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Friday - October 31, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: a

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ID Word Definition
2 a-posteriori A-POSTERIORI, [L. posterior, after.]Arguments a posteriori, are drawn from effect, consequences or ...
3 a-re A-RE,
1 a A is the first letter of the Alphabet in most of the known languages of the earth; in the Ethiopic, ...
4 aam AAM, n. A measure of liquids among the Dutch equal to 288 English pints.
5 aaronic AARON'IC, a. Pertaining to Aaron, the Jewish High Priest, or to the priesthood of which he was the ...
6 ab AB, In English names, is an abbreviation of Abbey or Abbot.AB, a prefix to words of Latin origin, ...
7 abacist AB'ACIST, n. One that casts accounts; a calculator.
8 aback ABACK, adv. [At, on or towards the back. See Back] Towards the back; on the back part; backward. ...
9 abacot AB'ACOT, n. The cap of State, formerly used by English Kings, wrought into the figure of two ...
10 abactor ABAC'TOR, n. [Latin from abigo, ab and ago, to drive.] In law, one that feloniously drives away or ...
11 abacus AB'ACUS, n. [L. anything flat, as a cupboard, a bench, a slate, a table or board for games; Gr. ...
12 abada AB'ADA, n. A wild animal of Africa, of the size of a steer, or half grown colt, having two horns ...
13 abaddon ABAD'DON, n. [Heb. Ch. Syr. Sam. to be lost, or destroyed, to perish.]1. The destroyer, or angel ...
14 abaft AB'AFT, adv. or prep. [Sax. eft or aeft, again. Hence efter or aefter, after, subsequent; Sax. ...
15 abagun AB'AGUN, n. The name of a fowl in Ethiopia, remarkable for its beauty and for a sort of horn, ...
16 abaisance ABAISANCE, [See Obeisance.]
17 abalienation ABALIENA'TION, n. The transferring of title to property. [See Alienation.]
18 abandon ABAN'DON, v.t. [Fr. abandonner; Sp. and Port. abandonar; It. abbandonare; said to be from ban, and ...
19 abandoned ABAN'DONED, pp. Wholly forsaken or deserted.2. Given up, as to a vice; hence, extremely wicked, or ...
20 abandoner ABAN'DONER, n. One who abandons.
21 abandoning ABAN'DONING, ppr. Forsaking or deserting wholly; renouncing; yielding one's self without ...
22 abandonment ABAN'DONMENT, n. 1. A total desertion; a state of being forsaken.2. In commerce, the relinquishing ...
23 abanga ABAN'GA, n. The ady; a species of Palmtree. [See Ady.]
24 abannition ABANNI'TION, n. [Low Lat.]A banishment for one or two years for manslaughter. [Not used.]
25 abaptiston ABAPTIS'TON, n. The perforating part of the trephine, an instrument used in trepanning.
26 abare ABA'RE, v.t. [Sax abarian. See Bare.]To make bare; to uncover. [Not in use.]
27 abarticulation ABARTICULA'TION, n. [See Articulate.]In anatomy, that species of articulation or structure of ...
28 abas ABAS', n. A weight in Persia used in weighing pearls, one eighth less than the European carat.
29 abase ABA'SE, v.t. [Fr abaisser, from bas, low, or the bottom; W. bais; Latin and Gr. basis; Eng. base; ...
30 abased ABA'SED, pp. Reduced to a low state, humbled, degraded.In heraldry, it is used of the wings of ...
31 abasement ABA'SEMENT, n. The act of humbling or bringing low; also a state of depression, degradation, or ...
32 abash ABASH', v.t. [Heb. and Ch. bosh, to be confounded, or ashamed.]To make the spirits to fall; to ...
33 abashed ABASH'ED, pp. Confused with shame; confounded; put to silence; followed by at.
34 abashing ABASH'ING, ppr. Putting to shame or confusion.
35 abashment ABASH'MENT, n. Confusion from shame. [Little used.]
36 abasing ABA'SING, ppr. Humbling, depressing, bringing low.
37 abassi ABAS'SI, or ABAS'SIS, n. A silver coin of Persia, of the value of twenty cents, about ten pence ...
38 abassis ABAS'SI, or ABAS'SIS, n. A silver coin of Persia, of the value of twenty cents, about ten pence ...
39 abatable ABA'TABLE, a. That may or can be abated; as an abatable writ or nuisance.
40 abate ABA'TE, v.t. [Heb. Ch., to beat. The Saxon has the participle gebatod, abated. The prefix is sunk ...
41 abated ABA'TED, pp. Lessened; decreased; destroyed; mitigated; defeated; remitted; overthrown.
42 abatement ABA'TEMENT, n. 1. The act of abating; the state of being abated.2. A reduction, removing, or ...
43 abater ABA'TER, n. The person or thing that abates.
44 abating ABA'TING, ppr. Pulling down, diminishing, defeating, remitting.
45 abatis AB'ATIS, Rubbish. In fortification, piles of trees, or branches of trees sharpened, and laid with ...
46 abator ABA'TOR, n. A person who enters into a freehold on the death of the last possessor, before the ...
47 abattis AB'ATTIS, n. [from beating or pulling down.]
48 abature AB'ATURE, n. [from abate.] Grass beaten or trampled down by a stag in passing.
49 abb ABB, n. Among weavers, yarn for the warp. Hence abb-wool is wool for the abb.
50 abba AB'BA, n. In the Chaldee and Syriac, a father, and figuratively a superior. appen.In the Syriac, ...
51 abbacy AB'BACY, n. [from abba, Low Lat, abbatia.] The dignity, rights and privileges of an abbot. It ...
52 abbatial ABBA'TIAL, a.
53 abbatical ABBAT'ICAL, a. Belonging to an abbey.
54 abbe AB'BE, n. Ab'by, [from abba.]In a monastic sense, the same as an abbot; but more generally, a ...
55 abbess AB'BESS, n. [from abba.]A female superior or governess of a nunnery, or convent of nuns, having ...
57 abbey-lubber AB'BEY-LUBBER, n. A name given to monks, in contempt for their idleness.
56 abbey AB'BEY, n. plu. abbeys, [from abba.]A monastery or society of persons of either sex, secluded from ...
58 abbot AB'BOT, n. [formerly abbat, from abba, latinized abbas, or from Heb. plural.] The superior or ...
59 abbotship AB'BOTSHIP, n. The state of an abbot.
60 abbreuvoir ABBREUVOIR, n. [Fr. from abreuver, to water.]Among masons, the joint between stones in a wall, to ...
61 abbreviate ABBRE'VIATE, v.t. [from Latin abbrevio, brevio, from brevis, short]1. To shorten; to make shorter ...
62 abbreviated ABBRE'VIATED, pp. 1. Shortened; reduced in length; abridged.2. In botany an abbreviated perianth ...
63 abbreviating ABBRE'VIATING, ppr. Shortening; contracting in length or into a smaller compass.
64 abbreviation ABBREVIA'TION, n. 1. The act of shortening or contracting.2. A letter or a few letters used for ...
65 abbreviator ABBRE'VIATOR, n. One who abridges or reduces to a smaller compass.
66 abbreviators ABBRE'VIATORS, a college of seventy-two persons in the chancery of Rome, whose duty is to draw up ...
67 abbreviatory ABBRE'VIATORY, n. Shortening, contracting.
68 abbreviature ABBRE'VIATURE, n. A letter or character for shortening; an abridgment, a compend.
69 abdals AB'DALS, n. The name of certain fanatics in Persia, who, in excess of zeal, sometimes run into the ...
70 abderite AB'DERITE, n. An inhabitant of Abdera, a maritime town in Thrace. Democritus is so called, from ...
71 abdicant AB'DICANT, a. [See Abdicate.] Abdicating; renouncing.
72 abdicate AB'DICATE, v.t. [L. abdica; ab and dico, to dedicate, to bestow, but the literal primary sense of ...
73 abdicated AB'DICATED, pp. Renounced; relinquished without a formal resignation; abandoned.
74 abdicating AB'DICATING, ppr. Relinquishing without a formal resignation; abandoning.
75 abdication ABDICA'TION, n. 1. The act of abdicating; the abandoning of an office or trust, without a formal ...
76 abdicative AB'DICATIVE, a. Causing or implying abdication. [Little used.]
77 abditive AB'DITIVE, a. [L. abdo, to hide; ab and do.] Having the power or quality of hiding. [Little ...
78 abditory AB'DITORY, n. A place for secreting or preserving goods.
79 abdomen AB'DOMEN, or ABDO'MEN, n. [L. perhaps abdo and omentum.]1. The lower belly or that part of the ...
80 abdominal ABDOM'INAL, a. Pertaining to the lower belly.ABDOM'INAL, n. plu. abdominals. In ichthyology the ...
81 abdominous ABDOM'INOUS, a. Pertaining to the abdomen; having a large belly.
82 abduce ABDU'CE, v.t. [L. adduco, to lead away, of ab and duco, to lead. See Duke.]To draw from; to ...
83 abducent ABDU'CENT, a. Drawing from, pulling back; used of those muscles which pull back certain parts of ...
84 abduction ABDUC'TION, n. 1. In a general sense, the act of drawing apart, or carrying away.2. In surgery, ...
85 abductor ABDUC'TOR, n. In anatomy, a muscle which serves to withdraw, or pull back a certain part of the ...
86 abear ABEA'R, v.t. abare, To bear; to behave. obs.
87 abearance ABEA'RANCE, n. [from abear, now disused from bear, to carry.] Behavior, demeanor. [Little used.]
88 abecedarian ABECEDA'RIAN, n. [a word formed from the first four letters of the alphabet.] One who teaches the ...
89 abecedary ABECE'DARY, a. Pertaining to, or formed by the letters of the alphabet.
90 abed ABED', adv. [See Bed.] On or in bed.
91 abel-tree ABE'LE or ABEL-TREE, n. An obsolete name of the while poplar. [See Poplar.]
92 abele ABE'LE or ABEL-TREE, n. An obsolete name of the while poplar. [See Poplar.]
93 abelians ABE'LIANS, ABELO'NIANS or A'BELITES, in Church history, a sect in Africa which arose in the reign ...
94 abelites ABE'LIANS, ABELO'NIANS or A'BELITES, in Church history, a sect in Africa which arose in the reign ...
95 abelmosk A'BELMOSK, n. A trivial name of a species of hibiscus, or Syrian mallow. The plant rises on a ...
96 abelonians ABE'LIANS, ABELO'NIANS or A'BELITES, in Church history, a sect in Africa which arose in the reign ...
97 aberrance ABER'RANCE, [L. aberrans, aberro, to wander from; of ab and ABER'RANCY, erro, to wander.]A ...
98 aberrant ABER'RANT, a. Wandering, straying from the right way. [Rarely used.]
99 aberration ABERRA'TION, n. [L. aberratio.] 1. The act of wandering from the right way; deviation from truth ...
100 aberring ABER'RING, part, a. Wandering; going astray.
101 aberruncate ABERRUN'CATE, v.t. [L. averrunco.] To pull up by the roots; to extirpate utterly. [Not used.]
102 abet ABET' v.t. [Sax. betan, gebatan; properly to push forward, to advance; hence to amend, to revive, ...
103 abetment ABET'MENT, n. The act of abetting.
104 abetted ABETTED, pp. Incited, aided, encouraged to a crime.
105 abetting ABETTING, ppr. Counselling, aiding or encouraging to a crime.
106 abettor ABETTOR, n. One who abets, or incites, aids or encourages another to commit a crime. In treason, ...
107 abevacuation ABEVACUA'TION, n. [ab and evacuation.]In medicine, a partial evacuation of morbid humors of the ...
108 abeyance ABEY'ANCE, n. pron. abayance. [Norm. abbaiaunce, or abaizance, in expectation; boyance, ...
109 abhor ABHOR', v.t. [L abhorreo, of ab and horreo, to set up bristles, shiver or shake; to look ...
110 abhorred ABHOR'RED, pp. Hated extremely, detested.
111 abhorrence ABHOR'RENCE, n. Extreme hatred, detestation, great aversion.
112 abhorrency ABHOR'RENCY,
113 abhorrent ABHOR'RENT, a. 1. Hating, detesting, struck with abhorrence.2. Contrary, odious, inconsistent ...
114 abhorrently ABHOR'RENTLY, adv. With abhorrence.
115 abhorrer ABHOR'RER, n. One who abhors.
116 abhorring ABHOR'RING, ppr. Having great aversion, detesting. As a noun, it is used in Isaiah lxvi, for the ...
117 abib A'BIB, n. [Heb. swelling, protuberant. To produce the first or early fruit; a full grown ear of ...
118 abide ABI'DE, v. i. pert. and part. abode.abada, to be, or exist, to continue; W. bod, to be; to dwell, ...
119 abider ABI'DER, n. One who dwells or continues.
120 abiding ABI'DING, ppr. Dwelling; remaining; continuing; enduring; awaiting.ABI'DING, n. Continuance; ...
121 abidingly ABI'DINGLY, adv. In a manner to continue; permanently.
122 ability ABIL'ITY, n. [L. habilitas, ableness, fitness, from habeo, to have or hold.]1. Physical power, ...
123 abintestate ABINTEST'ATE, a. [L. ab and intestatus - dying without a will, from in and tester, to bear ...
124 abject ABJECT', v.t. To throw away; to cast out. Obs.
125 abjectedness ABJECT'EDNESS, n. A very low or despicable condition. [Little used.]
126 abjection ABJEC'TION, n. A state of being cast away, hence a low state; meanness of spirit; baseness.
127 abjectly AB'JECTLY, adv. In a contemptible manner; meanly; servilely.
128 abjectness AB'JECTNESS, n. the state of being abject; meanness; servility.
129 abjuration ABJURA'TION, n. [See Abjure.]1. The act of abjuring; a renunciation upon oath; as "an abjuration ...
130 abjure ABJU'RE, v.t. [L. abjuro, to deny upon oath, from ab and juro, to swear.]1. To renounce upon ...
131 abjured ABJU'RED, pp. Renounced upon oath; solemnly recanted.
132 abjurer ABJU'RER, n. One who abjures.
133 abjuring ABJU'RING, ppr. Renouncing upon oath; disclaiming with solemnity.
134 abjurratory ABJUR'RATORY, a. Containing abjuration
135 ablactate ABLAC'TATE, v.t. [L. ablacto; from ab and lac, milk.] to wean from the breast. [Little used.]
136 ablactation ABLACTA'TION, n. [L. ab and lae, milk. Lacto, to suckle.]1. In medical authors, the weaning of a ...
137 ablaqueation ABLAQUEA'TION, [L. ablaqueatio, from ab and laquear, a roof or covering.]A laying bare the roots of ...
138 ablation ABLA'TION, n. [L. ab and latio, a carrying.]A carrying away. In medicine, the taking from the ...
139 ablative AB'LATIVE, a. [L.ablativus; L. ablatus, from aufero, to carry away, of ab and fero.]A word applied ...
141 able-bodied A'BLE-BODIED, a. Having a sound strong body, or a body of competent strength for service. In ...
140 able ABLE, a. a'bl. [L. habitis]1. Having physical power sufficient; having competent power or ...
142 ablen AB'LEN, or AB'LET, n. A small fresh water fish, the bleak.
143 ableness A'BLENESS, n. Ability of body or mind; force; vigor; capability.
144 ablepsy AB'LEPSY, n. Want of sight; blindness.
145 abler A'BLER, and A'BLEST, Comp. and superl. of able.
146 ablest A'BLER, and A'BLEST, Comp. and superl. of able.
147 ablet AB'LEN, or AB'LET, n. A small fresh water fish, the bleak.
148 ablocate AB'LOCATE, v.t. [L. abloco, ab and loco, to let our.] To let out; to lease.
149 ablocation ABLOCA'TION, n. A letter to hire.
150 ablude ABLU'DE, v.t. [L. abludo, ab and ludo, to play.]To be unlike; to differ. [Not used.]
151 abluent AB'LUENT, a. [L. abluo, to wash away; ab and luo, or lavo, to wash.]Washing clean; cleansing by ...
152 ablution ABLU'TION, n. [L. ablutio, from ab and luo or lavo to wash.]1. In a general sense, the act of ...
153 ably A'BLY, adv. In an able manner; with great ability.
154 abnegate AB'NEGATE, v.t. To deny. [Not used.]
155 abnegation ABNEGA'TION, n. [L. abnego, to deny, from ab and nego; Eng. nay; L. nee, not.] A denial; a ...
156 abnegator AB'NEGATOR, n. One who denies, renounces, or opposes any thing.
157 abnodation ABNODA'TION, n. [L. abnodo; ab and nodus, a knot.] The act of cutting away the knots of trees.
158 abnormity ABNORM'ITY, n. [L. abnormis, irregular; ab and norma, a rule.] Irregularity; deformity. [Little ...
159 abnormous ABNORM'OUS, a. [L. abnormis, supra.] Irregular; deformed. [Little used.]
160 aboard ABOARD, adv. [a and board. See Board.] Within a ship, vessel, or boat.To go aboard, to enter a ...
161 abodance ABO'DANCE, n. [from bode.] An omen. [Not used.]
162 abode ABO'DE, pret. of abideABO'DE, n. [See Abide.] 1. Stay; continuance in a place; residence for a ...
163 abodement ABO'DEMENT, n. [from body.] A secret anticipation of something future.
164 aboding ABO'DING, n. Presentiment; prognostication.
165 abolish ABOL'ISH, v.t. [L. abolco; from ab and oleo, olesco, to grow.]1. To make void; to annul; to ...
166 abolishable ABOL'ISHABLE, a. That may be annulled, abrogated, or destroyed, as a law, rite, custom, &c.
167 abolished ABOL'ISHED, pp. annulled; repealed; abrogated, or destroyed.
168 abolisher ABOL'ISHER, n. One who abolishes.
169 abolishing ABOL'ISHING, ppr. Making void; annulling; destroying.
170 abolishment ABOL'ISHMENT, n. The act of annulling; abrogation; destruction.
171 abolition ABOLI'TION, n. abolishun. The act of abolishing; or the state of being abolished; an annulling; ...
172 abominable ABOM'INABLE, a. [See Abominate.] 1. Very hateful; detestable; lothesome.2. This word is ...
173 abominableness ABOM'INABLENESS, n. The quality or state of being very odious; hatefulness.
174 abominably ABOM'INABLY, adv. 1. Very odiously; detestably; sinfully. 1Kings xxi.2. In vulgar language, ...
175 abominate ABOM'INATE, v.t. [L. abomino, supposed to be formed by ab and omen; to deprecate as ominous; may ...
176 abominated ABOM'INATED, pp. Hated utterly, detested; abhorred.
177 abominating ABOM'INATING, ppr. Abhorring; hating extremely.
178 abomination ABOMINA'TION, n. 1. Extreme hatred; detestation.2. The object of detestation, a common ...
179 abord ABO'RD, n. [Fr. See Border.] Literally, arrival, but used for first appearance, manner of ...
180 aborea ABO'REA, n. A species of duck, called by Edwards, the black-bellied whistling duck. This fowl is ...
181 aboriginal ABORIG'INAL, a. [L. ab and origo, origin. See Origin.]First; original; primitive; aboriginal ...
182 aborinines ABORIN'INES, n. plur. Aboriginals - but not an English word.It may be well to let it pass into ...
183 aborsement ABORSEMENT, n. abors'ment. [See Abort.]Abortion. [Not in use.]
184 abort ABORT', v.i. [L. aborto; ab and ortus, orior.]To miscarry in birth. [Not in use.]ABORT', n. an ...
185 abortion ABOR'TION, n. [L. abortio, a miscarriage; usually deduced from ab and orior.]1. The act of ...
186 abortive ABOR'TIVE, a. 1. Brought forth in an immature state; failing, or coming to naught, before it is ...
187 abortively ABOR'TIVELY, adv. Immaturely; in an untimely manner.
188 abortiveness ABOR'TIVENESS, n. The state of being abortive; a failing in the progress to perfection or ...
189 abortment ABORT'MENT, n. An untimely birth.
190 abound ABOUND', v. i. [L. abundo. If this word is from L. unda, a wave, the latter has probably lost its ...
191 abounding ABOUND'ING, ppr. Having in great plenty; being in great plenty, being very prevalent; generally ...
192 about ABOUT', prep. [Gr. butan, without, [see but,] literally, around, on the outside.]1. Around; on the ...
194 above-cited ABOVE-CITED, Cited before, in the preceding part of a book or writing.
195 above-ground ABOVE-GROUND, Alive, not buried.
196 above-mentioned ABOVE-MENTIONED, Mentioned before. A. Bp. Abbrev. for Archbishop.
193 above ABOVE', prep.1. Literally, higher in place.The fowls that fly above the earth. Gen. i. 20.2. ...
197 abracadabra ABRACADAB'RA, The name of a deity worshipped by the Syrians: a cabalistic word. The letters of ...
198 abrade ABRA'DE, v.t. [L. abrado, to scrape, from rado.]To rub or wear off; to waste by friction; used ...
199 abraded ABRA'DED, pp. Rubbed or worn off; worn; scraped.
200 abrading ABRA'DING, ppr. Rubbing off; wearing.
201 abrahamic ABRAHAM'IC, a. Pertaining to Abraham, the patriarch, as Abrahamic Covenant.
202 abrasion ABRA'SION, n. abra'zhun. The act of wearing or rubbing off; also substance worn off by attrition.
203 abreast ABREAST', adv. abrest', [from a and breast.]1. Side by side; with the breasts in a line.Two men ...
204 abridge ABRIDGE', v.t. abridj', [G. short, or its root, from the root of break or a verb of that ...
205 abridged ABRIDG'ED, pp. Made shorter; epitomized; reduced to a smaller compass; lessened; deprived.
206 abridger ABRIDG'ER, n. One who abridges; one who makes a compend.
207 abridging ABRIDG'ING, ppr. shortening; lessening; depriving; debarring.
208 abridgment ABRIDG'MENT, n. 1. An epitome; a compend, or summary of a book.2. Diminution; contraction; ...
209 abroach ABROACH, adv. [See Broach.]Broached; letter out or yielding liquor, or in a posture for letting ...
210 abroad ABROAD, adv. abrawd'. [See Broad]In a general sense, at large; widely; not confined to narrow ...
211 abrogate AB'ROGATE, v.t. [L abrago, to repeal. from ab and rogo, to ask or propose. See the English reach. ...
212 abrogated AB'ROGATED, pp. Repealed; annulled by an act of authority.
213 abrogating AB'ROGATING, ppr. Repealing by authority; making void.
214 abrogation ABROGA'TION, n. the act of abrogating; a repeal of authority of the legislative power.
215 abrood ABROOD', adv. [See Brood.] In the action of brooding. [Not in use.]
216 abrooding ABROOD'ING, n. A sitting abrood. [Not in use.]
217 abrook ABROOK', v.t. To brook, to endure. [Not in use. See Brook.]
218 abrotanum ABRO'TANUM, n. A species of plant arranged under the Genus, Artemisia; called also southern wood.
219 abrupt ABRUPT', a. [L. abruptus, from abrumpo, to break off, of ab and rumpo. See Rupture.]1. ...
220 abruption ABRUP'TION, n. A sudden breaking off; a violent separation of bodies.
221 abruptly ABRUPT'LY, adv. suddenly; without giving notice, or without the usual forms; as, the Minister left ...
222 abruptness ABRUPT'NESS, n. 1. A state of being broken; craggedness; steepness.2. Figuratively, suddenness; ...
223 abscess AB'SCESS, n. [L. abscessus, from ab and cedo, to go from.]An imposthume. A collection of morbid ...
224 abscind ABSCIND', vt. [L. abscindo.] To cut off. [Little used.]
225 absciss AB'SCISS, n. [L. abscissus, from ab and scindere, to cut; See Scissors.]In conics, a part of the ...
226 abscission ABSCIS'SION, n. [See Absciss.]1. A cutting off, or a begin cut off. In surgery, the separation of ...
227 abscond ABSCOND', v.i. [L. abscondo, to hide, of abs and condo, to hide, i.e. to withdraw, or to thrust ...
228 absconder ABSCOND'ER, n. One who withdraws from public notice, or conceals himself from public view.
229 absconding ABSCOND'ING, ppr. Withdrawing privately from public view; as, an absconding debtor, who confines ...
230 absence AB'SENCE, n. [L. absens, from absum, abesse, to be away; ab and sum.]1. A state of being at a ...
231 absent AB'SENT, a. 1. Not present; not in company; at such a distance as to prevent communication. It ...
232 absentee ABSENTEE', n. One who withdraws from his country, office or estate; one who removed to a distant ...
233 absenter ABSENT'ER, n. One who absents himself.
234 absentment ABSENT'MENT, n. A state of being absent.
235 absinthian ABSINTH'IAN, a. [from absinthium.] Of the nature of wormwood.
236 absinthiated ABSINTH'IATED, a. Impregnated with wormwood.
237 absinthium ABSINTH'IUM, n. Budaeus in his commentaries on Theophrast, supposes the word composed of a priv. ...
238 absis AB'SIS, In astronomy. [See Apsis.]
239 absolute AB'SOLUTE, a. [L. absolutus. See Absolve.]1. Literally, in a general sense, free, independent of ...
240 absolutely AB'SOLUTELY, adv. 1. Completely, wholly, as a thing is absolutely unintelligible.2. Without ...
241 absoluteness AB'SOLUTENESS, n. Independence, completeness in itself.2. Despotic authority, or that which is ...
242 absolution ABSOLU'TION, n. In the civil law, an acquittal or sentence of a judge declaring an accused person ...
243 absolutory AB'SOLUTORY, a. Absolving; that absolves.
244 absolvatory ABSOLV'ATORY, a. [from absolve.] Containing absolution, pardon, or release; having power to ...
245 absolve ABSOLVE', v.t. abzolv', [L. absolvo, from ab and solvo, to loose or release; to absolve, to ...
246 absolved ABSOLV'ED, pp. Released; acquitted; remitted; declared innocent.
247 absolver ABSOLV'ER, n. One who absolves; also one that pronounces sin to be remit.
248 absolving ABSOLV'ING, ppr. Setting free from a debt, or charge; acquitting; remitting.
249 absonant AB'SONANT, a. [See absonous.] Wide from the purpose; contrary to reason.
250 absonous AB'SONOUS, a. [L. absonus; ab and sonus, sound.] Unmusical or untunable
251 absorb ABSORB', v.t. [L. absorbeo, ab and sorbeo, to drink in; to draw or drink in; whence sirup, ...
252 absorbability ABSORBABIL'ITY, n. a state or quality of being absorbable.
253 absorbable ABSORB'ABLE, a. That may be imbibed or swallowed.
254 absorbed ABSORB'ED, or ABSORPT', pp. Imbibed; swallowed; wasted; engaged; lost in study; wholly engrossed.
255 absorbent ABSORB'ENT, a. Imbibing; swallowing.ABSORB'ENT, n. In anatomy, a vessel which imbibes, as the ...
256 absorbing ABSORB'ING, ppr. Imbibing; engrossing; wasting.
257 absorpt ABSORB'ED, or ABSORPT', pp. Imbibed; swallowed; wasted; engaged; lost in study; wholly engrossed.
258 absorption ABSORP'TION, n. 1. The act or process of imbibing or swallowing; either by water which ...
259 absorptive ABSORP'TIVE, a. Having power to imbibe.
260 abstain ABSTA'IN, v.i. [L. abstineo, to keep from; abs and teneo, to hold. See Tenant.]In a general ...
261 abstemious ABSTE'MIOUS, a. [L. abstemium, from abs and temetum, an ancient name of strong wine, according to ...
262 abstemiously ABSTE'MIOUSLY, adv. Temperately; with a sparing use of meat or drink.
263 abstemiousness ABSTE'MIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being temperate or sparing in the use of food and strong ...
264 absterge ABSTERGE', v.t. abstery'. [L. abstergeo, of abs and tergeo, to wipe. Tergeo may have a common ...
265 abstergent ABSTERG'ENT, a. Wiping; cleansing.ABSTERG'ENT, n. a medicine which frees the body from ...
266 abstersion ABSTER'SION, n. [from L. abstergeo, abstersus.] The act of wiping clean; or a cleansing by ...
267 abstersive ABSTER'SIVE, a. Cleansing; having the quality of removing obstructions. [See Detersive.]
268 abstinence AB'STINENCE, n. [L. abstinentia. See Abstain.] 1. In general, the act or practice of ...
269 abstinent AB'STINENT, a. Refraining from indulgence, especially in the use of food and drink.
270 abstinently AB'STINENTLY, adv. With abstinence.
271 abstinents AB'STINENTS, a sect which appeared in France and Spain in the third century, who opposed marriage, ...
272 abstract ABSTRACT', v.t. [L. abstraho, to draw from or separate; from abs and traho, which is the Eng. ...
273 abstracted ABSTRACT'ED, pp. Separated; refined; exalted; abstruse; absent in mind.
274 abstractedly ABSTRACT'EDLY, adv. In a separate state, or in contemplation only.
275 abstractedness ABSTRACT'EDNESS, n. the state of being abstracted.
276 abstracter ABSTRACT'ER, n. One who makes an abstract, or summary.
277 abstracting ABSTRACT'ING, ppr. Separating, making a summary.
278 abstraction ABSTRAC'TION, n. 1. The act of separating, or state of being separated.2. The operation of the ...
279 abstractitious ABSTRACTI'TIOUS particularly from vegetables, without fermentation.
280 abstractive ABSTRACT'IVE, a. Having the power or quality of abstracting.ABSTRACT'IVE, a. Abstracted, or drawn ...
281 abstractly AB'STRACTLY, adv. separately; absolutely; in a state or manner unconnected with any thing else; ...
282 abstractness AB'STRACTNESS, n. A separate state; a state of being in contemplation only, or not connected with ...
283 abstrude ABSTRU'DE, v.t. [Infra.] To thrust or pull away. [Not used.]
284 abstruse ABSTRU'SE, a. [L. abstrusus, from abstrudo, to thrust away, to conceal; abs and trudo; Eng. to ...
285 abstrusely ABSTRU'SELY, adv. In a concealed; hence, remote from apprehension; difficult to be comprehended or ...
286 absurd ABSURD', a. [L. absurdus, from ab and surdus, deaf, insensible.] Opposed to manifest truth; ...
287 absurdity ABSURD'ITY, n. 1. The quality of being inconsistent with obvious truth, reason, or sound ...
288 absurdly ABSURD'LY, adv. In a manner inconsistent with reason or obvious propriety.
289 absurdness ABSURD'NESS, n. The same as absurdity, and less used.
290 abtruseness ABTRU'SENESS, n. Obscurity of meaning; the state of quality of being difficult to be understood.
291 abundance ABUND'ANCE, n. Great plenty; an overflowing quantity; ample sufficiency; in strictness applicable ...
292 abundant ABUND'ANT, a. Plentiful; in great quantity; fully sufficient; as an abundant supply. In ...
293 abundantly ABUND'ANTLY, adv. Fully; amply; plentifully; in a sufficient degree.
294 abusage ABU'SAGE, n. Abuse. [Not used.]
295 abuse ABU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. abutor, abusus of ab and utor, to use; Gr. to accustom. See Use.]1. To ...
296 abused ABU'SED, pp. s as z. Ill-used; used to a bad purpose; treated with rude language; misemployed; ...
297 abuseful ABU'SEFUL, a. Using or practicing abuse; abusive. [Not used.]
298 abuser ABU'SER, n. s as z. One who abuses, in speech or behavior; one that deceives; a ravisher; a ...
299 abusing ABU'SING, ppr. s as z. Using ill; employing to bad purposes; deceiving; violating the person; ...
300 abusion ABU'SION, n. abu'zhon. Abuse; evil or corrupt usage; reproach. [Little used.]
301 abusive ABU'SIVE, a. 1. Practicing abuse; offering harsh words, or ill treatment; as an abusive author; ...
302 abusively ABU'SIVELY, adv. In an abusive manner; rudely; reproachfully.
303 abusiveness ABU'SIVENESS, n. Ill-usage; the quality of being abusive; rudeness of language, or violence to the ...
304 abut ABUT', v.i. To border upon; to be contiguous to; to meet; in strictness, to adjoin to at the end; ...
305 abutment ABUT'MENT, n. 1. The head or end; that which unites one end of a thing to another; chiefly used ...
306 abuttal ABUT'TAL, n. The butting or boundary of land at the end; a head-land.
307 aby ABY', v.t. or i. [Probably contracted from abide.] To endure; to pay dearly; to remain. Obs.
308 abysm ABYSM', n. abyzm'. [See Abyss.] A gulf.
309 abyss ABYSS', n. [Gr. bottomless, from a priv. and bottom, Ion. See Bottom.] 1. A bottomless gulf; ...
310 abyssinian ABYSSIN'IAN, a. A name denoting a mixed multitude or a black race.
311 abyssinians ABYSSIN'IANS, n. A sect of christians in Abyssinia, who admit but one nature in Jesus Christ, and ...
312 ac AC, in Saxon, oak, the initial syllable of names, as acton, oaktown.
313 acacalot ACAC'ALOT, n. A Mexican fowl, the Tantalus Mexicanus, or
314 acacia ACA'CIA, n. [L. acacia, a thorn, from Gr., a point.]Egyptian thorn, a species of plant ranked by ...
315 acacians ACA'CIANS, in Church History, were certain sects, so denominated from their leaders, Acacius, ...
316 academe ACADE'ME; n. an academy; a society of persons. [Not used.]
317 academial ACADE'MIAL, a Pertaining to an academy.
318 academian ACADE'MIAN, n. A member of an academy; a student in a university or college.
319 academic ACADEM'IC, a. Belonging to an academy, or to a college or ACADEM'ICAL, university - as academic ...
320 academically ACADEM'ICALLY, adv. In an academical manner.
321 academician ACADEMI'CIAN, n. a member of an academy, or society for promoting arts and sciences; particularly, ...
322 academism ACAD'EMISM, n. The doctrine of the academic philosophy.
323 academist ACAD'EMIST, n. a member of an Academy for promoting arts and sciences; also an academic ...
324 academy ACAD'EMY, n. [L. academia.] Originally, it is said, a garden, grove, or villa, near Athens, ...
325 acalot AC'ALOT, Corvusaquaticus, water raven.
326 acamacu ACAMAC'U, n. A bird, the Brazilian fly catcher, or Todus.
327 acanaceous ACANA'CEOUS, a acana'shus. [Gr. a prickly shrub.]Armed with prickles. A class of plants are ...
328 acantha ACANTH'A, n. [Gr. a spine or thorn.]In botany, a prickle; in zoology, a spine or prickly fin; an ...
329 acanthaceous ACANTHA'CEOUS, a. Armed with prickles, as a plant.
330 acantharis ACAN'THARIS, n. In entomology, a species of Cimex, with a spinous thorax, and a ciliated abdomen, ...
331 acanthine ACANTH'INE, a [See acanthus.]Pertaining to the plant, acanthus. The acanthine garments of the ...
332 acanthopterygious ACANTHOPTERYG'IOUS, a [Gr. a thorn, and a little feather, from a feather.]In zoology, having back ...
333 acanthus ACANTH'US, n. [G. and L. acanthus, from a prickle or thorn. See acantha.]1. The plant bear's ...
334 acanticone ACAN'TICONE, n. See Pistacite.
335 acarnar ACARN'AR, n. A bright star, of the first magnitude, in Eridanus.
336 acatalectic ACATALEC'TIC, n. [Gr. not defective at the end, to cease.] A verse, which has the complete number ...
337 acatalepsy ACAT'ALEPSY, n. [Gr. to comprehend.]Impossibility of complete discovery or comprehension; ...
338 acatechill ACAT'ECHILL, n. a Mexican bird, a species of Fringilla, of the size of the siskin.
339 acater ACATER, ACATES. See Caterer and Cates.
340 acates ACATER, ACATES. See Caterer and Cates.
341 acauline ACAU'LINE, a. [L. a priv. and caulis, Gr. a stalk. See ACAU'LOUS, Colewort.]In botany, without a ...
342 accede ACCE'DE, v.i. [L. accedo, of ad and cedo, to yield or give place, or rather to move.]1. To agree ...
343 acceding ACCE'DING, ppr. Agreeing; assenting: becoming a party to a treaty by agreeing to the terms ...
344 accelerate ACCEL'ERATE, v.t. [L. accelero, of ad and celero, to hasten, from celer, quick.1. To cause to ...
345 accelerated ACCEL'ERATED, pp. Quickened in motion; hastened in progress.
346 accelerating ACCEL'ERATING, ppr. Hastening; increasing velocity or progression.
347 acceleration ACCELERA'TION, n. The act of increasing velocity or progress; the state of being quickened in ...
348 accelerative ACCEL'ERATIVE, a. Adding to velocity; quickening progression.
349 acceleratory ACCEL'ERATORY, a Accelerating; quickening motion.
350 accend ACCEND', v.t. [L. accendo, to kindle; ad and candeo, caneo, to be white, canus, white; W. can, ...
351 accendibility ACCENDIBIL'ITY, n. Capacity of being kindled, or of becoming inflamed.
352 accendible ACCEND'IBLE, a. Capable OF being inflamed or kindled.
353 accension ACCEN'SION, n. The act of kindling or setting on fire; or the state of being kindled; ...
354 accent AC'CENT, n. [L. accentus, from ad and cano, cantum, to sing; See Accend.]1. The modulation of the ...
355 accented AC'CENTED, pp. Uttered with accent; marked with accent.
356 accenting AC'CENTING, ppr. Pronouncing or marking with accent.
357 accentual ACCENT'UAL, a. Pertaining to accent.
358 accentuate ACCENT'UATE, v.t. To mark or pronounce with an accent or with accents.
359 accentuation ACCENTUA'TION, n. The act of placing accents in writing, or of pronouncing them in speaking.
360 accept ACCEPT', v.t. [L. accepto, from accipio, ad and capio, to take.]1. To take or receive what is ...
361 acceptable ACCEPT'ABLE, a. 1. That may be received with pleasure; hence pleasing to a receiver; gratifying; ...
362 acceptableness ACCEPT'ABLENESS, n. the quality of being agreeable to a ACCEPTABIL'ITY, receiver, or to a person ...
363 acceptably ACCEPT'ABLY, adv. In a manner to please, or give satisfaction.Let us have grace whereby we may ...
364 acceptance ACCEPT'ANCE, n. 1. A receiving with approbation or satisfaction; favorable reception; as work ...
365 acceptation ACCEPTA'TION, n. 1. Kind reception; a receiving with favor or approbation.This is a saying worthy ...
366 accepted ACCEPT'ED, pp. Kindly received; regarded; agreed to; understood; received as a bill of exchange.
367 accepter ACCEPT'ER, OR ACCEPT'OR, n. A person who accepts; the person who receives a bill of exchange so as ...
368 accepting ACCEPT'ING, ppr. Receiving favorably; agreeing to; understanding.
369 acception ACCEP'TION, n. The received sense of a word. [Not now used.]
370 acceptive ACCEPT'IVE, a. Ready to accept. [Not used.]
371 acceptor ACCEPT'ER, OR ACCEPT'OR, n. A person who accepts; the person who receives a bill of exchange so as ...
372 access ACCESS', n. [L. accessus, from accedo. See Accede.]1. A coming to; near approach; admittance; ...
373 accessarily ACCESSARILY, See ACCESSORILY.
374 accessariness ACCESSARINESS, See ACCESSORINESS
375 accessary ACCESSARY, See ACCESSORY.
376 accessibility ACCESSIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being approachable; or of admitting access.
377 accessible ACCESS'IBLE, a. 1. That may be approached or reached; approachable; applied to things; as an ...
378 accession ACCESS'ION, n. [L. accessio.] 1. A coming to; an acceding to and joining; as a king's accession ...
379 accessional ACCESS'IONAL, a. Additional
380 accessorial ACCESSO'RIAL, a. Pertaining to an accessory; as accessorial agency, accessorial guilt.
381 accessorily AC'CESSORILY, adv. [See Accessory.] In the manner of an accessory; by subordinate means, or in a ...
382 accessoriness AC'CESSORINESS, n. The state of being accessory, or of being or acting in a secondary character.
383 accessory AC'CESSORY, a. [L. Accessorius, from accessus, accedo. See Accede. This word is accented on the ...
384 accidence AC'CIDENCE, n. [See Accident.] A small book containing the rudiments of grammar.
385 accident AC'CIDENT, n. [L. accidens, falling, from ad and cado, to fall. See Case and Cadence. Class ...
386 accidental ACCIDENT'AL, a. 1. Happening by chance, or rather unexpectedly; casual; fortuitous, taking place ...
387 accidentally ACCIDENT'ALLY, adv. By chance; casually; fortuitously; not essentially.
388 accidentalness ACCIDENT'ALNESS, n. The quality of being casual. [Little used.]
389 accidentiary ACCIDEN'TIARY, a. Pertaining to the accidence. [Not used.]
390 accipiter ACCIP'ITER, n. [L. ad and capio, to seize.]1. A name given to a fish, the milvus or lucerna, a ...
391 accipitrine ACCIP'ITRINE, a. Seizing; rapacious; as the accipitrine order of fowls.
392 accite ACCI'TE v.t. [L. adand cito, to cite.] To call; to cite; to summon. [Not used.]
393 acclaim ACCLA'IM v.t. [L acclamo, ad and clamo, to cry out. See Claim, Clamor.] To applaud. [Little ...
394 acclamation ACCLAMA'TION, n. [L. acclamatio. See acclaim.]A shout of applause uttered by a multitude. ...
395 acclamatory ACCLAM'ATORY, a. Expressing joy or applause by shouts, or clapping of hands.
396 acclimated ACCLI'MATED, a. Habituated to a foreign climate, or a climate not native; so far accustomed to a ...
397 acclivity ACCLIV'ITY, n. [L. acclivus, acclivis, ascending, from ad and clivus, an ascent. A slope or ...
398 acclivous ACCLI'VOUS, a. Rising, as a hill with a slope.
399 accloy ACCLOY', To fill; to stuff; to fill to satiety. [Not used.] [See Clay.]
400 accoil ACCOIL', [See Coil.]
401 accola AC'COLA, n. A delicate fish eaten at Malta.
402 accolade ACCOLA'DE, n. [L. ad and collum, neck.] A ceremony formerly used in conferring knighthood; but ...
403 accommodable ACCOM'MODABLE, a. [See Accommodate.]That may be fitted, made suitable, or made to agree. [Little ...
404 accommodate ACCOM'MODATE, v.t. [L. accommodo, to apply or suit, from ad and commodo, to profit or help; of ...
405 accommodated ACCOM'MODATED, pp. fitted; adjusted; adapted; applied; also furnished with conveniences.We are ...
406 accommodately ACCOM'MODATELY, adv. Suitable; fitly. [Little used.]
407 accommodateness ACCOM'MODATENESS, n. fitness. [Little used.]
408 accommodating ACCOM'MODATING, ppr. Adapting; making suitable; reconciling; furnishing with conveniences; ...
409 accommodation ACCOMMODA'TION, n. 1. Fitness; adaptation; followed by to.The organization of the body with ...
410 accommodator ACCOM'MODATOR, n. One that accommodates; one that adjusts.
411 accompanable ACCOM'PANABLE, a. [See Accompany.] sociable. [Not used.]
412 accompanied ACCOM'PANIED, pp. Attended; joined with in society.
413 accompaniment ACCOM'PANIMENT, n. Something that attends as a circumstance, or which is added by way of ornament ...
414 accompanist ACCOM'PANIST, n. The performer in music who takes the accompanying part.
415 accompany ACCOM'PANY, v.t. [See Company.]1. To go with or attend as a companion or associate on a journey, ...
416 accompanying ACCOM'PANYING, ppr. Attending; going with as a companion.
417 accomplice ACCOM'PLICE, n. [L. complicatus, folded together, of con, with, and plico, to fold. See Complex ...
418 accomplish ACCOM'PLISH, v.t. [L. compleo, to complete. See Complete.] 1. To complete; to finish ...
419 accomplished ACCOM'PLISHED, pp. 1. Finished; completed; fulfilled; executed; effected.2. a. Well endowed ...
420 accomplisher ACCOM'PLISHER, n. One who accomplishes.
421 accomplishing ACCOM'PLISHING, ppr. finishing; completing; fulfilling; executing; effecting; furnishing with ...
422 accomplishment ACCOM'PLISHMENT, n.1. Completion; fulfillment; entire performance; as the accomplishment of a ...
423 accompt ACCOMPT', obs. [See Account.]
424 accomptant ACCOMPT'ANT, Obs. [See Accountant.]
425 accord ACCORD', n.The Lat. has concors, concordo. 1. Agreement; harmony of minds; consent or concurrence ...
426 accordable ACCORD'ABLE, a. Agreeable, consonant.
427 accordant ACCORD'ANT, a. Corresponding; consonant; agreeable.
428 accorded ACCORD'ED, pp. Make to agree; adjusted.
429 accorder ACCORD'ER, n. One that aids, or favors. [Little used.]
430 according ACCORD'ING, ppr. 1. Agreeing; harmonizing.Th' according music of a well mixt state.2. Suitable; ...
431 accordingly ACCORD'INGLY, adv. Agreeably; suitably; in a manner conformable to.Those who live in faith and ...
432 accorporate ACCORP'ORATE, v.t. To unite; [Not in use.] [See Incorporate.]
433 accost ACCOST', v.t. 1. To approach; to draw near; to come side by side, or face to face. [Not in ...
434 accostable ACCOST'ABLE, a. Ease of access; familiar.
435 accosted ACCOST'ED, pp. Address; first spoken to. In heraldry, being side by side.
436 accosting ACCOST'ING, ppr. Addressing by first speaking to.
437 accoucheur ACCOUCHEUR, n. accoshare. A man who assists women in childbirth.
438 account ACCOUNT', n.1. A sum stated on paper; a registry of a debt or credit; of debts and credits, or ...
439 accountability ACCOUNTABIL'ITY, n. 1. The state of being liable to answer for one's conduct; liability to give ...
440 accountable ACCOUNT'ABLE, a.1. Liable to be called to account; answerable to a superior.Every man is ...
441 accountableness ACCOUNT'ABLENESS, n. Liableness to answer or to give account; the state of being answerable, or ...
442 accountant ACCOUNT'ANT, n. One skilled in mercantile accounts; more generally, a person who keeps accounts; ...
443 accountbook ACCOUNT'BOOK, n. A book in which accounts are kept.
444 accounted ACCOUNT'ED, pp. Esteemed; deemed; considered; regarded; valued.Accounted for, explained.
445 accounting ACCOUNT'ING, ppr. Deeming; esteeming; reckoning; rendering an account.Accounting for, rendering an ...
446 accouple ACCOUPLE, v.t. accup'ple. To couple; to join or link together. [See Couple.]
447 accouplement ACCOUPLEMENT, n. accup'plement. A coupling, a connecting in pairs; junction. [Little used.]
448 accourage ACCOUR'AGE, v.t. accur'age. [See Courage.] To encourage. [Not used.]
449 accourt ACCOURT, v.t. [See Court.] To entertain with courtesy. [Not used.]
450 accouter ACCOUTER, v.t. acoot'erIn a general sense, to dress; to equip, but appropriately, to array in a ...
451 accoutered ACCOUT'ERED, pp. Dressed in arms; equipped.
452 accoutering ACCOUT'ERING, ppr. Equipping with military habiliments.
453 accouterments ACCOUT'ERMENTS, n. plu. 1. Dress; equipage; furniture for the body; appropriately, military dress ...
454 accoy ACCOY', v.t. To render quiet or diffident; to soothe; to caress. [Obs.]
455 accredit ACCRED'IT, v.t. [L. ad and credo, to believe, or give faith to. See Credit.]To give credit, ...
456 accreditation ACCREDITA'TION, n. That which gives title to credit. [Little used.]
457 accredited ACCRED'ITED, pp. Allowed; received with reputation; authorized in a public character.
458 accrediting ACCRED'ITING, ppr. Giving authority or reputation.
459 accrescent ACCRES'CENT,a. [See Accretion.] Increasing.
460 accretion ACCRE'TION, n. [Lat. accretio, increase; accres'co, to increase, literally, to grow to; ad and ...
461 accretive ACCRE'TIVE, a. Increasing by growth; growing; adding to be growth; as the accretive motion of ...
462 accroach ACCROACH, v.i.1. To hook, or draw to, as with a hook; but in this sense not used.2. To encroach; ...
463 accrue ACCRUE, v.i. accru'. [L. accresco, cresco.]Literally, to grow to; hence to arise, proceed or ...
464 accruing ACCRU'ING, ppr. Growing to; arising; coming; being added.
465 accrument ACCRU'MENT, n. Addition; increase. [Little used.]
466 accubation ACCUBA'TION, n. [L. accubatio, a reclingin, from ad and cubo, to lie down. See Cube.]A lying or ...
467 accumb ACCUMB', v.i. [L. accumbo; ad and cubo.] To recline as at table. [Not used.]
468 accumbency ACCUM'BENCY, n. State of being accumbent or reclining.
469 accumbent ACCUM'BENT, a. [L. accumbens, accumbo, from cubo. See Accubation.] Leaning or reclining, as the ...
470 accumulate ACCU'MULATE, v.t. [L. accumulo, ad and cumulo, to heap; cumulus a heap.]1. To heap up; to pile; ...
471 accumulated ACCU'MULATED, pp. Collected into a heap or great quantity.
472 accumulating ACCU'MULATING, ppr. Heaping up; amassing; increasing greatly.
473 accumulation ACCUMULA'TION,n. 1. The act of accumulating; the state of being accumulated; an amassing; a ...
474 accumulative ACCU'MULATIVE, a. That accumulates; heaping up; accumulating.
475 accumulator ACCU'MULATOR, n. One that accumulates, gathers, or amasses.
476 accuracy AC'CURACY,n. [L. accuratio, from accurare, to take care of; ad and curare, to take care; cura, ...
477 accurate AC'CURATE, a. [L. accuratus.] 1. In exact conformity to truth, or to a standard or rule, or to a ...
478 accurately AC'CURATELY, adv. 1. Exactly; in an accurate manner; with precision; without error or defect; as ...
479 accurateness AC'CURATENESS, n. Accuracy; exactness; nicety; precision.
480 accurse ACCURSE, v.t. accurs', [ Ac for ad and curse.] To devote to destruction; to imprecate misery or ...
481 accursed ACCURS'ED, pp. or a. 1. Doomed to destruction or misery:The city shall be accursed. John 6.2. ...
482 accusable ACCU'SABLE,a. That may be accused; chargeable with a crime; blamable; liable to censure; followed ...
483 accusant ACCU'SANT, n. One who accuses.
484 accusation ACCUSA'TION, n. 1. The act of charging with a crime or offense; the act of accusing of any wrong ...
485 accusative ACCU'SATIVE, a. A term given to a case of nouns, in Grammars, on which the action of a verb ...
486 accusatively ACCU'SATIVELY, adv. 1. In an accusative manner.2. In relation to the accusative case in Grammar.
487 accusatory ACCU'SATORY, a. Accusing; containing an accusation; as an accusatory libel.
488 accuse ACCU'SE, v.t. [L. accuso, to blame or accuse; ad and causor, to blame, or accuse; causa, blame, ...
489 accused ACCU'SED, pp. Charged with a crime, by a legal process; charged with an offense; blamed.
490 accuser ACCU'SER, n. One who accuses or blames; an officer who prefers an accusation against another for ...
491 accusing ACCU'SING, ppr. Charging with a crime; blaming.
492 accustom ACCUS'TOM, v.t.To make familiar by use; to form a habit by practice; to habituate or inure; as to ...
493 accustomable ACCUS'TOMABLE, a. Of long custom; habitual; customary. [Little used.]
494 accustomably ACCUS'TOMABLY, adv. According to custom or habit. [Little used.]
495 accustomance ACCUS'TOMANCE, n. custom; habitual use or practice. [Not used.]
496 accustomarily ACCUS'TOMARILY, adv. According to custom or common practice. [See Customarily.] [Little used.]
497 accustomary ACCUS'TOMARY, a. Usual; customary [See Customary.] [Little used.]
498 accustomed ACCUS'TOMED, pp. 1. Being familiar by use; habituated; inured.2. a. Usual; often practiced; as ...
499 accustoming ACCUS'TOMING, ppr. Making familiar by practice; inuring.
500 ace ACE, n. [L. as, a unit or pound; G. ass.]1. A unit; a single point on a card or die; or the card ...
501 aceetate ACE'ETATE, n. [See Acid.] In chimistry, a neutral salt formed by the union of the acetic acid, or ...
502 aceldama ACEL'DAMA, n. A field said to have laid south of Jerusalem, the same as the potters field, ...
503 acephalous ACEPH'ALOUS, a. [Gr. a priv., a head.]Without a head, headless. In history, the term Acephali, or ...
504 acephalus ACEPH'ALUS, n. an obsolete name of the taenia or tape worm, which was formerly supposed to have no ...
505 acerb ACERB', a. [L. acerbus; G. herbe, harsh, sour, tart, bitter, rough, whence herbst autumn, ...
506 acerbity ACERB'ITY, n. 1. A sourness, with roughness, or astringency.2. Figuratively, harshness or ...
507 aceric ACER'IC, a. [L. acer, a maple tree.]Pertaining to the maple; obtained from the maple, as aceric ...
508 acerous AC'EROUS, a. [L. acerosus, chaffy, from acus, chaff or a point.]1. In botany, chaffy; resembling ...
509 acescency ACES'CENCY, n. [L. acescens, turning sour, from acesco. See Acid.] A turning sour by spontaneous ...
510 acescent ACES'CENT, a. Turning sour; becoming tart or acid by spontaneous decomposition. Hence slightly ...
511 aceste ACES'TE, n. In entomology, a species of papilio or butterfly, with subdentated wings, found in ...
512 acestis ACES'TIS, n. A factitious sort of chrysocolla, made of Cyprian verdigris, urine, and niter.
513 acetabulum ACETAB'ULUM, n. [L. from acetum, vinegar. See Acid.] Among the Romans a vinegar cruse or like ...
514 acetary AC'ETARY, n. [See Acid.] an acid pulpy substance in certain fruits, as the pear, inclosed in a ...
515 acetated AC'ETATED, a. [See Acid.] Combined with acetic acid, or radical vinegar.
516 acetic ACE'TIC, a. [See Acid.] A term used to denote a particular acid, acetic acid, the concentrated ...
517 acetification ACETIFICA'TION, n. The act of making acetous or sour; or the operation of making vinegar.
518 acetify ACE'TIFY, v.t. To convert into acid or vinegar.
519 acetite AC'ETITE, [See Acid.] Neutral salt formed by the acetous acid, with a salifiable base; as the ...
520 acetometer ACETOM'ETER, n. [L. acetum, vinegar, and measure.]An instrument for ascertaining the strength of ...
521 acetous ACE'TOUS, a. [See Acid.[ Sour; like or having the nature of vinegar. Acetous acid is the term ...
522 acetum ACE'TUM, n. [L. See Acid.] Vinegar, a sour liquor, obtained from vegetables dissolved in boiling ...
523 ache ACHE, v.i. ake. [Gr. to ache or be in pain. The primary sense is to be pressed. Perhaps the ...
524 achean ACHE'AN, a. Pertaining to Achaia in Greece, and a celebrated league or confederacy established ...
525 acherner ACHERN'ER, n. A star of the first magnitude in the southern extremity of the constellation ...
526 acherset ACH'ERSET, n. An ancient measure of corn, supposed to be about eight bushels.
527 achievable ACHIE'VABLE, a. [See Achieve.] That may be performed.
528 achievance ACHIE'VANCE, n. Performance.
529 achieve ACHIE'VE, v.t.1. To perform, or execute; to accomplish; to finish, or carry on to a final close. ...
530 achieved ACHIE'VED, pp. Performed; obtained; accomplished.
531 achievement ACHIE'VEMENT, n.1. The performance of an action.2. A great or heroic deed; something accomplished ...
532 achiever ACHIE'VER, n. One who accomplishes a purpose, or obtains an object by his exertions.
533 achieving ACHIE'VING, ppr. Performing; executing; gaining.
534 aching A'CHING, ppr. Being in pain; suffering distress.A'CHING, n. Pain; continued pain or distress.
535 achiote A'CHIOTE, n. The anotta, a tree, and a drug used for dyeing red. The bard of the tree makes good ...
536 achor A'CHOR, n. [Gr., sordes capitis.]1. The scald head, a disease forming scaly eruptions, supposed ...
537 achromatic ACHROMAT'IC, a. [Gr. priv. and color.]Destitute of color. achromatic telescopes are formed of a ...
538 acicular ACIC'ULAR, a. [L. acicula, Priscian, a needle, from Gr., L. a point. See Acid.]In the shape of a ...
539 acicularly ACIC'ULARLY, adv. In the manner of needles, or prickles.
540 acid AC'ID, a. [L. acidus. See Edge.]Sour, sharp or biting to the taste, having the taste of vinegar, ...
541 acidiferous ACIDIF'EROUS, a. [Acid and L. fero.] Containing acids, or an acid.Acidiferous minerals are such ...
542 acidifiable ACID'IFIABLE, a. [From Acidify.]Capable of being converted into an acid, by union with an ...
543 acidification ACIDIFICA'TION, n. The act or process of acidifying or changing into an acid.
544 acidified ACID'IFIED, pp. Made acid; converted into an acid.
545 acidifier ACID'IFIER, n. That which by combination forms an acid, as oxygen and hydrogen.
546 acidify ACID'IFY, v.t. [Acid and L. facio.]To make acid; but appropriately to convert into an acid, ...
547 acidifying ACID'IFYING, ppr. Making acid; converting into an acid; having power to change into an acid. ...
548 acidimeter ACIDIM'ETER, n. [Acid and Gr. measure.]An instrument for ascertaining the strength of acids.
549 acidity ACID'ITY, n. The quality of being sour; sourness; tartness; sharpness to the taste.
550 acidness AC'IDNESS, n. The quality of being sour; acidity.
551 acidulate ACID'ULATE, v.t. [L. acidulus, slightly sour;To tinge with an acid; to make acid in a moderate ...
552 acidulated ACID'ULATED, pp. Tinged with an acid; made slightly sour.
553 acidulating ACID'ULATING, ppr. Tinging with an acid.
554 acidule AC'IDULE, n. In chimistry, a compound base is supersaturated
555 acidulous ACID'ULOUS, a. [L. acidulus. See Acid.]Slightly sour; sub-acid, or having an excess of acid; as ...
556 acidulum ACID'ULUM, with acid; as, tartareous acidulum; oxalic acidulum.
557 acinaciform ACINAC'IFORM, a. [L. acinaces, a cimeter, Gr. and L. forma, form.]In botany, formed like, or ...
558 aciniform AC'INIFORM, a. [L. acinus, a grape stone, and forma, shape.]Having the form of grapes; being in ...
559 acinose AC'INOSE, a. [From L. acinus. See Aciniform.]
560 acinous AC'INOUS,
561 acinus AC'INUS, n. [L.] In botany, one of the small grains, which compose the fruit of the blackberry, ...
562 acipenser AC'IPENSER, a. In ichthyology, a genus of fishes, of the order of chondropterygii, having an ...
563 acitli ACIT'LI, n. A name of the water hare, or great crested grebe or diver.
564 acknowledge ACKNOWL'EDGE, v.t. Aknol'edge, [ad and knowledge. See Know.]1. To own, avow or admit to be true, ...
565 acknowledged ACKNOWL'EDGED, pp. Owned; confessed; noticed with regard or gratitude; received with approbation; ...
566 acknowledging ACKNOWL'EDGING, ppr. Owning; confessing; approving; grateful; but the latter sense is a gallicism, ...
567 acknowledgment ACKNOWL'EDGMENT, n. 1. The act of owning; confession; as, the acknowledgment of a fault.2. The ...
568 acme AC'ME, n. Ac'my [Gr.]The top or highest point. It is used to denote the maturity or perfection ...
569 acne AC'NE, n. Ac'ny. [Gr.]A small hard pimple or tubercle on the face.
570 acnestis ACNESTIS, n. [Gr. a priv. to rub or gnaw.]That part of the spine in quadrupeds which extends from ...
571 aco AC'O, n. A Mediterranean fish, called also sarachus.
572 acolin AC'OLIN, n. a bird of the partridge kind in Cuba. Its breast and belly are white; its back and ...
573 acolothist ACOL'OTHIST, n. [Gr.]
574 acolyte AC'OLYTE,In the ancient church, one of the subordinate officers, who lighted the lamps, prepared ...
575 aconite AC'ONITE, n. [L. aconitum; Gr.]The herb wolf's bane, or monks-hood, a poisonous plant; and in ...
576 acontias ACON'TIAS, n. [Gr. a dart.]1. A species of serpent, called dart-snake, or jaculum, from its ...
577 acop ACOP' adv. [a and cope.] At the top.
578 acorn A'CORN, n.1. The seed or fruit of the oak; an oval nut which grows in a rough permanent cup.The ...
579 acorned A'CORNED, a. Furnished or loaded with acorns.
580 acorus A'CORUS, n. [L. from Gr..]1. Aromatic Calamus, sweet flag, or sweet rush.2. In natural history, ...
581 acotyledon ACOTYL'EDON, n. [Gr. a priv. a hollow.]In botany, a plant whose seeds have no side lobes, or ...
582 acotyledonous ACOTYLED'ONOUS, a. Having no side lobes.
583 acoustic ACOUS'TIC, a. [Gr. to hear.]Pertaining to the ears, to the sense of hearing, or to the doctrine of ...
584 acoustics ACOUS'TICS, n. 1. The science of sounds, teaching their cause, nature and phenomena. This ...
585 acquaint ACQUA'INT, v.t. [Eng. can, and ken; which see.]1. To make known; to make fully or intimately ...
586 acquaintance ACQUAI'NTANCE, n. 1. Familiar knowledge; a state of being acquainted, or of having intimate or ...
587 acquainted ACQUA'INTED, pp. Known; familiarly known; informed; having personal knowledge.
588 acquainting ACQUA'INTING, ppr. Making known to; giving notice, or information to.
589 acquest ACQUEST', n. [L. acquisitus, acquiro.]1. Acquisition; the thing gained.2. Conquest; a place ...
590 acquiesce ACQUIESCE, v.i. acquiess'. [L. acquiesco, of ad and quiesco, to be quiet; quies, rest.]1. To ...
591 acquiescence ACQUIES'CENCE, n. A quiet assent; a silent submission, or submission with apparent content; ...
592 acquiescent ACQUIES'CENT, a. Resting satisfied; easy; submitting; disposed to submit.
593 acquiescing ACQUIES'CING, ppr. Quietly submitting; resting content.
594 acquirable ACQUI'RABLE, a. That may be acquired.
595 acquire ACQUI'RE, v.t. [L. acquiro, ad and quaero to seek, that is to follow, to press, to urge; acquiro ...
596 acquired ACQUI'RED, pp. Gained, obtained, or received from art, labor, or other means, in distinction from ...
597 acquirement ACQUI'REMENT, n. The act of acquiring, or that which is acquired; attainment. It is used in ...
598 acquirer ACQUI'RER, n. A person who acquires.
599 acquiring ACQUI'RING, ppr. Gaining by labor or other means, something that has a degree of permanence in the ...
600 acquiry ACQUI'RY, n. Acquirement. [Not used.]
601 acquisite AC'QUISITE, a. s as z. Gained. [Not used.]
602 acquisition ACQUISI'TION, n. [L. acquisitio, from acquisitus, acquaesivi, which are given as the part. and ...
603 acquisitive ACQUIS'ITIVE, a. that is acquired; acquired; [but improper.]
604 acquisitively ACQUIS'ITIVELY, adv. Noting acquirement, with to or for following.
605 acquist ACQUIST', n. See Acquest. [Not used.]
606 acquit ACQUIT', v.t. [L. cedo.]To set free; to release or discharge from an obligation, accusation, ...
607 acquitment ACQUIT'MENT, n. The act of acquitting, or state of being acquitted. [This word is superseded by ...
608 acquittal ACQUIT'TAL, n. A judicial setting free, or deliverance from the charge of an offense; as, by ...
609 acquittance ACQUIT'TANCE, n. 1. A discharge or release from a debt.2. The writing, which is evidence of a ...
610 acquitted ACQUIT'TED, pp. Set free, or judicially discharge from an accusation; released from a debt, duty, ...
611 acquitting ACQUIT'TING, ppr. Setting free from accusation; releasing from a charge, obligation, or suspicion ...
612 acrase ACRA'SE, v.t.
613 acrasy AC'RASY, n. [Gr. from a priv. constitution or temperament.]In medical authors, an excess or ...
614 acraze ACRA'ZE, 1. To make crazy; to infatuate. [Not in use.] [See Crazy.]2. To impair; to destroy. ...
615 acre ACRE, n. a'ker. [Gr; Lat. ager. In these languages, the word retains its primitive sense, an ...
616 acred A'CRED, a. Possessing acres or landed property.
617 acrid AC'RID, a. [L. accr.]Sharp; pungent; bitter; sharp or biting to the taste; acrimonious; as acrid ...
618 acridness AC'RIDNESS, n. A sharp, bitter, pungent quality.
619 acrimonious ACRIMO'NIOUS, a. 1. Sharp; bitter; corrosive; abounding with acrimony.2. Figuratively, sharpness ...
620 acrimoniously ACRIMO'NIOUSLY, adv. With sharpness or bitterness.
621 acrisy AC'RISY, n. [Gr. a priv., judgment.]A state or condition of which no right judgment can be formed; ...
622 acritude AC'RITUDE, n. [See Acrid.]An acrid quality; bitterness to the taste; biting heat.
623 acroamatic ACROAMAT'IC, a. [Gr. to hear.]Abstruse; pertaining to deep learning; an epithet applied to the ...
624 acroatic ACROAT'IC, a. [Gr.]Abstruse; pertaining to deep learning; and opposed to exoteric. Aristotle's ...
625 acroceraunian ACROCERAU'NIAN, a. [Gr. a summit, and thunder.]An epithet applied to certain mountains between ...
626 acromion ACRO'MION, n. [Gr. highest, and shoulder.]In anatomy, that part of the spine of the scapula, which ...
627 acronic ACRON'IC, a. [Gr. extreme and night.]
628 acronical ACRON'ICAL,In astronomy, a term applied to the rising of a star at sun set, or its setting at sun ...
629 acronically ACRON'ICALLY, adv. In an acronical manner; at the rising or setting of the sun.
630 acrospire AC'ROSPIRE, n. [Gr. highest, a spire, or spiral line.]A shoot, or sprout of a seed; the plume, or ...
631 acrospired AC'ROSPIRED, a. having a sprout, or having sprouted at both ends.
632 across ACROSS', prep. akraus'. [a and cross. See Cross.]1. From side to side, opposed to along, which ...
633 acrostic ACROS'TIC, n. [Gr extremity or beginning, order, or verse.]A composition in verse, in which the ...
634 acrostically ACROS'TICALLY, adv. In the manner of an acrostic.
635 acroteleutic ACROTELEU'TIC, n. [Gr. extreme, and end.]Among ecclesiastical writers, an appellation given to any ...
636 acroter AC'ROTER, n. [Gr. a summit.]In architecture, a small pedestal, usually with out a base, anciently ...
637 acrothymion ACROTHYM'ION, n. [Gr. extreme, and thyme.]Among physicians, a species of wart, with a narrow basis ...
638 act ACT, v.i. [Gr., Lat. to urge, drive, lead, bring, do, perform, or in general to move, to exert ...
639 acted ACT'ED, pp. Done; performed; represented on the stage.
640 actian AC'TIAN, a. Relating to Actium, a town and promontory of Epirus, as Actian games, which were ...
641 acting ACT'ING, ppr. Doing; performing; behaving; representing the character of another.ACT'ING, n. ...
642 actinolite AC'TINOLITE, n. [Gr. a ray, a stone.]A mineral, called, by Werner, strahlstein, ray-stone, nearly ...
643 actinolitic ACTINOLIT'IC, a. Like or pertaining to actinolite.
644 action AC'TION, n. [L. actio. See Act.]1. Literally, a driving; hence, the state of acting or moving; ...
645 actionable AC'TIONABLE, a. That will bear a suit, or for which an action at law may be sustained; as, to call ...
646 actionably AC'TIONABLY, adv. In a manner that subjects to legal process.
647 actionary AC'TIONARY or AC'TIONIST, n. In Europe, a proprietor of stock in a trading company; one who owns ...
648 actionist AC'TIONARY or AC'TIONIST, n. In Europe, a proprietor of stock in a trading company; one who owns ...
649 active ACT'IVE, a. [L. activus.]1. That has the power or quality of acting; that contains the principle ...
650 actively ACT'IVELY, adv. in an active manner; by action; nimbly; briskly; also in an active signification, ...
651 activeness ACT'IVENESS, n. the quality of being active; the faculty of acting; nimbleness; quickness of ...
652 activity ACTIV'ITY, n. The quality of being active; the active faculty; nimbleness; agility; also the habit ...
653 actor ACT'OR, n. 1. He that acts or performs; an active agent.2. He that represents a character or ...
654 actress ACT'RESS, n. A female who acts or performs, and especially, on the stage, or in a play.
655 actual ACT'UAL, a.1. Real or effective, or that exists truly and absolutely; as, actual heat, opposed to ...
656 actuality ACTUAL'ITY, n. Reality.
657 actually ACT'UALLY, adv. In fact; really; in truth.
658 actuary ACT'UARY, n. [L. actuarius.]A register or clerk; a term of the civil law, and used originally in ...
659 actuate ACT'UATE, a. Put in action. [Little used.] ACT'UATE, v.t. [from act.]To put into action; to ...
660 actuated ACT'UATED, pp. Put in action; incited to action.
661 actuating ACT'UATING, ppr. Putting in action; inciting to action.
662 actuation ACTUA'TION, n. The state of being put in action; effectual operation.
663 actus ACT'US, n. Among the Romans, a measure in building equal to 120 Roman feet. In agriculture, the ...
664 acuate AC'UATE, v.t. [L. acuo, to sharpen. See Acid.]To sharpen; to make pungent, or corrosive. ...
665 acubene ACUBE'NE, n. A star of the fourth magnitude in the southern claw of Cancer.
666 acuition ACUI'TION, n. [from L. acuo, to sharpen.]The sharpening of medicines to increase their effect.
667 aculeate ACU'LEATE, a. [L. aculeus, from acus, Gr. a point, and the diminutive. See Acid.]1. In botany, ...
668 aculei ACU'LEI, n. [L.] In botany and zoology, prickles or spines.
669 aculon AC'ULON, or AC'ULOS, n. [Gr. probably from ac, an oak.]The fruit or acorn of the ilex, or scarlet ...
670 aculos AC'ULON, or AC'ULOS, n. [Gr. probably from ac, an oak.]The fruit or acorn of the ilex, or scarlet ...
671 acumen ACU'MEN, n. [L. acumen, from acus or acuo.]A sharp point; and figuratively, quickness of ...
672 acuminate ACU'MINATE, a. [L. acuminatus, from acumen.]Ending in a sharp point; pointed.
673 acuminated ACU'MINATED, a. Sharpened to a point.
674 acumination ACUMINA'TION, n. A sharpening; termination in a sharp point.
675 acupuncture ACUPUNC'TURE, n. [L. acus, needle, and punctura, or punctus, a pricking.]Among the Chinese, a ...
676 acus A'CUS, n. [L.]1. The needle-fish,or gar-fish.2. The ammodyte or sand eel.3. The oblong cimex.
677 acute ACU'TE, a. [L. acutus, sharp-pointed; Heb.]1. Sharp at the end; ending in a sharp point; opposed ...
678 acutely ACU'TELY, adv. Sharply; keenly; with nice discrimination.
679 acuteness ACU'TENESS, n. 1. Sharpness; but seldom used in this literal sense, as applied to material ...
680 acutiator ACUTIA'TOR, n. In the middle ages, a person whose office was to sharpen instruments. Before the ...
681 ad AD. A Latin preposition, signifying to. It is probably from Heb. Ch. Syr. Sam. Eth. and Ar. To ...
682 adage AD'AGE, n. [L. adagium, or adagio]A proverb; an old saying, which has obtained credit by long use; ...
683 adagio ADA'GIO, n. [L. otium; Eng. ease.]In music, a slow movement. As an adverb, slowly, leisurely, and ...
684 adam AD'AM, n. In Heb., Man; primarily, the name of the human species, mankind; appropriately, the ...
685 adamant AD'AMANT, n. [ Gr.; L. adamas; a word of Celtic origin.]A very hard or impenetrable stone; a name ...
686 adamantean ADAMANTE'AN, a. Hard as adamant.
687 adamantine ADAMANT'INE, a. Made of adamant; having the qualities of adamant; that cannot be broken, ...
688 adamic AD'AMIC, a. Pertaining to Adam. Adamic earth, is the term given to common red clay, so called by ...
689 adamites AD'AMITES, in Church history, a sect of visionaries, who pretended to establish a state of ...
690 adamitic ADAMIT'IC, Like the Adamites.
691 adansonia ADANSO'NIA, n. Ethiopian sour gourd, monkey's bread, of African calabash-tree. It is a tree of ...
692 adapt ADAPT' v.t. [L. ad. and apto, to fit; Gr.]To make suitable; to fit or suit; as, to adapt an ...
693 adaptable ADAPT'ABLE, a. That may be adapted.
694 adaptation ADAPTA'TION, n. The act of making suitable, or the state of being suitable, or fit; fitness.
695 adapted ADAPT'ED, pp. Suited; made suitable; fitted.
696 adapter ADAPT'ER. See adopter.
697 adapting ADAPT'ING, ppr. Suiting; making fit.
698 adaption ADAP'TION, n. Adaptation; the act of fitting [Little used, and hardly legitimate.]
699 adaptness ADAPT'NESS, n. A state of being fitted. [Not used.]
700 adar A'DAR, n. a Hebrew month, answering to the latter part of February, and the beginning of March, ...
701 adarce ADAR'CE, n. [Gr.]A saltish concretion on reeds and grass in marshy grounds in Galatia. It is lax ...
702 adarcon ADAR'CON, n. In Jewish antiquity, a gold coin worth about three dollars and a third, or about ...
703 adarme ADAR'ME, n. A Spanish weight, the sixteenth of an ounce. The Spanish ounce is seven per cent. ...
704 adatis AD'ATIS, n. A muslin or species of cotton cloth from India. It is fine and clear; the piece is ...
705 adaunt AD'AUNT, v.t. To subdue. [Not used. See Daunt.]
706 adaw ADAW', v.t. To daunt; to subject. [Not used.]
707 adays ADA'YS, adv. On or in days; as in the phrase, now adays.
708 add ADD, v.t. [L. addo, from ad and do, to give.]1. To set or put together, join or unite, as one ...
709 addarac AD'DARAC, n. Red orpiment.
710 addecimate ADDEC'IMATE, v.t. [L. ad and decimus, tenth.]To take, or to ascertain tithes.
711 added ADD'ED, pp. Joined in place, in sum, in mass or aggregate, in number, in idea or consideration; ...
712 addeem ADDEE'M, v.t. [See Deem.] To award; to sentence. [Little used.]
714 adder-fly AD'DER-FLY, n. a name of the dragon-fly or libellula; sometimes called adder-bolt.
713 adder AD'DER, n. [L. natrix, a serpent.]A venomous serpent or viper, of several species.
715 adders-grass ADDER'S-GRASS, n. A plant about which serpents lurk.
716 adders-tongue ADDER'S-TONGUE, n. A plant whose seeds are produced on a spike resembling a serpent's tongue.
717 adders-wort ADDER'S-WORT, n. Snakeweed, so named from its supposed virtue in curing the bite of serpent.
718 addibility ADDIBIL'ITY, n. The possibility of being added.
719 addible AD'DIBLE, a. [See Add.] That may be added.
720 addice AD'DICE, obs. [See Adz.]
721 addict ADDICT', a. Addicted. [Not much used.]
722 addicted ADDICT'ED, pp. Devoted by customary practice.
723 addictedness ADDICT'EDNESS, n. The quality or state of being addicted.
724 addicting ADDICT'ING, ppr. Devoting time and attention; practicing customarily.
725 addiction ADDIC'TION, n. 1. The act of devoting or giving up in practice; the state of being devoted.His ...
726 adding ADD'ING, ppr. Joining; putting together; increasing.
727 additament ADDIT'AMENT, n. [L. additamentum, from additus and ment. See Add.]An addition, or rather the ...
728 addition ADDI'TION, n. [L. additio, from addo.]1. The act of adding, opposed to subtraction, or ...
729 additional ADDI'TIONAL, a. That is added. it is used by Bacon for addition; but improperly.
730 additionally ADDI'TIONALLY, adv. By way of addition.
731 additive ADD'ITIVE, a. That may be added, or that is to be added.
732 additory ADD'ITORY, a. That adds, or may add.
734 addle-pated AD'DLE-PATED, a. Having empty brains.
733 addle AD'DLE, a. [Heb. to fail.]In a morbid state; putrid; applied to eggs. Hence, barren, producing ...
735 addled AD'DLED, a. Morbid, corrupt, putrid, or barren.
736 addoom ADDOOM', v.t. [See Doom.] To adjudge.
737 addorsed ADDORS'ED, a. [L. ad and dorsum,the back.]In heraldry, having the backs turned to each other, as ...
738 address ADDRESS', v.t. [This is supposed to be from L. dirigo.]1. To prepare; to make suitable ...
739 addressed ADDRESS'ED, pp. Spoken or applied to; directed; courted; consigned.
740 addresser ADDRESS'ER, n. One who addresses or petitions.
741 addressing ADDRESS'ING, ppr. Speaking or applying to, directing; courting; consigning.
742 adduce ADDU'CE, v.t. [L. adduco, to lead or bring to; ad and duco, to lead. See Duke.]1. To bring ...
743 adduced ADDU'CED, pp. Brought forward; cited; alledged in argument.
744 adducent ADDU'CENT, a. Bringing forward, or together; a word applied to those muscles of the body which ...
745 adducible ADDU'CIBLE, a. That may be adduced.
746 adducing ADDU'CING, ppr. Bringing forward; citing in argument.
747 adduction ADDUC'TION n. The act of bringing forward.
748 adductive ADDUC'TIVE, a. That brings forward.
749 adductor ADDUC'TOR, n. [L.]A muscle which draws one part of the body towards another; as the adductor ...
750 addulce ADDULCE, v.t. adduls'. [L. ad and dulcis, sweet.]To sweeten. [Not used.]
751 adeb AD'EB, n. An Egyptian weight of 210 okes, each of three rotolos, which is a weight of about two ...
752 adel ATHEL, ADEL or AETHEL, nobel of illustrious birth.
753 adelantado ADELANTA'DO, n. A governor of a province; a lieutenant governor.
754 adeling AD'ELING, n. a title of honor given by our Saxon ancestors to the children of princes, and to ...
755 adelite AD'ELITE, n. adelites or Almogenens, in Spain, were conjurers, who predicted the fortunes of ...
756 ademption ADEMP'TION, n. [L. adimo, to take away; of ad and emo, to take.]In the civil law, the revocation ...
757 adenography ADENOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a gland, and to describe.]That part of anatomy which treats of the glands.
758 adenoid AD'ENOID, a. [Gr. a gland, and form.]In the form of a gland; glandiform; glandulous; applied to ...
759 adenological ADENOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the doctrine of the glands.
760 adenology ADENOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a gland, and discourse.]In anatomy, the doctrine of the glands, their nature, ...
761 adenos AD'ENOS, n. a species of cotton, from Aleppo, called also marine cotton.
762 adept ADEPT', n. [L. adeptus, obtained, from adipiscor.]One fully skilled or well versed in any art. ...
763 adeption ADEP'TION, n. [L. adeptio.]An obtaining; acquirement. Obs.
764 adequacy AD'EQUACY, n. [L. adaequatus, of ad and aquatus, made equal.The state or quality of being equal ...
765 adequate AD'EQUATE, a. Equal; proportionate; correspondent to; fully sufficient; as, means adequate to the ...
766 adequately AD'EQUATELY, adv. In an adequate manner; in exact proportion; with just correspondence, ...
767 adequateness AD'EQUATENESS, n. The state of being adequate; justness of proportion or representation; ...
768 adequation ADEQUA'TION, n. Adequateness. [not used.]
769 adessenarians ADESSENA'RIANS, n. [L. adesse, to be present.]In church history, a sect who hold the real presence ...
770 adfected ADFECT'ED, a. In algebra, compounded; consisting of different powers of the unknown quantity.
771 adfiliated ADFIL'IATED, a. Adopted as a son. [See Affiliate.]
772 adfiliation ADFILIA'TION, n. [L. ad and filius, a son.]A Gothic custom, by which the children of a former ...
773 adhere ADHE'RE, v.i. [L. adhaereo, ad and haereo, to stick.]1. To stick to, as glutinous substances, or ...
774 adherence ADHE'RENCE, n. 1. The quality or state of sticking or adhering.2. Figuratively, a being fixed in ...
775 adherency ADHE'RENCY, n. The same as adherence. In the sense of that which adhers, not legitimate.
776 adherent ADHE'RENT, a. Sticking, uniting, as glue or wax; united with, as an adherent mode in Locke, that ...
777 adherently ADHE'RENTLY, adv. In an adherent manner.
778 adherer ADHE'RER, n. One that adheres; an adherent.
779 adhesion ADHE'SION, n. adhe'shun. [L. adhasio.]1. The act or state of sticking, or being united and ...
780 adhesive ADHE'SIVE, a. Sticky; tenacious, as glutinous substances; apt or tending to adhere. Thus gums are ...
781 adhesively ADHE'SIVELY, adv. In an adhesive manner.
782 adhesiveness ADHE'SIVENESS, n. The quality of sticking or adhering; stickiness; tenacity.
783 adhibit ADHIB'IT, v.t. [L. adhibeo, ad and habeo, to have.]To use, or apply. [Rarely used.]
784 adhibition ADHIBI'TION, n. Application; use.
785 adhil AD'HIL, n. A star of the sixth magnitude, upon the garment of Andromeda, under the last star in ...
786 adhortation ADHORTA'TION, n. [L. adhortatio.]Advice. [Seldom used.]
787 adhortatory ADHORT'ATORY, a. [L. adhortor, to advise, ad and hortor.]Advisory; containing counsel or warning.
788 adiaphorists ADIAPH'ORISTS, n. [Gr. indifferent.]Moderate Lutherans; a name given in the sixteenth century, to ...
789 adiaphorous ADIAPH'OROUS, a. Indifferent; neutral; a name given by Boyle to a spirit distilled from tartar, ...
790 adieu ADIEU', Adu'.Farewell; an expression of kind wishes at the parting of friends.ADIEU', n. A ...
791 adipocerate ADIPOC'ERATE, v.t. To convert into adipocere.
792 adipoceration ADIPOCERA'TION,n. The act or process of being changed into adipocere.
793 adipocere AD'IPOCERE, n. [L. adeps, fat, and cera.]A soft unctuous or waxy substance, of a light brown ...
794 adipose AD'IPOSE, a. [L. adiposus, from adeps, fat. Heb. fat, gross, AD'IPOUS, stupid.]Fat. The adipose ...
795 adit ADIT, n. [L. aditus, from adeo, aditum, to approach, ad and eo, to go.]An entrance or passage; a ...
796 adjacency ADJA'CENCY, n. [L. adjaceo, to lie contiguous, from ad and jaceo, to lie.]The state of lying ...
797 adjacent ADJA'CENT, a. Lying near, close, or contiguous; bordering upon; as, a field adjacent to the ...
798 adject ADJECT' v.t. [L. adjicio, of ad and jacio, to throw.]To add or put, as one thing to another.
799 adjection ADJEC'TION,n. The act of adding, or thing added. [Little used.]
800 adjectitious ADJECTI'TIOUS, a. Added
801 adjective AD'JECTIVE, n. In grammar, a word used with a noun, to express a quality of the thing named, or ...
802 adjectively AD'JECTIVELY, adv. In the manner of an adjective; as, a word is used adjectively.
803 adjoin ADJOIN', v.t. [L. adjungo, ad and jungo. See Join.]To join or unite to; to put to, by placing in ...
804 adjoinant ADJOIN'ANT, a. Contiguous to. [Not used.]
805 adjoined ADJOIN'ED, pp. Joined to; united.
806 adjoining ADJOIN'ING, ppr. Joining to; adjacent; contiguous.
807 adjourn ADJOURN', v.t. Adjurn'. Literally, to put off, or defer to another day; but now used to denote a ...
808 adjourned ADJOURN'ED, pp. 1. Put off, delayed, or deferred for a limited time.2. As an adjective, existing ...
809 adjourning ADJOURN'ING, ppr. Deferring; suspending for a time; closing a session.
810 adjournment ADJOURN'MENT, n.1. The act of adjourning; as, in legislatures, the adjournment of one house is not ...
811 adjudge ADJUDGE', v.t.To decide, or determine, in the case of a controverted question; to decree by a ...
812 adjudged ADJUDG'ED, pp. Determined by judicial opinion; decreed; sentenced.
813 adjudging ADJUDG'ING, ppr. Determining by judicial opinion; sentencing.
814 adjudgment ADJUDG'MENT, n. The act of judging; sentenced.
815 adjudicate ADJU'DICATE, v.t. [L. adjudico, to give sentence. See Judge.]To adjudge; to try and determine, as ...
816 adjudicated ADJU'DICATED, pp. Adjudged; tried and decided.
817 adjudicating ADJU'DICATING, ppr. Adjudging; trying and determining.
818 adjudication ADJUDICA'TION, n. 1. The act of adjudging; the act or process of trying and determining ...
819 adjument AD'JUMENT, n. [L. adjumentum.] Help; support. [Not used.]
820 adjunct AD'JUNCT,n. [L. adjunctus, joined, from adjungo. See Join.]1. Something added to another, but ...
821 adjunction ADJUNC'TION, n. The act of joining; the thing joined.
822 adjunctive ADJUNC'TIVE, a. Joining; having the quality of joining.ADJUNC'TIVE, n. That which is joined.
823 adjunctively ADJUNC'TIVELY, adv. In an adjunctive manner.
824 adjunctly ADJUNCT'LY, adv. In connection with; consequently.
825 adjuration ADJURA'TION, n. 1.The act of adjuring; a solemn charging on oath, or under the penalty of a ...
826 adjure ADJU'RE, v.t. [L. adjuro, to sweat solemnly, or compel one to swear; from ad and juro, to ...
827 adjured ADJU'RED, pp. Charged on oath, or with a denunciation of God's wrath; solemnly urged.
828 adjurer ADJU'RER, n. One that adjures; one that exacts an oath.
829 adjuring ADJU'RING, ppr. Charging on oath or on the penalty of a curse; beseeching with solemnity.
830 adjust ADJUST', v.t. [L. ad, and justus, just, exact. See Just.]1. To make exact; to fit; to make ...
831 adjusted ADJUST'ED, pp. Made exact or conformable; reduced to a right form or standard settled.
832 adjuster ADJUST'ER, n. A person who adjusts; that which regulates.
833 adjusting ADJUST'ING, ppr. Reducing to due form; fitting; making exact or correspondent; settling.
834 adjustment ADJUST'MENT, n. The act of adjusting; regulation; a reducing to just form or order; a making fit ...
835 adjutage AJ'UTAGE, or AD'JUTAGE, n. A tube fitted to the mouth of a vessel, through which the water of a ...
836 adjutancy AD'JUTANCY, n. [See Adjutant.] The office of an adjutant; skillful arrangement.
837 adjutant AD'JUTANT, n. [L. adjutans, aiding; from adjuto, to assist; of ad and juvo, jutum, to help.]In ...
838 adjute ADJU'TE, v.t. To help. [Not used.]
839 adjutor ADJU'TOR, n. A helper. [Little used; its compound coadjutor is in common use.]
840 adjuvant ADJU'VANT, a. Helping; assisting.
841 adker 'ADKER, n.1. One who asks; a petitioner; an inquirer.2. A water newt.
842 adlegation ADLEGA'TION, n. [L. ad and legatio, an embassy, from lego, to send. See Legate.]In the public law ...
843 adlocution ADLOCU'TION, n. [See Allocation.]
844 admeasure ADMEAS'URE, v.t. admezh'ur. [ad and measure. See Measure.]1. To measure or ascertain dimensions, ...
845 admeasured ADMEAS'URED, pp. Measured; apportioned.
846 admeasurement ADMEAS'UREMENT, n. 1. The measuring of dimensions by a rule, as of a ship, cask, and the like.2. ...
847 admeasurer ADMEAS'URER, n. One that admeasures.
848 admeasuring ADMEAS'URING, ppr. Measuring; apportioning.
849 admensuration ADMENSURA'TION Is equivalent to admeasurement, but not much used. See Mensuration.]
850 adminicle ADMIN'ICLE, n. [L. adminiculum.] Help; support. [Not used.]
851 adminicular ADMINIC'ULAR, a. Supplying help; helpful.
852 administer ADMIN'ISTER, v.t. [L. administro, of ad and ministro, to serve or manage. See Minister.]1. To ...
853 administered ADMIN'ISTERED, pp. Executed; managed; governed; afforded; given; dispensed.
854 administerial ADMINISTE'RIAL, a. Pertaining to administration, or to the executive part of government.
855 administering ADMIN'ISTERING, ppr. Executing; carrying into effect; giving; dispensing.
856 administrate ADMIN'ISTRATE, In the place of administer, has been used, but is not well authorized.
857 administration ADMINISTRA'TION, n. 1. The act of administering; direction; management; government of public ...
858 administrative ADMIN'ISTRATIVE, a. That administers, or by which one administers.
859 administrator ADMINISTRA'TOR, n. 1. a man who, by virtue of a commission from the Ordinary, Surrogate, Court of ...
860 administratorship ADMINISTRA'TORSHIP, n. The office of an administrator.
861 administratrix ADMINISTRA'TRIX, n. A female who administers upon the estate of an intestate; also a female who ...
862 admirable AD'MIRABLE, a. [L. admirabilis.]To be admired; worthy of admiration; having qualities to excite ...
863 admirableness AD'MIRABLENESS, n. The quality of being admirable; the power of exciting admiration.
864 admirably AD'MIRABLY, adv. In a manner to excite wonder, mingled with approbation, esteem or veneration.
865 admiral AD'MIRAL, n. [In the Latin of the middle ages. Amira, Amiras, Admiralis, an Emir; Heb. to speak. ...
866 admiralship AD'MIRALSHIP, n. The office or power of an admiral. [Little used.]
867 admiralty AD'MIRALTY, n. In Great Britain, the office of Lord High Admiral. This office is discharged by ...
868 admiration ADMIRA'TION, n. Wonder mingled with pleasing emotions, as approbation, esteem, love or veneration; ...
869 admirative ADMI'RATIVE, n. A note of admiration, thus! [Not used.]
870 admire ADMI'RE, v.t. [L. admiror, ad and miror, to wonder; demiror. See Moor and Mar.]1. To regard with ...
871 admired ADMI'RED, pp. Regarded with wonder, mingled with pleasurable sensations, as esteem, love or ...
872 admirer ADMI'RER, n. One who admires; one who esteems or loves greatly.
873 admiring ADMI'RING, ppr. Regarding with wonder united with love or esteem.
874 admiringly ADMI'RINGLY, adv. With admiration; in the manner of an admirer.
875 admissibility ADMISSIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being admissable.
876 admissible ADMISS'IBLE, a. [See admit.] That may be admitted, allowed or conceded; as, the testimony is ...
877 admission ADMISS'ION, n. [L. admissio.]1. The act or practice of admitting, as the admission of aliens into ...
878 admit ADMIT', v.t. [L. admitto, from ad and mitto, to send.]1. To suffer to enter; to grant entrance; ...
879 admittable ADMIT'TABLE, a. That may be admitted or allowed.
880 admittance ADMIT'TANCE, n. 1. The act of admitting; allowance. More usually,2. Permission to enter; the ...
881 admitted ADMIT'TED, pp. Permitted to enter or approach; allowed; granted; conceded.
882 admitter ADMIT'TER, n. He that admits.
883 admitting ADMIT'TING, ppr. Permitting to enter or approach; allowing; conceding.
884 admix ADMIX', v.t. To mingle with something else. [See Mix.]
885 admixtion ADMIX'TION, n. admixchun, [L. admixtio, or admistio; of ad and misceo, to mix. See Mix.]A ...
886 admixture ADMIX'TURE, n. [From admix.]The substance mingled with another; sometimes the act of mixture. We ...
887 admonish ADMON'ISH, v.t. [L. admoneo, ad and moneo, to teach, warn, admonish.]1. To warn or notify of a ...
888 admonished ADMON'ISHED, pp. Reproved; advised; warned; instructed.
889 admonisher ADMON'ISHER, n. One who reproves or counsels.
890 admonishing ADMON'ISHING, ppr. Reproving; warning; counseling; directing.
891 admonishment ADMON'ISHMENT, n. Admonition.
892 admonition ADMONI'TION, n. Gentle reproof; counseling against a fault; instruction in duties; caution; ...
893 admonitioner ADMONI'TIONER, n. A dispenser of admonitions.
894 admonitive ADMON'ITIVE, a. Containing admonition.
895 admonitor ADMON'ITOR, n. An admonisher, a monitor.
896 admonitory ADMON'ITORY, a. Containing admonition; that admonishes.
897 admortization ADMORTIZA'TION, n. The reducing of lands or tenements to mortmain. [See Mortmain.]
898 admove ADMOVE', v.t. [L. admoveo.]To move to; to bring one thing to another. [Little used.]
899 adnascent ADNAS'CENT, a. [L. ad and nascens, growing.]
900 adnata ADNA'TA, n. [L. ad and natus, grown from nascor, to grow.]1. In anatomy, one of the coats of the ...
901 adnate AD'NATE, a. [L. ad and natus, grown.]In botany, pressing close to the stem, or growing to it.
902 adnoun AD'NOUN, n. [ad and noun.]In grammar, an adjective, or attribute. [Little used.]
903 ado ADO', n. Bustle; trouble; labor; difficulty; as, to make a great ado about trifles; to persuade ...
904 adolescence ADOLES'CENCE, n. [L. adolescens, growing, of ad and olesco, to grow, from oleo. Heb. to ...
905 adolescent ADOLES'CENT, a. Growing; advancing from childhood to manhood.
906 adonean ADONE'AN, a. Pertaining to Adonis.Fair Adonean Venus.
907 adonia ADO'NIA, n. Festivals celebrated anciently in honor of Adonis, by females, who spent two days in ...
908 adonic ADO'NIC, a. Adonic Verse, a short verse, in which the death of Adonis was bewailed. It consists ...
909 adonis ADO'NIS, n. In mythology, the favorite of Venus, said to be the son of Cinyras, king of Cyprus. ...
910 adonists ADO'NISTS, n. [Heb. Lord, a scriptural title of the Supreme Being.]Among critics, a sect or party ...
911 adopt ADOPT', v.t. [L. adopto, of ad and opto, to desire or choose. See Option.]1. To take a stranger ...
912 adopted ADOPT'ED, pp. Taken as one's own; received as son and heir; selected for use.
913 adoptedly ADOPT'EDLY, adv. In the manner of something adopted.
914 adopter ADOPT'ER, n.1. One who adopts.2. In chimistry, a large round receiver, with two necks, ...
915 adopting ADOPT'ING, ppr. Taking a stranger as a son; taking as one's own.
916 adoption ADOP'TION, n. [L. adoptio.]1. The act of adopting, or the state of being adopted; the taking and ...
917 adoptive ADOPT'IVE, a. [L. adoptivus.]That adopts, as an adoptive father; or that is adopted, as an ...
918 adorable ADO'RABLE, a. That ought to be adored; worth of divine honors. In popular use, worthy of the ...
919 adorableness ADO'RABLENESS, n. The quality of being adorable, or worthy of adoration.
920 adorably ADO'RABLY, adv. In a manner worthy of adoration.
921 adoration ADORA'TION, n. 1. The act of paying honors to a divine being; the worship paid to God; the act of ...
922 adore ADO'RE, v.t. [L. adoro. In Heb. to honor, reverence or glorify to adorn; to be magnificent or ...
923 adored ADO'RED, pp. Worshipped as divine; highly reverenced; greatly beloved.
924 adorer ADO'RER, n. One who worships, or honors as divine; in popular language, an admiring lover.
925 adoring ADO'RING, ppr. or a. Honoring or addressing as divine; regarding with great love or reverence.
926 adorn ADORN', v.t. [L. adorno, ad and orno, to deck, or beautify, to dress, set off, extol, furnish.1. ...
927 adorned ADORN'ED, pp. Decked; decorated; embellished.
928 adorning ADORN'ING, ppr. Ornamenting; decorating; displaying beauty.ADORN'ING, n. Ornament; decoration. ...
929 adosculation ADOSCULA'TION, n. [L. ad and osculatio, a kissing, from osculum, a kiss, or mouth.]The ...
930 adossed ADOS'SED, a. In heraldry, denoting two figures or bearings place back to back.
931 adown ADOWN', prep. [a and down.] From a higher to a lower situation; downwards; implying ...
932 adread ADREAD', a. Adred'. [See Dread.] Affected by dread. Obs.
933 adriatic ADRIAT'IC, a. [L. Aldria, or Hadria, the gulf of Venice.]Pertaining to the Gulf, called, from ...
934 adrift ADRIFT', a. or adv. [See Drive. Adrift is the participle of the verb.]Literally, driven; ...
935 adrogation ADROGA'TION, n. [L. ad and rogo, to ask. See Interrogate and Rogation.]A species of adoption in ...
936 adroit ADROIT', [L. directus, dirigo. See Right.]Dextrous; skillful; active in the use of the hands, and ...
937 adroitly ADROIT'LY, adv. With dexterity; in a ready skillful manner.
938 adroitness ADROIT'NESS, n. Dexterity; readiness in the use of the limbs, or of the mental faculties.
939 adry ADRY', a. Thirsty, in want of drink. [This adjective always follows the noun.]
940 adscititious ADSCITI'TIOUS, a. [L. ascititius, from adscisco, ascisco, to add or join.]Added; taken as ...
941 adstrictory ADSTRIC'TORY, ADSTRING'ENT. [See Astringent.]
942 adstringent ADSTRIC'TORY, ADSTRING'ENT. [See Astringent.]
943 adularia ADULA'RIA, n. [From Adula, the summit of a Swiss mountain.]A mineral deemed the most perfect ...
944 adulation ADULA'TION, n. [L. adulatio.]Servile flattery; praise in excess, or beyond what is merited; high ...
945 adulator AD'ULATOR, n. A flatterer; one who offers praise servilely.
946 adulatory AD'ULATORY, a. Flattering; containing excessive praise or compliments; servilely praising; as, an ...
947 adulatress AD'ULATRESS, n. A female that flatters with servility.
948 adult ADULT', n. [L. adultus, grown to maturity, from oleo, to grow; Heb. to ascend.]Having arrived at ...
949 adulterant ADUL'TERANT, n. The person or thing that adulterates.
950 adulterate ADUL'TERATE, v.t. [L. adultero, from adulter, mixed, or an adulterer; ad and alter, other.]To ...
951 adulterated ADUL'TERATED, pp. Corrupted; debased by a mixture with something of less value.
952 adulterateness ADUL'TERATENESS, n. The quality or state of being debased or counterfeit.
953 adulterating ADUL'TERATING, ppr. Debasing; corrupting; counterfeiting.
954 adulteration ADULTERA'TION, n. The act of adulterating, or the state of being adulterated, corrupted or debased ...
955 adulterer ADUL'TERER, n. [L. adulter.]1. A man guilty of adultery; a man who has sexual commerce with any ...
956 adulteress ADUL'TERESS, n. A married woman guilty of incontinence.
957 adulterine ADUL'TERINE, a. Proceeding from adulterous commerce; spurious.
958 adulterous ADUL'TEROUS, a. 1. Guilty of adultery; pertaining to adultery.2. In scripture, idolatrous, very ...
959 adultery ADUL'TERY, n. [L. adulterium. See Adulterate.]1. Violation of the marriage bed; a crime, or a ...
960 adultness ADULT'NESS, n. The state of being adult.
961 adumbrant ADUM'BRANT, a. [See Adumbrate.] Giving a faint shadow, or slight resemblance.
962 adumbrate ADUM'BRATE, v.t. [L. adumbro, to shade, from umbra, a shade.]To give a faint shadow, or slight ...
963 adumbration ADUMBRA'TION, n. 1. The act of making a shadow or faint resemblance.2. A faint sketch; an ...
964 adunation ADUNA'TION, n. [L. ad and unus, unio,.]The state of being united; union. [Not used.]
965 aduncity ADUN'CITY, n. [L. aduncitas, hookedness, of ad and uncus, a hook.]Hookedness; a bending in form of ...
966 aduncous ADUN'COUS, a. [L. aduncus.]Hooked; bent or made in the form of a hook.
967 adunque ADUNQUE, a. Adunk'. Hooked. [Not used.]
968 adure ADU'RE, v.t. [L. aduro, ad and uro, to burn.]To burn up. [Not used.]
969 adust ADUST', a. [L. adustus, burnt, the participle of aduro, to burn.]Burnt; scorched; become dry by ...
970 adusted ADUST'ED, a. Become hot and dry; burnt; scorched.
971 adustion ADUS'TION, n. The act of burning, scorching, or heating to dryness; a state of being thus heated ...
972 advance ADV'ANCE, v.t. adv'ans. [Heb. surface, face; whence.]1. To bring forward; to move further in ...
973 advanced ADV'ANCED, pp. Moved forward; promoted; improved; furnished beforehand; situated in front, or ...
974 advancement ADV'ANCEMENT, n. 1. The act of moving forward or proceeding.2. The state of being advanced; ...
975 advancer ADV'ANCER, n. One who advances; a promoter.Among sportsmen, a start or branch of a buck's attire, ...
976 advancing ADV'ANCING, ppr. Moving forward; proceeding; promoting; raising to higher rank or excellence; ...
977 advancive ADV'ANCIVE, a. Tending to advance, or promote.
979 advantage-ground ADV'ANTAGE-GROUND, n. Ground that gives advantage or superiority; a state that gives superior ...
978 advantage ADV'ANTAGE, n. 1. Any state, condition, or circumstance, favorable to success, prosperity, ...
980 advantageable ADV'ANTAGEABLE, a. Profitable; convenient; gainful. [Little used.]
981 advantaged ADV'ANTAGED, pp. Benefitted; promoted.
982 advantageous ADVANTA'GEOUS, a. Being of advantage; furnishing convenience, or opportunity to gain benefit; ...
983 advantageously ADVANTA'GEOUSLY, adv. In an advantageous manner; profitably; usefully; conveniently.
984 advantageousness ADVANTA'GEOUSNESS, n. The quality or state of being advantageous; profitableness; usefulness; ...
985 advantaging ADV'ANTAGING, ppr. Profiting; benefiting.
986 advene ADVE'NE, v.i. [L. advenio, to come to, ad and venio.]To accede, or come to; to be added to, or ...
987 advenient ADVE'NIENT, a. Advening; coming from outward causes.
988 advent AD'VENT, n. [L. adventus, from advenio, of ad and venio, to come. See Find.]A coming; ...
989 adventine ADVENT'INE, a. Adventitious. [Not used.]
990 adventitious ADVENTI'TIOUS, a. [L. adventitius, from advenio. See Advent.]Added extrinsically; accidental; not ...
991 adventitiously ADVENTI'TIOUSLY, adv. Accidentally.
992 adventive ADVENT'IVE, a. Accidental; adventitious. [Little used.]
993 adventual ADVENT'UAL, a. Relating to the season of advent.
994 adventure ADVENT'URE, n. [See Advent.]1. Hazard; risk; chance; that of which one has no direction; as, at ...
995 adventured ADVENT'URED, pp. Put to hazard; ventured; risked.
996 adventurer ADVENT'URER, n.1. One who hazards, or puts something at risk, as merchant-adventurers.2. One who ...
997 adventuresome ADVENT'URESOME, a. Bold; daring; incurring hazard. [See Venturesome.]
998 adventuresomeness ADVENT'URESOMENESS, n. The quality of being bold and venturesome.
999 adventuring ADVENT'URING, ppr. Putting to risk; hazarding.
1000 adventurous ADVENT'UROUS, a.1. Inclined or willing to incur hazard; bold to encounter danger; daring; ...
1001 adventurously ADVENT'UROUSLY, adv. Boldly; daringly; in a manner to incur hazard.
1002 adventurousness ADVENT'UROUSNESS, n. The act or quality of being adventurous.
1003 adverb AD'VERB, n. [L. adverbium, of ad and verbum, to a verb.]In grammar, a word used to modify the ...
1004 adverbial ADVERB'IAL, a. Pertaining to an adverb.
1005 adverbially ADVERB'IALLY, adv. In the manner of an adverb.
1006 adversaria ADVERSA'RIA, n. [L. from adversus. See Adverse.]Among the ancients, a book of accounts, so named ...
1007 adversary AD'VERSARY, n. [See Adverse.]1. An enemy or foe; one who has enmity at heart.The Lord shall take ...
1008 adversative ADVERS'ATIVE, a. Noting some difference, contrariety, or opposition; as, John is an honest man, ...
1009 adverse AD'VERSE, a. [L. adversus, opposite; of ad and versus, turned; from verto, to turn. See Advert. ...
1010 adversely AD'VERSELY, adv. In an adverse manner; oppositely; unfortunately; unprosperously; in a manner ...
1011 adverseness AD'VERSENESS, n. Opposition; unprosperousness.
1012 adversity ADVERS'ITY, n. An event, or series of events, which oppose success or desire; misfortune; ...
1013 advert ADVERT', v.i. [L. adverto, of ad and verto, to turn.]To turn the mind or attention to; to regard, ...
1014 adverted ADVERT'ED, pp. Attended to; regarded; with to.
1015 advertence ADVERT'ENCE,
1016 advertency ADVERT'ENCY, n. A direction of the mind to; attention; notice; regard; consideration; ...
1017 advertent ADVERT'ENT, a. Attentive; heedful.
1018 adverting ADVERT'ING, ppr. Attending to; regarding; observing.
1019 advertise ADVERTI'SE, v.t. s as z. [See Advert.]1. To inform; to give notice, advice or intelligence to, ...
1020 advertised ADVERTI'SED, pp. Informed; notified; warned; used of persons: published; made known; used of ...
1021 advertisement ADVER'TISEMENT, n. Information; admonition, notice given. More generally, a publication intended ...
1022 advertiser ADVERTI'SER, n. One who advertises. This title is often given to public prints.
1023 advertising ADVERTI'SING, ppr. 1. Informing; giving notice; publishing notice.2. a. Furnishing ...
1024 advice ADVI'CE, n. [L. viso, to see, to visit.]1. Counsel; an opinion recommended, or offered, as worthy ...
1025 advisable ADVI'SABLE, a. [See Advise.]1. Proper to be advised; prudent; expedient; proper to be done or ...
1026 advisableness ADVI'SABLENESS, n. The quality of being advisable or expedient.
1027 advise ADVI'SE, v.t. s as z. [See Advice.]1. To give counsel to; to offer an opinion, as worthy or ...
1028 advised ADVI'SED, pp. 1. Informed; counseled; also cautious; prudent; acting with deliberation.Let him be ...
1029 advisedly ADVI'SEDLY, adv. With deliberation or advice; heedfully; purposely; by design; as, an enterprize ...
1030 advisedness ADVI'SEDNESS, n. Deliberate consideration; prudent procedure.
1031 advisement ADVI'SEMENT, n.1. Counsel; information; circumspection.2. Consultation.The action standing ...
1032 adviser ADVI'SER, n. One who gives advice or admonition; also, in a bad sense, one who instigates or ...
1033 advising ADVI'SING, ppr. Giving counsel.
1034 advisory ADVI'SORY, a. 1. Having power to advise.The general association has a general advisory ...
1035 advocacy AD'VOCACY, n. 1. The act of pleading for; intercession.2. Judicial pleading; law-suit.
1036 advocate AD'VOCATE, n. [L. advocatus, from advoco, to call for, to plead for; of ad and voco, to call. See ...
1037 advocated AD'VOCATED, pp. Defended by argument; vindicated.
1038 advocatess AD'VOCATESS, n. A female advocate.
1039 advocating AD'VOCATING, ppr. Supporting by reasons; defending; maintaining.
1040 advocation ADVOCA'TION, n. A pleading for: plea; apology.A bill of advocation, in Scotland, is a written ...
1041 advoutress ADVOU'TRESS, n. An adulteress.
1042 advoutry ADVOU'TRY, n. Adultery. [Little used.]
1043 advowee ADVOWEE', n. 1. He that has the right of advowson.2. The advocate of a church or religious ...
1044 advowson ADVOW'SON, n. s as z. [The word was latinized, advocatio, from advoco, and avow is from ...
1045 advoyer ADVOY'ER, or Avoy'er, A chief magistrate of a town or canton in Switzerland.
1046 ady A'DY, n. The abanga, or Thernel's restorative; a species of Palm tree, in the West Indies, tall, ...
1047 adz ADZ, n. An iron instrument with an arching edge, across the line of the handle, and ground from a ...
1048 ae AE, a diphthong in the Latin language; used also by the Saxon writers. In derivatives from the ...
1049 aed AED, ed, ead, syllables found in names from the Saxon, signify happy; as, Eadric, happy kingdom; ...
1050 aedile AE'DILE, n. [Lat.] In ancient Rome, an officer or magistrate, who had the care of the public ...
1051 aegilops AE'GILOPS, n. [Gr. a goat and the eye.]A tumor in the corner of the eye, and a plant so called.
1052 aegis AE'GIS, n. [Gr. a goat skin, and shield; from a goat.]A shield, or defensive armor.
1053 ael AEL, Eng. all, are seen in many names; as, in AElfred, Alfred, all peace; AElwin, all conqueror.
1054 aelf AELF, seems to be one form of help, but more generally written elph or ulph; as, in AElfwin, ...
1055 aeolist AE'OLIST, n. [L. AEolus.]A pretender to inspiration.
1056 aerate A'ERATE, v.t. [See Air.] To combine with carbonic acid, formerly called fixed air. [The word has ...
1057 aerated A'ERATED, pp. Combined with carbonic acid.
1058 aerating A'ERATING, ppr. Combining with carbonic acid.
1059 aeration AERA'TION, n. The act or operation of combining with carbonic acid.
1060 aerial AE'RIAL, a. [L. aerius. See Air.]1. Belonging to the air, or atmosphere; as, aerial regions.2. ...
1061 aerians AE'RIANS, n. In church history, a branch of Arians, so called from Aerius, who maintained, that ...
1062 aerie A'ERIE, n. The nest of a fowl, as of an eagle or hawk; a covey of birds.
1063 aerification AERIFICA'TION, n.1. The act of combining air with; the state of being filled with air.2. The act ...
1064 aerified A'ERIFIED, pp. Having air infused, or combined with.
1065 aeriform A'ERIFORM, a. [L. aer, air, and forma, form.]Having the form or nature of air, or of an elastic, ...
1066 aerify A'ERIFY, v.t. To infuse air into; to fill with air, or to combine air with.
1067 aerography AEROG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. air, and to describe.]A description of the air or atmosphere; but aerology is ...
1068 aerolite A'EROLITE, n. [Gr. air, and a stone.]A stone falling from the air, or atmospheric regions; a ...
1069 aerological AEROLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to aerology.
1070 aerologist AEROL'OGIST, n. One who is versed in aerology.
1071 aerology AEROL'OGY, n [Gr. air, and description.]A description of the air; that branch of philosophy which ...
1072 aeromancy A'EROMANCY, n. [Gr. divination.]Divination by means of the air and winds. [Little used.]
1073 aerometer AEROM'ETER, n. [Gr. air, and measure.]An instrument for weighing air, or for ascertaining the ...
1074 aerometry AEROM'ETRY, n. [as above.] The science of measuring the air, including the doctrine of its ...
1075 aeronaut A'ERONAUT, n. [Gr. a sailor, from a ship.]One who sails or floats in the air; an aerial navigator; ...
1076 aeronautic AERONAUT'IC, a. Sailing or floating in the air; pertaining to aerial sailing.
1077 aeronautics AERONAUT'ICS, n. The doctrine, science, or art of sailing in the air, by means of a balloon.
1078 aeronautism A'ERONAUTISM, n. The practice of ascending and floating in the atmosphere, in balloons.
1079 aeroscopy AEROS'COPY, n. [Gr to see.] The observation of the air. [Little used.]
1080 aerostat A'EROSTAT, n. [Gr. sustaining, from to stand.]A machine or vessel sustaining weights in the air; a ...
1081 aerostatic AEROSTAT'IC, a. Suspending in air; pertaining to the art of aerial navigation.
1082 aerostation AEROSTA'TION, n. 1. Aerial navigation; the science of raising, suspending, and guiding machines ...
1083 aery-light A'ERY-LIGHT, in Milton, light as air; used for airy light.
1084 aethel ATHEL, ADEL or AETHEL, nobel of illustrious birth.
1085 afar AF'AR, adv. [a and far. See Far.]1. At a distance in place; to or from a distance; used with ...
1086 afeard AFE'ARD, a. Afeard is the participle passive. See Fear.]Afraid; affected with fear or ...
1087 affa AF'FA, n. A weight used on the Guinea coast, equal to an ounce. The half of it is call eggeba.
1088 affability AFFABIL'ITY, n. [See Affable.] The quality of being affable; readiness to converse; civility and ...
1089 affable AF'FABLE, a. [L. affabilis, of ad and fabulor. See Fable.]1. Easy of conversation; admitting ...
1090 affableness AF'FABLENESS, n. Affability.
1091 affably AF'FABLY, adv. In an affable manner; courteously; invitingly.
1092 affair AFFA'IR, n. [L. facere. The primary sense of facio is to urge, drive, impel.]1. Business of any ...
1093 affect AFFECT', v.t. [L. afficio, affectum, of ad and facio, to make; affecto, to desire, from the same ...
1094 affectation AFFECTA'TION, n. [L. affectatio.]1. An attempt to assume or exhibit what is not natural or real; ...
1095 affected AFFECT'ED, pp. 1. Impressed; moved, or touched, either in person or in interest; having suffered ...
1096 affectedly AFFECT'EDLY, adv. In an affected manner; hypocritically; with more show than reality; formally; ...
1097 affectedness AFFECT'EDNESS, n. The quality of being affected; affectation.
1098 affecter AFFECT'ER, n. One that affects; one that practices affectation.
1099 affecting AFFECT'ING, ppr.1. Impressing; having an effect on; touching the feelings; moving the passions; ...
1100 affectingly AFFECT'INGLY, adv. In an affecting manner; in a manner to excite emotions.
1101 affection AFFEC'TION, n. 1. The state of being affected. [Little used.]2. Passion; but more generally,3. ...
1102 affectionate AFFEC'TIONATE, a. 1. Having great love, or affection; fond; as, an affectionate brother.2. Warm ...
1103 affectionately AFFEC'TIONATELY, adv. With affection; fondly; tenderly; kindly. 1Thes. 2.
1104 affectionateness AFFEC'TIONATENESS, n. Fondness; goodwill; affection.
1105 affectioned AFFEC'TIONED, a. 1. Disposed; having an affection of heart.Be ye kindly affectioned one to ...
1106 affective AFFECT'IVE, a. That affects, or excites emotion; suited to affect. [Little used.]
1107 affectively AFFECT'IVELY, adv. In an affective or impressive manner.
1108 affector AFFECT'OR
1109 affectuous AFFECT'UOUS, a. Full of passion. [Not used.]
1110 affeer AFFEE'R, v.t. To confirm. [Not used.]AFFEE'R, v.t.In law, to assess or reduce an arbitrary ...
1111 affeered AFFEE'RED, pp. Moderated in sum; assessed; reduced to a certainty.
1112 affeerment AFFEE'RMENT, n. The act of affeering, or assessing an amercement, according to the circumstances ...
1113 affeeror AFFEE'ROR, n. One who affeers; a person sworn to assess a penalty, or reduce an uncertain penalty ...
1114 affettuoso AFFETTUO'SO, or con affetto, [L. affectus.]In music, a direction to render notes soft and ...
1115 affiance AFFI'ANCE, n. [L. fido, fides.]1. The marriage contract or promise; faith pledged.2. Trust in ...
1116 affianced AFFI'ANCED, pp. Pledged in marriage; betrothed; bound in faith.
1117 affiancer AFFI'ANCER, n. One who makes a contract of marriage between parties.
1118 affiancing AFFI'ANCING, ppr. Pledging in marriage; promising fidelity.
1119 affidavit AFFIDA'VIT, n. [An old law verb in the perfect tense; he made oath; from ad and fides, faith.]A ...
1120 affied AFFI'ED, a. or part. Joined by contract; affianced. [Not used.]
1121 affile AFFI'LE, v.t. To polish. [Not used.]
1122 affiliate AFFIL'IATE, v.t. [L. ad and filius, a son.]1. To adopt; to receive into a family as a son.2. To ...
1123 affiliation AFFILIA'TION, n. Adoption; association in the same family or society.
1124 affinity AFFIN'ITY, n. [L. affinitas, from affinis, adjacent, related by marriage; ad and finis, end.]1. ...
1125 affirm AFFIRM, v.t. afferm' [L. affirmo; ad and firmo, to make firm. See Firm.]1. To assert positively; ...
1126 affirmable AFFIRM'ABLE, a. That may be asserted or declared; followed by of; as, an attribute affirmable of ...
1127 affirmance AFFIRM'ANCE, n. 1. Confirmation; ratification; as, the affirmance of a judgment; a statute in ...
1128 affirmant AFFIRM'ANT, n. One who affirms.
1129 affirmation AFFIRMA'TION, n.1. The act of affirming or asserting as true; opposed to negation or denial.2. ...
1130 affirmative AFFIRM'ATIVE, a. 1. That affirms, or asserts; declaratory of what exists; opposed to negative; ...
1131 affirmatively AFFIRM'ATIVELY, adv. In an affirmative manner; positively; on the affirmative side of a question; ...
1132 affirmed AFFIRM'ED, pp. Declared; asserted; averred; confirmed; ratified.
1133 affirmer AFFIRM'ER, n. One who affirms.
1134 affirming AFFIRM'ING, ppr. Asserting; declaring positively; confirming.
1135 affix AFFIX', v.t. [L. affigo, affixum, of ad and figo, to fix. Eng. peg. See Fix.]1. To unite at ...
1136 affixed AFFIX'ED, pp. United at the end; annexed; attached.
1137 affixing AFFIX'ING, ppr. Uniting at the end; subjoining; attaching.
1138 affixion AFFIX'ION, n. The act of uniting at the end, or state of being so united. [Little used.]
1139 affixture AFFIX'TURE, n. That which is affixed.
1140 afflation AFFLA'TION, n. [L. affle, afflatum, of ad and flo; Eng. blow. See Blow.]A blowing or breathing ...
1141 afflatus AFFLA'TUS, n. [L.]1. A breath or blast of wind.2. Inspiration; communication of divine ...
1142 afflict AFFLICT', v.t. [L. affligo, afflicto, of ad and figo, to strike; eng. flog; Gr. to strike;, L. ...
1143 afflicted AFFLICT'ED, pp. Affected with continued or often repeated pain, either of body or mind; suffering ...
1144 afflictedness AFFLICT'EDNESS, n. The state of being afflicted; but superseded by affliction.
1145 afflicter AFFLICT'ER, n. One who afflicts, or causes pain of body or of mind.
1146 afflicting AFFLICT'ING, ppr. Causing continued or durable pain of body or mind; grieving; ...
1147 affliction AFFLIC'TION, n. 1. The state of being afflicted; a state of pain, distress, or grief.Some virtues ...
1148 afflictive AFFLICT'IVE, a. Giving pain; causing continued or repeated pain or grief; painful; distressing.
1149 afflictively AFFLICT'IVELY, adv. In a manner to give pain or grief.
1150 affluence AF'FLUENCE, n. [L. affluentia, of ad and fluo, to flow. See Flow.]1. Literally, a flowing to, or ...
1151 affluent AF'FLUENT, a. Flowing to; more generally, wealthy; abounding in goods or riches; abundant.
1152 affluently AF'FLUENTLY, adv. In abundance; abundantly.
1153 afflux AF'FLUX, n. [L. affluxum, from affluo. See Flow.]The act of flowing to; a flowing to, or that ...
1154 affluxion AFFLUX'ION, n. The act of flowing to; that which flows to. [See Afflux.]
1155 afforage AF'FORAGE, n. [ad and force.]In France, a duty paid to the lord of a district, for permission to ...
1156 afforcement AFFO'RCEMENT, n. [ad and force.]In old charters, a fortress; a fortification for defense. Obs.
1157 afford AFFO'RD, v.t. [ad and the root of forth, further. The sense is to send forth. But I have not ...
1158 afforded AFFO'RDED, pp. Yielded as fruit, produce or result; sold without loss or with profit.
1159 affording AFFO'RDING, ppr. Yielding; producing; selling without loss; bearing expenses.
1160 afforest AFFOR'EST, v.t. [ad and forest.]To convert ground into forest, as was done by the first Norman ...
1161 afforestation AFFORESTA'TION, n. The act of turning ground into forest or wood land.
1162 afforested AFFOR'ESTED, pp. Converted into forest.
1163 afforesting AFFOR'ESTING, ppr. Converting into forest.
1164 affranchisement AFFRAN'CHISEMENT,n. [See Franchise and disfranchise.]The act of making free, or liberating from ...
1165 affrap AFFRAP', v.t. [Eng. rap.] To strike. Obs.
1166 affray AFFRA'Y,
1167 affrayment AFFRA'YMENT, n.1. In law, the fighting of two or more persons, in a public place, to the terror ...
1168 affreight AFFREIGHT', v.t. affra'te. [See Freight.]To hire a ship for the transportation of goods or ...
1169 affreighted AFFREIGHT'ED, pp. Hired for transporting goods.
1170 affreighter AFFREIGHT'ER, n. The person who hires or charters a ship or other vessel to convey goods.
1171 affreightment AFFREIGHT'MENT, n. The act of hiring a ship for the transportation of goods.
1172 affret AFFRET', n. A furious onset, or attack. [Not used.]
1173 affriction AFFRIC'TION, n. The act of rubbing. [Not used.] [See Friction.]
1174 affriended AFFRIENDED, a. affrend'ed. Made friends; reconciled. Obs.
1175 affright AFFRI'GHT, v.t. affri'te. [See Fright.]To impress with sudden fear; to frighten; to terrify or ...
1176 affrighted AFFRI'GHTED, pp. Suddenly alarmed with fear; terrified; followed by at or with, more generally by ...
1177 affrighter AFFRI'GHTER, n. One who frightens.
1178 affrightful AFFRI'GHTFUL, a. Terrifying; terrible; that may excite great fear; dreadful.
1179 affrighting AFFRI'GHTING, ppr. Impressing sudden fear; terrifying.
1180 affrightment AFFRI'GHTMENT, n. Affright; terror; the state of being frightened. [Rarely used.] [In common ...
1181 affront AFFRONT', v.t. [L. frons, front, face.]1. Literally, to meet or encounter face to face, in a good ...
1182 affronted AFFRONT'ED, pp. 1. Opposed face to face; dared; defied; abused.2. In popular language, offended; ...
1183 affrontee AFFRONTEE', a. In heraldry, front to front; an epithet given to animals that face each other.
1184 affronter AFFRONT'ER, n. One that affronts.
1185 affronting AFFRONT'ING, ppr. Opposing face to face; defying; abusing; offering abuse, or any cause of ...
1186 affrontive AFFRONT'IVE, a. Giving offense; tending to offend; abusive.
1187 affrontiveness AFFRONT'IVENESS, n. The quality that gives offense. [Little used.]
1188 affuse AFFU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. affundo, affusum, ad and fundo, to pour out. See Fuse.]To pour upon; ...
1189 affused AFFU'SED, pp. Sprinkled with a liquid; sprinkled on; having a liquid poured upon.
1190 affusing AFFU'SING, ppr. Pouring upon, or sprinkling.
1191 affusion AFFU'SION, n. affu'zhun. The act of pouring upon, or sprinkling with a liquid substance, as water ...
1192 affy AFFY', v.t. To betroth; to bind or join. [Not used.]AFFY', v.t. To trust or confide in. [Not ...
1193 afield AFIE'LD, adv. [a and field.] To the field.
1194 afire AFI'RE, adv. On fire.
1195 aflat AFLAT', adv. [a and flat.] Level with the ground.
1196 afloat AFLO'AT, adv. or a. [a and float.]1. Borne on the water; floating; swimming; as, the ship is ...
1197 afoot AFOOT', adv. [a or on and foot.] 1. On foot; borne by the feet; opposed to riding.2. In action; ...
1198 afore AFO'RE, adv. or prep. [a and fore.]1. In front.2. Between one object and another, so as to ...
1199 aforegoing AFO'REGOING, a. Going before. [See Foregoing, which is chiefly used.]
1200 aforehand AFO'REHAND, adv. [afore and hand.]1. In time previous; by previous provision; as, he is ready ...
1201 aforementioned AFO'REMENTIONED, a. [afore and mention.]Mentioned before in the same writing or discourse.
1202 aforenamed AFO'RENAMED, a. [afore and name.] Named before.
1203 aforesaid AFO'RESAID, a. [afore and say.] Said or recited before, or in a proceeding part.
1204 aforetime AFO'RETIME, adv. [afore and time.] In time past; in a former time.
1205 afoul AFOUL', adv. or a. [a and foul.] Not free; entangled.
1206 afraid AFRA'ID, a. [The participle of affray.]Impressed with fear or apprehension; fearful. This word ...
1207 afresh AFRESH', adv. [a and fresh.] Anew; again; recently; after intermission.They crucify the son of ...
1208 afric AF'RIC,
1209 africa AF'RICA, n. [L. a neg. and frigus, cold.]One of the four quarters or largest divisions of the ...
1210 african AF'RICAN, a. Pertaining to Africa.AF'RICAN, n. A native of Africa.This name is given also to the ...
1211 afront AFRONT', adv. In front.
1212 aft 'AFT, a. or adv.In seaman's language, a word used to denote the stern or what pertains to the stern ...
1214 after-account 'AFTER-ACCOUNT, n. A subsequent reckoning.
1215 after-act 'AFTER-ACT, n. A subsequent act.
1216 after-ages 'AFTER-AGES, n. Later ages; succeeding times. After-age, in the singular, is not improper.
1217 after-band 'AFTER-BAND, n. A future band.
1218 after-birth 'AFTER-BIRTH, n. The appendages of the fetus, called also secundines.
1219 after-clap 'AFTER-CLAP, n. An unexpected, subsequent event; something happening after an affair is supposed ...
1220 after-comer 'AFTER-COMER, n. A successor.
1221 after-comfort 'AFTER-COMFORT, n. Future comfort
1222 after-conduct 'AFTER-CONDUCT, n. Subsequent behavior.
1223 after-conviction 'AFTER-CONVIC'TION, n Future conviction.
1224 after-cost 'AFTER-COST, n. Later cost; expense after the execution of the main design.
1225 after-course 'AFTER-COURSE, n. Future course.
1226 after-crop 'AFTER-CROP, n. The second crop in the same year.
1227 after-days 'AFTER-DAYS, n. Future days.
1228 after-eatage 'AFTER-EATAGE, n. Part of the increase of the same year. [Local.]
1229 after-endeavor 'AFTER-ENDEAV'OR, n. An endeavor after the first or former effort.
1230 after-game 'AFTER-GAME, n. A subsequent scheme, or expedient.
1231 after-guard 'AFTER-GUARD, n. The seaman stationed on the poop or after part of the ship, to attend the after ...
1232 after-hope 'AFTER-HOPE, n. Future hope.
1233 after-hours 'AFTER-HOURS, n. Hours that follow; time following.
1234 after-ignorance 'AFTER-IGNORANCE, n. Subsequent ignorance.
1235 after-king 'AFTER-KING, n. A succeeding king.
1236 after-life 'AFTER-LIFE, n. 1. Future life or the life after this. 2. A later period of life; subsequent ...
1237 after-liver 'AFTER-LIVER, n. One who lives in succeeding times.
1238 after-love 'AFTER-LOVE, n. The second or later love.
1239 after-malice 'AFTER-MALICE, n. Succeeding malice.
1240 after-math 'AFTER-MATH, n. [after and math. See Mow.]A second crop of grass, in the same season; rowen.
1241 after-most 'AFTER-MOST, a. Superl. In marine language, nearest the stern, opposed to foremost; also ...
1242 after-noon 'AFTER-NOON', n. The part of the day which follows noon, between noon and evening.
1243 after-pains 'AFTER-PAINS, n. The pains which succeed child birth.
1244 after-part 'AFTER-PART, n. The latter part. In marine language, the part of a ship towards the stern.
1245 after-piece 'AFTER-PIECE, n. A piece performed after a play; a farce or other entertainment.
1246 after-proof 'AFTER-PROOF, n. Subsequent proof or evidence; qualities known by subsequent experience.
1247 after-repentance 'AFTER-REPENT'ANCE, n. Subsequent repentance.
1248 after-report 'AFTER-REPORT, n. Subsequent report, or information.
1249 after-sails 'AFTER-SAILS, n. The sails on the mizzenmast and stays, between the main and mizzen-masts.
1250 after-state 'AFTER-STATE, n. The future state.
1251 after-sting 'AFTER-STING, n. Subsequent sting.
1252 after-storm 'AFTER-STORM, n. A succeeding or future storm.
1253 after-supper 'AFTER-SUPPER, n. The time between supper and going to bed.
1254 after-swarm 'AFTER-SWARM, n. A swarm of bees which leaves the hive after the first.
1255 after-taste 'AFTER-TASTE, n. A taste which succeeds eating and drinking.
1256 after-thought 'AFTER-THOUGHT, n. [See Thought.] Reflections after an act; later thought, or expedient occurring ...
1257 after-times 'AFTER-TIMES, n. Succeeding times. It may be used in the singular.
1258 after-tossing 'AFTER-TOSSING, n. The swell or agitation of the sea after a storm.
1259 after-wise 'AFTER-WISE, a. Wise afterwards or too late.
1260 after-wit 'AFTER-WIT, n. Subsequent wit; wisdom that comes too late.
1261 after-wrath 'AFTER-WRATH, n. Later wrath; anger after the provocation has ceased.
1262 after-writer 'AFTER-WRITER, n. A succeeding writer.
1213 after 'AFTER, a. [The comparative degree of aft. But is some Teutonic dialects it is written with g.]1. ...
1263 afterward 'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. [See Ward.] In later or subsequent time.
1264 afterwards 'AFTERWARD, or 'AFTERWARDS, adv. [See Ward.] In later or subsequent time.
1265 aga AGA, n. In the Turkish dominions, a commander or chief officer. The title is given to various ...
1266 again AGAIN, adv. agen'. [L. con, whence contra;]1. A second time; once more.I will not again curse the ...
1267 against AGAINST, prep. agenst'.1. In opposition; noting enmity or disapprobation.His hand will be against ...
1268 agalloch AG'ALLOCH,
1269 agallochum AGAL'LOCHUM, n. [Of oriental origin.]Aloes-wood, the product of a tree growing in China, and some ...
1270 agalmatolite AGALMAT'OLITE,n. [Gr. image, and stone.]A name given by Klaproth to two varieties of the pierre de ...
1271 agape AG'APE, adv. or a. [a and gape. See Gape.]Gaping, as with wonder, expectation, or eager ...
1272 agaric AG'ARIC, n. [Gr.]In botany, mushroom, a genus of funguses, containing numerous species. Mushrooms ...
1273 agast AG'AST or AGH'AST, aStruck with terror, or astonishment; amazed; struck silent with horror.With ...
1274 agate AGA'TE, adv. [a and gate.] On the way; going. Obs.
1275 agatine AG'ATINE, a. Pretaining to agate.AG'ATINE, n. A genus of shells, oval or oblong.
1276 agatized AG'ATIZED, a. Having the colored lines and figures of agate.Agatized wood, a substance apparently ...
1277 agaty AG'ATY, a. Of the nature of agate.
1278 agave AGA'VE, n. [Gr. admirable.]1. The American aloe. The great aloe rises twenty feet, and its ...
1279 agaze AGA'ZE, v.t. [from gaze.] To strike with amazement. Obs.
1280 agazed AGA'ZED, pp. Struck with amazement. [Not in use.]
1281 age AGE, n. [L. aetas,or aevum. But these are undoubtedly contracted words.]1. The whole duration of ...
1282 aged A'GED, a. 1. Old; having lived long; having lived almost the usual time allotted to that species ...
1283 agen AGEN', for again. Obs.
1284 agency A'GENCY, n. [L. agens. See Act.]1. The quality of moving or of exerting power; the state of ...
1285 agenda AGEND'A, n. [L. things to be done.]A memorandum-book; the service or office of a church; a ritual ...
1286 agent A'GENT, a. Acting; opposed to patient, or sustaining action; as, the body agent. [Little ...
1287 agentship A'GENTSHIP, n. The office of an agent. [Not used.] We now use agency.
1288 aggelation AGGELA'TION, n. [L. gelu.] Concretion of a fluid. [Not used.]
1289 aggeneration AGGENERA'TION, n. [L. ad and generatio.] The state of growing to another. [Not used.]
1290 agger AG'GER, n. [L.] A fortress, or mound. [Not used.]
1291 aggerate AG'GERATE, v.t. [L. aggero.] To heap. [Not used.]
1292 aggeration AGGERA'TION, n. A heaping; accumulation; as, "aggerations of sand."
1293 agglomerate AGGLOM'ERATE, v.t. [L. agglomero, ad and glomero, to wind into a ball, from glomus a ball of ...
1294 agglomerated AGGLOM'ERATED, pp. Wound or collected into a ball.
1295 agglomerating AGGLOM'ERATING, ppr. Winding into a ball; gathering into a lump.
1296 agglomeration AGGLOMERA'TION, n. The act of winding into a ball; the state of being gathered into a ball or ...
1297 agglutinant AGGLU'TINANT, n. Any viscous substance which unites other substances, by causing an adhesion; any ...
1298 agglutinate AGGLU'TINATE, v.t. [Lat. agglutino, ad and glutino, from gluten. Eng. glue. See Glue.]To unite, ...
1299 agglutinated AGGLU'TINATED, pp. Glued together; united by a viscous substance.
1300 agglutinating AGGLU'TINATING, ppr. Gluing together; united by causing adhesion.
1301 agglutination AGGLUTINA'TION, n. The act of uniting by glue or other tenacious substance; the state of being ...
1302 agglutinative AGGLU'TINATIVE, a. That tends to unite, or has power to cause adhesion.
1303 aggrace AGGRA'CE, v.t. To favor. [Not used.]AGGRA'CE, n. Kindness; favor. [Not used.]
1304 aggrandization AGGRANDIZA'TION, n. The act of aggrandizing. [Not used.]
1305 aggrandize AG'GRANDIZE, v.t. [L. ad and grandis. See Grand.]1. To make great or greater in power, rank or ...
1306 aggrandized AG'GRANDIZED, pp. Made great or greater; exalted; enlarged.
1307 aggrandizement AGGRAND'IZEMENT, n. The act of aggrandizing; the state of being exalted in power, rank or honor; ...
1308 aggrandizer AG'GRANDIZER, n. One that aggrandizes or exalts in power, rank or honor.
1309 aggrandizing AG'GRANDIZING, ppr. Making great; exalting; enlarging.
1310 aggrate AGGRA'TE, v.t. To please. [Not used.]
1311 aggravate AG'GRAVATE, v.t. [L. aggravo, of ad and gravis, heavy. See Grave, Gravity.]1. To make heavy, but ...
1312 aggravated AG'GRAVATED, pp. Increased, in severity or enormity; made worse; exaggerated.
1313 aggravating AG'GRAVATING, ppr. Increasing in severity, enormity, or degree, as evils, misfortunes, pain, ...
1314 aggravation AGGRAVA'TION, n. 1. The act of making worse, used of evils, natural or moral; the act of ...
1315 aggregate AG'GREGATE, v.t [L. aggrego, to collect in troops, of ad and grex, a herd or band. See ...
1316 aggregated AG'GREGATED, pp. Collected into a sum, mass or system.
1317 aggregately AG'GREGATELY, adv. Collectively; taken in a sum or mass.
1318 aggregating AG'GREGATING, ppr. Collecting into a sum or mass.
1319 aggregation AGGREGA'TION, n. 1. The act of aggregating; the state of being collected into a sum or mass; a ...
1320 aggregative AG'GREGATIVE, a. Taken together; collective.
1321 aggregator AG'GREGATOR, n. He that collects into a whole or mass.
1322 aggress AGGRESS', v.i. [L. aggredior, aggressus, of ad and gradior, to go. See Grade.]To make a first ...
1323 aggressing AGGRESS'ING, ppr. Commencing hostility first; making the first attack.
1324 aggression AGGRESS'ION, n. The first attack, or act of hostility; the first act of injury, or first act ...
1325 aggressive AGGRESS'IVE, a. Tending to aggress; making the first attack.
1326 aggressor AGGRESS'OR, n. The person who first attacks; he who first commences hostility or a quarrel; an ...
1327 aggrievance AGGRIE'VANCE, n. See Aggrieve.] Oppression; hardship; injury. But grievance is more generally ...
1328 aggrieve AGGRIE'VE, v.t. [of ad and grieve from grief. See Grief and Grave.]1. To give pain or sorrow; to ...
1329 aggrieved AGGRIE'VED, pp. Pained; afflicted, civilly or politically oppressed.
1330 aggrieving AGGRIE'VING, ppr. Afflicting; imposing hardships on; oppressing.
1331 aggroop AGGROOP, v.t. [See Group.]To bring together; to group; to collect many persons in a crowd, or many ...
1332 aggrooped AGGROOP'ED, pp. Collected into a group or assemblage.
1333 aggroup AGGROUP',
1334 aggrouped AGGROUP'ED,
1335 aghast AGH'AST, or more correctly AGHAST, a or adv. [Perhaps the participle of agaze; otherwise from the ...
1336 agile AG'ILE, a. [L. agilis, from ago. See Act.]Nimble; having the faculty of quick motion in the ...
1337 agileness AG'ILENESS, n. Nimbleness; activity; the faculty of moving the limbs quickly; agility.
1338 agility AGIL'ITY, n. [L. agilitas.]The power of moving the limbs quickly; nimbleness; briskness; activity; ...
1339 agio A'GIO, n.1. In commerce, the difference between bank notes and current coin. In Holland, the agio ...
1340 agist AGIST', v.t. In law, to take the cattle of others to graze, at a certain sum; to feed or pasture ...
1341 agistator AGIST'OR, or AGISTA'TOR n. An officer of the king's forest, who has the care of cattle agisted, ...
1342 agistment AGIST'MENT, n. The taking and feeding other men's cattle in the king's forest, or on one's own ...
1343 agistor AGIST'OR, or AGISTA'TOR n. An officer of the king's forest, who has the care of cattle agisted, ...
1344 agitable AG'ITABLE, a. [See Agitate.] That may be agitated, shaken or discussed.
1345 agitate AG'ITATE, v.t. [L. agito, from ago. See Act.]1. To stir violently; to move back and forth with a ...
1346 agitated AG'ITATED, pp. Tossed from side to side; shaken; moved violently and irregularly; disturbed; ...
1347 agitating AG'ITATING, ppr. Shaking; moving with violence; disturbing; disputing; contriving.
1348 agitation AGITA'TION, n. 1. The act of shaking; the state of being moved with violence, or with irregular ...
1349 agitato AGITA'TO, in music, denotes a broken style of performance, adapted to awaken surprise or ...
1350 agitator AG'ITATOR, n. One who agitates; also, an insurgent; one who excites sedition or revolt. In ...
1352 aglet-baby AG'LET-BABY, n. A small image on the top of a lace.
1351 aglet AG'LET,
1353 agminal AG'MINAL, a. [L. agmen, a troop or body of men arrayed from ago.] Pertaining to an army or troop. ...
1354 agnail AG'NAIL, n. [ad and nail. See Nail.]A disease of the nail; a whitlow; an inflammation round the ...
1355 agnate AG'NATE, a. [L. agnatus.] Related or akin by the father's side.AG'NATE, n. [L. agnatus, ...
1356 agnatic AGNAT'IC, a. Pertaining to descent by the male line of ancestors.
1357 agnation AGNA'TION, n. Relation by the father's side only, or descent in the male line, distinct from ...
1358 agnel AG'NEL, n. [From agnus, a lamb, the figure struck on the coin.]An ancient French coin, value ...
1359 agnition AGNI'TION, n. [L. agnitio, agnosco.] Acknowledgment. [Little used.]
1360 agnize AGNI'ZE, v.t. To acknowledge. [Not in use.]
1361 agnominate AGNOM'INATE, v.t. [L. agnomino; ad and nomino, nomen, name.] To name. [Little used.]
1362 agnomination AGNOMINA'TION, n. [L. agnomen, a surname, of ad and nomen. See Name.]1. An additional name, or ...
1363 ago AGO', adv. or a. [See Go.] Past; gone; as a year ago.
1364 agog AGOG', adv.In a state of desire; highly excited by eagerness after an object.The gaudy gossip when ...
1365 agoing AGO'ING, [The participle of go, with the prefix a.]In motion, as to set a mill agoing; or about to ...
1366 agon A'GON, n. [Gr.] The contest for the prize. [Not used.]
1367 agone AGONE, pp. agawn;, [See ago and Gone.] Ago; past; since.[Nearly Obs.]
1368 agonism AG'ONISM, n. [Gr.] Contention for a prize.
1369 agonist AG'ONIST, n. One who contends for the prize in public games. Milton has used Agonistes in this ...
1370 agonistic AGONIST'IC,
1371 agonistical AGONIST'ICAL, a. Pertaining to prize-fighting, contests of strength, or athletic combats.
1372 agonistically AGONIST'ICALLY, adv. In an agonistic manner; like prize-fighting.
1373 agonize AG'ONIZE, v.t. [Gr. to strive. See Agony.]To write with extreme pain; to suffer violent ...
1374 agonizing AG'ONIZING, ppr. Suffering severe pain; writhing with torture.
1375 agonizingly AG'ONIZINGLY, adv. With extreme anguish.
1376 agony AG'ONY, n. [Gr. a contest with bodily exertion; a word used to denote the athletic games, in ...
1377 agood AGOOD, adv. In earnest. [Not used.]
1378 agouty AGOUTY, n. [L. acutus.]A quadruped of the order Rodentia; arranged by naturalist in the genus ...
1379 agrarian AGRA'RIAN, a. [L. agrarius, from ager, a field.]Relating to lands. appropriately, denoting or ...
1380 agree AGREE', v.i.[L. gratia. the primary sense is advancing, from the same root as L. gradior.]1. To ...
1381 agreeability AGREEABIL'ITY, n. Easiness of disposition. [Not used.]
1382 agreeable AGREE'ABLE, a.1. Suitable; conformable; correspondent; consistent with; as, the practice of virtue ...
1383 agreeableness AGREE'ABLENESS, n. 1. Suitableness; conformity; consistency; as, the agreeableness of virtue to ...
1384 agreeably AGREE'ABLY, adv.1. Pleasingly; in an agreeable manner; in a manner to give pleasure; as, to be ...
1385 agreed AGREE'D, pp. 1. Being in concord or harmony of opinion; of one mind.Can two walk together except ...
1386 agreeing AGREE'ING, ppr. Living in concord; concurring; assenting; settling by consent.
1387 agreeingly AGREE'INGLY, adv. In conformity to. [Little used.]
1388 agreement AGREE'MENT, n. 1. Concord; harmony; conformity.What agreement hath the temple of God with idols? ...
1389 agrestic AGRES'TIC,
1390 agrestical AGRES'TICAL, a. [L. agrestis; ager, a field, or the same root.]Rural; rustic; pertaining to fields ...
1391 agricultor AG'RICULTOR, n. [L. ager, a field, and cultor, a cultivator.]One whose occupation is to till the ...
1392 agricultural AGRICUL'TURAL, a. Pertaining to husbandry, tillage, or the culture of the earth.
1393 agriculture AG'RICULTURE, n. [L. ager, a field, and cultura, cultivation. See Acre and Culture.]In general ...
1394 agriculturism AGRICUL'TURISM, n. The art or science of agriculture. [Little used.]
1395 agriculturist AGRICUL'TURIST, n. One skilled in the art of cultivating the ground; a skilful husbandman.
1396 agrimony AG'RIMONY, n. [L. agremonia, from the Gr. Thus it is written by Pliny. But in lower Latin it is ...
1397 agrippinians AGRIPPIN'IANS, n. In Church history, the followers of Agrippinus, bishop of Carthage, in the third ...
1398 agrise AGRISE, v.i. To shiver. [Not in use.]AGRISE, v.t. To terrify; also, to make frightful. [Not in ...
1399 agrom A'GROM, n. a disease frequent in Bengal, and other parts of the E. Indies, in which the tongue ...
1400 agrostemma AGROSTEM'MA, n. A genus of plants of several species, containing the common corn cockle, wild ...
1401 agrostis AGROS'TIS, n. [Gr.] Bent grass; a genus of many species.
1402 aground AGROUND', adv. [Of a, at or on, and ground.]1. On the ground; a marine term, signifying that the ...
1403 aguapecaca AGUAPECA'CA, n. The Jacana, a Brazilian bird, about the size of a pigeon. In the extremity of ...
1405 ague-cake A'GUE-CAKE, n. a hard tumor on the left side of the belly, lower than the false ribs; supposed to ...
1406 ague-fit A'GUE-FIT, n. A paroxysm of cold, or shivering; chilliness.
1407 ague-proof A'GUE-PROOF, n. Able to resist agues; proof against agues.
1408 ague-spell A'GUE-SPELL, n. A charm or spell to cure or prevent ague.
1409 ague-struck A'GUE-STRUCK, a. Struck with ague.
1410 ague-tree A'GUE-TREE, n. A name sometimes applied to sassafras, on account of its febrifuge qualities.
1404 ague A'GUE, n. a'gu,1. The cold fit which precedes a fever, or a paroxysm of fever in intermittents. ...
1411 agued A'GUED, a. Chilly; having a fit of ague; shivering with cold or fear.
1412 aguerry AGUER'RY, v.t. To inure to the hardships of war; to instruct in the art of war. [Not in use.]
1413 aguillaneuf AGUILLANEUF', n. [From a, to, gui, misleto, and l'an neuf, the new year.]A form of rejoicing among ...
1414 aguise AGUI'SE, v.t. [See Guise.] To dress; to adorn. [Not in use.]AGUI'SE, n. Dress. [Not in use.]
1415 aguish A'GUISH, a. Chilly; somewhat cold or shivering; also, having the qualities of an ague.Her aguish ...
1416 aguishness A'GUISHNESS, n. Chilliness; the quality of being aguish.
1417 agul A'GUL, n. A species of the hedysarum.
1418 ah AH, An exclamation, expressive of surprise, pity, complaint, contempt, dislike, joy, exultation, ...
1419 aha 'AH'A.1. An exclamation expressing triumph, contempt, or simple surprise; but the senses are ...
1420 ahaniger AHAN'IGER, n. A name of the gar-fish.
1421 ahead AHEAD, adv. Ahed', [a and head, or at head.]1. Further forward than another thing; in front; ...
1422 aheight AHEI'GHT, adv. [a and height.] Aloft; on high. [Not used.]
1423 ahiccyatli AHICCYAT'LI, n. A poisonous serpent of Mexico, somewhat resembling the rattlesnake, but destitute ...
1424 ahigh AHI'GH, adv. On high. [Not used.]
1425 ahold AHO'LD, adv. Near the wind; as, to lay a ship ahold. [Not in use.]
1426 ahovai AHOVAI, n. A trivial name synonymous with Cerbera, a very poisonous species of plum.
1427 ahoy AHOY;, Exclam. A sea term used in hailing.
1428 ahriman AHRIMAN. [See Ariman.]
1429 ahuitla AHUIT'LA, n. A worm found in the lake of Mexico, four inches in length, as thick as a goose-quill; ...
1430 ahuitzote AHUIT'ZOTE, n. An amphibious quadruped of the tropical climate. of America, whose body is a foot ...
1431 aia A'IA, n. A Brazilian fowl of the spoon-bill kind, and resembling that bird in form and size.
1432 aicurus AICU'RUS, n. A large and beautiful species of parrot, found in Brazil; its head beautifully ...
1433 aid AID, v.t. [L. adjuto.To help; to assist; to support, either by furnishing strength or means to ...
1434 aidance A'IDANCE, n. Aid; help; assistance. [little used.]
1435 aidant A'IDANT, a. Helping; helpful; supplying aid. [Not used.]
1436 aiddecamp A'IDDECAMP, n. plur. Aiddecamps.]In military affairs, an officer whose duty is to receive and ...
1437 aided A'IDED, pp. Assisted; supported; furnished with succor.
1438 aider A'IDER, n. One who helps; an assistant, or auxiliary.
1439 aiding A'IDING, ppr. Helping; assisting.
1440 aidless A'IDLESS, a. Helpless; without aid; unsupported; undefended.
1441 aiglet A'IGLET, n. 1. A tag of a point curved into the representation of an animal, generally of a man; ...
1442 aigret A'IGRET, AIGRETTE, n. 1. In zoology, a name of the small white heron.2. In botany. [See ...
1443 aigrette A'IGRET, AIGRETTE, n. 1. In zoology, a name of the small white heron.2. In botany. [See ...
1444 aigulet A'IGULET, n. [Fr. Usually contracted into aiglet, which see.]
1445 aikraw A'IKRAW, n. A popular name of a species of lichen, or moss.
1446 ail AIL, v.t.To trouble; to affect with uneasiness, either of body or mind; used to express some ...
1447 aile AISLE, or AILE, n. Pronounced Ile. [L. ala.]The wing of a quire; a walk in a church.
1448 ailing A'ILING, ppr. Diseased; indisposed; full of complaints.
1449 ailment A'ILMENT, n. Disease; indisposition; morbid affection of the body; but the word is not applied ...
1450 aim AIM, v.i.To point at, with a missive weapon; to direct the intention or purpose; to attempt to ...
1451 aimed A'IMED, pp. Pointed; directed; intended to strike or affect.
1452 aimer A'IMER, n. One that aims.
1453 aiming A'IMING, ppr. Pointing a weapon at an object; directing any thing to an object; intending; ...
1454 aimless A'IMLESS, a. Without aim.
1456 air-balloon A'IR-BALLOON. [See Balloon.]
1457 air-bladder A'IR-BLADDER, n. A vesicle or cuticle filled with air; also, the bladder of a fish.
1458 air-born A'IR-BORN, a. Born of the air.
1459 air-braving A'IR-BRAVING, a. Braving the winds.
1460 air-built A'IR-BUILT, a. Erected in the air; having no solid foundation; chimerical; as, an air-built ...
1461 air-drawn A'IR-DRAWN, a. Drawn in air; imaginary.
1462 air-gun A'IR-GUN, n. A pneumatic engine, resembling a musket, to discharge bullets by means of the elastic ...
1463 air-holder A'IR-HOLDER, n. [Air and hold.]An instrument for holding air, for the purpose of counteracting the ...
1464 air-hole A'IR-HOLE, n. An opening to admit or discharge air.
1465 air-jacket A'IR-JACKET, n. A leather jacket, to which are fastened bags or bladders filled with air, to ...
1466 air-pipe A'IR-PIPE, n. A pipe used to draw foul air from a ship's hold, by means of a communication with ...
1467 air-poise A'IR-POISE, n. [Air and poise.]An instrument to measure the weight of the air.
1468 air-pump A'IR-PUMP, n. A machine for exhausting the air of a vessel. The machines for this purpose are of ...
1469 air-sacs A'IR-SACS, n. Air bags in birds, which are certain receptacles of air, or vesicles lodged in the ...
1470 air-shaft A'IR-SHAFT, n. A passage for air into a mine, usually opened in a perpendicular direction, and ...
1471 air-stirring A'IR-STIRRING, a. Putting the air in motion.
1472 air-thread A'IR-THREAD, n. A name given to the spider's webs, which are often seen floating in the air. ...
1473 air-threatening A'IR-THREATENING, a. Threatening the air; lofty.
1474 air-vessel A'IR-VESSEL, n. A spiral duct in plants contained air, and supposed to be analogous to the lungs ...
1455 air AIR, n. [L. aer; Heb. to shine. The radical sense is to open, expand; whence clear; or to flow, ...
1475 aira A'IRA, n. Hair grass, a genus of plants.
1476 aired A'IRED, pp. Exposed to air; cleansed by air; heated or dried by exposure to a fire; ventilated.
1477 airer A'IRER, n. One who exposes to the air.
1478 airiness A'IRINESS, n. 1. Exposure to a free current of air; openness to the air; as, the airiness of a ...
1479 airing A'IRING, ppr. Exposing to the air; warming; drying.A'IRING, n. An exposure to the air, or to a ...
1480 airless A'IRLESS, a. Not open to a free current of air; wanting fresh air, or communication with open air.
1481 airling A'IRLING, n. A thoughtless, gay person.
1483 airy-flying A'IRY-FLYING, a. Flying like air.
1482 airy A'IRY, a. 1. Consisting of air; as, an airy substance.2. Relating or belonging to air; high in ...
1484 aisle AISLE, or AILE, n. Pronounced Ile. [L. ala.]The wing of a quire; a walk in a church.
1485 aizoon AIZO'ON, n. [L. aizoon.] it seems to be composed of Gr. always, and Eng. aye, and living.]A genus ...
1486 ajava AJA'VA, n. The seed of a plant brought from Malabar, said to be an excellent carminative, and very ...
1487 ajuga AJU'GA, n. Bugle, a genus of plants.
1488 ajuru-catinga AJU'RU-CATINGA, n. A species of American parrot, of a green color, with eyes of a fiery red, ...
1489 ajuru-curau AJU'RU-CURAU, n. An American parrot, of a lively green color, with a blue crown; the throat, and ...
1490 ajuru-para AJU'RU-PARA, n. A small parrot of America, of a beautiful green, with the beak, legs and circlets ...
1491 ajutage AJ'UTAGE, or AD'JUTAGE, n. A tube fitted to the mouth of a vessel, through which the water of a ...
1492 ake AKE, v.i. Less properly written ache. [See Ache.]1. To be in pain; usually, in pain of some ...
1493 aker A'KER, n. [Gr., L. ager.]Originally an open field. But in G. Britain the quantity of land in the ...
1494 akin AKIN', a. [a or of and kin. See Kin.]1. Related by blood, used of persons; as, the two families ...
1495 aking A'KING, ppr. Having continued pain; suffering distress of mind, or grief.
1496 al AL, in Arabic, an adjective or inseparable prefix. Its use is to render nouns definite, like the ...
1497 alabaster AL'ABASTER, n. [L. from Gr.]A sub-variety of carbonate of lime, found in large masses, formed by ...
1498 alack ALACK', exclam.An exclamation expressive of sorrow.
1499 alackaday ALACK'ADAY, An exclamation uttered to express regret or sorrow.
1500 alacriousness ALAC'RIOUSNESS, n. Briskness. [Not used.]
1501 alacrity ALAC'RITY, n. [L. alacritas, from alacer, alaris.]Cheerfulness; gaiety; sprightliness; more ...
1502 aladinists ALAD'INISTS. Free thinkers among the Mohammedans.
1503 alalite AL'ALITE, n. A crystallized mineral; diopside; a semi-transparent pyroxene. A variety with twelve ...
1504 alamire ALAMIRE', n. The lowest note but one, in Guido Aretine's scale of music.
1505 alamodality ALAMODAL'ITY, n. Conformity to the prevailing mode, or fashion of the times. [Little used.]
1506 alamode ALAMO'DE, adv. According to the fashion or prevailing mode.ALAMO'DE, n. A thin glossy silk for ...
1507 aland ALAND', adv. At or on land.
1509 alarm-bell AL'ARM-BELL, n. A bell that gives notice of danger.
1510 alarm-post AL'ARM-POST, n. A place to which troops are to repair in cases of an alarm.
1511 alarm-watch AL'ARM-WATCH, n. A watch that strikes the hour by regulated movement.
1508 alarm AL'ARM, n. 1. Any sound, outcry or information intended to give notice of approaching danger as, ...
1512 alarmed AL'ARMED, pp. Notified of sudden danger; surprised with fear; roused to vigilance or activity by ...
1513 alarming AL'ARMING, ppr. Giving notice of approaching danger; rousing to vigilance; exciting solicitude by ...
1514 alarmingly AL'ARMINGLY, adv. With alarm; in a manner to excite apprehension.
1515 alarmist AL'ARMIST, n. One that excites alarm.
1516 alarum ALARUM, For alarm, is a corruption, and is not to be used.
1517 alas ALAS', ex. An exclamation expressive of sorrow, grief, pity, concern, or apprehension of evil; ...
1518 alate ALA'TE, adv. Lately. [Not used.]
1519 alated ALA'TED, a. [L. ala, a wing; alatus, winged.]Winged; having dilatations like wings.
1520 alatern AL'ATERN, n. A trivial name of a species of rhamnus or buckthorn.
1521 alb ALB, n. [L. albus, Gr. white.]A surplice or vestment of white linen, reaching to the feet, worn by ...
1522 albatros AL'BATROS, n. An aquatic fowl, belonging to the order of ansers. The bill is strait; the upper ...
1523 albegeois ALBIGEN'SES, ALBEGEOIS, n. A party of Reformers, who separated from the church of Rome, in the ...
1524 albeit ALBE'IT, [This is supposed to be a compound of all, be and it, and is equivalent to admit, or ...
1525 albelen AL'BELEN, n. A fish of the truttaceous or trout kind, found in the German lakes, weighing five or ...
1526 albescent ALBES'CENT, a. [L. albesco, to grow white.]Becoming white, or rather, whitish; moderately white.
1527 albicore AL'BICORE, n. A marine fish, like a tunny, noted for following ships.
1528 albigenses ALBIGEN'SES, ALBEGEOIS, n. A party of Reformers, who separated from the church of Rome, in the ...
1529 albin AL'BIN, n. [L. albus, white.]A mineral, of an opake white color, consisting of aggregated ...
1530 albino ALBI'NO, n. [L. albus, white.]A white descendant of black parents, or a white person belonging to ...
1531 albinos ALBI'NOS, n. A name signifying white men, given by the Portuguese to the white negroes of Africa. ...
1532 albion AL'BION, n. An ancient name of England, still used in poetry. It is supposed this name was given ...
1533 albora ALBO'RA, n. A sort of itch or rather leprosy, terminating without ulceration, but with fetid ...
1534 alboro ALBO'RO, n. The erythrinus, a small red fish of the Mediterranean.
1535 albugineous ALBUGIN'EOUS, a. [L. albugo, the white spot in the eye, from albus white.]Pertaining to or ...
1536 albugo ALBU'GO,n. The white speck in the eye, called the film, haw, dragon, pearl or cicatrice. Also a ...
1537 albula ALBU'LA, n. A species of truttaceous fish, destitute of teeth. The albula Indica is called by the ...
1538 album AL'BUM, n. [L. albus, white.]1. Among the Romans, a white table, board or register, on which the ...
1539 albumen ALBU'MEN, n. [L. from albus, white.]The white of an egg. A like substance is a chief constituent ...
1540 albuminous ALBU'MINOUS, a. Pertaining to, or having the properties of albumen.
1541 alburn AL'BURN,
1542 alburnum ALBURN'UM, n. [L. alburnum, from albus, white.]The white and softer part of wood, between the ...
1543 alcahest AL'CAHEST, or ALKAHEST, n. A pretended universal dissolvent, or menstruum.
1544 alcaic ALCA'IC, a. Pertaining to Alcaeus, a Lyric poet of Mitylene, in Lesbos, who flourished about the ...
1545 alcaics ALCA'ICS, n. plu. Several kinds of verse; so called from Alcaeus, their inventor. One kind ...
1546 alcaid ALCA'ID,Among the Moors, Spaniards and Portuguese, a governor. In Portugal, the chief civil ...
1547 alcanna ALCAN'NA, n. A plant; and a powder, prepared from the leaves of the Egyptian privet, used by the ...
1548 alcatraz AL'CATRAZ, n. The Spanish name of the Pelecanus Onocrotalus of Linne; a pelican; also a fish taken ...
1549 alcavala ALCAV'ALA, n. In Spain, a tax on every transfer of property, real or personal.
1550 alcedo ALCE'DO, n. [L.]The king fisher; a genus of birds, of the order of Picae. The species are ...
1551 alchimic ALCHIM'IC,
1552 alchimical ALCHIM'ICAL
1553 alchimically ALCHIM'ICALLY, a. Relating to alchimy, or produced by it. adv. In the manner of alchimy.
1554 alchimist AL'CHIMIST, n. One who practices alchimy.
1555 alchimistic ALCHIMIST'IC,
1556 alchimistical ALCHIMIST'ICAL, a. Practicing alchimy, or relating to it.
1557 alchimy AL'CHIMY, n. [See Chimistry.]1. The more sublime and difficult part of chimistry, and chiefly ...
1558 alcmanian ALCMA'NIAN, a. Pertaining to Alcman, a lyric poet of the twenty-seventh Olympiad, celebrated for ...
1559 alco AL'CO, n. a quadruped of America, nearly resembling a dog, but mute and melancholy; and this ...
1560 alcohol AL'COHOL, n. [Heb. to paint with a preparation of powder of antimony. The oriental females still ...
1561 alcoholic ALCOHOL'IC, a. Pertaining to alcohol, or partaking of its qualities.
1562 alcoholization ALCOHOLIZA'TION, n. the act of rectifying spirit, till it is wholly dephlegmatedor of reducing a ...
1563 alcoholize AL'COHOLIZE, v.t. To convert into alcohol; to rectify spirit till it is wholly dephlegmated; also, ...
1564 alcor AL'COR, n. A small star adjoining to the large bright one in the middle of the tail of Ursa Major.
1565 alcoran ALCORAN. [See Koran and Alkoran.]
1566 alcove AL'COVE or ALCO'VE, n. [Eng. cubby.]1. A recess, or part of a room, separated by an estrade, or ...
1567 alcyon AL'CYON, n. A trivial name of the kingfisher. [See Halcyon.]
1568 alcyonite AL'CYONITE, n. A fossil zoophite, somewhat resembling a fungus.
1569 alcyonium ALCYO'NIUM, n. The name of a submarine plant, or bastard spunge. Also a kind of astroit or coral, ...
1570 alder AL'DER, n. [L. alnus.]A tree, usually growing in moist land, and belonging to the genus Alnus. ...
1571 alderman ALD'ERMAN, n. plu. Aldermen.1. Among our Saxon ancestors, a senior or superior. The title was ...
1572 aldermanly AL'DERMANLY, a. Pertaining to or like an alderman.
1573 aldern AL'DERN, a. Made of Alder.
1575 ale-bench A'LE-BENCH, n. A bench in or before an ale house.
1576 ale-berry A'LE-BERRY, n. A beverage, made by boiling ale with spice, sugar and sops of bread.
1577 ale-brewer A'LE-BREWER, n. One whose occupation is to brew ale.
1578 ale-conner A'LE-CONNER, n. [ale and con, to know or see.]An officer in London, whose business is to inspect ...
1579 ale-cost A'LE-COST, n. Costmary, a plant, a species of Tanacetum.
1580 ale-fed A'LE-FED, a. Fed with ale.
1581 ale-gar A'LE-GAR, n. Sour ale; the acid of ale.
1582 ale-hoof A'LE-HOOF, n.Ground-ivy, the glechoma hederacea, of Linne. The leaves of this plant are used to ...
1584 ale-house-keeper A'LE-HOUSE-KEEPER, n. One who keeps an ale-house.
1583 ale-house A'LE-HOUSE, n. a house where ale is retailed; and hence a tipling house.
1585 ale-knight A'LE-KNIGHT, n. a pot companion.
1586 ale-shot A'LE-SHOT, n. A reckoning to be paid for ale.
1587 ale-silver A'LE-SILVER, n. A duty paid to the Lord Mayor of London, by the sellers of ale within the city.
1588 ale-stake A'LE-STAKE, n. a stake set as a sign before an ale-house.
1589 ale-taster A'LE-TASTER, n. An officer appointed in every court leet, and sworn, to inspect ale, beer and ...
1590 ale-vat A'LE-VAT, n. a vat in which ale is fermented.
1591 ale-washed A'LE-WASHED, a. Steeped or soaked in ale.
1592 ale-wife A'LE-WIFE, n. a woman who keeps an ale house.
1574 ale ALE, n.1. A liquor made from an infusion of malt by fermentation. It differs from beer, in having ...
1593 alectryomancy ALECTRYOM'ANCY, n. [Gr. a cock and divination.]An ancient practice of foretelling events by means ...
1594 alee ALEE', adv. [a or at and lee. See Lee.]In seaman's language, on the side opposite to the wind, ...
1595 aleger A'LEGER, a. [L. alacer.]Gay; cheerful; sprightly. [Not used.]
1596 alegge ALEGGE, v.t To lighten; to lessen; to assuage. [Not used.]
1597 alembdar ALEMB'DAR, n. In Turkey, an officer who bears the green standard of Mohammed, when the Sultan ...
1598 alembic ALEM'BIC, n.A chimical vessel used in distillation; usually made of glass or copper. The bottom ...
1599 alength ALENGTH', adv. [a and length.]At full length; along; stretched at full length.
1600 alepidote ALEP'IDOTE, n. [Gr. a scale.]Any fish whose skin is not covered with scales.
1601 alert ALERT', a.1. Watchful; vigilant; active in vigilance. hence the military phrase, upon the alert, ...
1602 alertness ALERT'NESS, n. Briskness; nimbleness; sprightliness; levity.
1603 aleuromancy ALEUROM'ANCY, n. [Gr. meal and divination.]A kind of divination by meal, used by the ancients.
1604 aleutian ALEU'TIAN, or ALEU'TIC, a. Designating certain isles in the Pacific ocean, eastward of ...
1605 aleutic ALEU'TIAN, or ALEU'TIC, a. Designating certain isles in the Pacific ocean, eastward of ...
1606 alewife A'LEWIFE, or A'LOOF, n. An American fish, belonging to the genus Clupea, and called Clupea ...
1607 alexanders ALEX'ANDERS, n. The name of a plant of the genus Smyrnium.
1608 alexandrian ALEX'ANDRIAN, n. Pertaining to Alexandria. There are many cities of this name, in various parts ...
1609 alexandrine ALEX'ANDRINE,or ALEXANDRIAN, n. A kind of verse, consisting of twelve syllables, or of twelve and ...
1610 alexipharmic ALEXIPH'ARMIC, a. [Gr. to expel, and poison.]Expelling poison; antidotal; sudorific; that has the ...
1611 alexiterial ALEXITE'RIAL, a. [Gr. to expel, and poison.]Resisting poison; obviating the effects of venom.
1612 alexiteric ALEXITER'IC,
1613 alexiterical ALEXITER'ICAL, n. A medicine to resist the effects of poison, or the bite of venomous animals; ...
1614 algarot AL'GAROT, or AL'GAROTH, n. The name of an emetic powder, prepared from the regulus of antimony, ...
1615 algaroth AL'GAROT, or AL'GAROTH, n. The name of an emetic powder, prepared from the regulus of antimony, ...
1616 algates ALGATES, adv. By all means; on any terms.
1617 algebra AL'GEBRA, n. [Ar. the reduction of parts to a whole, or fractions to whole numbers from the verb, ...
1618 algebraic ALGEBRA'IC,
1619 algebraical ALGEBRA'ICAL, a. Pertaining to algebra; containing an operation of Algebra, or deduced from such ...
1620 algebraist ALGEBRA'IST, n. One who is versed in the science of algebra.
1621 algeneb AL'GENEB, n. A fixed star of the second magnitude, in the right side of Perseus; Long. 27 degrees ...
1622 algerine ALGERINE', n. [from Algiers.] A native of Algiers, a city and a government on the coast of ...
1623 algid AL'GID, a. [L. algidus.] Cold. [Not used.]
1624 algol AL'GOL, n. A fixed star of the third magnitude, called Medusa's head, in Perseus; Long. 21 degrees ...
1625 algor AL'GOR, n. [Lat.] Among physicians, an unusual coldness in any part of the body.
1626 algorism AL'GORITHM, or AL'GORISM, n. An arabic term, signifying numerical computation, or the six ...
1627 algorithm AL'GORITHM, or AL'GORISM, n. An arabic term, signifying numerical computation, or the six ...
1628 algous AL'GOUS, a. [L. alga, sea weed.] Pertaining to sea weed; abounding with, or like sea weed.
1629 algum AL'GUM, n. In scripture, a tree or wood about which the learned are not agreed. The most probably ...
1630 alhenna ALHEN'NA, n. [See Alkenna.]
1631 alias A'LIAS, [L.] Otherwise; as in this example, Simson alias Smith; a word used in judicial ...
1632 alibi AL'IBI, n. [L.] Elsewhere; in another place; a law term. When a person is charged with an ...
1633 alien A'LIEN, a. alyen, [L. alienus, from alius, another. L. alieno, to alienate; alter, another, to ...
1634 alienability ALIENABIL'ITY, n. The capacity of being alienated or transferred.The alienability of the domain.
1635 alienable A'LIENABLE, a. That may be sold, or transferred to another; as, land is alienable according to the ...
1636 alienage A'LIENAGE, n. The state of being an alien. Why restore estates, forfeitable on account of ...
1637 alienate A'LIENATE, v.t. [L. alieno.]1. To transfer title, property or right to another; as, to alienate ...
1638 alienation ALIENA'TION, n. [L. alienatio.]1. A transfer of title; or a legal conveyance of property to ...
1639 alienator A'LIENATOR, n. One that alienates or transfers property.
1640 aliene ALIE'NE, v.t. [L. alieno.]1. To transfer title or property to another; to sell.Nor could he ...
1641 alienee ALIENEE', n. One to whom the title to property is transferred.If the alienee enters and keeps ...
1642 alienism ALIENISM, n. Alyenizm. The state of being an alien.The law was very gentle in the construction of ...
1643 alife ALI'FE, adv. [a or on and life.] On my life.
1644 aliferous ALIF'EROUS, a. [L. ala, wing, and fero, to bear.] Having wings.
1645 aliform ALI'FORM, a. [L. ala, wing, and forma, shape.]Having the shape of a wing; a term applied to a ...
1646 aligerous ALIG'EROUS, a. [L. ala wing, and gero, to carry] Having wings.
1647 alight ALI'GHT, v.i.1. To get down or descend, as from on horseback or from a carriage.2. To descend and ...
1649 alike-minded ALI'KE-MINDED, a. Having the same mind; but like-minded is more generally used.
1648 alike ALI'KE, a.Having resemblance or similitude; similar.The darkness and the light are both alike to ...
1650 aliment AL'IMENT, n. [L. alimentum, from alo, to feed.]That which nourishes; food; nutriment; any thing ...
1651 alimental ALIMENT'AL, a. Supplying food; that has the quality of nourishing; that furnishes the materials ...
1652 alimentally ALIMENT'ALLY, adv. So as to serve for nourishment or food.
1653 alimentariness ALIMENT'ARINESS, n. The quality of supplying nutriment.
1654 alimentary ALIMENT'ARY, a. Pertaining to aliment or food; having the quality of nourishing; as, alimentary ...
1655 alimentation ALIMENTA'TION, n. 1. The act or power of affording nutriment.2. The state of being nourished.
1656 alimonious ALIMO'NIOUS, a. [See alimony.] Nourishing; affording food. [Little used.]
1657 alimony ALI'MONY, n. [L. alimonia, of alo, to feed. See Aliment.]An allowance made for the support of a ...
1658 aliped AL'IPED, a. [L. ala, wing, and pes, foot.]Wing-footed; having the toes connected by a membrane, ...
1659 aliquant AL'IQUANT, a. [L. aliquantum, a little.]In arithmetic, an aliquant number or part is that which ...
1660 aliquot AL'IQUOT, a. [L.]An aliquot part of a number or quantity is one which will measure it without a ...
1661 alish A'LISH, a. [From ale.] Like ale; having the qualities of ale.
1662 alive ALI'VE, a.1. Having life, in opposition to dead; living; being in a state in which the organs ...
1663 alkahest AL'KAHEST, n. A universal dissolvent; a menstrumm capable of dissolving every body, which ...
1664 alkalescency ALKALES'CENCY, n. [See Alkali.]A tendency to become alkaline; or a tendency to the properties of ...
1665 alkalescent ALKALES'CENT, a. tending to the properties of an alkali; slightly alkaline.
1666 alkali AL'KALI, n. plu. AlkaliesIn chimistry, a term applied to all bodies which possess the following ...
1667 alkalify AL'KALIFY, v.t. To form, or to convert into an alkali.AL'KALIFY, v.i. To become an alkali.
1668 alkaligenous ALKALIG'ENOUS, a. [Alkali and to generate.]Producing or generating alkali.
1669 alkalimeter ALKALIM'ETER, n. [Alkali and Gr. measure.]An instrument for ascertaining the strength of alkalies, ...
1670 alkaline AL'KALINE, a. Having the properties of alkali.
1671 alkalinity ALKALIN'ITY, n. The quality which constitutes an alkali.
1672 alkalizate AL'KALIZATE, a. Alkaline; impregnated with alkali. Obs.
1673 alkalization ALKALIZA'TION, n. The act of rendering alkaline by impregnating with an alkali.
1674 alkalize AL'KALIZE, v.t. [and formerly Alkalizate.]To make alkaline; to communicate the properties of an ...
1675 alkanet AL'KANET, n. The plant bugloss. The root is used to impart a deep red color to oily substances, ...
1676 alkekengi ALKEKEN'GI, n. The winter cherry, a species of physalis. The plant bears a near resemblance to ...
1677 alkenna ALKEN'NA or ALHEN'NA, n. Egyptian privet, a species of Lawsonia. The pulverized leaves of this ...
1678 alkermes ALKERM'ES, n.In pharmacy, a compound cordial, in the form of a confection, derived from the kermes ...
1679 alkerva ALKER'VA, n. An arabic name of the Palma Christi.
1680 alkoran AL'KORAN, n.The book which contains the Mohammedan doctrines of faith and practice. It was written ...
1681 alkoranist AL'KORANIST, n. One who adheres strictly to the letter of the Alkoran, rejecting all comments. ...
1682 alkussa ALKUS'SA, n. A fish of the Silurus kind, with one beard only under the chin.
1684 all-abandoned ALL-ABAN'DONED, a. Abandoned by all
1685 all-abhorred ALL-ABHOR'RED, a. Detested by all.
1686 all-accomplished ALL-ACCOM'PLISHED, a. Fully accomplished; whose education is highly finished or complete.
1687 all-admiring ALL-ADMI'RING, a. Wholly admiring.
1688 all-advised ALL-ADVI'SED, a. Advised by all.
1689 all-approved ALL-APPROVED, a. Approved by all.
1690 all-atoning ALL-ATO'NING, a. Atoning for all; making complete atonement.
1691 all-bearing ALL-BEA'RING, a. Producing every thing; omniparous.
1692 all-beauteous ALL-BEAU'TEOUS, a. Perfectly beautiful
1693 all-beholding ALL-BEHO'LDING, a. Beholding or seeing all things.
1694 all-blasting ALL-BL'ASTING, a. Blasting all; defaming or destroying all.
1695 all-bounteous ALL-BOUN'TEOUS,
1696 all-bountiful ALL-BOUN'TIFUL, a. Perfectly bountiful; of infinite bounty.
1697 all-changing ALL-CHA'NGING, a. Perpetually changing.
1698 all-cheering ALL-CHEE'RING, a. That cheers all; that gives gaiety or cheerfulness to all.
1699 all-commanding ALL-COMM'ANDING, a. Having command or sovereignty over all.
1700 all-complying ALL-COMPLY'ING, a. Complying in every respect.
1701 all-composing ALL-COMPO'SING, a. That makes all tranquil or peaceful.
1702 all-comprehensive ALL-COMPREHEN'SIVE, a. Comprehending all things.
1703 all-concealing ALL-CONCE'ALING, a. Hiding or concealing all.
1704 all-conquering ALL-CON'QUERING, a. That subdues all.
1705 all-conscious ALL-CON'SCIOUS, a. Conscious of all; all-knowing.
1706 all-constraining ALL-CONSTRA'INING, a. Constraining all
1707 all-consuming ALL-CONSU'MING, a. That consumes or devours all.
1708 all-daring ALL-DA'RING, a. Daring to attempt every thing.
1709 all-destroying ALL-DESTROY'ING, a. Destroying every thing.
1710 all-devastating ALL-DEV'ASTATING, a. Wasting every thing.
1711 all-devouring ALL-DEVOUR'ING, a Eating or consuming all.
1712 all-dimming ALL-DIM'MING, a. Obscuring every thing.
1713 all-discovering ALL-DISCOV'ERING, a. Discovering or disclosing every thing.
1714 all-disgraced ALL-DISGRA'CED, a. Completely disgraced.
1715 all-dispensing ALL-DISPENS'ING, a. Dispensing all things; affording dispensation or permission.
1716 all-divine ALL-DIVI'NE, a. Supremely excellent.
1717 all-divining ALL-DIVI'NING, a. Foretelling all things.
1718 all-dreaded ALL-DREAD'ED, a. Dreaded by all.
1719 all-efficient ALL-EFFI'CIENT, a. Of perfect or unlimited efficacy or efficiency.
1720 all-eloquent ALL-EL'OQUENT, a. Eloquent in the highest degree.
1721 all-embracing ALL-EMBRA'CING, a. Embracing all things.
1722 all-ending ALL-END'ING, a. Putting an end to all things.
1723 all-enlightening ALL-ENLI'GHTENING, a. Enlightening all things.
1724 all-enraged ALL-ENRA'GED, a. Highly enraged.
1725 all-flaming ALL-FLA'MING, a. Flaming in all directions.
1726 all-fools-day ALL-FOOL'S-DAY, n. The first of April.
1727 all-forgiving ALL-FORGIV'ING, a. Forgiving or pardoning all.
1728 all-fours ALL-FOURS, n. [all and four.]A game at cards, played by two or four persons; so called from the ...
1729 all-giver ALL-GIV'ER, n. The giver of all things.
1730 all-good ALL-GOOD', a. Completely good.
1731 all-gracious ALL-GRA'CIOUS, a. Perfectly gracious.
1732 all-guiding ALL-GUI'DING, a. Guiding or conducting all things.
1733 all-hail ALL-HA'IL, ex.All health; a phrase of salutation, expressing a wish of all health or safety to the ...
1735 all-hallow-tide ALL-HALLOW-TIDE, n. The time near All Saints, or November first.
1734 all-hallow ALL-HAL'LOW, or ALL-HALLOWS, n. All Saints day, the first of November; a feast dedicated to all ...
1736 all-hallows ALL-HAL'LOW, or ALL-HALLOWS, n. All Saints day, the first of November; a feast dedicated to all ...
1737 all-happy ALL-HAP'PY, a. Completely happy.
1738 all-heal ALL-HE'AL, n. The popular name of several plants.
1739 all-healing ALL-HE'ALING, a. Healing all things.
1740 all-helping ALL-HELP'ING, a. Assisting all
1741 all-hiding ALL-HI'DING, a. Concealing all things.
1742 all-honored ALL-HON'ORED, a. Honored by all.
1743 all-hurting ALL-HURT'ING, a. Hurting all things.
1744 all-idolizing ALL-I'DOLIZING, a. Worshiping any thing.
1745 all-imitating ALL-IM'ITATING, a. Imitating every thing.
1746 all-informing ALL-INFORM'ING, a. Imitating every thing.
1747 all-interesting ALL-IN'TERESTING, a. Interesting in the highest degree.
1748 all-interpreting ALL-INTER'PRETING, a. Explaining all things.
1749 all-judging ALL-JUDG'ING, a. Judging all; possessing the sovereign right of judging.
1750 all-just ALL-JUST;, a. Perfectly just.
1751 all-kind ALL-KI'ND, a. Perfectly kind or benevolent.
1752 all-knowing ALL-KNO'WING, a. Having all knowledge; omniscient.
1753 all-licensed ALL-LI'CENSED, a. Licensed to every thing.
1754 all-loving ALL-LOV'ING, a. Of infinite love.
1755 all-making ALL-MA'KING, a. Making or creating all; omnific.
1756 all-maturing ALL-MATU'RING, a. Maturing all things.
1757 all-merciful ALL-MER'CIFUL, a. Of perfect mercy or compassion.
1758 all-murdering ALL-MUR'DERING, a. Killing or destroying every thing.
1759 all-obedient ALL-OBE'DIENT, a. Entirely obedient.
1760 all-obeying ALL-OBEY'ING, a. [See Obey.] Receiving obedience from all.
1761 all-oblivious ALL-OBLIV'IOUS, a. Causing total oblivion.
1762 all-obscuring ALL-OBSCU'RING, a. Obscuring every thing.
1763 all-patient ALL-PA'TIENT, a. Enduring every thing without murmurs.
1764 all-penetrating ALL-PEN'ETRATING, a. Penetrating every thing.
1765 all-perfect ALL-PER'FECT, a. Completely perfect; having all perfection.
1766 all-perfectness ALL-PER'FECTNESS, n. The perfection of the whole; entire perfection.
1767 all-piercing ALL-PIER'CING, a. Piercing every thing.
1768 all-powerful ALL-POW'ERFUL, a. Almighty; omnipotent.
1769 all-praised ALL-PRA'ISED, a. Praised by all.
1770 all-ruling ALL-RU'LING, a. Governing all things.
1771 all-sagacious ALL-SAGA'CIOUS, a. Having all sagacity; of perfect discernment.
1772 all-saints-day ALL-SAINTS-DAY, n. The first day of November, called also all hallows; a feast in honor of all the ...
1773 all-sanctifying ALL-SANC'TIFYING, a. Sanctifying the whole.
1774 all-saving ALL-SA'VING, a. Saving all.
1775 all-searching ALL-SEARCH'ING, a. Pervading and searching every thing.
1776 all-seeing ALL-SEE'ING, a. Seeing every thing.
1777 all-seer ALL-SEE'R, n. One that sees every thing.
1778 all-shaking ALL-SHA'KING, a. Shaking all things.
1779 all-shunned ALL-SHUN'NED, a. Shunned by all.
1780 all-souls-day ALL-SOULS-DAY, n. The second day of November; a feast or solemnity held by the church of Rome, to ...
1781 all-sufficiency ALL-SUFFI'CIENCY, n. Complete or infinite ability.
1782 all-sufficient ALL-SUFFI'CIENT, a. Sufficient to every thing; infinitely able.ALL-SUFFI'CIENT, n. The ...
1783 all-surrounding ALL-SURROUND'ING, a. Encompassing the whole.
1784 all-surveying ALL-SURVEY'ING, n. [See Survey.] Surveying every thing.
1785 all-sustaining ALL-SUSTA'INING, a. Upholding all things.
1786 all-telling ALL-TELL'ING, a. Telling or divulging every thing.
1787 all-triumphing ALL-TRI'UMPHING, a. Triumphant every where or over all.
1788 all-watched ALL-WATCH'ED, a. Watched throughout.
1789 all-wise ALL-WI'SE, a. Possessed of infinite wisdom.
1790 all-witted ALL-WIT'TED, a. Having all kinds of wit.
1791 all-worshiped ALL-WOR'SHIPED, a. Worshiped or adored by all.
1792 all-worthy ALL-WOR'THY, a. Of infinite worth; of the highest worth.
1683 all ALL, a. awl. [Gr. Shemitic from calah, to be ended or completed to perfect.]1. Every one, or the ...
1793 allagite AL'LAGITE, n. A mineral, of a brown or green color, massive, with a flat conchoidal fracture, and ...
1794 allanite AL'LANITE, n. A mineral named from Mr. Allan, of Edinburg, who first recognized it as a distinct ...
1795 allatrate AL'LATRATE, v.t. [L. allatro.] To bark, as a dog. [Not used.]
1796 allay ALLA'Y, v.t. [Gr.; L.ligo, to bind; but this may be the same word differently applied, that is, to ...
1797 allayed ALLA'YED, pp. Layed at rest; quieted; tranquilized; abated; [reduced by mixture. Obs.]
1798 allayer ALLA'YER, n. He, or that which allays.
1799 allaying ALLA'YING, ppr. Quieting; reducing to tranquility; abating; [reducing by mixture. Obs.]
1800 allayment ALLA'YMENT, n. The act of quieting, or a state of tranquility; a state of rest after disturbance; ...
1801 alle AL'LE, n. ally. The little auk, or black and white diver.
1802 allective ALLEC'TIVE, a. Alluring. [Not used.]ALLEC'TIVE, n. Allurement. [Not used.]
1803 alledge ALLEDGE', v.t. [L. allego, ad and lego, to send; Eng. lay.]1. To declare; to affirm; to assert; ...
1804 alledged ALLEDG'ED, pp. Affirmed; asserted, whether as a charge or a plea.
1805 alledger ALLEDG'ER, n. One who affirms or declares.
1806 alledging ALLEDG'ING, ppr. Asserting; averring; declaring.
1807 allegation ALLEGA'TION, n. 1. Affirmation; positive assertion or declaration.2. That which is affirmed or ...
1808 allege ALLEGE. [See Alledge.]
1809 allegeable ALLEG'EABLE, a. That may be alledged. [Not used.]
1810 allegeas ALLE'GEAS, or ALLE'GIAS, n. A stuff manufactured in the East Indies, of two kinds, one of cotton, ...
1811 allegement ALLEG'EMENT, n. Allegation. [Not in use.]
1812 alleghanean ALLEGHA'NEAN, a. Pertaining to the mountains called Alleghany, or Alleghenny.
1813 alleghany ALLEGHA'NY, n. The chief ridge of the great chains of mountains which run from N. East to S. West ...
1814 allegiance ALLE'GIANCE, n. [L. alligo, of ad and ligo, to bind. See Liege and League.]The tie or obligation ...
1815 allegiant ALLE'GIANT, a. Loyal. [Not used.]
1816 allegias ALLE'GEAS, or ALLE'GIAS, n. A stuff manufactured in the East Indies, of two kinds, one of cotton, ...
1817 allegoric ALLEGOR'IC,
1818 allegorical ALLEGOR'ICAL, a. In the manner of allegory; figurative; describing by resemblances.
1819 allegorically ALLEGOR'ICALLY, adv. In a figurative manner; by way of allegory.
1820 allegoricalness ALLEGOR'ICALNESS, n. The quality of being allegorical.
1821 allegorize AL'LEGORIZE, v.t. 1. To form an allegory; to turn into allegory; as, to allegorize the history of ...
1822 allegorized AL'LEGORIZED, pp. Turned into allegory, or understood allegorically.
1823 allegorizing AL'LEGORIZING, ppr. Turning into allegory, or understanding in all allegorical sense.
1824 allegory AL'LEGORY, n. [Gr. other, to speak, a forum, an oration.]A figurative sentence or discourse, in ...
1825 allegretto ALLEGRET'TO, [from allegro,] denotes, in music, a movement or time quicker than andante, but not ...
1826 allegro ALLE'GRO. [See Light.]In music, a word denoting a brisk movement; a sprightly part or strain; the ...
1827 alleluiah ALLELU'IAH, n. [Heb. praise to Jah.]Praise to Jehovah; a word used to denote pious joy and ...
1828 allemand ALLEMAND', n. A slow air in common time, or grave, solemn music, with a slow movement. Also a ...
1829 allemannic ALLEMAN'NIC, a. Belonging to the Alemanni, ancient Germans, and to Alemannia, their country. The ...
1830 allerion ALLER'ION, n. In heraldry, an eagle without beak or feet, with expanded wings; denoting ...
1831 alleveur ALLEVEU'R, n. A small Swedish coin, value about a cent.
1832 alleviate ALLE'VIATE, v.t. [Low L. allevio; ad and levo, to raise, levis, light.]1. To make light; but ...
1833 alleviated ALLE'VIATED, pp. Made lighter; mitigated; eased; extenuated.
1834 alleviating ALLE'VIATING, ppr. Making lighter, or more tolerable; extenuating.
1835 alleviation ALLEVIA'TION, n. 1. The act of lightening, allaying, or extenuating; a lessening or mitigation.2. ...
1836 alleviative ALLE'VIATIVE, n. That which mitigates. [Not in use.]
1837 alley AL'LEY, n. al'ly1. A walk in a garden; a narrow passage.2. A narrow passage or way in a city, as ...
1838 alliaceous ALLIA'CEOUS, a. [L. allium, garlic.]Pertaining to allium, or garlic; having the properties of ...
1839 alliance ALLI'ANCE, n. [Gr.; L.]1. The relation or union between families, contracted by marriage.2. The ...
1840 alliant ALLI'ANT, n. An ally. [Not used.]
1841 alliciency ALLI'CIENCY, n. [Lat. allicio, ad and lacio, allecto, elicio.The power of attracting any thing; ...
1842 allicient ALLI'CIENT, n. That which attracts. [Not used.]
1843 allied ALLI'ED, pp. Connected by marriage, treaty or similitude. [See ally.]
1844 alligate AL'LIGATE, v.t. [L. alligo, and ad and ligo, to bind. See Allegiance, Liege, League.]To tie ...
1845 alligation ALLIGA'TION, n. 1. The act of tying together; the state of being tied. [Little used.]2. A rule ...
1847 alligator-pear ALLIGA'TOR-PEAR, n. A west India fruit, resembling a pear in shape, from one to two pounds in ...
1846 alligator ALLIGA'TOR, n. [The Latin word seems to be connected with lacertus, the arm; and the animal may be ...
1848 alligature ALLIG'ATURE, n. See Ligature, which is the word in use.
1849 allinement ALLI'NEMENT, n. [L. linea.]A reducing to a line or to a square; a state of being in squares, in a ...
1850 allioth AL'LIOTH, n. A star in the tail of the great bear, much used for finding the latitude at sea.
1851 allision ALLISION, n. allizh'un. [L. allido, to dash or strike against of ad and lado, to hurt by ...
1852 alliteration ALLITERA'TION, n. [L. ad and litera, a letter.]The repetition of the same letter at the beginning ...
1853 alliterative ALLIT'ERATIVE, a. Pertaining to, or consisting in, alliteration.
1854 allocation ALLOCA'TION, n. [L. ad and locatio, a placing, from locus, place. See Local.]The act of putting ...
1855 allochroite AL'LOCHROITE, n. An amorphous, massive, opake mineral, of a grayish, yellowish or reddish color, ...
1856 allocution ALLOCU'TION, n. [L. allocutio, of ad and loquor, to speak. See eloquence.]1. The act or manner ...
1857 allodial ALLO'DIAL, a. Pertaining to allodium; freehold; free of rent or service; held independence of a ...
1858 allodian ALLODIAN is sometimes used, but is not well authorized.
1859 allodium ALLO'DIUM, n.Freehold estate; land which is the absolute property of the owner; real estate held in ...
1860 allonge ALLONGE', n. allunj'.1. A pass with a sword; a thrust made by stepping forward and extending the ...
1861 alloo ALLOO', v.t. or i. To incite dogs by a call.[See the correct word, Halloo.]
1862 allophane AL'LOPHANE, n. [Gr. other and to appear.]A mineral of a blue, and sometimes of a green or brown ...
1863 allot ALLOT', v.t. [of ad and lot; See Lot.]1. To divide or distribute by lot.2. To distribute, or ...
1864 allotment ALLOT'MENT, n.1. That which is allotted; a share, part, or portion granted or distributed; that ...
1865 allotted ALLOT'TED, pp. Distributed by lot; granted; assigned.
1866 allottery ALLOT'TERY is used by Shakespeare for allotment; but is not authorized by usage.
1867 allotting ALLOT'TING, ppr. Distributing by lot giving as portions; assigning.
1869 allow-ableness ALLOW-ABLENESS, n. The quality of being allowable; lawfulness; exemption from prohibition, or ...
1868 allow ALLOW', v.t. [L. loco, to lay, set, place. See Lay.]1. To grant, give or yield; as, to allow a ...
1870 allowable ALLOW'ABLE, a. That may be permitted as lawful, or admitted as true and proper; not forbid; not ...
1871 allowably ALLOW'ABLY, adv. In an allowable manner; with propriety.
1872 allowance ALLOW'ANCE, n. 1. The act of allowing or admitting.2. Permission; license; approbation; sanction; ...
1873 allowed ALLOW'ED, pp. Granted; permitted; assented to; admitted; approved; indulged; appointed; abated.
1874 allowing ALLOW'ING, ppr. Granting; permitting; admitting; approving; indulging; deducting.
1875 alloy ALLOY', v.t. [L. alligo, ad and ligo, to bind. Gr.]1. To reduce the purity of a metal, by mixing ...
1876 alloyage ALLOY'AGE, n. 1. The act of alloying metals or the mixture of a baser metal with a finer, to ...
1877 alloyed ALLOY'ED, pp. Mixed; reduced in purity; debased; abated by foreign mixture.
1878 alloying ALLOY'ING, ppr. Mixing a baser metal with a finer, to reduce its purity; abating by foreign ...
1879 allspice ALL'SPICE, [See under the compounds of all.]
1880 allude ALLU'DE, v.i. [L. alludo, to smile upon or make sport with of ad and ludo, to play.]To refer to ...
1881 alluding ALLU'DING, ppr. Having reference; hinting at.
1882 alluminor ALLU'MINOR, n.One who colors or paints upon paper or parchment, giving light and ornament to ...
1883 allure ALLU'RE, v.t.To attempt to draw to; to tempt by the offer of some good, real or apparent; to invite ...
1884 allured ALLU'RED,