 oration ORA'TION, n. [L. oratio, from oro, to pray, to utter.]1. A speech or discourse composed according ...
38276 orator OR'ATOR, n. [L.]1. A public speaker. In ancient Rome, orators were advocates for clients in the ...
38277 oratorial ORATO'RIAL,
38278 oratorially ORATO'RIALLY,
38279 oratorical ORATOR'ICAL, a. Pertaining to an orator or to oratory; rhetorical; becoming an orator. We say, a ...
38280 oratorically ORATOR'ICALLY, adv. In a rhetorical manner.
38281 oratorio ORATO'RIO, n. 1. In Italian music, a sacred drama of dialogues, containing recitatives, duets, ...
38282 oratory OR'ATORY, n. [Low L. oratoria, from orator.]1. The art of speaking well, or of speaking according ...
38283 oratress OR'ATRESS,
38284 oratrix OR'ATRIX, n. A female orator.
38285 orb ORB, n. [L. orbis.]1. A spherical body; as the celestial orbs.2. In astronomy, a hollow globe or ...
38286 orbate ORB'ATE, a. [L. orbatus.] Bereaved; fatherless; childless.
38287 orbation ORBA'TION, n. [L. orbatio, from orbo, to bereave.]Privation of parents or children, or privation ...
38288 orbed ORB'ED, a. 1. Round; circular; orbicular.2. Formed into a circle or round shape.3. Rounded or ...
38289 orbic ORB'IC, a. Spherical.
38290 orbicular ORBIC'ULAR, a. [L. orbiculus.] Spherical; circular; in the form of an orb.
38291 orbicularly ORBIC'ULARLY, adv. Spherically.
38292 orbicularness ORBIC'ULARNESS, n. Sphericity; the state of being orbicular.
38293 orbiculate ORBIC'ULATE,
38294 orbiculated ORBIC'ULATED, a. [L. orbiculatus.] Made or being in the form of an orb. In botany, an orbiculate ...
38295 orbiculation ORBICULA'TION, n. The state of being made in the form of an orb.
38296 orbis ORB'IS,
38297 orbit ORB'IT, n. [L. orbita, a trace or track, from orbis, a wheel.]1. In astronomy, the path of a ...
38298 orbital ORB'ITAL,
38299 orbitual ORBIT'UAL, a. Pertaining to the orbit. [Orbital is the preferable word.]
38300 orbitude ORB'ITUDE,
38301 orbity ORB'ITY, n. [L. orbitas.] Bereavement by loss of parents or children. [Little used.]
38302 orby ORB'Y, a. [from orb.] Resembling an orb.
38303 orc ORC, n. [L. orea; Gr.] A sea-fish, a species of whale.The Delphinus orca is the grampus.
38304 orchal ORCHAL,
38305 orchanet OR'CHANET, n. A plant, [Anchusa tinctoria.]
38306 orchard OR'CHARD, n. [See Yard.]An inclosure for fruit trees. In Great Britain, a department of the ...
38307 orcharding OR'CHARDING, n. 1. The cultivation of orchards.2. Orchards in general.
38308 orchardist OR'CHARDIST, n. One that cultivates orchards.
38309 orchel ORCHEL,
38310 orchester OR'CHESTER,
38311 orchestra OR'CHESTRA, n. [L. orchestra; Gr. a dancer, to dance; originally, the place for the chorus of ...
38312 orchestral OR'CHESTRAL, a. [supra.] Pertaining to an orchester; suitable for or performed in the orchester.
38313 orchil ORCHIL, [See Archil.]
38314 orchis OR'CHIS, n. [L. orchis; Gr.] A genus of plants, called fool-stones.
38315 ord ORD, n. An edge or point; as in ordhelm.Ord signifies beginning; as in ords and ends.
38316 ordain ORDA'IN, v.t. [L. ordino, from ordo, order.]1. Properly, to set; to establish in a particular ...
38317 ordainabale ORDA'INABALE, a. That may be appointed.
38318 ordained ORDA'INED, pp. Appointed; instituted; established; invested with ministerial or pastoral ...
38319 ordainer ORDA'INER, n. One who ordains, appoints or invests with sacerdotal powers.
38320 ordaining ORDA'INING, ppr. Appointing; establishing; investing with sacerdotal or pastoral functions.
38321 ordeal OR'DEAL, n. [The last syllable is deal, to divide or distribute. The sense of the prefix is less ...
38322 order OR'DER, n. [L. ordo.]1. Regular disposition or methodical arrangement of things; a word of ...
38323 ordered OR'DERED, pp. Regulated; methodized; disposed; commanded; managed.
38324 orderer OR'DERER, n. 1. One that gives orders.2. One that methodizes or regulates.
38325 ordering OR'DERING, ppr. Regulating; systemizing; commanding; disposing.OR'DERING, n. Disposition; ...
38326 orderless OR'DERLESS, a. Without regularity; disorderly; out of rule.
38327 orderliness OR'DERLINESS, n. [from orderly.]1. Regularity; a state of being methodical.2. The state of being ...
38328 orderly OR'DERLY, a.1. Methodical; regular2. Observant of order or method.3. Well regulated; performed ...
38329 ordinability ORDINABIL'ITY, n. Capability of being appointed. [Not used.]
38330 ordinable OR'DINABLE, a. Such as may be appointed. [Not used.]
38331 ordinal OR'DINAL, a. [L. ordinalis.] Noting order; as the ordinal numbers, first, second, third, ...
38332 ordinance OR'DINANCE, n. 1. A rule established by authority; a permanent rule of action. An ordinance may ...
38333 ordinant OR'DINANT, a. [L. ordinans.] Ordaining; decreeing. [Not used.]
38334 ordinarily OR'DINARILY, adv. Primarily, according to established rules or settled method; hence, commonly; ...
38335 ordinary OR'DINARY, a. [L. ordinarius.]1. According to established order; methodical; regular; customary; ...
38336 ordinate OR'DINATE, v.t. To appoint. [Not used.]OR'DINATE, a. [L. ordinatus.] Regular; methodical. An ...
38337 ordinately OR'DINATELY, adv. In a regular methodical manner.
38338 ordination ORDINA'TION, n. [L. ordinatio.]1. The state of being ordained or appointed; established order or ...
38339 ordinative OR'DINATIVE, a. Directing; giving order.
38340 ordnance ORD'NANCE, n. [from ordinance.] Cannon or great guns, mortars and howitzers; artillery.
38341 ordonnance OR'DONNANCE, n. In painting, the disposition of the parts of a picture, either in regard to the ...
38342 ordure OR'DURE, n. Dung; excrements.
38344 ore-weed OR'E-WEED,
38345 ore-wood OR'E-WOOD, n. Sea Weed. [Not used.]
38343 ore ORE, n. [L. as, aris, brass.1. The compound of a metal and some other substance, as oxygen, ...
38346 oread O'READ, n. [from Gr. mountain.] A mountain nymph.
38347 orfgild ORF'GILD, n.The restitution of goods or money stolen, if taken in the day time.
38348 orfrays OR'FRAYS, n. Fringe of gold; gold embroidery.
38349 orgal OR'GAL, n. Argal; lees of wine dried; tartar.
38351 organ-builder OR'GAN-BUILDER, n. An artist whose occupation is to construct organs.
38352 organ-loft OR'GAN-LOFT, n. The loft where an organ stands.
38353 organ-pipe OR'GAN-PIPE, n. The pipe of a musical organ.
38354 organ-stop OR'GAN-STOP, n. The stop of an organ, or any collection of pipes under one general name.
38350 organ OR'GAN, n. [L. organum; Gr.]1. A natural instrument of action or operation, or by which some ...
38355 organic ORGAN'IC,
38356 organical ORGAN'ICAL, a. [l. organicus.] 1. Pertaining to an organ or to organs; consisting of organs or ...
38357 organically ORGAN'ICALLY, adv. 1. With organs; with organical structure or disposition of parts. The bodies ...
38358 organicalness ORGAN'ICALNESS, n. The state of being organical.
38359 organism OR'GANISM, n. Organical structure; as the organism of bodies.
38360 organist OR'GANIST, n. 1. One who plays on the organ.2. One who sung in parts; an old musical use of the ...
38361 organization ORGANIZA'TION, n.1. The act or process of forming organs or instruments of action.2. The act of ...
38362 organize OR'GANIZE, v.t. 1. To form with suitable organs; to construct so that one part may cooperate with ...
38363 organized OR'GANIZED, pp. Formed with organs; constructed organically; systemized; reduced to a form in ...
38364 organizing OR'GANIZING, ppr. Constructing with suitable organs; reducing to system in order to produce united ...
38365 organographic ORGANOGRAPH'IC,
38366 organographical ORGANOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to organography.
38367 organography ORGANOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr.]In botany, a description of the organs of plants, or of the names and kinds ...
38368 organy ORGANY. [See origan.]
38369 organzine ORGAN'ZINE, n. Silk twisted into threads; thrown silk.
38370 orgasm OR'GASM, n. [Gr. to swell; to irritate.]Immoderate excitement or action; as the orgasm of the ...
38371 orgeat OR'GEAT, n. A liquor extracted from barley and sweet almonds.
38372 orgeis OR'GEIS, n. A fish, called also organ-ling; supposed to be from Orkneys, on the coast of which it ...
38373 orgies OR'GIES, n. plu. [Gr. to swell; fury; L. orgia.]Frantic revels at the feast in honor of Bacchus, ...
38374 orgillous ORGIL'LOUS, a. [Gr. to swell.] Proud; haughty. [Not used.]
38375 orgues OR'GUES, n.1. In the military art, long thick pieces of timber, pointed and shod with iron and ...
38376 orichalch OR'ICHALCH,
38377 orichalcum ORICHAL'CUM, n. [L. orichalcum, mountain brass; Gr. aurichalcum, gold-brass.]A metallic substance ...
38378 oriel O'RIEL,
38379 oriency O'RIENCY, n. [See Orient.] Brightness or strength of color. [Little used.]
38380 orient O'RIENT, a. [L. oriens, from orior, to arise.]1. Rising, as the sun.- Moon, that now meet'st the ...
38381 oriental ORIENT'AL, a. 1. Eastern; situated in the east; as oriental seas or countries.2. Proceeding from ...
38382 orientalism ORIENT'ALISM, n. An eastern mode of speech; an idiom of the eastern languages.
38383 orientalist ORIENT'ALIST,n.1. An inhabitant of the eastern parts of the world.2. One versed in the eastern ...
38384 orientality ORIENTAL'ITY, n. The state of being oriental or eastern. [Not used.]
38385 orifice OR'IFICE, n. [L. orificium; os, oris, mouth, and facio, to make.]The mouth or aperture of a tube, ...
38386 oriflamb OR'IFLAMB, n. The ancient royal standard of France.
38387 origan OR'IGAN,
38388 origanum ORIGA'NUM, n. [L. from Gr.] Marjoram, a genus of plants. One species of this genus is a rich ...
38389 origenism OR'IGENISM, n. The doctrines or tenets of Origen, who united Platonism with christianity.
38390 origenist OR'IGENIST, n. A follower of Origen of Alexandria, a celebrated christian father. The Origenists ...
38391 origin OR'IGIN, n. [L. origo.]1. The first existence or beginning of any thing; as the origin of Rome. ...
38392 original ORIG'INAL, n. 1. Origin. [See Origin, with which it accords in signification.]2. Fountain; ...
38393 originality ORIGINAL'ITY, n.1. The quality or state of being original.2. The power of originating or ...
38394 originally ORIG'INALLY, adv. 1. Primarily; from the beginning or origin.God is originally holy in himself.2. ...
38395 originalness ORIG'INALNESS, n. The quality or state of being original.
38396 originary ORIG'INARY, a.1. Productive; causing existence.The production of animals in the originary way, ...
38397 originate ORIG'INATE, v.t. To cause to be; to bring into existence; to produce what is new.The change is to ...
38398 originated ORIG'INATED, pp. Brought into existence.
38399 originating ORIG'INATING, ppr. Bringing into existence.
38400 origination ORIGINA'TION, n.1 The act of bringing or coming into existence; first production.Descartes first ...
38401 orillon ORIL'LON, n. In fortification, a rounding of earth, faced with a wall, raised on the shoulder of ...
38402 oriol O'RIOL, n. A small apartment next a hall, where particular persons dine; a sort of recess. Obs.
38403 oriole O'RIOLE, n. A genus of birds of the order of picae.
38404 orion ORI'ON, n. [Gr. unfortunately accented by the poets on the second syllable.]A constellation in the ...
38405 orison OR'ISON, n. [L. oratio, from, oro.]A prayer of supplication.Lowly they bowed adoring, and began ...
38406 ork ORK, n. [L. orca.] A fish.
38407 orle ORLE, n. [infra.] In heraldry, an ordinary in the form of a fillet, round the shield.
38408 orlet OR'LET,
38409 orlo OR'LO, n. [Heb.] In architecture, a fillet under the ovolo of a capital.
38410 orlop OR'LOP, n. In a ship of war, a platform of planks laid over the beams in the hold, on which the ...
38411 ornament OR'NAMENT, n. [L. ornamentum, from orno, to adorn. Varro informs us that this was primitively ...
38412 ornamental ORNAMENT'AL, a. Serving to decorate; giving additional beauty; embellishing.Some think it most ...
38413 ornamentally ORNAMENT'ALLY, adv. In such a manner as to add embellishment.
38414 ornamented OR'NAMENTED, pp. Decorated; embellished; beautified.
38415 ornamenting OR'NAMENTING, ppr. Decorating; embellishing.
38416 ornate OR'NATE, a. [L. ornatus.] Adorned; decorated; beautiful.
38417 ornately OR'NATELY, adv. With decoration.
38418 ornateness OR'NATENESS, n. State of being adorned.
38419 ornature OR'NATURE, n. Decoration. [Little used.]
38420 orniscopics ORNISCOP'ICS, n. Divination by the observation of fowls.
38421 orniscopist ORNIS'COPIST, n. [Gr. a bird, and to view.]One who views the flight of fowls in order to foretell ...
38422 ornitholite ORNITH'OLITE, n. A petrified bird.
38423 ornithological ORNITHOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to ornithology.
38424 ornithologist ORNITHOL'OGIST, n. [See Ornithology.] A person who is skilled in the natural history of fowls, ...
38425 ornithology ORNITHOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a fowl, and discourse.]The science of fowls, which comprises a knowledge of ...
38426 ornithomancy ORNITH'OMANCY, n. [Gr. a fowl, and divination.]Augury, a species of divination by means of fowls, ...
38427 orohaned OR'OHANED, a. Bereft of parents or friends.
38428 orological OROLOG'ICAL, a. [See Orology.] Pertaining to a description of mountains.
38429 orologist OROL'OGIST, n. A describer of mountains.
38430 orology OROL'OGY, n. [Gr. a mountain, and discourse.] The science or description of mountains.
38431 orphan OR'PHAN, n. [Gr.]A child who is bereaved of father or mother or of both.OR'PHAN, a. Bereaved of ...
38432 orphanage OR'PHANAGE,
38433 orphanism OR'PHANISM, n. The state of an orphan.
38434 orphanotrophy ORPHANOT'ROPHY, n. [Gr. orphan, and food.] A hospital for orphans.
38435 orphean OR'PHEAN,
38436 orpheus OR'PHEUS, n. A fish found in the Mediterranean, broad, flat and thick, and sometimes weighing ...
38437 orphic OR'PHIC, a. Pertaining to Orpheus, the poet and musician; as Orphic hymns.
38438 orpiment OR'PIMENT, n. [L. auripigmentum; aurum, gold, and pigmentum.]Sulphuret of arsenic, found native ...
38439 orpine OR'PINE, n. A plant of the genus Sedum, lesser houseleek or live-long. The bastard orpine is of ...
38440 orrach OR'RACH, n. A plant of the genus Atriplex, used as a substitute for spinage.Wild orach is of the ...
38441 orrery OR'RERY, n. A machine so constructed as to represent by the movements of its parts, the motions ...
38442 orris OR'RIS, n.1. The plant iris, of which orris seems to be a corruption; fleur de lis or ...
38443 ort ORT, n. A fragment; refuse.
38444 ortalon OR'TALON, n. A small bird of the genus Alauda.
38445 orthite OR'THITE, n. [Gr. straight.] A mineral occurring in straight layers in felspath rock with albite, ...
38446 orthoceratite ORTHOCER'ATITE, n. [Gr. straight, and a horn.]The name of certain fossil univalve shells, straight ...
38447 orthodox OR'THODOX, a. [See Orthodoxy.]1. Sound in the christian faith; believing the genuine doctrines ...
38448 orthodoxly OR'THODOXLY, adv. With soundness of faith.
38449 orthodoxness OR'THODOXNESS, n. The state of being sound in the faith, or of according with the doctrines of ...
38450 orthodoxy OR'THODOXY, n. [Gr. right, true, and opinion, from to think.]1. Soundness of faith; a belief in ...
38451 orthodromic ORTHODROM'IC, a. [See orthodromy.] Pertaining to orthodromy.
38452 orthodromics ORTHODROM'ICS, n. The art of sailing in the arc of a great circle, which is the shortest distance ...
38453 orthodromy OR'THODROMY, n. [Gr. right, and course.] The sailing in a straight course.
38454 orthoepist OR'THOEPIST, n. [See Orthoepy.] One who pronounces words correctly, or who is well skilled in ...
38455 orthoepy OR'THOEPY, n. [Gr. right, and word, or to speak.]The art of uttering words with propriety; a ...
38456 orthogon OR'THOGON, n. [Gr. right, and angle.] A rectangular figure.
38457 orthogonal ORTHOG'ONAL, a. Right angled; rectangular.
38458 orthographer ORTHOG'RAPHER, n. [See Orthography.] One that spells words correctly, according to common usage.
38459 orthographic ORTHOGRAPH'IC,
38460 orthographical ORTHOGRAPH'ICAL, a. 1. Correctly spelled; written with the proper letters.2. Pertaining to the ...
38461 orthographically ORTHOGRAPH'ICALLY, adv.1. According to the rules of proper spelling.2. In the manner of ...
38462 orthography ORTHOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. right, and writing.]1. The art of writing words with the proper letters, ...
38463 orthology ORTHOL'OGY, n. [Gr. right, and discourse.] The right description of things.
38464 orthometry ORTHOM'ETRY, n. [Gr. right, and measure.]The art or practice of constructing verse correctly; the ...
38465 orthopny ORTHOP'NY, n. [Gr. right, erect, and breath; to breathe.]1. A species of asthma in which ...
38466 ortive OR'TIVE, a. [L. ortivus, from ortus, orior, to rise.]Rising, or eastern. The ortive amplitude of ...
38467 ortolan OR'TOLAN, n. [L. hortulanus, from hortus, a garden.]A bird of the genus Emberiza, about the size ...
38468 orts ORTS, n. Fragments; pieces; refuse.
38469 orval OR'VAL, n. The herb clary.
38470 orvietan ORVIE'TAN, n. An antidote or counter poison. [Not used.]
38471 oryctognostic ORYCTOGNOS'TIC, a. Pertaining to oryctognosy.
38472 oryctognosy ORYCTOG'NOSY, n. [Gr. fossil, and knowledge.]That branch of mineralogy which has for its object ...
38473 oryctography ORYCTOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. fossil, and to describe.]That part of natural history in which fossils are ...
38474 oryctology ORYCTOL'OGY, n. [Gr. fossil, and discourse.] That part of physics which treats of fossils.
38475 oscheocele OS'CHEOCELE, n. [Gr. the scrotum, and a tumor.] A rupture in the scrotum; scrotal hernia.
38476 oscillate OS'CILLATE, v.i. [L. oscillo, from ant. cillo, Gr. to move.]To swing; to move backward and ...
38477 oscillation OSCILLA'TION, n. [L. oscillatio.] Vibration; a moving backward and forward, or swinging like a ...
38478 oscillatory OS'CILLATORY, a. Moving backward and forward like a pendulum; swinging; as an oscillatory motion.
38479 oscitancy OS'CITANCY, n. [L. oscito, to yawn, from os, the mouth.]1. The act of gaping or yawning.2. ...
38480 oscitant OS'CITANT, a.1. Yawning; gaping.2. Sleepy; drowsy; dull; sluggish.
38481 oscitantly OS'CITANTLY, adv. Carelessly.
38482 oscitation OSCITA'TION, n. The act of yawning or gaping from sleepiness.
38483 osculation OSCULA'TION, n. [L. osculatio, a kissing.] In geometry, the contract between any given curve and ...
38484 osculatory OS'CULATORY, a. An osculatory circle, in geometry, is a circle having the same curvature with any ...
38485 osier OSIER, n. o'sher. A willow or water willow, or the twig of the willow, used in making baskets.
38486 osmazome OS'MAZOME, n. [Gr. odor, and juice.]A substance of an aromatic flavor, obtained from the flesh of ...
38487 osmium OS'MIUM, n. [Gr. odor.] A metal recently discovered, and contained in the ore of platinum. A ...
38488 osmund OS'MUND, n. A plant, or a genus of plants, osmunda, moonwort. The most remarkable species is the ...
38489 osnaburg OSNABURG, n. oz'nburg. A species of coarse linen imported from Osnaburg, in Germany.
38490 ospray OS'PRAY, n. [L. ossifraga; as, a bone, and frango, to break; the bone-breaker.]The sea-eagle, a ...
38491 osselet OS'SELET, n. [L. os, osis, a bone.]A hard substance growing on the inside of a horse's knee, among ...
38492 osseous OS'SEOUS, a. [L. osseus, from os, a bone.] Bony; resembling bone.
38493 ossicle OS'SICLE, n. [L. ossiculum.] A small bone.
38494 ossiferous OSSIF'EROUS, a. [L. os, a bone, and fero, to produce.] Producing or furnishing bones.
38495 ossific OSSIF'IC, a. [L. os, a bone, and facio, to make.]Having power to ossify or change carneous and ...
38496 ossification OSSIFICA'TION, n. [from ossify.] 1. The change or process of changing from flesh or other matter ...
38497 ossified OS'SIFIED, pp. Converted into bone, or a hard substance like bone.
38498 ossifrage OS'SIFRAGE, n. [L. ossifraga. See Ospray.]The ospray or sea-eagle. In Leviticus 11:13, it ...
38499 ossify OS'SIFY, v.t. [L. os, bone, anf facio, to form.]To form bone; to change from a soft animal ...
38500 ossivorous OSSIV'OROUS, a. [L. os, bone, and voro, to eat.]Feeding on bones; eating bones; as ossivorous ...
38501 ossuary OS'SUARY, n. [L. ossuarium.] A charnel house; a place where the bones of the dead are deposited.
38502 ost OST,
38503 ostensibility OSTENSIBIL'ITY, n. [See Ostensible.] The quality or state of appearing or being shown.
38504 ostensible OSTEN'SIBLE, a. [L. ostendo, to show.]1. That may be shown; proper or intended to be shown.2. ...
38505 ostensibly OSTEN'SIBLY, adv. In appearance; in a manner that is declared or pretended.An embargo and ...
38506 ostensive OSTEN'SIVE, a. [L. ostendo.] Showing; exhibiting. Ostensive demonstration, is one which plainly ...
38507 ostent OS'TENT, n. [L. ostentum, from ostendo.]1. Appearance; air; manner; mien. [Little used.]2. ...
38508 ostentate OS'TENTATE, v.t. [L. ostento.] To make an ambitious display of; to show or exhibit boastingly. ...
38509 ostentation OSTENTA'TION, n. [L. ostentatio.]1. Outward show or appearance.2. Ambitious display; vain show; ...
38510 ostentatious OSTENTA'TIOUS, a. 1. Making a display from vanity; boastful; fond of presenting one's endowments ...
38511 ostentatiously OSTENTA'TIOUSLY, adv. With vain display; boastfully.
38512 ostentatiousness OSTENTA'TIOUSNESS, n. Vain display; vanity; boastfulness.
38513 ostentator OSTENTA'TOR, n. [L.] One who makes a vain show; a boaster. [Little used.]
38514 ostentous OSTENT'OUS, a. Fond of making a show. [Little used.]
38515 osteocol OS'TEOCOL,
38516 osteocolla OSTEOCOL'LA, n. [Gr. a bone, and glue.] A carbonate of lime, a fossil formed by incrustation on ...
38517 osteocope OS'TEOCOPE, n. [Gr. a bone, and labor, uneasiness.]Pain in the bones; a violent fixed pain in any ...
38518 osteologer OSTEOL'OGER,
38519 osteologic OSTEOLOG'IC,
38520 osteological OSTEOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a description of the bones.
38521 osteologically OSTEOLOG'ICALLY, adv. According to osteology.
38522 osteologist OSTEOL'OGIST, n. [See Osteology.] One who describes the bones of animals.
38523 osteology OSTEOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a bone, and discourse.]1. A description of the bones; that part of anatomy ...
38524 ostiary OS'TIARY, n. [L. ostium, mouth.] The mouth or opening by which a river discharges its waters into ...
38525 ostler OSTLER. [See Hostler.]
38526 ostlery OSTLERY. [See Hostlery.]
38527 ostmen OST'MEN, n. plu. East men; Danish settlers in Ireland, so called.
38528 ostracism OSTRACISM, n. [Gr. from a shell, or potter's ware.]1. In Grecian antiquity, banishment by the ...
38529 ostracite OS'TRACITE, n. [Gr. from a shell.]An oyster shell in its fossil state, or a stone formed in the ...
38530 ostracize OS'TRACIZE, v.t. [See Ostracism.] To banish by the popular voice, particularly a person eminent ...
38531 ostrich OS'TRICH, n. [L. struthio-camelus; Gr. a sparrow, and an ostrich. The meaning of the name is not ...
38532 otacoustic OTACOUS'TIC, a. [Gr. ears, and to hear.] Assisting the sense of hearing; as an otacoustic ...
38533 otency OMNIP'OTENCE,'OTENCY, n. [L. omnipotens; omnis, all, and potens, powerful.]1. Almighty power; ...
38534 other OTH'ER, a. [Heb.]1. Not the same; different; not this or these.Then the other company which is ...
38535 othergates OTH'ERGATES, adv. [other and gate, for way, manner.] Of another manner. Obs.
38536 otherguise OTH'ERGUISE, adv. [other and guise, manner.] Of another kind. [corruptly pronounced otherguess.]
38537 otherwhere OTH'ERWHERE, adv. [other and where.] In some other place; or in other places.
38538 otherwhile OTH'ERWHILE,
38539 otherwhiles OTH'ERWHILES, adv. [other and while.] At other times.
38540 otherwise OTH'ERWISE, adv. [other and wise, manner.] 1. In a different manner.Thy father was a worthy ...
38541 otomo OT'OMO, n. A fowl of the Lagopus kind, about the size of a tame pigeon, a native of Germany, and ...
38542 otter OT'TER,
38543 ottoman OT'TOMAN, a. Designating something that pertains to the Turks or to their government; as the ...
38544 ouch OUCH, n. 1. A bezil or socket in which a precious stone or seal is set. Ex. 39.2. The blow given ...
38545 ought OUGHT. [See Aught, the true orthography.]
38546 ounce OUNCE, n. ouns. [L. uncia, the twelfth part of any thing; Gr; but the Greek is from Latin. Inch ...
38547 ounded OUND'ED,
38548 ounding OUND'ING, a. Waving. [L. unda. Not used.]
38549 ouphe OUPHE, n. oof'y. A fairy; a goblin; an elf. Obs.
38550 ouphen OUPHEN, n. oof'en. Elfish. Obs.
38551 our OUR, a. 1. Pertaining or belonging to us; as our country; our rights; our troops.2. Ours, which ...
38552 ouranography OURANOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. heaven, and to describe.] A description of the heavens.
38553 ourself OURSELF', pron. reciprocal. [our and self.] This is added after we and us, and sometimes is used ...
38554 ourselves OURSELVES, plu. of ourself. We or us, not others; added to we, by way of emphasis or opposition.We ...
38555 ouse OUSE, n. ooz. [from ooze.] Tanner's bark.
38556 ousel OUSEL, n. oo'zl. The blackbird, a species of the genus Turdus.
38557 oust OUST, n. [L. ustus.] A kiln to dry hops or malt.
38558 ousted OUST'ED, pp. Taken away; removed; ejected.
38559 ouster OUST'ER, n. Amotion of possession; disseizin; dispossession; ejection.Ouster of the freehold is ...
38560 ousting OUST'ING, ppr. Taking away; removing; ejecting.
38561 out OUT, adv. 1. Without; on the outside; not within; on the exterior or beyond the limits of any ...
38562 outact OUTACT', v.t. To do beyond; to exceed in act.He has made me heir to treasures, would make me ...
38563 outbalance OUTBAL'ANCE, v.t. To out weigh; to exceed in weight or effect.Let dull Ajax bear away my right, ...
38564 outbar OUTB'AR, v.t. To shut out by bars or fortification.These to outbar with painful pionings.
38565 outbid OUTBID', v.t. To bid more than another; to offer a higher price.For Indian spices, for Peruvian ...
38566 outbidden OUTBID'DEN, pp. Exceeded in the price offered.
38567 outbidder OUTBID'DER, n. One that outbids.
38568 outbidding OUTBID'DING, ppr. Bidding a price beyond another.
38569 outblown OUTBLOWN, pp. Inflated; swelled with wind.
38570 outblush OUTBLUSH', v.t. To exceed in rosy color.
38571 outborn OUT'BORN, a. Foreign; not native. [Little used.]
38572 outbound OUT'BOUND, a. Destined or proceeding from a country or harbor to a distant country or port; as an ...
38573 outbrave OUTBRA'VE, v.t.1. To bear down by more daring or insolent conduct.I would outstare the sternest ...
38574 outbrazen OUTBRA'ZEN, v.t. To bear down with a brazen face or impudence.
38575 outbreak OUT'BREAK, n. A bursting forth; eruption.The flash and outbreak of a fiery mind.
38576 outbreaking OUT'BREAKING, n. That which bursts forth.
38577 outbreathe OUTBRE'ATHE, v.t. 1. To weary by having better breath.2. To expire.
38578 outbud OUTBUD', v.i. To sprout forth.
38579 outbuild OUTBUILD, v.t. outbild'. To exceed in building, or in durability of building.
38580 outcant OUTCANT', v.t. To surpass in canting.
38581 outcast OUT'CAST, pp. or a. Cast out; thrown away; rejected as useless.OUT'CAST, n. One who is cast out ...
38582 outcept OUTCEPT, for except, is not in use.
38583 outclimb OUTCLIMB, v.t. To climb beyond.
38584 outcompass OUTCOM'PASS, v.t. To exceed due bounds.
38585 outcraft OUTCR'AFT, v.t. To exceed in cunning.
38586 outcry OUT'CRY, n.1. A vehement or loud cry; cry of distress.2. Clamor; noisy opposition or ...
38587 outdare OUTDA'RE, v.t. To dare or venture beyond.
38588 outdate OUTDA'TE, v.t. To antiquate; as outdated ceremonies. [Not used.]
38589 outdo OUTDO, v.t. pret. outdid; pp. outdone. [See Do.]To excel; to surpass; to perform beyond another.An ...
38590 outdoing OUTDOING, ppr. Excelling; surpassing in performance.OUTDOING, n. Excess in performance.
38591 outdone OUTDONE, pp. Of outdo.
38592 outdrink OUTDRINK', v.t. [See Drink.] To exceed in drinking.
38593 outdwell OUTDWELL', v.t. To dwell or stay beyond.
38594 outer OUT'ER, a. [comp. of out.] Being on the outside; external; opposed to inner; as the outer wall; ...
38595 outerly OUT'ERLY, adv. Towards the outside.
38596 outermost OUT'ERMOST, a. [superl. from outer.] Being on the extreme external part; remotest from the midst; ...
38597 outface OUTFA'CE, v.t. To brave; to bear down with an imposing front or with impudence; to stare down.
38598 outfall OUT'FALL, n. A fall of water; a canal.
38599 outfawn OUT'FAWN, v.t. To exceed in fawning or adulation.
38600 outfeast OUTFE'AST, v.t. To exceed in feasting.
38601 outfit OUT'FIT, n. A fitting out, as of a ship for a voyage; usually in the plural, outfits, the expenses ...
38602 outflank OUTFLANK', v.t. To extend the flank of one army beyond that of another.
38603 outfly OUTFLY, v.t. To fly faster than another; to advance before in flight or progress.
38604 outfool OUTFOOL', v.t. To exceed in folly.
38605 outform OUT'FORM, n. External appearance.
38606 outfrown OUTFROWN', v.t. To frown down; to overbear by frowning.
38607 outgate OUT'GATE, n. An outlet; a passage outward.
38608 outgeneral OUTGEN'ERAL, v.t. To exceed in generalship; to gain advantage over by superior military skill.
38609 outgive OUTGIVE, v.t. outgiv'. To surpass in giving.
38610 outgo OUTGO', v.t. [See Go.]1. To go beyond; to advance before in going; to go faster.2. To surpass; ...
38611 outgoing OUTGO'ING, ppr. Going beyond.
38612 outgrin OUTGRIN', v.t. To surpass in grinning.
38613 outgrow OUTGROW, v.t.1. To surpass in growth.2. To grow too great or too old for any thing. Children ...
38614 outgrown OUTGROWN, pp. Of outgrow.
38615 outguard OUT'GUARD, n. A guard at a distance from the main body of an army; or a guard at the farthest ...
38616 outherod OUTHER'OD, v.t. To surpass in enormity, absurdity or cruelty.
38617 outhouse OUT'HOUSE, n. A small house or building at a little distance from the main house.
38618 outjest OUTJEST', v.t. To overpower by jesting.
38619 outjuggle OUTJUG'GLE, v.t. To surpass in juggling.
38620 outknave OUTKNAVE, v.t. outna've. To surpass in knavery.
38621 outland OUT'LAND, a. Foreign. Obs.
38622 outlander OUT'LANDER, n. A foreigner; not a native. Obs.
38623 outlandish OUTLAND'ISH, a.1. Foreign; not native.Nevertheless, even him did outlandish women cause to ...
38624 outlast OUTL'AST, v.t. To last longer than something else; to exceed in duration. Candles laid in bran ...
38625 outlaw OUT'LAW, n. A person excluded from the benefit of the law, or deprived of its protection. ...
38626 outlawed OUT'LAWED, pp. Excluded from the benefit of law.
38627 outlawing OUT'LAWING, ppr. Depriving of the benefit of law.
38628 outlawry OUT'LAWRY, n. The putting a man out of the protection of law, or the process by which a man is ...
38629 outlay OUT'LAY, n. A laying out or expending; expenditure.
38630 outleap OUTLE'AP, v.t. To leap beyond; to pass by leaping.
38631 outlet OUT'LET, n. Passage outward; the place or the means by which any thing escapes or is discharged. ...
38632 outlicker OUT'LICKER, n. In ships, a small piece of timber fastened to the top of the poop.
38633 outlie OUTLI'E, v.t. To exceed in lying.
38634 outlier OUT'LIER, n. One who does not reside in the place with which his office or duty connects him.
38635 outline OUT'LINE, n. Contour; the line by which a figure is defined; the exterior line.OUT'LINE, v.t. To ...
38636 outlive OUTLIVE, v.t. outliv'. 1. To live beyond; to survive; to live after something has ceased; as, a ...
38637 outliver OUTLIV'ER, n. A survivor.
38638 outlook OUTLOOK', v.t.1. To face down; to browbeat.2. To select. [Not in use.]
38639 outlope OUT'LOPE, n. [See Lope and Leap.] An excursion. [Not used.]
38640 outluster OUTLUS'TER,
38641 outlustre OUTLUS'TRE, v.t. To excel in brightness.
38642 outlying OUTLY'ING, a.1. Lying or being at a distance from the main body or design.2. Being on the ...
38643 outmarch OUTM'ARCH, v.t. To march faster than; to march so as to leave behind.The horse outmarched the ...
38644 outmeasure OUTMEASURE, v.t. outmezh'ur. To exceed in measure or extent.
38645 outmost OUT'MOST, a. Farthest outward; most remote from the middle.
38646 outnumber OUTNUM'BER, v.t. To exceed in number. The troops outnumbered those of the enemy.
38647 outpace OUTPA'CE, v.t. To outgo; to leave behind.
38648 outparamour OUTPAR'AMOUR, v.t. [See Paramour.] To exceed in keeping mistresses.
38649 outparish OUT'PARISH, n. A parish lying without the walls, or on the border.
38650 outpart OUT'PART, n. A part remote from the center or main part.
38651 outpass OUTP'ASS, v.t. To pass beyond; to exceed in progress.
38652 outpoise OUTPOISE, v.t. outpoiz'. To outweigh.
38653 outporch OUT'PORCH, n. An entrance.
38654 outpost OUT'POST, n.1. A post or station without the limits of a camp, or at a distance from the main body ...
38655 outpour OUTPOUR, v.t.1. To pour out; to send forth in a stream.2. To effuse.
38656 outpouring OUT'POURING, n. A pouring out; effusion.
38657 outpray OUTPRA'Y, v.t. To exceed in prayer or in earnestness of entreaty.
38658 outpreach OUTPRE'ACH, v.t. To surpass in preaching; to produce more effect in inculcating lessons or ...
38659 outprize OUTPRI'ZE, v.t. To exceed in value or estimated worth.
38660 outrage OUT'RAGE, v.t. [L. ultra, beyond.]To treat with violence and wrong; to abuse by rude or insolent ...
38661 outrageous OUTRA'GEOUS, a.1. Violent; furious; exorbitant; exceeding all bounds of moderation; as outrageous ...
38662 outrageously OUTRA'GEOUSLY, adv. With great violence; furiously; excessively.
38663 outrageousness OUTRA'GEOUSNESS, n. Fury; violence; enormity.
38664 outraze OUTRA'ZE, v.t. To raze to extermination.
38665 outre OUTRE, a. ootra'y. Being out of the common course or limits; extravagant.
38666 outreach OUTRE'ACH, v.t. To go or extend beyond.
38667 outreason OUTRE'ASON, v.t. To excel or surpass in reasoning.
38668 outreckon OUTRECK'ON, v.t. To exceed in assumed computation.
38669 outreign OUTREIGN, v.t. To reign through the whole of.
38670 outride OUTRI'DE, v.t. To pass by riding; to ride faster than.OUTRI'DE, v.i. To travel about on ...
38671 outrider OUT'RIDER, n. 1. A summoner whose office is to cite men before the sheriff. [Not used.]2. One ...
38672 outrigger OUT'RIGGER, n. In seamen's language, a strong beam fixed on the side of a ship and projecting from ...
38673 outright OUT'RIGHT, adv. 1. Immediately; without delay; at once.2. Completely.
38674 outrival OUTRI'VAL, v.t. To surpass in excellence.
38675 outroar OUTROAR, v.t. To exceed in roaring.
38676 outrode OUT'RODE, n. An excursion.
38677 outroot OUTROOT', v.t. To eradicate; to extirpate.
38678 outrun OUTRUN', v.t1. To exceed in running; to leave behind in running.2. To exceed; as, to outrun one's ...
38679 outsail OUTSA'IL, v.t. To sail faster than; to leave behind in sailing.
38680 outscape OUTSCA'PE, n. Power of escaping. [Not used.]
38681 outscorn OUTSCORN', v.t. To bear down or confront by contempt; to despise.
38682 outscourings OUTSCOUR'INGS, n. [out and scour.] Substances washed or scoured out.
38683 outsell OUTSELL', v.t.1. To exceed in amount of sales.2. To exceed in the prices of things sold.3. To ...
38684 outset OUT'SET, n. Beginning; first entrance on any business.Every thing almost depends upon giving a ...
38685 outshine OUTSHI'NE, v.t.1. To send forth brightness or luster.2. To excel in luster or excellence; as ...
38686 outshoot OUTSHOOT', v.t.1. To exceed in shooting.2. To shoot beyond.
38687 outshut OUTSHUT', v.t. To shut out or exclude.
38688 outside OUTSI'DE, n.1. The external part of a thing; the part, end or side which forms the surface or ...
38689 outsit OUTSIT', v.t. To sit beyond the time of any thing.
38690 outskip OUTSKIP', v.t. To avoid by flight.
38691 outskirt OUT'SKIRT, n. Border; outpost; suburb.
38692 outsleep OUTSLEE'P, v.t. To sleep beyond.
38693 outsoar OUTSOAR, v.t. To soar beyond.
38694 outsound OUTSOUND', v.t. To surpass in sound.
38695 outspeak OUTSPE'AK, v.t. To speak something beyond; to exceed.
38696 outsport OUTSPORT, v.t. To sport beyond; to outdo in sporting.
38697 outspread OUTSPREAD', v.t To extend; to spread; to diffuse.
38698 outstand OUTSTAND', v.t. 1. To resist effectually; to withstand; to sustain without yielding. [Little ...
38699 outstanding OUTSTAND'ING, ppr. 1. Resisting effectually. [Little used.]2. Projecting outward.3. Not ...
38700 outstare OUTSTA'RE, v.t. To face down; to browbeat; to outface with effrontery; as we say, to stare out of ...
38701 outstep OUTSTEP', v.t. To step or go beyond; to exceed.
38702 outstorm OUTSTORM', v.t. To overbear by storming.Insults the tempest and outstorms the skies.
38703 outstreet OUT'STREET, n. A street in the extremities of a town.
38704 outstretch OUTSTRETCH', v.t. To extend; to stretch or spread out; to expand.
38705 outstride OUTSTRI'DE, v.t. To surpass in striding.
38706 outstrip OUTSTRIP', v.t. To outgo; to outrun; to advance beyond.
38707 outswear OUTSWEAR, v.t. To exceed in swearing; to overpower by swearing.
38708 outsweeten OUTSWEE'TEN, v.t. To exceed in sweetness.
38709 outswell OUTSWELL', v.t. To overflow; to exceed in swelling.
38710 outtalk OUTTALK, v.t. outtauk'. To overpower by talking; to exceed in talking.
38711 outthrow OUTTHROW, v.t. To throw out or beyond.
38712 outtongue OUTTONGUE, v.t. outtung'. To bear down by talk, clamor or noise.
38713 outtop OUTTOP', v.t. To overtop. [Not used.]
38714 outvalue OUTVAL'UE, v.t. To exceed in price or value.
38715 outvenom OUTVEN'OM, v.t. To exceed in poison.
38716 outvie OUTVI'E, v.t. To exceed; to surpass.
38717 outvillain OUTVIL'LAIN, v.t. To exceed in villainy.
38718 outvoice OUTVOICE, v.t. outvois'. To exceed in roaring or clamor. [Not used.]
38719 outvote OUTVO'TE, v.t. To exceed in the number of votes given; to defeat by plurality of suffrages.
38720 outwalk OUTWALK, v.t. outwauk'.1. To walk faster than; to leave behind in walking.2. To exceed the ...
38721 outwall OUT'WALL, n. 1. The exterior wall of a building or fortress.2. Superficial appearance. ...
38723 outward-bound OUTWARD-BOUND', a. Proceeding from a port or country.
38722 outward OUT'WARD, a. [L. versus.]1. External; exterior; forming the superficial part; as the outward coat ...
38724 outwardly OUT'WARDLY, adv.1. Externally; opposed to inwardly; as outwardly content, but inwardly uneasy.2. ...
38725 outwards OUT'WARDS, adv. 1. To the outer parts; tending or directed towards the exterior.The light falling ...
38726 outwash OUTWASH', v.t. To wash out; to cleanse from. [Little used.]
38727 outwatch OUTWATCH', v.t. To surpass in watching.
38728 outwear OUTWEAR, v.t.1. To wear out. [Not used.]2. To pass tediously to the end.By the stream, if I the ...
38729 outweed OUTWEE'D, v.t. To weed out; to extirpate, as a weed.
38730 outweep OUTWEE'P, v.t. To exceed in weeping.
38731 outweigh OUTWEIGH, v.t. outwa'y. [See Weigh.]1. To exceed in weight.2. To exceed in value, influence or ...
38732 outwell OUTWELL', v.t. or i. To pour out. [Not used.]
38733 outwent OUTWENT', pret. of outgo.
38734 outwhore OUTWHO'RE, v.t. To exceed in lewdness.
38735 outwin OUTWIN', v.t. To get out of. [Not used.]
38736 outwind OUTWIND, v.t. To extricate by winding; to unloose.
38737 outwing OUTWING', v.t. To move faster on the wing; to outstrip.
38738 outwit OUTWIT', v.t. To surpass in design or stratagem; to overreach; to defeat or frustrate by superior ...
38739 outwork OUT'WORK, n. The part of a fortification most remote from the main fortress or citadel.
38740 outworn OUTWORN, pp. [See Wear.] Worn out; consumed by use.
38741 outworth OUTWORTH, v.t. To exceed in value.
38742 outwrest OUTWREST, v.t. outrest'. To extort; to draw from or forth by violence.
38743 outwrite OUTWRITE, v.t. outri'te. To surpass in writing.
38744 outwrought OUTWROUGHT, pp. outraut'. [See Work.] Outdone; exceeded in act or efficacy.
38745 outzany OUTZA'NY, v.t. [See Zany.] To exceed in buffoonery.
38746 oval O'VAL, a. [L. ovum, an egg.]1. Of the shape or figure of an egg; oblong; curvilinear; resembling ...
38747 ovarious OVA'RIOUS, a. Consisting of eggs; as ovarious food.
38748 ovary O'VARY, n. [L. ovarium, from ovum, an egg.]The part of a female animal in which the eggs are ...
38750 ovate-lanceolate OVATE-LAN'CEOLATE, a. Having something of the form of an egg and a lance, inclining to the latter.
38751 ovate-subulate OVATE-SUB'ULATE, a. Having something of the form of an egg and an awl, but most tending to the ...
38749 ovate O'VATE,
38752 ovated O'VATED, a. [L. ovatus, from ovum, an egg.] Egg-shaped; as an ovate leaf.
38753 ovation OVA'TION, n. [L. ovatio.] In Roman antiquity, a lesser triumph allowed to commanders who had ...
38754 ovato-oblong OVATO-OB'LONG, a. Oblong in the shape of an egg, or with the end lengthened.
38755 oven OVEN, n. uv'n.An arch of brick or stone work, for baking bread and other things for food. Ovens ...
38756 over O'VER, prep. [L. super., Gr.]1. Across; from side to side; implying a passing or moving either ...
38757 overabound OVERABOUND', v.i. To abound more than enough; to be superabundant.
38758 overact OVERACT', v.t. To act or perform to excess; as, he overacted his part.OVERACT', v.i. To act more ...
38759 overagitate OVERAG'ITATE, v.t. To agitate or discuss beyond what is expedient.
38760 overalls O'VERALLS, n. A kind of trousers.
38761 overanxious OVERANX'IOUS, a. Anxious to excess.
38762 overarch OVER'ARCH, v.t. To arch over; to cover with an arch.Brown with o'erarching shades.
38763 overawe OVERAWE, v.t. overaw'. To restrain by awe, fear or superior influence.The kind was present in ...
38764 overbalance OVERBAL'ANCE, v.t. To weigh down; to exceed in weight, value or importance. The evils which ...
38765 overbattle OVERBAT'TLE, a. Too fruitful; exuberant. [Not used.]
38766 overbear OVERBEAR, v.t. [See Bear.] To bear down; to repress; to subdue.The point of reputation, when the ...
38767 overbearing OVERBEARING, ppr.1. Bearing down; repressing.2. a. Haughty and dogmatical; disposed or tending ...
38768 overbend OVERBEND', v.t. To bend or stretch to excess.
38769 overbid OVERBID', v.t. 1. To bid or offer beyond.2. To bid or offer more than an equivalent.
38770 overblow OVERBLOW, v.i. 1. To blow with too much violence; a seaman's phrase.2. To blow over, or be past ...
38771 overblown OVERBLOWN, pp. Blown by and gone; blown away; driven by; past.And when this cloud of sorrow's ...
38772 overboard OVERBOARD, adv. Literally, over the side of a ship; hence, out of a ship or from on board; as, to ...
38773 overbrow OVERBROW', v.t. To hang over.
38774 overbuilt OVERBUILT, pp. overbilt'. Built over.
38775 overbulk OVERBULK', v.t. To oppress by bulk. [Not used.]
38776 overburden OVERBUR'DEN, v.t. To load with too great weight.
38777 overburdened OVERBUR'DENED, pp. Overloaded.
38778 overburn OVERBURN', v.t. To burn too much.
38779 overbusy OVERBUSY, a. overbiz'zy. Too busy; officious.
38780 overbuy OVERBUY', v.t. To buy at too dear a rate.
38781 overcanopy OVERCAN'OPY, v.t. To cover as with a canopy.
38782 overcare OVERCA'RE, n. Excessive care or anxiety.
38783 overcareful OVERCA'REFUL, a. Careful to excess.
38784 overcarry OVERCAR'RY, v.t. To carry too far; to carry or urge beyond the proper point.
38785 overcast OVERC'AST, v.t. 1. To cloud; to darken; to cover with gloom.The clouds that overcast our morn ...
38786 overcautious OVERCAU'TIOUS, a. Cautious or prudent to excess.
38787 overcharge OVERCH'ARGE, v.t.1. To charge or load to excess; to cloy; to oppress.The heavy load of abundance ...
38788 overclimb OVERCLIMB, v.t. To climb over.
38789 overcloud OVERCLOUD', v.t. To cover or overspread with clouds.
38790 overcloy OVERCLOY', v.t. To fill beyond satiety.
38791 overcold OVERCOLD, a. Cold to excess.
38792 overcome OVERCOME, v.t. [See Come.]1. To conquer; to vanquish; to subdue; as, to overcome enemies in ...
38793 overcomer OVERCOMER, n. One who vanquishes or surmounts.
38794 overcomingly OVERCOMINGLY, adv. With superiority.
38795 overconfidence OVERCON'FIDENCE, n. Excessive confidence.
38796 overcorn OVERCORN', v.t. To corn to excess.
38797 overcount OVERCOUNT', v.t. To rate above the true value.
38798 overcover OVERCOV'ER, v.t. To cover completely.
38799 overcredulous OVERCRED'ULOUS, a. Too apt to believe.
38800 overcrow OVERCROW, v.t. To crow as in triumph. [Not used.]
38801 overcurious OVERCU'RIOUS, a. Curious or nice to excess.
38802 overdate OVERDA'TE, v.t. To date beyond the proper period.
38803 overdight OVERDI'GHT, a. Covered over. Obs.
38804 overdiligent OVERDIL'IGENT, a. Diligent to excess.
38805 overdo OVERDO, v.t. 1. To do or perform too much.2. To harass; to fatigue; to oppress by too much ...
38806 overdone OVERDONE, pp.1. Overacted; acted to excess.2. Wearied or oppressed by too much labor.3. Boiled, ...
38807 overdose OVERDOSE, n. Too great a dose.
38808 overdress OVERDRESS', v.t. To dress to excess; to adorn too much.
38809 overdrink OVERDRINK', v.t. To drink to excess.
38810 overdrive OVERDRI'VE, v.t. To drive too hard, or beyond strength. Gen. 33.
38811 overdry OVERDRY', v.t. To dry too much.
38812 overeager OVERE'AGER, a. Too eager; too vehement in desire.
38813 overeagerly OVERE'AGERLY, adv. With excessive eagerness.
38814 overeagerness OVERE'AGERNESS, n. Excess of earnestness.
38815 overeat OVERE'AT, v.t. To eat to excess.
38816 overelegant OVEREL'EGANT, a. Elegant to excess.
38817 overempty OVEREMP'TY, v.t. To make too empty.
38818 overeye OVEREYE, v.t. 1. To superintend; to inspect. [Little used.]2. To observe to remark.
38819 overfall O'VERFALL, n. A cataract; the fall of a river.
38820 overfatigue OVERFATIGUE, n. overfatee'g. To fatigue to excess.OVERFATIGUE, v.t. overfatee'g. To fatigue to ...
38821 overfeed OVERFEE'D, v.t. To feed to excess.
38822 overfill OVERFILL', v.t. To fill to excess; to surcharge.
38823 overfloat OVERFLOAT, v.t. To overflow; to inundate.
38824 overflourish OVERFLOURISH, v.t. overflur'ish. To make excessive display or flourish.
38825 overflow OVERFLOW, v.t.1. To spread over, as water; to inundate; to cover with water or other fluid.2. To ...
38826 overflowing OVERFLOWING, ppr. Spreading over, as a fluid; inundating; running over the brim or ...
38827 overflowingly OVERFLOWINGLY, adv. Exuberantly; in great abundance.
38828 overflush OVERFLUSH', v.t. To flush to excess.
38829 overflushed OVERFLUSH'ED, pp.1. Flushed to excess; reddened to excess.2. Elated to excess.
38830 overfly OVERFLY', v.t. To pass over or cross by flight.
38831 overforward OVERFOR'WARD, a. Forward to excess.
38832 overforwardness OVERFOR'WARDNESS, a. Too great forwardness or readiness; officiousness.
38833 overfreight OVERFREIGHT, v.t. overfra'te. [See Freight.]To load too heavily; to fill with too great quantity ...
38834 overfruitful OVERFRU'ITFUL, a. Too rich; producing superabundant crops.
38835 overget OVERGET', v.t. To reach; to overtake. [Not used.]
38836 overgild OVERGILD', v.t. To gild over; to varnish.
38837 overgird OVERGIRD', v.t. To gird or bind too closely.
38838 overglance OVERGL'ANCE, v.t. To glance over; to run over with the eye.
38839 overgo OVERGO', v.t.1. To exceed; to surpass.2. To cover. [Not used.]
38840 overgone OVERGONE, pp. overgawn'. Injured; ruined.
38841 overgorge OVERGORGE, v.t. overgorj'. To gorge to excess.
38842 overgrassed OVERGR'ASSED, pp. Overstocked with grass; overgrown with grass.
38843 overgreat OVERGREAT, a. Too great.
38844 overgrow OVERGROW, v.t.1. To cover with growth or herbage.2. To grow beyond; to rise above.OVERGROW, v.i. ...
38845 overgrowth OVERGROWTH, n. Exuberant or excessive growth.
38846 overhale OVERHALE. [See Overhaul.]
38847 overhandle OVERHAND'LE, v.t. To handle too much; to mention too often.
38848 overhang OVERHANG', v.t.1. To impend or hang over.2. To jut or project over.OVERHANG', v.i. To jut over.
38849 overharden OVERH'ARDEN, v.t. To harden too much; to make too hard.
38850 overhastily OVERHASTILY, adv. In too much haste.
38851 overhastiness OVERHASTINESS, n. Too much haste; percipitation.
38852 overhasty OVERHASTY, a. Too hasty; precipitate.
38853 overhaul OVERHAUL', v.t. 1. To spread over.2. To turn over for examination; to separate and inspect.3. ...
38854 overhead OVERHEAD, adv. overhed'. Aloft; above; in the zenith or ceiling.
38855 overhear OVERHE'AR, v.t. To hear by accident; to hear what is not addressed to the hearer, or not intended ...
38856 overheard OVERHE'ARD, pp. Heard by accident.
38857 overheat OVERHE'AT, v.t. To heat to excess.
38858 overhele OVERHE'LE, v.t. To cover over. [Not used.]
38859 overhend OVERHEND', v.t. To overtake. [Not used.]
38860 overjoy OVERJOY', v.t. To give great joy to; to transport with gladness.
38861 overlabor OVERLA'BOR, v.t.1. To harass with toil.2. To execute with too much care.
38862 overlade OVERLA'DE, v.t. To load with too great a cargo or other burden.
38863 overladen OVERLA'DEN, pp. Overburdened; loaded to excess.
38864 overlaid OVERLA'ID, pp. [See Overlay.] Oppressed with weight; smothered; covered over.
38865 overlarge OVERL'ARGE, a. Too large; too great.
38866 overlargeness OVERL'ARGENESS, n. Excess of size.
38867 overlash OVERLASH', v.i. 1. To exaggerate. [Little used.]2. To proceed to excess. [Little used.]
38868 overlay OVERLA'Y, v.t.1. To lay too much upon; to oppress with incumbent weight; as a country overlaid ...
38869 overlaying OVERLA'YING, n. A superficial covering. Ex. 38.
38870 overleap OVERLE'AP, v.t. To leap over; to pass or move from side to side by leaping; as, to overleap a ...
38871 overleather O'VERLEATHER,
38872 overleaven OVERLEAVEN, v.t. overlev'n.1. To leaven too much; to cause to rise and swell too much.2. To mix ...
38873 overlether O'VERLETHER, n. The leather which forms or is intended to form the upper part of a shoe; that ...
38874 overliberal OVERLIB'ERAL, a. Too liberal; too free; abundant to excess; as overliberal diet.
38875 overlight OVERLIGHT, n. Too strong a light.
38876 overlive OVERLIVE, v.t. overliv'. To outlive; to live longer than another; to survive. [We generally use ...
38877 overliver OVERLIV'ER, n. One that lives longest; a survivor.
38878 overload OVERLOAD, v.t. To load with too heavy a burden or cargo; to fill to excess; as, to overload the ...
38879 overlong OVERLONG', a. Too long.
38880 overlook OVERLOOK', v.t.1. To view from a higher place; applied to persons; as, to stand on a hill and ...
38881 overlooker OVERLOOK'ER, n. One that overlooks.
38882 overloop OVERLOOP, now written orlop, which see.
38883 overlove OVERLOVE, v.t. To love to excess; to prize or value too much.
38884 overly O'VERLY, a. Careless; negligent; inattentive. [Not used.]
38885 overmast OVERM'AST, v.t. To furnish with a mast or with masts that are too long or too heavy for the weight ...
38886 overmasted OVERM'ASTED, pp. Having masts too long or too heavy for the ship.
38887 overmaster OVERM'ASTER, v.t. To overpower; to subdue; to vanquish; to govern.
38888 overmatch OVERMATCH', v.t. To be too powerful for; to conquer; to subdue; to oppress by superior ...
38889 overmeasure OVERMEASURE, v.t. overmezh'ur. To measure or estimate too largely.OVERMEASURE, n. overmezh'ur. ...
38890 overmix OVERMIX', v.t. To mix with too much.
38891 overmodest OVERMOD'EST, a. Modest to excess; bashful.
38892 overmost O'VERMOST, a. Highest; over the rest in authority.
38893 overmuch OVERMUCH', a. Too much; exceeding what is necessary or proper.OVERMUCH', adv. In too great a ...
38894 overmuchness OVERMUCH'NESS, n. Superabundance. [Not used and barbarous.]
38895 overmultitude OVERMUL'TITUDE, v.t. To exceed in number. [Not used.]
38896 overname OVERNA'ME, v.t. To name over or in a series. [Not used.]
38897 overneat OVERNE'AT, a. Excessively neat.
38898 overnight OVERNIGHT, n. Night before bed-time. [See Over, prep.]
38899 overnoise OVERNOISE, v.t. overnoiz'. To overpower by noise.
38900 overoffended OVEROFFEND'ED, a. Offended to excess.
38901 overoffice OVEROF'FICE, v.t. To lord by virtue of an office. [Not used.]
38902 overofficious OVEROFFI'CIOUS, a. Too busy; too ready to intermeddle; too importunate.
38903 overpaint OVERPA'INT, v.t. To color or describe too strongly.
38904 overpass OVERP'ASS, v.t. 1. To cross; to go over.2. To overlook; to pass without regard.3. To omit, as in ...
38905 overpassed OVERP'ASSED,
38906 overpast OVERP'AST, pp. Passed by; passed away; gone; past.
38907 overpay OVERPA'Y, v.t1. To pay too much or more than is due.2. To reward beyond the price or merit.
38908 overpeer OVERPEE'R, v.t. To overlook; to hover over. [Not used.]
38909 overpeople OVERPE'OPLE, v.t. To overstock with inhabitants.
38910 overperch OVERPERCH', v.t. To perch over or above; to fly over.
38911 overpersuade OVERPERSUA'DE, v.t. To persuade or influence against one's inclination or opinion.
38912 overpicture OVERPIC'TURE, v.t. To exceed the representation or picture.
38913 overplus O'VERPLUS, n. [over and L. plus, more.]Surplus; that which remains after a supply, or beyond a ...
38914 overply OVERPLY', v.t. To ply to excess; to exert with too much vigor.
38915 overpoise OVERPOISE, v.t. overpoiz'. To outweigh.OVERPOISE, n. overpoiz'. Preponderant weight.
38916 overpolish OVERPOL'ISH, v.t. To polish too much.
38917 overponderous OVERPON'DEROUS, a. To heavy; too depressing.
38918 overpost OVERPOST, v.t. To hasten over quickly.
38919 overpower OVERPOW'ER, v.t.1. To affect with a power or force that cannot be borne; as, the light overpowers ...
38920 overpress OVERPRESS', v.t. 1. To bear upon with irresistible force; to crush; to overwhelm.2. To overcome ...
38921 overprize OVERPRI'ZE, v.t. To value or prize at too high a rate.
38922 overprompt OVERPROMPT', a. Too prompt; too ready or eager.
38923 overpromptness OVERPROMPT'NESS, n. Excessive promptness; precipitation.
38924 overproportion OVERPROPO'RTION, v.t. To make of too great proportion.
38925 overquietness OVERQUI'ETNESS, n. Too much quietness.
38926 overrake OVERRA'KE, v.t. To break in upon a ship. When the waves break in upon a ship riding at anchor, it ...
38927 overrank OVERRANK', a. Too rank or luxuriant.
38928 overrate OVERRA'TE, v.t. To rate at too much; to estimate at a value or amount beyond the truth.
38929 overreach OVERRE'ACH, v.t.1. To reach beyond in any direction; to rise above; to extend beyond.2. To ...
38930 overreacher OVERRE'ACHER, n. One that overreaches; one that deceives.
38931 overreaching OVERRE'ACHING, n. The act of deceiving; a reaching too far.
38932 overread OVERRE'AD, v.t. To read over; to peruse. [Not used.]
38933 overred OVERRED', v.t. To smear with a red color. [Not used.]
38934 overrid OVERRID',
38935 overridden OVERRID'DEN, pp. Rid to excess.
38936 override OVERRI'DE, v.t. 1. To ride over. [Not used.]2. To ride too much; to ride beyond the strength of ...
38937 overripen OVERRI'PEN, v.t. To make too ripe.
38938 overroast OVERROAST, v.t. To roast too much.
38939 overrule OVERRU'LE, v.t.1. To influence or control by predominant power; to subject to superior authority. ...
38940 overruler OVERRU'LER, n. One who controls, directs or governs.
38941 overruling OVERRU'LING, pp.1. Controlling; subjecting to authority.2. a. Exerting superior and controlling ...
38942 overrun OVERRUN', v.t. 1. To run or spread over; to grow over; to cover all over. The sluggard's farm is ...
38943 overrunner OVERRUN'NER, n. One that overruns.
38944 overrunning OVERRUN'NING, ppr. Spreading over; ravaging; changing the disposition of types.
38945 oversaturate OVERSAT'URATE, v.t. To saturate to excess.
38946 oversaturated OVERSAT'URATED, pp. More than saturated.
38947 oversaturating OVERSAT'URATING, ppr. Saturating to excess.
38948 overscrupulous OVERSCRU'PULOUS, a. Scrupulous to excess.
38949 oversea OVERSEA, a. Foreign; from beyond sea.
38950 oversee OVERSEE', v.t.1. To superintend; to overlook, implying care.2. To pass unheeded; to omit; to ...
38951 overseen OVERSEE'N, pp.1. Superintended.2. Mistaken; deceived. [Not used.]
38952 overseer OVERSEE'R, n. 1. One who overlooks; a superintendent; a supervisor.2. An officer who has the ...
38953 overset OVERSET', v.t1. To turn from the proper position or basis; to turn upon the side, or to turn ...
38954 overshade OVERSHA'DE, v.t. To cover with shade; to cover with any thing that causes darkness; to render dark ...
38955 overshadow OVERSHAD'OW, v.t1. To throw a shadow over; to overshade.2. To shelter; to protect; to cover with ...
38956 overshadower OVERSHAD'OWER, n. One that throws a shade over any thing.
38957 overshadowing OVERSHAD'OWING, ppr. Throwing a shade over; protecting.
38958 overshoot OVERSHOOT', v.t. 1. To shoot beyond the mark.2. To pass swiftly over.To overshoot one's self, to ...
38959 overshot OVERSHOT', pp. Shot beyond.
38960 oversight O'VERSIGHT, n.1. Superintendence; watchful care. 1Peter 5.2. Mistake; an overlooking; omission; ...
38961 oversize OVERSI'ZE, v.t.1. To surpass in bulk or size. [Not much used.]2. To cover with viscid matter.
38962 overskip OVERSKIP', v.t. 1. To skip or leap over; to pass by leaping.2. To pass over.3. To escape.
38963 oversleep OVERSLEE'P, v.t. To sleep too long; as, to oversleep the usual hour of rising.
38964 overslip OVERSLIP', v.t. To slip or pass without notice; to pass undone, unnoticed or unused; to omit; to ...
38965 overslow OVERSLOW, v.t. To render slow; to check; to curb. [Not used.]
38966 oversnow OVERSNOW, v.t. To cover with snow. [Not much used.]
38967 oversold OVERSOLD, pp. Sold at too high a price.
38968 oversoon OVERSOON', adv. Too soon.
38969 oversorrow OVERSOR'ROW, v.t. To grieve or afflict to excess.
38970 overspan OVERSPAN', v.t. To reach or extend over.
38971 overspeak OVERSPE'AK, v.t. To speak too much; to use too many words.
38972 overspent OVERSPENT', pp. [See Spend.] Harassed or fatigued to an extreme degree.
38973 overspread OVERSPREAD, v.t. overspred'.1. To spread over; to cover over. The deluge overspread the earth.2. ...
38974 overstand OVERSTAND', v.t. To stand too much on price or conditions; to lose a sale by holding the price too ...
38975 overstare OVERSTA'RE, v.t. To stare wildly. [Not used.]
38976 overstep OVERSTEP', v.t. To step over or beyond; to exceed.
38977 overstock OVERSTOCK', n. Superabundance; more than is sufficient.OVERSTOCK', v.t. 1. To fill too full; to ...
38978 overstore OVERSTO'RE, v.t. To store with too much; to supply or fill with superabundance.
38979 overstrain OVERSTRA'IN, v.i. To strain to excess; to make too violent efforts.OVERSTRA'IN, v.t. To stretch ...
38980 overstrew OVERSTREW',
38981 overstrike OVERSTRI'KE, v.t. To strike beyond.
38982 overstrow OVERSTROW, v.t. To spread or scatter over.
38983 overstrown OVERSTROWN, pp. Spread or scattered over.
38984 oversupply OVERSUPPLY', v.t. To furnish more than is sufficient.
38985 oversway OVERSWA'Y, v.t. To overrule; to bear down; to control.
38986 overswell OVERSWELL', v.t. To swell or rise above; to overflow.
38987 overt O'VERT, a. [L. aperio.]Open to view; public; apparent; as overt virtues; an overt essay. But the ...
38988 overtake OVERTA'KE, v.t.1. To come up with in a course, pursuit, progress or motion; to catch.The enemy ...
38989 overtask OVERT'ASK, v.t. To impose too heavy a task or injunction on.
38990 overtax OVERTAX', v.t. To tax too heavily.
38991 overthrow OVERTHROW, v.t. [See Throw.]1. To turn upside down.His wife overthrew the table.2. To throw ...
38992 overthrower OVERTHROWER, n. One that overthrows, defeats or destroys.
38993 overthwart OVERTHWART', a. 1. Opposite; being over the way or street.2. Crossing at right angles.3. Cross; ...
38994 overthwartly OVERTHWART'LY, adv.1. Across; transversely.2. Perversely.
38995 overthwartness OVERTHWART'NESS, n. 1. The state of being athwart or lying across.2. Perverseness; pervicacity.
38996 overtire OVERTI'RE, v.t. To tire to excess; to subdue by fatigue.
38997 overtitle OVERTI'TLE, v.t. To give too high a title to.
38998 overtly O'VERTLY, adv. Openly; in open view; publicly.
38999 overtook OVERTOOK', pret. of overtake.
39000 overtop OVERTOP', v.t.1. To rise above the top.2. To excel; to surpass.3. To obscure; to make of less ...
39001 overtower OVERTOW'ER, v.t. To soar too high.
39002 overtrip OVERTRIP', v.t. To trip over; to walk nimbly over.
39003 overtrust OVERTRUST', v.t. To trust with too much confidence.
39004 overture O'VERTURE, n. 1. Opening; disclosure; discovery. [In this literal sense, little used.]2. ...
39005 overturn OVERTURN', v.t.1. To overset; to turn or throw from a basis or foundation; as, to overturn a ...
39006 overturnable OVERTURN'ABLE, a. That may be overturned. [Not much used.]
39007 overturned OVERTURN'ED, pp. Overset; overthrown.
39008 overturner OVERTURN'ER, n. One that overturns or subverts.
39009 overturning OVERTURN'ING, ppr. Oversetting; overthrowing; subverting.OVERTURN'ING, n. An oversetting; ...
39010 overvail OVERVA'IL,
39011 overvalue OVERVAL'UE, v.t. To rate at too high a price.
39012 overveil OVERVEIL, v.t. To cover; to spread over.
39013 overvote OVERVO'TE, v.t. To outvote; to outnumber in votes given.
39014 overwatch OVERWATCH', v.t. To watch to excess; to subdue by long want of rest.
39015 overwatched OVERWATCH'ED, a. Tired by too much watching.
39016 overweak OVERWE'AK, a. Too weak; too feeble.
39017 overweary OVERWE'ARY, v.t. To subdue with fatigue.
39018 overweather OVERWEATHER, v.t. overweth'er. [See Weather.] To bruise or batter by violence of weather.
39019 overween OVERWEE'N, v.i. [seen is obsolete, except in composition. See the word.]1. To think too highly; ...
39020 overweening OVERWEE'NING, ppr. 1. Thinking too highly or conceitedly.2. a. That thinks too highly, ...
39021 overweeningly OVERWEE'NINGLY, adv. With too much vanity or conceit.
39022 overweigh OVERWEIGH, v.t. To exceed in weight; to cause to preponderate; to outweigh; to overbalance.
39023 overweight OVERWEIGHT, n. Greater weight; preponderance.
39024 overwhelm OVERWHELM', v.t.1. To overspread or crush beneath something violent and weighty, that covers or ...
39025 overwhelming OVERWHELM'ING, ppr. Crushing with weight or numbers.
39026 overwhelmingly OVERWHELM'INGLY, adv. In a manner to overwhelm.
39027 overwing OVERWING', v.t. To outflank; to extend beyond the wing of an army.
39028 overwise OVERWI'SE, a. s as z. Wise to affectation.
39029 overwiseness OVERWI'SENESS, n. Pretended or affected wisdom.
39030 overword OVERWORD', v.t. To say too much.
39031 overwork OVERWORK', v.t. To work beyond the strength; to cause to labor too much; to tire.
39032 overworn OVERWORN, a. 1. Worn out; subdued by toil.2. Spoiled by time.
39033 overwrestle OVERWRESTLE, v.t. overres'l. To subdue by wrestling.
39034 overwrought OVERWROUGHT, pp. overraut'. 1. Labored to excess.2. Worked all over; as overwrought with ...
39035 overyeared OVERYE'ARED, a. Too old. [Not used.]
39036 overzealed OVERZE'ALED, a. Too much excited with zeal; ruled by too much zeal.
39037 overzealous OVERZEALOUS, a. overzel'ous. Too zealous; eager to excess.
39038 ovicular OVIC'ULAR, a. [from L. ovum, an egg.] Pertaining to an egg.
39039 oviduct O'VIDUCT, n. [L. ovum, an egg, and ductus, a duct.]In animals, a passage for the egg from the ...
39040 oviform O'VIFORM, a. [L. ovum, egg, and forma, form.] Having the form or figure of an egg.
39041 ovine O'VINE, a. [L. ovinus, from ovis, sheep.] Pertaining to sheep; consisting of sheep.
39042 oviparous OVIP'AROUS, a. [L. ovum, egg, and pario, to produce.]Producing eggs, or producing young from eggs. ...
39043 ovoid O'VOID, a. [L. ovum, egg, and Gr. form.] Having the shape of an egg.
39044 ovolo O'VOLO, n. In architecture, a round molding, the quarter of a circle; called also the quarter ...
39045 owe OWE, v.t. o. [Gr., Eng. own.]1. To be indebted; to be obliged or bound to pay. The merchants ...
39046 owing OWING, ppr. [This is used in a passive form, contrary to analogy, for owen or owed. But the use ...
39047 owl OWL, n. [L. ulula, ululo.]A fowl of the genus Strix, that flies chiefly in the night.
39048 owler OWL'ER, n. One that conveys contraband goods.
39049 owlet OWL'ET, n. An owl, which see.
39050 owling OWL'ING, n. The offense of transporting wool or sheep out of England, contrary to the ...
39051 own OWN, a. [See Owe and Ought.]1. Belonging to; possessed; peculiar; usually expressing property ...
39052 owned OWNED, pp. 1. The legal title being vested in; as, the property is owned by a company.2. ...
39053 owner OWNER, n. The rightful proprietor; one who has the legal or rightful title, whether he is the ...
39054 ownership OWNERSHIP, n. Property; exclusive right of possession; legal or just claim or title. The ...
39055 owning OWNING, ppr.1. Having the legal or just title to.2. Acknowledging; avowing; confessing.
39056 owre OWRE, n. [L. urus.] A beast. [Not used.]
39057 owse OWSE, n. Bark of oak beaten or ground to small pieces.
39058 owser OW'SER, n. Bark and water mixed in a tan-pit.
39060 ox-eye OX'-EYE, n. [ox and eye.] A plant of the genus Buphthalmum; another of the genus Anthemis; also, ...
39061 ox-eyed OX'-EYED, a. Having large full eyes, like those of an ox.
39059 ox OX, n. plu. oxen. pron. ox'n.The male of the bovine genus of quadrupeds, castrated and grown to his ...
39062 oxalate OX'ALATE, n. [See Oxalic.] In chimistry, a salt formed by a combination of the oxalic acid with a ...
39063 oxalic OXAL'IC, a. [Gr. sorrel,, acid.]Pertaining to sorrel. The oxalic acid is the acid of sorrel.
39064 oxbane OX'BANE, n. A plant, buphonos.
39065 oxfly OX'FLY, n. A fly hatched under the skin of cattle.
39066 oxgang OX'GANG, n. [ox and gang, going.] In ancient laws, as much land as an ox can plow in a year; said ...
39067 oxheal OX'HEAL, n. A plant.
39068 oxiodic OXIOD'IC, a. Pertaining to or consisting of the compound of oxygen and iodine.
39069 oxlike OX'LIKE, a. [ox and like.] Resembling an ox.
39070 oxlip OX'LIP, n. A plant, the cowslip.
39071 oxstall OX'STALL, n. A stall or stand for oxen.
39072 oxtongue OXTONGUE, n. ox'tung. A plant of the genus Picris.
39073 oxy-iodine OXY-I'ODINE, n. In chimistry, a compound of the chloriodic and oxiodic acids.
39074 oxycrate OX'YCRATE, n. [Gr. acid, and to mix.]A mixture of water and vinegar. [Little used.]
39075 oxyd OX'YD, n. [Gr. acid, sharp, vinegar.] In chimistry, a substance formed by the combination of a ...
39076 oxydability OXYDABIL'ITY, n. The capacity of being converted into an oxyd.
39077 oxydable OX'YDABLE, a. Capable of being converted into an oxyd.
39078 oxydate OX'YDATE, v.t. To convert into an oxyd, as metals and other substances, by combination with ...
39079 oxydated OX'YDATED, pp. Converted into an oxyd.
39080 oxydating OX'YDATING, ppr. Converting into an oxyd.
39081 oxydation OXYDA'TION, n. The operation or process of converting into an oxyd, as metals or other substances, ...
39082 oxydize OX'YDIZE, v.t. To oxydate, which see.
39083 oxydized OX'YDIZED, pp. Oxydated.
39084 oxydizement OX'YDIZEMENT, n. Oxydation.
39085 oxydizing OX'YDIZING, ppr. Oxydating. [Oxydize and its derivatives are now more generally used than ...
39086 oxygen OX'YGEN, n. [Gr. acid, and to generate.]In chimistry, oxygen or oxygen gas is an element or ...
39087 oxygenate OX'YGENATE, v.t. To unite or cause to combine with oxygen, without the evolution of heat or light; ...
39088 oxygenated OX'YGENATED, pp. United with oxygen.
39089 oxygenating OX'YGENATING, ppr. Uniting with oxygen.
39090 oxygenation OXYGENA'TION, n. The act, operation or process of combining with oxygen.
39091 oxygenizable OX'YGENIZABLE, a. Capable of being oxygenized.
39092 oxygenize OX'YGENIZE, v.t. To oxygenate, which see.
39093 oxygenized OX'YGENIZED, pp. United with oxygen.
39094 oxygenizement OX'YGENIZEMENT, n. Oxygenation.
39095 oxygenizing OX'YGENIZING, ppr. Oxygenating.
39096 oxygenous OXYG'ENOUS, a. Pertaining to oxygen, or obtained from it.
39097 oxygon OX'YGON, n. [Gr. sharp, and an angle.]A triangle having three acute angles.
39098 oxymel OX'YMEL, n. [Gr. acid, and honey.]A mixture of vinegar and honey.
39099 oxymoron OXYMO'RON, n. [Gr. a smart saying which at first view appears foolish.]A rhetorical figure, in ...
39100 oxyrrhodine OXYR'RHODINE, n. [compounded of Gr. acid, and rose.]A mixture of two parts of the oil of roses ...
39101 oxytone OX'YTONE, a. [Gr. sharp, and tone.]Having an acute sound.OX'YTONE, n. An acute sound.
39102 oyer OY'ER, n. 1. In law, a hearing or trial of causes. A court of oyer and terminer is constituted by ...
39103 oyes OYES, This word is used by the sheriff or his substitute in making proclamation in court, ...
39104 oylet-hole OYLET-HOLE. [See Eyelet-hole.]
39106 oyster-shell OYS'TER-SHELL, n. The hard covering or shell of the oyster.
39107 oyster-wench OYS'TER-WENCH,
39108 oyster-wife OYS'TER-WIFE,
39109 oyster-woman OYS'TER-WOMAN, n. A woman whose occupation is to sell oysters; a low woman.
39105 oyster OYS'TER, n. [L. ostrea; Gr. probably connected in origin with bone, and named from its hardness.]A ...
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gratulate

GRAT'ULATE, v.t. [L. gratulor, from gratus, pleasing, grateful.]

1. To express joy or pleasure to a person, on account of his success, or the reception of some good; to salute with declarations of joy; to congratulate. [The latter word is more generally used.]

To gratulate the gentle princes there.

2. To wish or express joy to.

3. To declare joy for; to mention with joy.

About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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