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Wednesday - April 16, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord point

1828 edition of Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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point

POINT, n. [L. punctum, from pungo, to prick, properly to thrust, pret. pepugi, showing that n is not radical.]

1. The sharp end of any instrument or body; as the point of a knife, of a sword or of a thorn.

2. A string with a tag; as a silken point.

3. A small cape, headland or promontory; a tract of land extending into the sea, a lake or river, beyond the line of the shore, and becoming narrow at the end; as point Judith; Montauk point. It is smaller than a cape.

4. The sting of an epigram; a lively turn of thought or expression that strikes with force and agreeable surprise.

With periods, points and tropes he slurs his crimes.

5. An indivisible part of time or space. We say, a point of time, a point of space.

6. A small space; as a small point of land.

7. Punctilio; nicety; exactness of ceremony; as points of precedence.

8. Place near, next or contiguous to; verge; eve. He is on the point of departure, or at the point of death.

9. Exact place. He left off at the point where he began.

10. Degree; state of elevation, depression or extension; as, he has reached an extraordinary point of excellence. He has fallen to the lowest point of degradation.

11. A character used to mark the divisions of writing, or the pauses to be observed in reading or speaking; as the comma, semi-colon, colon and period. The period is called a full stop,as it marks the close of a sentence.

12. A spot; a part of a surface divided by spots or lines; as the ace or sise point.

13. In geometry, that which has neither parts nor magnitude.

A point is that which has position but not magnitude.

A point is a limit terminating a line.

14. In music, mark or note anciently used to distinguish tones or sounds. Hence, simple counterpoint is when a note of the lower part answers exactly to that of the upper, and figurative counterpoint, is when a note is syncopated and one of the parts makes several notes or inflections of the voice while the other holds on one.

15. In modern music, a dot placed by a note to raise its value or prolong its time by one half, so as to make a semibreve equal to three minims; a minim equal to three quavers, &c.

16. In astronomy, a division of the great circles of the horizon, and of the mariner's compass. The four cardinal points, are the east, west, north and south. On the space between two of these points, making a quadrant or quarter of a circle, the compass is marked with subordinate divisions, the whole number being thirty two points.

17. In astronomy, a certain place marked in the heavens, or distinguished for its importance in astronomical calculations. The zenith and nadir are called vertical points; the nodes are the points where the orbits of the planets intersect the plane of the ecliptic; the place where the equator and ecliptic intersect are called equinoctial points; the points of the ecliptic at which the departure of the sun from the equator, north and south, is terminated, are called solstitial points.

18. In perspective, a certain pole or place with regard to the perspective plane.

19. In manufactories, a lace or work wrought by the needle; as point le Venice, point de Genoa, &c. Sometimes the word is used for lace woven with bobbins. Point devise is used for needle work, or for nice work.

20. The place to which any thing is directed, or the direction in which an object is presented to the eye. We say, in this point of view, an object appears to advantage. In this or that point of view, the evidence is important.

21. Particular; single thing or subject. In what point do we differ? All points of controversy between the parties are adjusted. We say, in point of antiquity, in point of fact, in point of excellence. The letter in every point is admirable. The treaty is executed in every point.

22. Aim; purpose; thing to be reached or accomplished; as, to gain one's point.

23. The act of aiming or striking.

What a point your falcon made.

24. A single position; a single assertion; a single part of a complicated question or of a whole.

These arguments are not sufficient to prove the point.

Strange point and new!

Doctrine which we would know whence learned.

25. A note or tune.

Turning your tongue divine

To a loud trumpet, and a point of war.

26. In heraldry, points are the several different parts of the escutcheon, denoting the local positions of figures.

27. In electricity, the acute termination of a body which facilitates the passage of the fluid to or from the body.

28. In gunnery, point-blank denotes the shot of a gun leveled horizontally. The point-blank range is the extent of the apparent right line of a ball discharged. In shooting point-blank,the ball is supposed to move directly to the object, without a curve. Hence adverbially, the word is equivalent to directly.

29. In marine language, points are flat pieces of braided cordage, tapering from the middle towards each end; used in reefing the courses and top-sails of square-rigged vessels.

Point de vise, [Fr.] exactly in the point of view.

Vowel-points, in the Hebrew and other eastern languages, are certain marks placed above or below the consonants, or attached to them, as in the Ethiopic, representing the vocal sounds or vowels, which precede or follow the articulations.

The point, the subject; the main question; the precise thing to be considered, determined or accomplished. This argument may be true, but it is not to the point.

POINT, v.t. To sharpen; to cut, forge, grind or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart or a pin; also, to taper, as a rope.

1. To direct towards an object or place, to show its position, or excite attention to it; as, to point the finger at an object; to point the finger of scorn at one.

2. To direct the eye or notice.

Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them, would see nothing but subjects of surprise.

3. To aim; to direct towards an object; as, to point a musket at a wolf; to point a cannon at a gate.

4. To mark with characters for the purpose of distinguishing the members of a sentence, and designating the pauses; as, to point a written composition.

5. To mark with vowel-points.

6. To appoint. [Not in use.]

7. To fill the joints with mortar, and smooth them with the point of a trowel; as, to point a wall.

To point out, to show by the finger or by other means.

To point a sail, to affix points through the eyelet-holes of the reefs.

POINT, v.i. To direct the finger for designating an object, and exciting attention to it; with at.

Now must the world point at poor Catherine.

Point at the tatter'd coat and ragged shoe.

1. To indicate, as dogs do to sportsmen.

He treads with caution, and he points with fear.

2. To show distinctly by any means.

To point at what time the balance of power was most equally held between the lords and commons at Rome, would perhaps admit a controversy.

3. To fill the joints or crevices of a wall with mortar.

4. In the rigging of a ship, to taper the end of a rope or splice, and work over the reduced part a small close netting, with an even number of knittles twisted from the same.

To point at, to treat with scorn or contempt by pointing or directing attention to.


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Why 1828?

I began to use it as I studied the scriptures to understand the unadulterated meaning of the words. But now I also use it as my main dictionary because I appreciate the dignity of words this dictionary maintains.

— Rachel

Word of the Day

voice

VOICE, n. [L. vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.

2. Any sound made by the breath; as the trumpet's voice.

3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote however given.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice of holy senates, and elect by voice.

I have no words; my voice is in my sword.

4. Language; words; expression.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church.

5. In Scripture, command; precept.

Ye would not be obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. Deut. 8.

6. Sound.

After the fire, a still small voice. 1Kings 19.

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job. 40.

The floods have lifted up their voice. Ps. 93.

7. Language; tone; mode of expression.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice. Gal. 4.

8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as the active voice; the passive voice.

VOICE, v.t.

1. To rumor; to report.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.]

2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

3. To vote.

VOICE, v.i. To clamor; to exclaim. Obs.

Random Word

glowingly

GLOWINGLY, adv. With great brightness; with ardent heat or passion.

About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

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