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Wednesday - October 1, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: r

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ID Word Definition
44364 r R is the eighteenth letter of the English Alphabet, and an articulation sui generis, having little ...
44365 ra RA, as an inseparable prefix or preposition, is the Latin re, coming to us through the Italian and ...
44366 rabate RABA'TE, v.t. [See Beat and Abate.]In falconry, to recover a hawk to the fist.
44367 rabato RABA'TO, n. A neckband or ruff. [Not in use.]
44369 rabbet-plane RAB'BET-PLANE, n. A joiner's plane for paring or cutting square down the edge of a board, &c.
44368 rabbet RAB'BET, v.t. 1. To pare down the edge of a board or other piece of timber, for the purpose of ...
44370 rabbeted RAB'BETED, pp. Pared down the edge of a board; united by a rabbet joint.
44371 rabbeting RAB'BETING, ppr. Paring down the edge of a board; uniting by a rabbet joint.
44372 rabbi RAB'BI,
44373 rabbin RAB'BIN, n.A title assumed by the Jewish doctors, signifying master or lord. This title is not ...
44374 rabbinic RABBIN'IC,
44375 rabbinical RABBIN'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the Rabbins, or to their opinions, learning and language.
44376 rabbinism RAB'BINISM, n. A Rabbinic expression or phraseology; a peculiarity of the language of the Rabbins.
44377 rabbinist RAB'BINIST, n. Among the Jews, one who adhered to the Talmud and the traditions of the Rabbins, in ...
44378 rabbinite RAB'BINITE, n. The same as rabbinist.
44379 rabbit RAB'BIT, n.A small quadruped of the genus Lepus, which feeds on grass or other herbage, and burrows ...
44381 rabble-charming RAB'BLE-CHARMING, a. Charming or delighting the rabble.
44380 rabble RAB'BLE, n. [L. rabula, a brawler, from rabo, to rave.]1. A tumultuous crowd of vulgar, noisy ...
44382 rabblement RAB'BLEMENT, n. A tumultuous crowd of low people. [Not in use.]
44383 rabdology RABDOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a rod, and discourse.]A method of performing mathematical operations by little ...
44384 rabid RAB'ID, a. [L. rabidus, from rabio, rabo, to rage.]Furious; raging; mad; as a rabid dog or wolf. ...
44385 rabidness RAB'IDNESS, n. Furiousness; madness.
44386 rabinet RAB'INET, n. A kind of smaller ordnance.
44387 raca R'ACA, n. A Syriac word signifying empty, beggarly, foolish; a term of extreme contempt. Matt. 5.
44389 race-ginger RACE-GIN'GER, n. Ginger in the root or not pulverized.
44390 race-horse RA'CE-HORSE, n. A horse bred or kept for running in contest; a horse that runs in competition.
44388 race RACE, n. [L. radix and radius having the same original. This word coincides in origin with rod, ...
44391 racemation RACEMA'TION, n. [L. racemus, a cluster.]1. A cluster, as of grapes.2. The cultivation of cluster ...
44392 raceme RAC'EME, n. [L. racemus, a bunch of berries.In botany a species of inflorescence, consisting of a ...
44393 racemiferous RACEMIF'EROUS, a. [L. racemus, a cluster, and fero, to bear.]Bearing racemes or clusters; as the ...
44394 racemous RAC'EMOUS, a. Growing in racemes or clusters.
44395 racer RA'CER, n. [from race.] a runner; one that contends in a race.And bade the nimblest racer seize ...
44396 rach RACH, n. A setting dog.
44397 raciness RA'CINESS, n. The quality of being racy.
44399 rack-rent RACK'-RENT, n. An annual rent of the full value of the tenement or near it.
44398 rack RACK, n. [Eng. to reach. See Reach and Break.]1. An engine of torture, used for extorting ...
44400 racked RACK'ED, pp.1. Tortured; tormented; strained to the utmost.2. Drawn off, as liquor.
44401 racker RACK'ER, n. One that tortures or torments; one that racks.
44402 racket RACK'ET, n. [This word belong to the root of crack. See Rocket.]1. A confused, clattering noise, ...
44403 rackety RACK'ETY, a. Making a tumultuous noise.
44405 racking-pace RACK'ING-PACE, n. The racking-pace of a horse is an amble, but with a quicker and shorter tread.
44404 racking RACK'ING, ppr.1. Torturing; tormenting; straining; drawing off.2. a. Tormenting; excruciating; ...
44406 racoon RACOON', n. An American quadruped of the genus Ursus. It is somewhat larger than a fox, and its ...
44407 racy RA'CY, a. [L. radix.]Strong; flavorous; tasting of the soil; as racy cider; racy wine.Rich racy ...
44408 rad RAD, the old pret. of read.
44409 raddle RAD'DLE, v.t.To twist; to wind together. [Not in use.]RAD'DLE, n. [supra.] A long stick used in ...
44410 raddock RAD'DOCK,
44411 radial RA'DIAL, a. [from L. radius, a ray, a rod, a spoke. See Radius and Ray.]Pertaining to the radius ...
44412 radiance RA'DIANCE,
44413 radiancy RA'DIANCY, n. [L. radians, radio, to beam or shoot rays. See Radius and Ray.]Properly, brightness ...
44414 radiant RA'DIANT, a. Shooting or darting rays of light; beaming with brightness; emitting a vivid light or ...
44415 radiantly RA'DIANTLY, adv. With beaming brightness; with glittering splendor.
44416 radiate RA'DIATE, v.i. [L. radio. See Ray.]1. To issue in rays, as light; to dart, as beams of ...
44417 radiated RA'DIATED, pp.1. Adorned with rays of light.2. Having crystals diverging from a center.
44418 radiating RA'DIATING, ppr. Darting rays of light; enlightening; as the radiating point in optics.
44419 radiation RADIA'TION, n. [L. radiatio.] 1. The emission and diffusion of rays of light; beamy ...
44420 radical RAD'ICAL, a. [L. radicalis, from radix, root. See Race and Ray.]1. Pertaining to the root or ...
44421 radicality RADICAL'ITY, n. 1. Origination.2. A being radical; a quantity which has relation to a root.
44422 radically RAD'ICALLY, adv. 1. Originally; at the origin or root; fundamentally; as a scheme or system ...
44423 radicalness RAD'ICALNESS, n. The state of being radical or fundamental.
44424 radicant RAD'ICANT, a. [L. radicans.] In botany, rooting; as a radicant stem or leaf.
44425 radicate RAD'ICATE, v.t. [L. radicatus, radicor, from radix, root.]To root; to plant deply and firmly; as ...
44426 radicated RAD'ICATED, pp. or a. Deeply planted.- Prejudices of a whole race of people radicated by a ...
44427 radication RADICA'TION, n. [from radicate.]1. The process of taking root deeply; as the radication of ...
44428 radicle RAD'ICLE, n. [L. radicula, from radix.]1. That part of the seed of a plant which upon vegetating ...
44429 radiometer RADIOM'ETER, n. [L. radius, rod, and Gr. measure.]The forestaff, an instrument for taking the ...
44430 radish RAD'ISH, n. [See Ruddy.]A plant of the genus Raphanus, the root of which is eaten raw. ...
44431 radius RA'DIUS, n. [L. id, a ray, a rod, a beam, a spoke, that is, a shoot; radio, to shine, that is, to ...
44432 radix RA'DIX, n. [L. a root.]1. In etymology, a primitive word from which spring other words.2. In ...
44433 raff R'AFF, v.t. [Heb.]To sweep; to snatch, draw or huddle together; to take by a promiscuous sweep. ...
44434 raffle RAF'FLE, v.i. [Heb. to strive. See Raff.]To cast dice for a prize, for which each person ...
44435 raffler RAF'FLER, n. One who raffles.
44436 raffling RAF'FLING, ppr. The act of throwing dice for a prize staked by a number.
44437 raft R'AFT, n. [Gr. to sew that is, to fasten together, and allied to reeve; or Gr. whence a flooring. ...
44438 rafter R'AFTER, n. [Gr. to cover; a roof.]A roof timber; a piece of timber that extends from the plate of ...
44439 raftered R'AFTERED, a. Built or furnished with rafters.
44440 rafty R'AFTY, a. Damp; musty. [Local.]
44441 rag RAG, n. [Gr. a torn garment; tear; a rupture, a rock, a crag; to tear asunder.]1. Any piece of ...
44442 ragamuffin RAGAMUF'FIN, n. A paltry fellow; a mean wretch.
44443 rage RAGE, n. [Heb. to grind or gnash the teeth.]1. Violent anger accompanied with furious words, ...
44444 rageful RA'GEFUL, a. Full of rage; violent; furious.
44445 ragery RA'GERY, n. Wantonness. [Not used.]
44446 ragg RAGG, n. Rowley ragg, a species of silicious stone, of a dusky or dark gray color, with shining ...
44447 ragged RAG'GED, a. [from rag.] 1. Rent or worn into tatters, or till its texture is broken; as a ragged ...
44448 raggedness RAG'GEDNESS, n.1. The state of being dressed in tattered clothes.2. The state of being rough or ...
44449 raging RA'GING, ppr. [from rage.]1. Acting with violence or fury.2. a. Furious; impetuous; vehemently ...
44450 ragingly RA'GINGLY, adv. With fury; with violent impetuosity.
44451 ragman RAG'MAN, n. A man who collects or deals in rags, the materials of paper.
44452 ragmans-roll RAGMAN'S-ROLL, n. A roll or register of the value of benefices in Scotland, made by Ragimund, a ...
44453 ragoo RAGOO',
44454 ragout RAGOUT, n. A sauce or seasoning for exciting a languid appetite; or a high seasoned dish, prepared ...
44455 ragstone RAG'STONE, n. A stone of the silicious kind, so named from its rough fracture. It is of a gray ...
44456 ragwort RAG'WORT, n. A plant of the genus Senecio.
44458 rail-bird RAIL-BIRD, n. A bird of the genus Cuculus.
44457 rail RAIL, n.1. A cross beam fixed at the ends in two upright posts.[In New England, this is never ...
44459 railer RA'ILER, n. One who scoffs, insults, censures or reproaches with opprobrious language.
44460 railing RA'ILING, ppr. 1. Clamoring with insulting language; uttering reproachful words.2. a. Expressing ...
44461 railingly RA'ILINGLY, adv. With scoffing or insulting language.
44462 raillery RA'ILLERY, n.Banter; jesting language; good humored pleasantry or slight satire; satirical ...
44463 railleur RA'ILLEUR, n. A banterer; a jester; a mocker. [Not English nor in use.]
44464 raiment RA'IMENT, n. [for arrayment. See Array and Ray.]1. Clothing in general; vestments; vesture; ...
44466 rain-deer RA'IN-DEER, n. The rane, a species of the cervine genus. [See Rane.]
44467 rain-water RA'IN-WATER, n. Water that has fallen from the clouds.
44465 rain RAIN, v.i. [It seems that rain is contracted from regen. It is the Gr. to rain, to water, which ...
44468 rainbat RA'INBAT, a. Beaten or injured by the rain. [Not used.]
44469 rainbow RA'INBOW, n. A bow, or an arch of a circle, consisting of all the colors formed by the refraction ...
44470 raininess RA'ININESS, n. [from rainy.] The state of being rainy.
44471 rainy RA'INY, a. Abounding with rain; wet; showery; as rainy weather; a rainy day or season.
44472 raise RAISE, v.t. raze. [This word occurs often in the Gothic version of the gospels, Luke 3:8. John ...
44473 raised RA'ISED, pp. Lifted; elevated; exalted; promoted; set upright; built; made or enlarged; produced; ...
44474 raiser RA'ISER, n. One who raises; that which raises; one that builds; one that levies or collects; one ...
44475 raisin RAISIN, n. razn.A dried grape. Grapes are suffered to remain on the vines till they are perfectly ...
44476 raising RA'ISING, ppr. Lifting; elevating; setting upright; exalting; producing; enhancing; restoring to ...
44477 raja RA'JA, n. [L. rex, regis.] In India, a prince. some of the rajahs are said to be independent ...
44478 rajah RA'JAH,
44479 rajahship RA'JAHSHIP, n. The dignity or principality of a rajah.
44480 rake RAKE, n. An instrument consisting of a head-piece in which teeth are inserted, and a long handle; ...
44481 raked RA'KED, pp. Scraped; gathered with a rake; cleaned with a rake; cannonaded fore and aft.
44482 rakehell RA'KEHELL, n.A lewd, dissolute fellow; a debauchee; a rake.
44483 rakehelly RA'KEHELLY, a. Dissolute; wild.
44484 raker RA'KER, n. One that rakes.
44485 rakeshame RA'KESHAME, n. A vile dissolute wretch.
44486 raking RA'KING, ppr. 1. Scraping; gathering with a rake; cleaning and smoothing with a rake; cannonading ...
44487 rakish RA'KISH, a. Given to a dissolute life; lewd; debauched.
44488 rakishness RA'KISHNESS, n. Dissolute practices.
44489 rally RAL'LY, v.t. [This seems to be a compound of re, ra, and lier, L. ligo, to unite.]1. To reunite; ...
44490 ram RAM, n. [See the Verb.]1. The male of the sheep or ovine genus; in some parts of England called a ...
44491 ramadan RAM'ADAN, n. Among the Mohammedans, a solemn season of fasting.
44492 ramage RAM'AGE, n. [L. ramus, a branch.]1. Branches of trees. [Not in use.]2. The warbling of birds ...
44493 ramble RAM'BLE, v.i.1. To rove; to wander; to walk, ride or sail from place to place, without any ...
44494 rambler RAM'BLER, n. One that rambles; a rover; a wanderer.
44495 rambling RAM'BLING, ppr. Roving; wandering; moving or going irregularly.RAM'BLING, n. A roving; irregular ...
44496 rambooze RAM'BOOZE,
44497 rambuse RAM'BUSE, n. a drink made of wine, ale, eggs and sugar in winter, or of wine, milk, sugar and rose ...
44498 ramekin RAM'EKIN,
44499 raments RAM'ENTS, n. [L. ramenta, a chip.] 1. Scrapings; shavings;. [Not used.]2. In botany, loose ...
44500 rameous RA'MEOUS, a. [L. ramus, a branch.] In botany, belonging to a branch; growing on or shooting from ...
44501 ramequins RAM'EQUINS, n. In cookery, small slices of bread covered with a farce of cheese and eggs.
44502 ramification RAMIFICA'TION, n. [L. ramus, a branch.]1. The process of branching or shooting branches from a ...
44503 ramified RAM'IFIED, pp. divided into branches.
44504 ramify RAM'IFY, v.t. [L. ramus, a branch, and facio, to make.]To divide into branches or parts; as, to ...
44505 ramifying RAM'IFYING, ppr. shooting into branches or divisions.
44506 ramish RAM'ISH, a. Rank; strong scented.
44507 ramishness RAM'ISHNESS, n. [from ram.] Rankness; a strong scent.
44508 rammed RAM'MED, pp. [See Ram.] Driven forcibly.
44509 rammer RAM'MER, n.1. One that rams or drives.2. An instrument for driving any thing with force; as a ...
44510 ramming RAM'MING, ppr. Driving with force.
44511 ramoon RAMOON', n. A tree of America.
44512 ramous RA'MOUS, a. [L. ramosus, from ramus, a branch.]1. In botany, branched, as a stem or root; having ...
44513 ramp RAMP, v.i. [See Ramble and Romance.]1. To climb, as a plant; to creep up.Plants furnished with ...
44514 rampallian RAMPAL'LIAN, n. A mean wretch. [Not in use.]
44515 rampancy RAMP'ANCY, n. [from rampant.] Excessive growth or practice; excessive prevalence; exuberance; ...
44516 rampant RAMP'ANT, a. [See Ramp and Ramble.]1. Overgrowing the usual bounds; rank in growth; exuberant; as ...
44517 rampart RAM'PART, n. [Hence we see rampart is from L. reparo; re and paro. See Parry and Repair.]1. In ...
44518 rampion RAM'PION, n. [from ramp.] The name of several plants; as the common esculent rampion, a species ...
44519 rampire RAMP'IRE, n. The same as rampart; but obsolete.
44520 ramsons RAM'SONS, n. A plant, a species of Allium.
44521 ran RAN, the pret. of run. In old writers, open robbery.
44522 rancescent RANCES'CENT, a. [L. ranceo, to be rank.] Becoming rancid or sour.
44523 ranch RANCH, v.t. [corrupted from wrench.] To sprain; to injure by violent straining or contortion. ...
44524 rancid RAN'CID, a. [L. rancidus, from ranceo, to be rank. This is the Eng. rank, luxuriant in ...
44525 rancidity RANCID'ITY,
44526 rancidness RAN'CIDNESS, n. The quality of being rancid; a strong, sour scent, as of old oil.The rancidity of ...
44527 rancor RAN'COR, n. [L. from ranceo, to be rank.]1. The deepest malignity or spite; deep seated and ...
44528 rancorous RAN'COROUS, a. Deeply malignant; implacably spiteful or malicious; intensely virulent.So flam'd ...
44529 rancorously RAN'COROUSLY, adv. With deep malignity or spiteful malice.
44530 rand RAND, n.A border; edge; margin; as the rand of a shoe.
44532 random-shot RAN'DOM-SHOT, n. A shot not directed to a point, or a shot with the muzzle of the gun elevated ...
44531 random RAN'DOM, n.1. A roving motion or course without direction; hence, want of direction, rule or ...
44533 randy RAN'DY, a. Disorderly; riotous. [Not used or local.]
44534 rane RANE,
44535 ranedeer RANEDEER, n.A species of deer found in the northern parts of Europe and Asia. He has large ...
44536 ranforce RAN'FORCE, n. The ring of a gun next to the vent.[I do not find this word in modern books.]
44537 range RANGE, v.t.1. To set in a row or in rows; to place in a regular line, lines or ranks; to dispose ...
44538 ranged RANGED, pp. Disposed in a row or line; placed in order; passed in roving placed in a particular ...
44539 ranger RANGER, n.1. One that ranges; a rover; a robber. [Now little used.]2. A dog that beats the ...
44540 rangership RANGERSHIP, n. The office of the keeper of a forest or park.
44541 ranging RANGING, ppr. Placing in a row or line; disposing in order, method or classes; roving; passing ...
44542 rank RANK, the old pret. of ring. [Nearly obsolete.]
44543 ranked RANK'ED, pp. Placed in a line; disposed in an order or class; arranged methodically.
44544 ranker RANK'ER, n. One that disposes in ranks; one that arranges.
44545 ranking RANK'ING, ppr. Placing in ranks or lines; arranging; disposing in orders or classes; having a ...
44546 rankle RANK'LE, v.i. [from rank.]1. To grow more rank or strong; to be inflamed; to fester; as a ...
44547 rankly RANK'LY, adv. 1. With vigorous growth; as, grass or weeks grow rankly.2. Coarsely; grossly.
44548 rankness RANK'NESS, n.1. Vigorous growth; luxuriance; exuberance; as the rankness of plants or herbage.2. ...
44549 ranny RAN'NY, n. The shrew-mouse.
44550 ransack RAN'SACK, v.t. [Eng. rand, and ran is rapine. The last syllable coincides with the English verb to ...
44551 ransacked RAN'SACKED, pp. Pillaged; search narrowly.
44552 ransacking RAN'SACKING, ppr. Pillaging; searching narrowly.
44553 ransom RAN'SOM, n.1. The money or price paid for the redemption of a prisoner or slave, or for goods ...
44554 ransomed RAN'SOMED, pp. Redeemed or rescued from captivity, bondage or punishment by the payment of an ...
44555 ransomer RAN'SOMER, n. One that redeems.
44556 ransoming RAN'SOMING, ppr. Redeeming from captivity, bondage or punishment by giving satisfaction to the ...
44557 ransomless RAN'SOMLESS, a. Free from ransom.
44558 ranter RANT'ER, n. A noisy talker; a boisterous preacher.
44559 ranting RANT'ING, ppr. Uttering high sounding words without solid sense; declaiming or preaching with ...
44560 rantipole RANT'IPOLE, a. [from rant.] Wild; roving; rakish. [A low word.]RANT'IPOLE, v.i. To run about ...
44561 rantism RANT'ISM, n. The practice or tenets of ranters.
44562 ranty RANT'Y, a. Wild; noisy; boisterous.
44563 ranula RAN'ULA, n. [L. rana, a frog; dim. a little frog.]A swelling under the tongue, similar to the ...
44564 ranunculus RANUN'CULUS, n. [L. from rana, a frog.] In botany, crowfoot, a genus of plants of many species, ...
44565 rap RAP, v.i. [L. rapio, rapidus, rapid.]To strike with a quick sharp blow; to knock; as, to rap on ...
44566 rapacious RAPA'CIOUS, a. [L. rapax, from rapio, to seize. See Rap.]1. Given to plunder; disposed or ...
44567 rapaciously RAPA'CIOUSLY, adv. By rapine; by violent robbery or seizure.
44568 rapaciousness RAPA'CIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being rapacious; disposition to plunder or to exact by ...
44569 rapacity RAPAC'ITY, n. [L. rapacitas, from rapax, rapio.]1. Addictedness to plunder; the exercise of ...
44570 rape RAPE, n. [L. rapio, raptus. See Rap.]1. In a general sense, a seizing by violence; also, a ...
44571 raperoot RA'PEROOT. [See Rape.]
44572 rapeseed RA'PESEED, n. The seed of the rape, from which oil is expressed.
44573 rapid RAP'ID, a. [L. rapidus, from rapio, the primary sense of which is to rush.]1. Very swift or ...
44574 rapidity RAPID'ITY, n. [L. rapiditas.]1. Swiftness; celerity; velocity; as the rapidity of a current; the ...
44575 rapidly RAP'IDLY, adv. 1. With great speed, celerity or velocity; swiftly; with quick progression; as, to ...
44576 rapidness RAP'IDNESS, n. Swiftness; speed; celerity; rapidity.
44577 rapids RAP'IDS, n. plu. The part of a river where the current moves with more celerity than the common ...
44579 rapier-fish RA'PIER-FISH, n. The sword-fish.
44578 rapier RA'PIER, n. A small sword used only in thrusting.
44580 rapil RAP'IL,
44581 rapillo RAPIL'LO, n. Pulverized volcanic substances.
44582 rapine RAP'INE, n. [L. rapina; rapio, to seize.]1. The act of plundering; the seizing and carrying away ...
44583 rapparee RAPPAREE', n. A wild Irish plunderer; so called from rapery, a half pike that he carries.
44584 rappee RAPPEE', n. A coarse kind of snuff.
44585 rapper RAP'PER, n. [from rap.]1. One that raps or knocks.2. The knocker of a door. [Not in common ...
44586 rapport RAP'PORT, n. Relation; proportion. [Not in use.]
44587 rapt RAPT, pp. [from rap.] Transported; ravished.RAPT, v.t. To transport or ravish. [Not legitimate ...
44588 rapter RAP'TER,
44589 raptor RAP'TOR, n. [l. raptor.] A ravisher; a plunderer.
44590 rapture RAP'TURE, n. [L. raptus, rapio.]1. A seizing by violence. [Little used.]2. Transport; ecstasy; ...
44591 raptured RAP'TURED, a. Ravished; transported.[But enraptured is generally used.]
44592 rapturist RAP'TURIST, n. An enthusiast.
44593 rapturous RAP'TUROUS, a. Ecstatic; transporting; ravishing; as rapturous joy, pleasure or delight.
44594 rare RARE, a. [L. rarus, thin.]1. Uncommon; not frequent; as a rare event; a rare phenomenon.2. ...
44595 rareeshow RA'REESHOW, n. [rare and show.] A show carried in a box.
44596 rarefaction RAREFAC'TION, n. [See Rarefy.]The act or process of expanding or distending bodies, by separating ...
44597 rarefiable RAR'EFIABLE, a. Capable of being rarefied.
44598 rarefy RAR'EFY, v.t. [L. rarefacio; rarus, rare, and facio, to make.]To make thin and porous or less ...
44599 rarefying RAR'EFYING, ppr. Making thin or less dense.
44600 rarely RA'RELY, adv. 1. Seldom; not often; as things rarely seen.2. Finely; nicely. [little used.]
44601 rareness RA'RENESS, n.1. The state of being uncommon; uncommonness; infrequency.And let the rareness the ...
44602 rareripe RA'RERIPE, a. Early ripe; ripe before others, or before the usual season.RA'RERIPE, n. An early ...
44603 rarity RAR'ITY, n. [L. raritas.]1. Uncommonness; infrequency.Far from being fond of a flower for its ...
44604 rascal RAS'CAL, n. A mean fellow; a scoundrel; in modern usage, a trickish dishonest fellow; a rogue; ...
44605 rascalion RASCAL'ION, n. [from rascal.] A low mean wretch.
44606 rascality RASCAL'ITY, n. 1. The low mean people.2. Mean trickishness or dishonesty; base fraud. [This is ...
44607 rascally RAS'CALLY, a.1. Meanly trickish or dishonest; vile.2. Mean; vile; base; worthless; as a rascally ...
44608 rase RASE, v.t. s as z. [L. rasus, rado.]1. To pass along the surface of a thing, with striking or ...
44609 rash RASH, a.1. Hasty in council or action; precipitate; resolving or entering on a project or measure ...
44610 rasher RASH'ER, n. A thin slice of bacon; a thin cut.
44611 rashly RASH'LY, adv. With precipitation; hastily; without due deliberation.He that doth any thing rashly, ...
44612 rashness RASH'NESS, n. 1. To much haste in resolving or in undertaking a measure; precipitation; ...
44613 rasp R'ASP, n. [See Rase.]1. A large rough file; a grater.2. A raspberry, which see.R'ASP, v.t. [See ...
44614 raspatory R'ASPATORY, n. A surgeon's rasp.
44616 raspberry-bush R'ASPBERRY-BUSH, n. The bramble producing raspberries.
44615 raspberry R'ASPBERRY, n. [from rasp, so named from the roughness of the brambles.]The fruit of a bramble or ...
44617 rasure RA'SURE, n. s as z. [L. rasura, from rado, rasus. See Rase.]1. The act of scraping or shaving; ...
44618 rat RAT, n. [Probably named from gnawing, and from the root of L. rodo.]A small quadruped of the genus ...
44619 ratable RA'TABLE, a. [from rate.] 1. That may be rated, or set at a certain value; as a Danish ore ...
44620 ratably RA'TABLY, adv. By rate or proportion; proportionally.
44621 ratafia RATAFIA, n. ratafee'. A fine spirituous liquor, prepared from the kernels of several kinds of ...
44622 ratan RATAN', n. A small cane, the growth of India.
44623 ratch RATCH, n. In clock work, a sort of wheel having twelve fangs, which serve to lift the detents ...
44624 ratchet RATCH'ET, n. In a watch, a small tooth at the bottom of the fusee or barrel, which stops it in ...
44625 ratchil RATCH'IL, n. Among miners, fragments of stone.
44626 rate RATE, n. [L. ratus, reor, contracted from retor, redor, or resor. See Ratio and Reason.]1. The ...
44627 rated RA'TED, pp.1. Set at a certain value; estimated; set in a certain order or rank.2. Chid; ...
44628 rater RA'TER, n. One who sets a value on or makes an estimate.
44629 rath RATH, n. A hill. Obs.RATH, a. [See Ready.]Early; coming before others, or before the usual ...
44630 rather RATH'ER, adv. [I would rather go, or sooner go. The use is taken from pushing or moving forward.] ...
44631 rathoffite RATH'OFFITE, n. A mineral brought from Sweden, of the garnet kind. Its color is a dingy brownish ...
44632 ratification RATIFICA'TION, n.1. The act of ratifying; confirmation.2. The act of giving sanction and validity ...
44633 ratified RAT'IFIED, pp. Confirmed; sanctioned; made valid.
44634 ratifier RAT'IFIER, n. He or that which ratifies or sanctions.
44635 ratify RAT'IFY, v.t. [L. ratum facio, to make firm.]1. To confirm; to establish; to settle.We have ...
44636 ratifying RAT'IFYING, ppr. Confirming; establishing; approving and sanctioning.
44637 rating RA'TING, ppr. [from rate.]1. Setting at a certain value; assigning rant to; estimating.2. ...
44638 ratio RA'TIO, n. ra'sho. [L. from ratus, reor, to think or suppose, to set, confirm or establish. Reor ...
44639 ratiocinate RA'TIOCINATE, v.i. [L. ratiocinor, from ratio, reason.] To reason; to argue. [Little used.]
44640 ratiocination RATIOCINA'TION, n. [L. ratiocinatio.] The act or process of reasoning, or of deducing ...
44641 ratiocinative RATIOC'INATIVE, a. Argumentative; consisting in the comparison of propositions or facts, and the ...
44642 ration RA'TION, n. [L. ratio, proportion.]A portion or fixed allowance of provisions, drink and forage, ...
44643 rational RA'TIONAL, a. [L. rationalis.]1. Having reason or the faculty of reasoning; endowed with reason; ...
44644 rationale RATIONA'LE, n.1. A detail with reasons; a series of reasons assigned; as Dr. Sparrow's rationale ...
44645 rationalist RA'TIONALIST, n. One who proceeds in his disquisitions and practice wholly upon reason.
44646 rationality RATIONAL'ITY, n.1. The power of reasoning.God has made rationality the common portion of ...
44647 rationally RA'TIONALLY, adv. In consistency with reason; reasonably. We rationally expect every man will ...
44648 rationalness RA'TIONALNESS, n. The state of being rational or consistent with reason.
44649 ratlin RAT'LIN,
44650 ratline RAT'LINE, n. A small line traversing the shrouds of a ship, making the step of a ladder for ...
44651 ratoon RATOON', n.A sprout from the root of the sugar cane, which has been cut.
44652 ratsbane RATS'BANE, n. [rat and bane.] Poison for rats; arsenic.
44653 ratsbaned RATS'BANED, a. Poisoned by ratsbane.
44654 ratteen RATTEEN', n. A thick woolen stuff quilled or twilled.
44655 rattinet RATTINET', n. A woolen stuff thinner than ratteen.
44657 rattle-headed RAT'TLE-HEADED, a. Noisy; giddy; unsteady.
44656 rattle RAT'TLE, v.i.1. To make a quick sharp noise rapidly repeated, by the collision of bodies not very ...
44659 rattlesnake-root RATTLESNAKE-ROOT, n. A plant or root of the genus Polygala, and another of the genus Prenanthes.
44660 rattlesnake-weed RATTLESNAKE-WEED, n. A plant of the genus Eryngium.
44658 rattlesnake RAT'TLESNAKE, n. A snake that has rattles at the tail, of the genus Crotalus. The rattles consist ...
44661 rattling RAT'TLING, ppr. Making a quick succession of sharp sounds.RAT'TLING, n. A rapid succession of ...
44662 raucity RAU'CITY, n. [L. raucus, hoarse. Raucus is the Eng. rough, which see.]1. Hoarseness; a loud ...
44663 raucous RAU'COUS, a. Hoarse; harsh. [Not in use.]
44664 raught RAUGHT, the old participle of reach. Obs.
44665 raunch RAUNCH. [See Wrench.]
44666 ravage RAV'AGE, n. [L. rapio.]1. Spoil; ruin; waste; destruction by violence, wither by men, beasts or ...
44667 ravaged RAV'AGED, pp. Wasted; destroyed; pillaged.
44668 ravager RAV'AGER, n. a plunderer a spoiler; he or that which lays waste.
44669 ravaging RAV'AGING, ppr. Plundering; pillaging; laying waste.
44670 rave RAVE, v.i. [L. rabio, to rave, to rage or be furious; rabies, rage.]1. To wander in mind or ...
44671 ravel RAVEL, v.t. rav'l.1. To entangle; to entwist together; to make intricate; to involve; to ...
44672 raveled RAV'ELED, pp. Twisted together; made intricate; disentangled.
44673 ravelin RAV'ELIN, n.In fortification, a detached work with two faces which make a salient angle, without ...
44674 raveling RAV'ELING, ppr. Twisting or weaving; untwisting; disentangling.
44675 raven RAVEN, n. ra'ven. [Heb. from its color. But this may be L. corvus, rapio.]A large fowl of a ...
44676 ravened RAV'ENED, pp. Devoured with voracity.
44677 ravener RAV'ENER, n. One that ravens or plunders.
44678 ravening RAV'ENING, ppr. Preying with rapacity; voraciously devouring; as a ravening wolf.RAV'ENING, n. ...
44679 ravenous RAV'ENOUS, a.1. Furiously voracious; hungry even to rage; devouring with rapacious eagerness; as a ...
44680 ravenously RAV'ENOUSLY, adv. With raging voracity.
44681 ravenousness RAV'ENOUSNESS, n. Extreme voracity; rage for prey; as the ravenousness of a lion.
44682 raver RA'VER, n. [from rave.] One that raves or is furious.
44683 ravet RAV'ET, n. An insect shaped like a cock-chaffer, which infests the West Indies.
44684 ravin RAVIN. [See raven.]
44685 ravine RAV'INE, n. A long deep hollow worn by a stream or torrent of water; hence, any long deep hollow ...
44686 raving RA'VING, ppr. or a. Furious with delirium; mad; distracted.
44687 ravingly RA'VINGLY, adv. With furious wildness or frenzy; with distraction.
44688 ravish RAV'ISH, v.t. [L. rapio.]1. To seize and carry away by violence.These hairs which thou dost ...
44689 ravished RAV'ISHED, pp. Snatched away by violence; forced to submit to carnal embrace; delighted to ...
44690 ravisher RAV'ISHER, n.1. One that takes by violence.2. One that forces a woman to his carnal embrace.3. ...
44691 ravishing RAV'ISHING, ppr. 1. Snatching or taking by violence; compelling to submit to carnal intercourse; ...
44692 ravishingly RAV'ISHINGLY, adv. To extremity of delight.
44693 ravishment RAV'ISHMENT, n. 1. The act of forcing a woman to carnal connection; forcible violation of ...
44694 raw RAW, a. [L. crudus, rodo.]1. Not altered from its natural state; not roasted, boiled or cooked; ...
44695 rawhead RAW'HEAD, n. The name of a specter, mentioned to frighten children; as rawhead and bloody bones.
44696 rawish RAW'ISH, a. Somewhat raw; cool and damp. [Not much used.]
44697 rawly RAW'LY, adv.1. In a raw manner.2. Unskillfully; without experience.3. Newly.
44698 rawness RAW'NESS, n. 1. The state of being raw; uncooked; unaltered by heat; as the rawness of flesh.2. ...
44699 ray RAY, n. [L. radius.]1. a line of light, or the right line supposed to be described by a particle ...
44700 rayless RA'YLESS, a. Destitute of light; dark; not illuminated.
44701 raze RAZE, n. A root. [See Race-ginger, under Race.]RAZE, v.t. [L. rasus, rado. See Rase and ...
44702 razed RA'ZED, pp. Subverted; overthrown; wholly ruined; erased; extirpated.
44703 razee RAZEE', n. A ship of war cut down to a smaller size.
44704 razing RA'ZING, ppr. subverting; destroying; erasing; extirpating.
44706 razor-bill RA'ZOR-BILL, n. An aquatic fowl, the Alca torda; also, the Rhynchops nigra or cut-water.
44707 razor-fish RA'ZOR-FISH, n. A species of fish with a compressed body.
44705 razor RA'ZOR, n. [L. rasus, rado, to scrape.]An instrument for shaving off beard or hair. Razors of a ...
44708 razorable RA'ZORABLE, a. Fit to be shaved. [Not in use.]
44709 razure RA'ZURE, n. [L. rasura, from rado.]The act of erasing or effacing; obliteration.[See Rasure.]
44711 re-collect RE-COLLECT', v.t. To gather again; to collect what has been scattered; as, to re-collect routed ...
44712 re-create RE-CREA'TE, v.t. To create or form anew. An opening the campaign of 1776, instead of reinforcing, ...
44713 re-created RE-CREA'TED, pp. Created or formed anew.
44714 re-creating RE-CREA'TING, ppr. Creating or forming anew.
44715 re-creation RE-CREA'TION, n. A forming anew.
44716 re-echo RE-ECH'O, v.t [re and echo.] To echo back; to reverberate again; as, the hills re-echo the roar ...
44717 re-echoed RE-ECH'OED, pp. [supra.] Returned, as sound; reverberated again.
44718 re-echoing RE-ECH'OING, ppr. Returning or reverberating an echo.
44719 re-edification RE-EDIFICA'TION, n. [from re-edify.] Act or operation of rebuilding; state of being rebuilt.
44720 re-edified RE-ED'IFIED, pp. Rebuilt.
44721 re-edify RE-ED'IFY, v.t.To rebuild; to build again after destruction.
44722 re-edifying RE-ED'IFYING, ppr. Rebuilding.
44723 re-elect RE-ELECT', v.t. [re and elect.] To elect again; as, to re-elect the former governor.
44724 re-elected RE-ELECT'ED, pp. Elected again; re-chosen.
44725 re-electing RE-ELECT'ING, ppr. Electing again.
44726 re-election RE-ELEC'TION, n. Election a second time, or repeated election; as the re-election of a former ...
44727 re-eligibility RE-ELIGIBIL'ITY, n. The capacity of being re-elected to the same office.
44728 re-eligible RE-EL'IGIBLE, a. [re and eligible.] Capable of being elected again to the same office.
44729 re-embark RE-EMB'ARK, v.t. [re and embark.] To embark or put on board again.RE-EMB'ARK, v.i. To embark or ...
44730 re-embarkation RE-EMBARKA'TION, n. A putting on board or a going on board again.
44731 re-embattle RE-EMBAT'TLE, v.t. [re and embattle.] To array again for battle; to arrange again in the order of ...
44732 re-embattled RE-EMBAT'TLED, pp. Arrayed again for battle.
44733 re-embattling RE-EMBAT'TLING, ppr. Arranging again in battle array.
44734 re-embody RE-EMBOD'Y, v.t. [re and embody.] To embody again.
44735 re-enact RE-ENACT', v.t. [re and enact.] To enact again.
44736 re-enacted RE-ENACT'ED, pp. Enacted again.
44737 re-enacting RE-ENACT'ING, ppr. Enacting anew; passing again into a law.
44738 re-enaction RE-ENAC'TION, n. The passing into a law again.
44739 re-enactment RE-ENACT'MENT, n. The enacting or passing of a law a second time; the renewal of a law.
44740 re-enforce RE-ENFORCE, v.t. [re and enforce.] To strengthen with new force, assistance or support, as to ...
44741 re-enforced RE-ENFORCED, pp. Strengthened by additional force, troops or ships.
44742 re-enforcement RE-ENFORCEMENT, n.1. The act of re-enforcing.2. Additional force; fresh assistance; particularly, ...
44743 re-enforcing RE-ENFORCING, ppr. Strengthening by additional force.
44744 re-engage RE-ENGA'GE, v.t. To engage a second time.RE-ENGA'GE, v.i. To engage again; to enlist a second ...
44745 re-enjoy RE-ENJOY', v.t. [re and enjoy.] To enjoy anew or a second time.
44746 re-enjoyed RE-ENJOY'ED, pp. Enjoyed again.
44747 re-enjoying RE-ENJOY'ING, ppr. Enjoying anew.
44748 re-enjoyment RE-ENJOY'MENT, n. A second or repeated enjoyment.
44749 re-enkindle RE-ENKIN'DLE, v.t. [re and enkindle.] To enkindle again; to rekindle.
44750 re-enkindled RE-ENKIN'DLED, pp. Enkindled again.
44751 re-enkindling RE-ENKIN'DLING, ppr. Enkindling anew.
44752 re-enlist RE-ENLIST', v.t. To enlist a second time. [See Re-inlist.]
44753 re-enter RE-EN'TER, v.t. [re and enter.] To enter again or anew.RE-EN'TER, v.i. To enter anew.
44754 re-entered RE-EN'TERED, pp. Entered again.
44755 re-entering RE-EN'TERING, ppr.1. Entering anew.2. Entering in return; as salient and re-entering angles.
44756 re-enthrone RE-ENTHRO'NE, v.t. [re and enthrone.] To enthrone again; to replace on a throne.
44757 re-enthroned RE-ENTHRO'NED, pp. Raised again to a throne.
44758 re-enthroning RE-ENTHRO'NING, ppr. Replacing on a throne.
44759 re-entrance RE-EN'TRANCE, n. [re and entrance.] The act of entering again.
44760 re-establish RE-ESTAB'LISH, v.t. [re and establish.] To establish anew; to fix or confirm again; as, to ...
44761 re-established RE-ESTAB'LISHED, pp. Established or confirmed again.
44762 re-establisher RE-ESTAB'LISHER, n. One who establishes again.
44763 re-establishing RE-ESTAB'LISHING, ppr. Establishing anew; confirming again.
44764 re-establishment RE-ESTAB'LISHMENT, n. The act of establishing again; the state of being re-established; renewed ...
44765 re-estate RE-ESTA'TE, v.t. [re and estate.] To re-establish. [Not used.]
44766 re-examination RE-EXAMINA'TION, n. A renewed or repeated examination.
44767 re-examine RE-EXAM'INE, v.t. [re and examine.] To examine anew.
44768 re-examined RE-EXAM'INED, ppr. Examined again.
44769 re-examining RE-EXAM'INING, ppr. Examining anew.
44770 re-exchange RE-EXCHANGE, n. [re and exchange.] 1. A renewed exchange.2. In commerce, the exchange ...
44771 re-export RE-EXPORT, v.t. [re and export.] To export again; to export what has been imported. In the ...
44772 re-exportation RE-EXPORTA'TION, n. The act of exporting what has been imported.
44773 re-exported RE-EXPORTED, pp. Exported after being imported.
44774 re-exporting RE-EXPORTING, ppr. Exporting what has been imported.
44775 re-ferment RE-FERMENT', v.t. [re and ferment.] To ferment again.
44776 re-find RE-FIND, v.t. [re and find.] To find again; to experience anew.
44777 re-formation RE-FORMA'TION, n. The act of forming anew; a second forming in order; as the re-formation of a ...
44778 re-resolve RE-RESOLVE, v.t. re-rezolv'. To resolve a second time.
44710 re RE, a prefix or inseparable particle in the composition of words, denotes return, repetition, ...
44779 reabsorb REABSORB', v.t. [re and absorb.]1. To draw in or inbibe again what has been effused, extravasated ...
44780 reabsorbed REABSORB'ED, pp. Imbibed again.
44781 reabsorbing REABSORB'ING, ppr. Reimbibing.
44782 reabsorption REABSORP'TION, n. The act or process of inbibing what has been previously thrown off, effused or ...
44783 reaccess REACCESS', n. [re and access.] A second access or approach; a visit renewed.
44784 reach REACH, v.t. Raught, the ancient preterit, is obsolete. The verb is now regular; pp. reached. L. ...
44785 reached RE'ACHED, pp. Stretched out; extended; touched by extending the arm; attained to; obtained.
44786 reacher RE'ACHER, n. One that reaches or extends; one that delivers by extending the arm.
44787 reaching RE'ACHING, ppr. Stretching out; extending; touching by extension of the arm; attaining to; ...
44788 react REACT', v.t. [re and act.] To act or perform a second time; as, to react a play. The same scenes ...
44789 reacted REACT'ED, pp. Acted or performed a second time.
44790 reacting REACT'ING, ppr. Acting again; in physics, resisting the impulse of another body.
44791 reaction REAC'TION, n. 1. In physics, counteraction; the resistance made by a body to the action or ...
44792 read READ, n. [See the Verb.]1. Counsel. [Obs.]2. Saying; sentence. Obs.READ, v.t. The preterit ...
44793 readable RE'ADABLE, a. That may be read; fit to be read.
44794 readeption READEP'TION, n. [from L. re and adeptus, obtained.]A regaining; recovery of something lost. [Not ...
44795 reader RE'ADER, n.1. One that reads; any person who pronounces written words; particularly, one whose ...
44796 readership RE'ADERSHIP, n. [See Read.] the office of reading prayers in a church.
44797 readily READILY, adv. red'ily. [See Ready.] 1. Quickly; promptly; easily. I readily perceive the ...
44798 readiness READINESS, n. red'iness. [from ready.]1. Quickness; promptness; promptitude; facility; freedom ...
44799 reading RE'ADING, ppr.1. Pronouncing or perusing written or printed words or characters of a book or ...
44800 readjourn READJOURN', v.t. [re and adjourn.]1. To adjourn a second time.2. To cite or summon again. [Not ...
44801 readjust READJUST', v.t. [re and adjust.] To settle again; to put in order again what had been ...
44802 readjusted READJUST'ED, pp. Adjusted again; resettled.
44803 readjusting READJUST'ING, ppr. Adjusting again.
44804 readjustment READJUST'MENT, n. A second adjustment.
44805 readmission READMIS'SION, n. [re and admission.] The act of admitting again what had been excluded; as the ...
44806 readmit READMIT', v.t. [re and admit.] To admit again.Whose ear is ever open and his eye gracious to ...
44807 readmittance READMIT'TANCE, n. A second admittance; allowance to enter again.
44808 readopt READOPT', v.t. [re and adopt.] To adopt again.
44809 readorn READORN', v.t. To adorn anew; to decorate a second time.
44810 readvertency READVERT'ENCY, n. [re and advertency.] The act of reviewing.
44811 ready READY, a. red'y. [Eng. to rid; redo, ready; rida, to ride; bereda, to prepare. Gr. easy. The ...
44812 reaffirm REAFFIRM', v.t. [re and affirm.] To affirm a second time.
44813 reaffirmance REAFFIRM'ANCE, n. A second confirmation.
44814 reagent REA'GENT, n. [re and agent.] In chimistry, a substance employed to precipitate another in ...
44815 reaggravation REAGGRAVA'TION, n. [re and aggravation.]In the Romish ecclesiastical law, the last monitory, ...
44816 reak REAK, n. A rush. [Not in use.]
44817 real RE'AL, a. [Low L. realis. The L. res and Eng. thing coincide exactly with the Heb. a word, a ...
44818 realgar RE'ALGAR, n.A combination of sulphur and arsenic; red sulphuret of arsenic. Realgar differs from ...
44819 realist RE'ALIST, n. A scholastic philosopher, who maintains that things and not words, are the objects of ...
44820 reality REAL'ITY, n.1. Actual being or existence of any thing; truth; fact; in distinction from mere ...
44821 realization REALIZA'TION, n. [from realize.] 1. The act of realizing or making real.2. The act of ...
44822 realize RE'ALIZE, v.t.1. To bring into being or act; as, to realize a scheme or project.We realize what ...
44823 realized RE'ALIZED, pp. Brought into actual being; converted into real estate; impressed, received or ...
44824 realizing RE'ALIZING, ppr.1. Bringing into actual being; converting into real estate; impressing as a ...
44825 realledge REALLEDGE, v.t. reallej'. [re and alledge.] To alledge again.
44826 really RE'ALLY, adv.1. With actual existence.2. In truth; in fact; not in appearance only; as things ...
44827 realm REALM, n. relm. [L. rex, king, whence regalis, royal.]1. A royal jurisdiction or extent of ...
44828 realty RE'ALTY, n. [L. rex.]1. Lovalty. [Not in use.]2. Reality. [Not in use.]3. In law, immobility. ...
44829 ream REAM, n. [L. remus., ramus, a branch, for the shoots of trees or shrubs were the first bands used ...
44830 reanimate REAN'IMATE, v.t. [re and animate.]1. To revive; to resuscitate; to restore to life; as a person ...
44831 reanimated REAN'IMATED, pp. Restored to life or action.
44832 reanimating REAN'IMATING, ppr. Restoring life to; invigorating with new life and courage.
44833 reanimation REANIMA'TION, n. The act or operation of reviving from apparent death; the act or operation of ...
44834 reannex REANNEX', v.t. [re and annex.] To annex again; to reunite; to annex what has been separated.
44835 reannexation REANNEXA'TION, n. The act of annexing again.
44836 reannexed REANNEX'ED, pp. Annexed or united again.
44837 reannexing REANNEX'ING, ppr. Annexing again; reuniting.
44838 reap REAP, v.t. [L. rapio, carpo; Gr. a sickle, to reap; Eng. crop.]1. To cut grain with a sickle; as, ...
44839 reaped RE'APED, pp. Cut with a sickle; received as the fruit of labor or works.
44840 reaper RE'APER, n. One that cuts grain with a sickle.
44842 reaping-hook RE'APING-HOOK, n. An instrument used in reaping; a sickle.
44841 reaping RE'APING, ppr. Cutting grain with a sickle; receiving as the fruit of labor or the reward of ...
44843 reapparel REAPPAR'EL, v.t. [re and apparel.] To clothe again.
44844 reappareled REAPPAR'ELED, pp. Clothed again.
44845 reappareling REAPPAR'ELING, ppr. Clothing again.
44846 reappear REAPPE'AR, v.i. [re and appear.] To appear a second time.
44847 reappearance REAPPE'ARANCE, n. A second appearance.
44848 reappearing REAPPE'ARING, ppr. Appearing again.
44849 reapplication REAPPLICA'TION, n. [See Reapply. A second application.
44850 reapply REAPPLY', v.t. or i. [re and apply.] To apply again.
44851 reapplying REAPPLY'ING, ppr. Applying again.
44852 reappoint REAPPOINT', v.t. To appoint again.
44853 reappointment REAPPOINT'MENT, n. A second appointment.
44854 reapportion REAPPORTION, v.t. To apportion again.
44855 reapportioned REAPPORTIONED, pp. Apportioned again.
44856 reapportioning REAPPORTIONING, ppr. Apportioning. again.
44857 reapportionment REAPPORTIONMENT, n. A second apportionment.
44859 rear-admiral REAR-ADMIRAL. [See Admiral.]
44860 rear-guard RE'AR-GU'ARD, n. The body of an army that marches in the rear of the main body to protect it.
44861 rear-line REAR-LINE, n. The line in the rear of an army.
44862 rear-mouse RE'AR-MOUSE, n. The leather-winged bat.
44863 rear-rank REAR-RANK, n. The rank of a body of troops which is in the rear.
44858 rear REAR, n.1. In a general sense, that which is behind or backwards; appropriately, the part of an ...
44864 reared RE'ARED, pp. Raised; lifted; brought up; educated; elevated.
44865 rearing RE'ARING, ppr. Raising; educating; elevating.
44866 rearward RE'ARWARD, n. [from rear. See Rereward.]1. The last troop; the rear-guard.2. The end; the tail; ...
44867 reascend REASCEND', v.i. [re and ascend.] To rise, mount or climb again.REASCEND', v.t. To mount or ...
44868 reascended REASCEND'ED, pp. Ascended again.
44869 reascending REASCEND'ING, ppr. Ascending again.
44870 reascension REASCEN'SION, n. The act of reascending; a remounting.
44871 reascent REASCENT', n. A returning ascent; acclivity.
44872 reason REASON, n. re'zn. [L. ratio, which is from ratus, and which proves reor to be contracted from ...
44873 reasonable RE'ASONABLE, a.1. Having the faculty of reason; endued with reason; as a reasonable being. [In ...
44874 reasonableness RE'ASONABLENESS, n.1. The faculty of reason. [In this sense, little used.]2. Agreeableness to ...
44875 reasonably RE'ASONABLY, adv.1. In a manner or degree agreeable to reason; in consistency with reason. We may ...
44876 reasoner RE'ASONER, n. One who reasons or argues; as a fiar reasoner; a close reasoner; a logical reasoner.
44877 reasoning RE'ASONING, ppr. arguing; deducing inferences from premises; debating; discussing.RE'ASONING, n. ...
44878 reasonless RE'ASONLESS, a. 1. Destitute of reason; as a reasonless man or mind.2. Void of reason; not ...
44879 reassemblage REASSEM'BLAGE, n. assemblage a second time.
44880 reassemble REASSEM'BLE, v.t. [re and assemble.] to collect again.REASSEM'BLE, v.i. to assemble or convene ...
44881 reassembled REASSEM'BLED, pp. assembled again.
44882 reassembling REASSEM'BLING, ppr. assembling again.
44883 reassert REASSERT', v.t. [re and asset.] To assert again; to maintain after suspension or cessation.Let us ...
44884 reasserted REASSERT'ED, pp. Asserted or maintained anew.
44885 reasserting REASSERT'ING, ppr. Asserting again; vindicating anew.
44886 reassign REASSIGN, v.t. [re and assign.] To assign back; to transfer back what has been assigned.
44887 reassimilate REASSIM'ILATE, v.t. [re and assimilate.] To assimilate or cause to resemble anew; to change again ...
44888 reassimilated REASSIM'ILATED, pp. Assimilated anew; changed again to a like substance.
44889 reassimilating REASSIM'ILATING, ppr. Assimilating again.
44890 reassimilation REASSIMILA'TION, n. A second or renewed assimilation.
44891 reassume REASSU'ME, v.t. [re and assume.] To resume; to take again.
44892 reassumed REASSU'MED, pp. Resumed; assumed again.
44893 reassuming REASSU'MING, ppr. Assuming or taking again.
44894 reassumption REASSUMP'TION, n. A resuming; a second assumption.
44895 reassurance REASSU'RANCE, n. [See Sure and Assurance.]A second assurance against loss; or the assurance of ...
44896 reassure REASSURE, v.t. reashu're. [re and assure.]1. To restore courage to; to free from fear or ...
44897 reassured REASSU'RED, pp.1. Restored from fear; re-encouraged.2. Insured against loss by risk taken, as an ...
44898 reassurer REASSU'RER, n. One who insures the first underwriter.
44899 reassuring REASSU'RING, ppr. 1. Restoring from fear, terror or depression of courage.2. Insuring against ...
44900 reastiness RE'ASTINESS, n. Rancidness. [Not in use or local.]
44901 reasty RE'ASTY, a. Covered with a kind of rust and having a rancid taste; applied to dried meat. [Not in ...
44902 reate RE'ATE, n. A kind of long small grass that grows in water and complicates itself. [Not in use or ...
44903 reattach REATTACH', v.t. [re and attach.] To attach a second time.
44904 reattachment REATTACH'MENT, n. A second attachment.
44905 reattempt REATTEMPT', v.t. [re and attempt.] To attempt again.
44906 reave REAVE, v.t. To take away by stealth or violence; to bereave. Obs. [See Bereave.]
44907 rebaptism REBAP'TISM, n. A second baptism.
44908 rebaptization REBAPTIZA'TION, n. [from rebaptize.] A second baptism.
44909 rebaptize REBAPTI'ZE, v.t. [re and baptize.] To baptize a second time.
44910 rebaptized REBAPTI'ZED, pp. Baptized again.
44911 rebaptizing REBAPTI'ZING, ppr. Baptizing a second time.
44912 rebate REBA'TE, v.t.To blunt; to beat to obtuseness; to deprive of keenness.He doth rebate and blunt his ...
44913 rebatement REBA'TEMENT, n.1. Diminution.2. In commerce, abatement in price; deduction.3. In heraldry, a ...
44914 rebato REBA'TO, n. A sort of ruff. [See Rabato.]
44915 rebeck RE'BECK, n. A three stringed fiddle. [Not much used.]
44916 rebel REB'EL, n. [L. rebellis, making war again.]1. One who revolts from the government to which he ...
44917 rebelled REBEL'LED, pp. or a. Rebellious; guilty of rebellion.
44918 rebeller REBEL'LER, n. One that rebels.
44919 rebelling REBEL'LING, ppr. Renouncing the authority of the government to which one owes allegiance; rising ...
44920 rebellion REBEL'LION, n. [L. rebellio. among the Romans, rebellion was originally a revolt or open ...
44921 rebellious REBEL'LIOUS, a. Engaged in rebellion; renouncing the authority and dominion of the government to ...
44922 rebelliously REBEL'LIOUSLY, adv. With design to throw off the authority of legitimate government; in opposition ...
44923 rebelliousness REBEL'LIOUSNESS, n. The quality or state of being rebellious.
44924 rebellow REBEL'LOW, v.i. [re and bellow.] To bellow in return; to echo back a loud roaring noise.The cave ...
44925 rebellowing REBEL'LOWING, ppr. Bellowing in return or in echo.
44926 rebild REBILD', v.t. [re and build.] To build again; to renew a structure; to build or construct what ...
44927 rebilding REBILD'ING, ppr. Building again.
44928 rebilt REBILT', pp. Built again; reconstructed.
44929 reblossom REBLOS'SOM, v.i. [re and blossom.] To blossom again.
44930 reboation REBOA'TION, n. [L. rebo; re and boo.] The return of a loud bellowing sound. [Not used.]
44931 reboil REBOIL', v.i. [L. re and bullio.] To take fire; to be hot.
44932 rebound REBOUND', v.i.To spring back; to start back; to be reverberated by an elastic power resisting ...
44933 rebounding REBOUND'ING, ppr. Springing or flying back; reverberating.
44934 rebrace REBRA'CE, v.t. [re and brace.] To brace again.
44935 rebreathe REBRE'ATHE, v.i. [re and breathe.] To breathe again.
44936 rebuff REBUFF', n. 1. Repercussion, or beating back; a quick and sudden resistance.The strong rebuff of ...
44937 rebuild REBUILD',
44938 rebuilding REBUILD'ING,
44939 rebuilt REBUILT',
44940 rebukable REBU'KABLE, a. [from rebuke.] Worthy of reprehension.
44941 rebuke REBU'KE, v.t. [See Pack and Impeach.]1. To chide; to reprove; to reprehend for a fault; to check ...
44942 rebuked REBU'KED, pp. Reproved; reprehended; checked; restrained; punished for faults.
44943 rebukeful REBU'KEFUL, a. Containing or abounding with rebukes.
44944 rebukefully REBU'KEFULLY, adv. With reproof or reprehension.
44945 rebuker REBU'KER, n. One that rebukes; a chider; one that chastises or restrains.
44946 rebuking REBU'KING, ppr. Chiding; reproving; checking; punishing.
44947 rebullition REBULLI'TION, n. [See ebullition and Boil.] Act of boiling or effervescing. [Little used.]
44948 rebury REBURY, v.t. reber'ry. [re and bury.] To inter again.
44949 rebus RE'BUS, n. [L. from res, which is of the class Rd, Rs, and of the same family as riddle. See ...
44950 rebut REBUT', v.t. [See Butt and Pout.]To repel; to oppose by argument, plea or countervailing proof. ...
44951 rebutted REBUT'TED, pp. Repelled; answered.
44952 rebutter REBUT'TER, n. In law pleadings, the answer of a defendant to a plaintiff's sur-rejoinder.If I ...
44953 rebutting REBUT'TING, ppr. Repelling; opposing by argument, countervailing allegation or evidence.
44954 recall RECALL', v.t. [re and call.]1. To call back; to take back; as, to recall words or declarations.2. ...
44955 recallable RECALL'ABLE, a. That may be recalled.Delegates recallable at pleasure.
44956 recalled RECALL'ED, pp. Called back; revoked.
44957 recalling RECALL'ING, ppr. Calling back; revoking.
44958 recant RECANT', v.t. [L. recanto; re and canto. See Cant.]To retract; to recall; to contradict a former ...
44959 recantation RECANTA'TION, n. The act of recalling; retraction; a declaration that contradicts a former one.
44960 recanted RECANT'ED, pp. Recalled; retracted.
44961 recanter RECANT'ER, n. One that recants.
44962 recanting RECANT'ING, ppr. Recalling; retracting.
44963 recapacitate RECAPAC'ITATE, v.t. [re and capacitate.] To qualify again; to confer capacity on again.
44964 recapacitated RECAPAC'ITATED, pp. Capacitated again.
44965 recapacitating RECAPAC'ITATING, ppr. Conferring capacity again.
44966 recapitulate RECAPIT'ULATE, v.t. [L. capitulum. See Capitulate.]To repeat the principal things mentioned in a ...
44967 recapitulated RECAPIT'ULATED, pp. Repeated in a summary.
44968 recapitulating RECAPIT'ULATING, ppr. Repeating the principal things in a discourse or argument.
44969 recapitulation RECAPITULA'TION, n.1. The act of recapitulating.2. A summary or concise statement or enumeration ...
44970 recapitulatory RECAPIT'ULATORY, a. Repeating again; containing recapitulation.
44971 recaption RECAP'TION, n. [L. re and captio; capio, to take.]The act of retaking; reprisal; the retaking of ...
44972 recaptor RECAP'TOR, n. [re and captor.] One who retakes; one that takes a prize which had been previously ...
44973 recapture RECAP'TURE, n. [re and capture.]1. The act of retaking; particularly, the retaking of a prize or ...
44974 recaptured RECAP'TURED, pp. Retaken.
44975 recapturing RECAP'TURING, ppr. Retaking, as a prize from the captor.
44976 recarnify REC'ARNIFY, v.t. [re and carnify, from L. caro, flesh.]To convert again into flesh. [Not much ...
44977 recarried RECAR'RIED, pp. Carried back or again.
44978 recarry RECAR'RY, v.t. [re and carry.] To carry back.
44979 recarrying RECAR'RYING, ppr. Carrying back.
44980 recast REC'AST, v.t. [re and cast.]1. To cast again; as, to recast cannon.2. To throw again.3. To mold ...
44981 recasting REC'ASTING, ppr. Casting again; molding anew.
44982 recede RECE'DE, v.i. [L. recedo; re and cedo.]1. To move back; to retreat; to withdraw.Like the hollow ...
44983 receded RECE'DED, pp. Ceded back; regranted.
44984 receding RECE'DING, ppr. 1. Withdrawing; retreating; moving back.2. Ceding back; regranting.
44985 receipt RECE'IPT,
44986 receit RECE'IT, n. rece't. [L. receptus. This word wought to follow the analogy of conceit, deceit, ...
44987 receivable RECE'IVABLE, a. That may be received.
44988 receivableness RECE'IVABLENESS, n. Capability of being received.
44989 receive RECE'IVE, v.t. [L. recipio; re and capio, to take.]1. To take, as a thing offered or sent; to ...
44990 received RECE'IVED, pp. Taken; accepted; admitted; embraced; entertained; believed.
44991 receivedness RECE'IVEDNESS, n. General allowance or belief; as the receivedness of an opinion.
44992 receiver RECE'IVER, n.1. One who takes or receives in any manner.2. An officer appointed to receive public ...
44993 receiving RECE'IVING, ppr. Taking; accepting; admitting; embracing; believing; entertaining.
44994 recelebrate RECEL'EBRATE, v.t. [re and celebrate.] To celebrate again.
44995 recelebrated RECEL'EBRATED, pp. Celebrated anew.
44996 recelebrating RECEL'EBRATING, ppr. Celebrating anew.
44997 recelebration RECELEBRA'TION, n. A renewed celebration.
44998 recency RE'CENCY, n. [L. recens.] 1. Newness; new state; late origin; as the recency of a wound or ...
44999 recense RECENSE, v.t. recens'. [L. recenso; re and censeo.]To review; to revise.
45000 recension RECEN'SION, n. [L. recensio.] Review; examination; enumeration.
45001 recent RE'CENT, a. [L. recens.]1. New; being of late origin or existence.The ancients believed some ...
45002 recently RE'CENTLY, adv. Newly; lately; freshly; not long since; as advices recently received; a torn ...
45003 recentness RE'CENTNESS, n. Newness; freshness; lateness of origin or occurrence; as the recentness of ...
45004 receptacle RECEP'TACLE, n. [L. receptaculum, from receptus, recipio.]1. A place or vessel into which ...
45005 receptacular RECEPTAC'ULAR, a. In botany, pertaining to the receptacle or growing on it, as the nectary.
45006 receptary REC'EPTARY, n. Thing received. [Not in use.]
45007 receptibility RECEPTIBIL'ITY, n. The possibility of receiving.
45008 reception RECEP'TION, n. [L. receptio.]1. The act of receiving; in a general sense; as the reception of ...
45009 receptive RECEP'TIVE, a. Having the quality of receiving or admitting what is communicated.Imaginary space ...
45010 receptivity RECEPTIV'ITY, n. The state or quality of being receptive.
45011 receptory RECEP'TORY, a. Generally or popularly admitted or received. [Not in use.]
45012 recess RECESS', n. [L. recessus, from recedo. See Recede.]1. A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; ...
45013 recession RECES'SION, n. [L. recessio.]1. The act of withdrawing, retiring or retreating.2. The act of ...
45014 rechange RECHANGE, v.t. [re and change.] To change again.
45015 rechanged RECHANGED, pp. Changed again.
45016 rechanging RECHANGING, ppr. Changing again.
45017 recharge RECH'ARGE, v.t. [re and charge.]1. To charge or accuse in return.2. To attack again; to attack ...
45018 recharged RECH'ARGED, pp. Accused in return; attacked anew.
45019 recharging RECH'ARGING, ppr. Accusing in return; attacking anew.
45020 recheat RECHE'AT, n. Among hunters, a lesson which the huntsman winds on the horn when the hounds have ...
45021 rechoose RECHOOSE, v.t. rechooz'. To choose a second time.
45022 rechosen RECHOSEN, pp. or a. recho'zn. Re-elected; chosen again.
45023 recidivation RECIDIVA'TION, n. [L. recidivus, from recido, to fall back; re and cado, to fall.]A falling back; ...
45024 recidivous RECID'IVOUS, a. [L. recidivus.] Subject to backslide. [Little used.]
45025 recipe RECIPE, n. res'ipy. [L. imperative of recipio, to take.]A medical prescription; a direction of ...
45026 recipient RECIP'IENT, n. [L. recipiens, recipio.] 1. A receiver; the person or thing that receives; he or ...
45027 reciprocal RECIP'ROCAL, a. [L. reciprocus.]1. Acting in vicissitude or return; alternate.Corruption is ...
45028 reciprocally RECIP'ROCALLY, adv. Mutually; interchangeably; in such a manner that each affects the other and is ...
45029 reciprocalness RECIP'ROCALNESS, n. Mutual return; alternateness.
45030 reciprocate RECIP'ROCATE, v.i. [L. reciproco.] To act interchangeably; to alternate.One brawny smith the ...
45031 reciprocated RECIP'ROCATED, pp. Mutually given and returned; interchanged.
45032 reciprocating RECIP'ROCATING, ppr. Interchanging; each giving or doing to the other the same thing.
45033 reciprocation RECIPROCA'TION, n. [L. reciprocatio.]1. Interchange of acts; a mutual giving and returning; as ...
45034 reciprocity RECIPROC'ITY, n. Reciprocal obligation or right; equal mutual rights or benefits to be yielded or ...
45035 recision RECI'SION, n. s as z. [L. recisio, from recido, to cut off; re and caedo.]The act of cutting off.
45036 recital RECI'TAL, n. [from recite.]1. Rehearsal; the repetition of the words of another or of a writing; ...
45037 recitation RECITA'TION, n. [L. recitatio.]1. Rehearsal; repetition of words.2. In colleges and schools, the ...
45038 recitative RECIT'ATIVE, a. [See recite.]Reciting; rehearsing; pertaining to musical ...
45039 recitatively RECIT'ATIVELY, adv. In the manner of recitative.
45040 recite RECI'TE, v.t. [L. recito; re and cito, to call or name.]1. To rehearse; to repeat the words of ...
45041 recited RECI'TED, pp. Rehearsed; told; repeated; narrated.
45042 reciter RECI'TER, n. One that recites or rehearses; a narrator.
45043 reciting RECI'TING, ppr. Rehearsing; telling; repeating narrating.
45044 reck RECK, v.i. [L. rego. See Rack and Reckon.]To care; to mind; to rate at much; as we say, to reckon ...
45045 reckless RECK'LESS, a. Careless; heedless; mindless.I made the king reckless, as them diligent.
45046 recklessness RECK'LESSNESS, n. Heedlessness; carelessness; negligence.[These words, formerly disused, have been ...
45047 reckon RECKON, v.t. rek'n. [L. rego, rectus, whence regnum, regno, Eng. to reign and right.]1. To count; ...
45048 reckoned RECKONED, pp. rek'nd. Counted; numbered; esteemed; reputed; computed; set or assigned to in ...
45049 reckoner RECKONER, n. rek'ner. One who reckons or computes.Reckoners without their host must reckon twice.
45051 reckoning-book RECK'ONING-BOOK, n. a book in which money received and expended is entered.
45050 reckoning RECKONING, ppr. rek'ning. Counting; computing; esteeming; reputing; stating an account mutually.
45052 reclaim RECLA'IM, v.t. [L. reclama. re and clamo, to call. See Claim.]1. To claim back; to demand to ...
45053 reclaimable RECLA'IMABLE, a. That may be reclaimed, reformed or tamed.
45054 reclaimant RECLA'IMANT, n. One that opposes, contradicts or remonstrates against.
45055 reclaimed RECLA'IMED, pp. Recalled from a vicious life; reformed; tamed; domesticated; recovered.
45056 reclaiming RECLA'IMING, ppr. Recalling to a regular course of life; reforming; recovering; taking; demanding.
45057 reclamation RECLAMA'TION, n.1. Recovery.2. Demand; challenge of something to be restored; claim made.
45058 reclinate REC'LINATE, a. [L. reclinatus. See recline.]In botany, reclined, as a leaf; bend downwards, so ...
45059 reclination RECLINA'TION, n. That act of leaning or reclining.
45060 recline RECLI'NE, v.t. [L. reclino; re and clino, to lean.]To lean back; to lean to one side or sideways; ...
45061 reclined RECLI'NED, pp. Inclined back or sideways.
45062 reclining RECLI'NING, ppr. Leaning back or sideways; resting; lying.
45063 reclose RECLO'SE, v.t. s as z. [re and close.] To close or shut again.
45064 reclosed RECLO'SED, pp. Closed again.
45065 reclosing RECLO'SING, ppr. Closing again.
45066 reclude RECLU'DE, v.t. [L. recludo; re and claudo, cludo.] To open. [Little used.]
45067 recluse RECLU'SE, a.Shut up; sequestered; retired from the world or from public notice; solitary; as a ...
45068 reclusely RECLU'SELY, adv. In retirement or seclusion from society.
45069 recluseness RECLU'SENESS, n. Retirement; seclusion from society.
45070 reclusion RECLU'SION, n. s as z. A state of retirement from the world; seclusion.
45071 reclusive RECLU'SIVE, a. Affording retirement from society.
45072 recoagulation RECOAGULA'TION, n. [re and coagulation.] A second coagulation.
45073 recoct RECOCT', a. [L. recoctus, recoquo.] New vamped. [Not used.]
45074 recognition RECOGNITION, n. reconish'on or recognish'on. [L. recognitio.]1. Acknowledgment; formal avowal; ...
45075 recognitor RECOGNITOR, n. recon'itor. One of a jury upon assize.
45076 recognizable RECOGNIZABLE, a. recon'izable. [from recognize.] That may be recognized or acknowledged.
45077 recognizance RECOGNIZANCE, n. recon'izance.1. Acknowledgment of a person or thing; avowal; profession; as the ...
45078 recognize RECOGNIZE, v.t. rec'onize. [L. recognosco; re and cognosco, to know. The g in these words has ...
45079 recognized REC'OGNIZED, pp. Acknowledged; recollected as known; bound by recognizance.
45080 recognizee RECOGNIZEE, n. reconizee'. The person to whom a recognizance is made.
45081 recognizing REC'OGNIZING, ppr. Acknowledging; recollecting as known; entering a recognizance.
45082 recognizor RECOGNIZOR, n. reconizor'. One who enters into a recognizance.
45083 recoil RECOIL', v.i.1. To move or start back; to roll back; as, a cannon recoils when fired; waves recoil ...
45084 recoiling RECOIL'ING, ppr. Starting or falling back; retiring; shrinking.RECOIL'ING, n. The act of starting ...
45085 recoilingly RECOIL'INGLY, adv. With starting back or retrocession.
45086 recoin RECOIN', v.t. [re and coin.] To coin again; as, to recoin gold or silver.
45087 recoinage RECOIN'AGE, n. 1. The act of coining anew.2. That which is coined anew.
45088 recoined RECOIN'ED, pp. Coined again.
45089 recoining RECOIN'ING, ppr. Coining anew.
45090 recollect RECOLLECT', v.t. [re and collect; L. recolligo, recollectus.]1. To collect again; applied to ideas ...
45091 recollected RECOLLECT'ED, pp. Recalled to the memory.
45092 recollecting RECOLLECT'ING, ppr. Recovering to the memory.
45093 recollection RECOLLEC'TION, n. 1. The act of recalling to the memory, as ideas that have escaped; or the ...
45094 recollective RECOLLECT'IVE, a. Having the power of recollecting.
45095 recollet REC'OLLET, n. A monk of a reformed order of Franciscans.
45096 recombination RECOMBINA'TION, n. Combination a second time.
45097 recombine RECOMBI'NE, v.t. [re and combine.] To combine again.If we recombine these two elastic fluids.
45098 recombined RECOMBI'NED, pp. Combined anew.
45099 recombining RECOMBI'NING, ppr. Combining again.
45100 recomfort RECOMFORT, v.t. [re and comfort.]1. To comfort again; to console anew.2. To give new strength.
45101 recomforted RECOMFORTED, pp. Comforted again.
45102 recomforting RECOMFORTING, ppr. Comforting again.
45103 recomfortless RECOMFORTLESS, a. Without comfort. [Not used.]
45104 recommence RECOMMENCE, v.t. recommens'. [re and commence.] To commence again; to begin anew.
45105 recommenced RECOMMEN'CED, pp. Commenced anew.
45106 recommencing RECOMMEN'CING, ppr. Beginning again.
45107 recommend RECOMMEND', v.t. [re and commend.]1. To praise to another; to offer or commend to another's ...
45108 recommendable RECOMMEND'ABLE, a. That may be recommended; worthy of recommendation or praise.
45109 recommendation RECOMMENDA'TION, n. 1. The act of recommending or of commending; the act of representing in a ...
45110 recommendatory RECOMMEND'ATORY, a. That commends to another; that recommends.
45111 recommended RECOMMEND'ED, pp. Praised; commended to another.
45112 recommender RECOMMEND'ER, n. One who commends.
45113 recommending RECOMMEND'ING, ppr. Praising to another; commending.
45114 recommission RECOMMIS'SION, v.t. [re and commission.] To commission again.Officers whose time of service had ...
45115 recommissioned RECOMMIS'SIONED, pp. Commissioned again.
45116 recommissioning RECOMMIS'SIONING, ppr. Commissioning again.
45117 recommit RECOMMIT', v.t. [re and commit.]1. To commit again; as, to recommit persons to prison.2. To ...
45118 recommitment RECOMMIT'MENT, n. A second or renewed commitment; a renewed reference to a committee.
45119 recommitted RECOMMIT'TED, pp. Committed anew; referred again.
45120 recommitting RECOMMIT'TING, ppr. Committing again; referring again to a committee.
45121 recommunicate RECOMMU'NICATE, v.i. [re and communicate.] To communicate again.
45122 recompact RECOMPACT', v.t. [re and compact.] To join anew.Repair and recompact my scatter'd body.
45123 recompensation RECOMPENSA'TION, n. Recompense. [Not used.]
45124 recompense REC'OMPENSE, v.t.1. To compensate; to make return of an equivalent for any thing given, done or ...
45125 recompensed REC'OMPENSED, pp. Rewarded; requited.
45126 recompensing REC'OMPENSING, ppr. Rewarding; compensating; requiting.
45127 recompilement RECOMPI'LEMENT, n. [re and compilement.] New compilation or digest; as a recompilement of laws.
45128 recompose RECOMPO'SE, v.t. s as z. [re and compose.]1. To quiet anew; to compose or tranquilize that which ...
45129 recomposed RECOMPO'SED, pp. Quieted again after agitation; formed anew; composed a second time.
45130 recomposing RECOMPO'SING, ppr. Rendering tranquil after agitation; forming or adjusting anew.
45131 recomposition RECOMPOSI'TION, n. Composition renewed.
45132 reconcilable RECONCI'LABLE, a. 1. Capable of being reconciled; capable of renewed friendship. The parties are ...
45133 reconcilableness RECONCI'LABLENESS, n.1. The quality of being reconcilable; consistency; as the reconcilableness of ...
45134 reconcile RECONCI'LE, v.t. [L. reconcilio; re and concilio; con and calo, to call, Gr. The literal sense ...
45135 reconciled RECONCI'LED, pp. Brought into friendship from a state of disagreement or enmity; made consistent; ...
45136 reconcilement RECONCI'LEMENT, n.1. Reconciliation; renewal of friendship. Animosities sometimes make ...
45137 reconciler RECONCI'LER, n.1. One who reconciles; one who brings parties at variance into renewed ...
45138 reconciliation RECONCILIA'TION, n. [L. reconciliatio.]1. The act of reconciling parties at variance; renewal of ...
45139 reconciliatory RECONCIL'IATORY, a. Able or tending to reconcile.
45140 reconciling RECONCI'LING, ppr. Bringing into favor and friendship after variance; bringing to content or ...
45141 recondensation RECONDENSA'TION, n. The act of recondensing.
45142 recondense RECONDENSE, v.t. recondens'. [re and condense.] To condense again.
45143 recondensed RECONDENS'ED, pp. Condensed anew.
45144 recondensing RECONDENS'ING, ppr. Condensing again.
45145 recondite REC'ONDITE, a. [L. reconditus, recondo; re and condo to conceal.]1. Secret; hidden from the view ...
45146 reconditory RECOND'ITORY, n. [supra.] A repository; a store-house or magazine. [Little used.]
45147 reconduct RECONDUCT', v.t [re and conduct.] To conduct back or again.
45148 reconducted RECONDUCT'ED, pp. Conducted back or again.
45149 reconducting RECONDUCT'ING, ppr. Conducting back or again.
45150 reconfirm RECONFIRM', v.t. [re and confirm.] To confirm anew.
45151 reconjoin RECONJOIN', v.t. [re and conjoin.] To join or conjoin anew.
45152 reconjoined RECONJOIN'ED, pp. Joined again.
45153 reconjoining RECONJOIN'ING, ppr. Joining anew.
45154 reconnoiter RECONNOIT'ER, v.t.To view; to survey; to examine by the eye; particularly in military affairs, to ...
45155 reconnoitered RECONNOIT'ERED, pp. Viewed; examined by personal observation.
45156 reconnoitering RECONNOIT'ERING, ppr. Viewing; examining by personal observation.
45157 reconquer RECONQUER, v.t. recon'ker. [re and conquer.]1. To conquer again; to recover by conquest.2. To ...
45158 reconquered RECON'QUERED, pp. Conquered again; regained.
45159 reconquering RECON'QUERING, ppr. Conquering again; recovering.
45160 reconsecrate RECON'SECRATE, v.t. [re and consecrate.] To consecrate anew.
45161 reconsecrated RECONSECRATED, pp. Consecrated again.
45162 reconsecrating RECON'SECRATING, ppr. Consecrating again.
45163 reconsecration RECONSECRA'TION, n. A renewed consecration.
45164 reconsider RECONSID'ER, v.t. [re and consider.]1. To consider again; to turn in the mind again; to review.2. ...
45165 reconsideration RECONSIDERA'TION, n. 1. A renewed consideration or review in the mind.2. A second consideration; ...
45166 reconsidered RECONSID'ERED, pp. Considered again; rescinded.
45167 reconsidering RECONSID'ERING, ppr. Considering again; rescinding.
45168 reconsolate RECON'SOLATE, v.t. To console or comfort again. [Not in use.]
45169 reconvene RECONVE'NE, v.t. [re and convene.] To convene or call together again.RECONVE'NE, v.i. To ...
45170 reconvened RECONVE'NED, pp. Assembled anew.
45171 reconvening RECONVE'NING, ppr. Assembling anew.
45172 reconversion RECONVER'SION, n. [re and conversion.] A second conversion.
45173 reconvert RECONVERT', v.t. [re and convert.] To convert again.
45174 reconverted RECONVERT'ED, pp. Converted again.
45175 reconverting RECONVERT'ING, ppr. Converting again.
45176 reconvey RECONVEY, v.t. [re and convey.]1. To convey back or to its former place; as, to reconvey goods.2. ...
45177 reconveyed RECONVEYED, pp. Conveyed back; transferred to a former owner.
45178 reconveying RECONVEYING, ppr. Conveying back; transferring to a former owner.
45179 record RECORD', v.t. [L. recorder, to call to mind, to remember, from re and cor, cordis, the heart or ...
45180 recordation RECORDA'TION, n. [L. recordatio.] Remembrance. [Not in use.]
45181 recorded RECORD'ED, pp. Registered; officially entered in a book or on parchment; imprinted on the memory.
45182 recorder RECORD'ER, n.1. A person whose official duty is to register writings or transactions; one who ...
45183 recording RECORD'ING, ppr. Registering; enrolling; imprinting on the memory.
45184 recouch RECOUCH', v.i. [re and couch.] To retire again to a lodge, as lions.
45185 recount RECOUNT', v.t. [re and count.]To relate in detail; to recite; to tell or narrate the particulars; ...
45186 recounted RECOUNT'ED, pp. Related or told in detail; recited.
45187 recounting RECOUNT'ING, ppr. Relating in a series; narrating.
45188 recountment RECOUNT'MENT, n. Relation in detail; recital. [Little used.]
45189 recoured RECOURED, for recovered or recured. [Not used.]
45190 recourse RECOURSE, n. [L. recursus; re and cursus, curro, to run.] Literally, a running back; a return.1. ...
45191 recourseful RECOURSEFUL, a. Moving alternately. [Not in use.]
45192 recover RECOVER, v.t. [L. recupero; re and capio, to take.]1. To regain; to get or obtain that which was ...
45193 recoverable RECOVERABLE, a. 1. That may be regained or recovered. Goods lost or sunk in the ocean are not ...
45194 recovered RECOVERED, pp. Regained; restored obtained by judicial decision.
45195 recoveree RECOVEREE', n. In law, the tenant or person against whom a judgment is obtained in common ...
45196 recovering RECOVERING, ppr. Regaining; obtaining in return or by judgment in law; regaining health.
45197 recoveror RECOVEROR, n. In law, the demandant or person who obtains a judgment in his favor in common ...
45198 recovery RECOVERY, n.1. The act of regaining, retaking or obtaining possession of anything lost. The ...
45199 recreant REC'REANT, a. [See Craven.]1. Crying for mercy, as a combatant in the trial by battle; yielding; ...
45200 recreate REC'REATE, v.t. [L. recero; re and creo, to create.]1. To refresh after toil; to reanimate, as ...
45201 recreated REC'REATED, pp. Refreshed; diverted; amused; gratified.
45202 recreating REC'REATING, ppr. Refreshing after toil; reanimating the spirits or strength; diverting; amusing.
45203 recreation RECREA'TION, n.1. Refreshment of the strength and spirits after toil; amusement; diversion.2. ...
45204 recreative REC'REATIVE, a. Refreshing; giving new vigor or animation; giving relief after labor or pain; ...
45205 recreatively REC'REATIVELY, adv. With recreation or diversion.
45206 recreativeness REC'REATIVENESS, n. The quality of being refreshing or diverting.
45207 recrement REC'REMENT, n. [L. recrementum; probably re and cerno, to secrete.]Superfluous matter separated ...
45208 recremental RECREMENT'AL,
45209 recrementitial RECREMENTI'TIAL,
45210 recrementitious RECREMENTI'TIOUS, a. Drossy; consisting of superfluous matter separated from that which is ...
45211 recriminate RECRIM'INATE, v.i. [L. re and criminor, to accuse.]1. To return one accusation with another.It is ...
45212 recriminating RECRIM'INATING, ppr. Returning one accusation with another.
45213 recrimination RECRIMINA'TION, n.1. The return of one accusation with another.2. In law, an accusation brought ...
45214 recriminator RECRIM'INATOR, n. He that accuses the accuser of a like crime.
45215 recriminatory RECRIM'INATORY, a. Retorting accusation.
45216 recross RECROSS', v.t. To cross a second time.
45217 recrossed RECROSS'ED, pp. Crossed a second time.
45218 recrossing RECROSS'ING, ppr. Crossing a second time.
45219 recrudescence RECRUDES'CENCE,
45220 recrudescency RECRUDES'CENCY, n. [from L. recrudescens; re and crudesco, to grow raw; crudus, raw.]The state of ...
45221 recrudescent RECRUDES'CENT, a. Growing raw, sore or painful again.
45222 recruit RECRUIT, v.t. [L. cresco.]1. To repair by fresh supplies any thing wasted. We say, food recruits ...
45223 recruited RECRUITED, pp. Furnished with new supplies of what is wasted.
45224 recruiting RECRUITING, ppr. Furnishing with fresh supplies; raising new soldiers for an army.RECRUITING, n. ...
45225 recruitment RECRUITMENT, n. The act or business of raising new supplies of men for an army.
45226 recrystalize RECRYS'TALIZE, v.i. To crystalize a second time.
45227 rectangle RECT'ANGLE, n. [L. rectangulus; rectus, right, and angulus, angle.]1. A right angled ...
45228 rectangled RECT'ANGLED, a. Having right angles, or angles of ninety degrees.
45229 rectangular RECTAN'GULAR, a. Right angled; having angles of ninety degrees.
45230 rectangularly RECTAN'GULARLY, adv. with or at right angles.
45231 rectifiable RECTIFIABLE, a. [from rectify.] that may be rectified; capable of being corrected or set right; ...
45232 rectification RECTIFICA'TION, n.1. The act or operation of correcting, amending or setting right that which is ...
45233 rectified REC'TIFIED, pp. Corrected; set or made right; refined by repeated distiliation or sublimation.
45234 rectifier REC'TIFIER, n.1. One that corrects or amends.2. One who refines a substance by repeated ...
45235 rectify REC'TIFY, v.t. [L. rectus, right, and facio, to make.]1. To make right; to correct that which is ...
45236 rectifying REC'TIFYING, ppr. Correcting; amending; refining by repeated distiliation or sublimation.
45237 rectilineal RECTILIN'EAL,
45238 rectilinear RECTILIN'EAR, a. [L. rectus, right, and linea, line.]Right lined; consisting of a right line or of ...
45239 rectilineous RECTILIN'EOUS, a. Rectilinear. Obs.
45240 rectitude REC'TITUDE, n. [L. rectus, right, straight.]In morality, rightness of principle or practice; ...
45241 rector REC'TOR, n. [L. rector, from rego, rectum, to rule.]1. A ruler or governor.God is the supreme ...
45242 rectoral REC'TORAL,
45243 rectorial RECTO'RIAL, a. Pertaining to a rector.
45244 rectorship REC'TORSHIP, n. The office or rank of a rector.
45245 rectory REC'TORY, n.1. A parish church, parsonage or spiritual living, with all its rights, tithes and ...
45246 rectress REC'TRESS,
45247 rectrix REC'TRIX, n. [L. rectrix.] A governess.
45248 rectum REC'TUM, n. [L.] In anatomy, the third and last of the large intestines.
45249 recubation RECUBA'TION, n. [L. recubo; re and cubo, to lie down.]The act of lying or leaning. [Little used.]
45250 recule RECU'LE, v.i. To recoil. [Not used. See Recoil.]
45251 recumb RECUMB', v.i. [L. recumbo; re and cumbo, to lie down.] To lean; to recline; to repose.
45252 recumbence RECUMB'ENCE, n. [from L. recumbens.] The act of reposing or resting in confidence.
45253 recumbency RECUMB'ENCY, n. 1. The posture of leaning, reclining or lying.2. Rest; repose; idle state.
45254 recumbent RECUMB'ENT, a. [L. recumbens.]1. Leaning; reclining; as the recumbent posture of the Romans at ...
45255 recuperation RECUPERA'TION, n. [L. recuperatio.] Recovery, as of any thing lost.
45256 recuperative RECU'PERATIVE,
45257 recuperatory RECU'PERATORY, a. Tending to recovery; pertaining to recovery.
45258 recur RECUR', v.i. [L. recurro; re and curro, to run.]1. To return to the thought or mind.When any word ...
45259 recure RECU'RE, v.t. [re and cure.] To cure; to recover. [Not in use.]RECU'RE, n. Cure; recovery. ...
45260 recureless RECU'RELESS, a. Incapable of cure or remedy. [Not in use.]
45261 recurrence RECUR'RENCE,
45262 recurrency RECUR'RENCY, n. [See Recur.] 1. Return; as the recurrence of error.2. Resort; the having ...
45263 recurrent RECUR'RENT, a. [L. recurrens.1. Returning from time to time; as recurrent pains of a disease.2. ...
45264 recursion RECUR'SION, n. [L. recursus, recurro; re and curro, to run.] Return. [Little used.]
45265 recurvate RECURV'ATE, v.t. [L. recurro; re and curvo, to bend.] To bend back.RECURV'ATE, a. 1. In botany, ...
45266 recurvation RECURVA'TION,
45267 recurve RECURVE, v.t. recurv'. [L. recurvo, supra.] To bend back.
45268 recurved RECURV'ED, pp. Bent back or downwards; as a recurved leaf.
45269 recurviroster RECURV'IROSTER, n. [L. recurvus, bent back, and rostrum, a beak.]A fowl whose beak or bill bends ...
45270 recurvity RECURV'ITY, n. A bending or flexure backwards.
45271 recurvous RECURV'OUS, a. [L. recurvus.] Bent backwards.
45272 recusancy RECU'SANCY, n. Non-conformity. [See Recusant.]
45273 recusant RECU'SANT, a. s as z. [L. recusans, recuso, to refuse; re and the root of causa, signifying to ...
45274 recusation RECUSA'TION, n. [L. recusatio.]1. Refusal.2. In law, the act of refusing a judge, or challenging ...
45275 recuse RECU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. recuso.] To refuse or reject, as a judge; to challenge that the judge ...
45277 red-berried RED'-BERRIED, a. Having or bearing red berries; as red-berried shrub cassia.
45278 red-bird RED-BIRD, n. The popular name of several birds in the United States, as the Tanagra aestiva or ...
45279 red-chalk RED-CHALK, n. A kind of clay ironstone; reddle.
45280 red-hot RED'-HOT, n. Red with heat; heated to redness; as red-hot iron; red-hot balls.
45281 red-led RED'-LED, n. red-led. [red and lead.] Minium, or red oxyd of lead, composed of 88 parts of lead ...
45276 red RED, a. [Gr red, and a rose, from its color. Heb. to descend, to bring down. L. gradior, also to ...
45282 redact REDACT', v.t. [L. redactus, redigo; red, re, and ago.]To force; to reduce to form. [Not used.]
45283 redan RED'AN, n. [written sometimes redent and redens; said to be contracted from L. recedens. ...
45284 redargue RED'ARGUE, v.t. [L. redarguo; red, re, and arguo.] To refute. [Not in use.]
45285 redargution REDARGU'TION, n. [supra.] Refutation; conviction. [Not in use.]
45286 redbreast RED'BREAST, n. A bird so called from the color of its breast, a species of Motacilla. In America, ...
45287 redbud RED'BUD, n. A plant or tree of the genus Cercis.
45288 redden REDDEN, v.t. red'n. [from red.] To make red.REDDEN, v.i. red'n. 1. To grow or become red.- The ...
45289 reddendum REDDEND'UM, n. In law, the clause by which rent is reserved in a lease.
45290 reddish RED'DISH, a. Somewhat red; moderately red. Lev. 13.
45291 reddishness RED'DISHNESS, n. Redness in a moderate degree.
45292 reddition REDDI'TION, n. [L. reddo, to return.] 1. A returning of any thing; restitution; surrender.2. ...
45293 redditive RED'DITIVE, a. [L. redditivus, from reddo.]Returning; answering to an interrogative; a term of ...
45294 reddle RED'DLE, n. [from red.] Red chalk, commonly used as a pigment. It is a mineral of a florid ...
45295 rede REDE, n. Counsel; advice. Obs.REDE, v.t. To counsel or advise. Obs.
45296 redeem REDEE'M, v.t. [L. redimo; red, re, and emo, to obtain or purchase.]1. To purchase back; to ...
45297 redeemable REDEE'MABLE, a.1. That may be redeemed; capable of redemption.2. That may be purchased or paid ...
45298 redeemableness REDEE'MABLENESS, n. The state of being redeemable.
45299 redeemed REDEE'MED, pp. Ransomed; delivered from bondage, distress, penalty, liability, or from the ...
45300 redeemer REDEE'MER, n.1. One who redeems or ransoms.2. The Savior of the world, JESUS CHRIST.
45301 redeeming REDEE'MING, ppr. Ransoming; procuring deliverance from captivity, capture, bondage, sin, distress ...
45302 redeliberate REDELIB'ERATE, v.i. [re and deliberate.] To deliberate again.REDELIB'ERATE, v.t. To reconsider. ...
45303 redeliver REDELIV'ER, v.t. [re and deliver.]1. To deliver back.2. To deliver again; to liberate a second ...
45304 redeliverance REDELIV'ERANCE, n. A second deliverance.
45305 redelivered REDELIV'ERED, pp. Delivered back; liberated again.
45306 redelivering REDELIV'ERING, ppr. Delivering back; liberating again.
45307 redelivery REDELIV'ERY, n. The act of delivering back; also, a second delivery or liberation.
45308 redemand REDEM'AND, v.t. [re and demand.]To demand back; to demand again.REDEM'AND, n. A demanding back ...
45309 redemandable REDEM'ANDABLE, a. That may be demanded back.
45310 redemanded REDEM'ANDED, pp. Demanded back or again.
45311 redemanding REDEM'ANDING, ppr. Demanding back or again.
45312 redemise REDEMI'SE, v.t. s as z. [re and demise.] To convey or transfer back, as an estate in fee simple, ...
45313 redemised REDEMI'SED, pp. Reconveyed, as an estate.
45314 redemising REDEMI'SING, ppr. Reconveying.
45315 redemption REDEMP'TION, n. [L. redemptio. See Redeem.]1. Repurchase of captured goods or prisoners; the act ...
45316 redemptioner REDEMP'TIONER, n. One who redeems himself, or purchases his release from debt or obligation to the ...
45317 redemptory REDEMP'TORY, a. Paid for ransom; as Hector's redemptory price.
45318 redented REDENT'ED, a. Formed like the teeth of a saw; indented.
45319 redescend REDESCEND', v.i. [re and descent.] To descend again.
45320 redescending REDESCEND'ING, ppr. Descending again.
45321 redeye RED'EYE, n. [red and eye.] A fish of a red color, particularly the iris.
45322 redgum RED'GUM, n. A disease of new born infants; an eruption of red pimples in early infancy.
45323 redient RED'IENT, a. [L. rediens, redeo, to return.] Returning.
45324 redigest REDIGEST', v.t. To digest or reduce to form a second time.
45325 redigested REDIGEST'ED, pp. Digested again.
45326 redigesting REDIGEST'ING, ppr. Digesting a second time; reducing again to order.
45327 redintegrate REDIN'TEGRATE, v.t. [L. redintegro; red, re, and integro, from integer, whole.]To make whole ...
45328 redintegrated REDIN'TEGRATED, pp. Renewed; restored to entireness.
45329 redintegrating REDIN'TEGRATING, ppr. Restoring to a perfect state.
45330 redintegration REDINTEGRA'TION, n.1. Renovation; restoration to a whole or sound state.2. In chimistry, the ...
45331 redisburse REDISBURSE, v.t. redisburs'. [re and disburse.] To repay or refund.
45332 redispose REDISPOSE, v.t. s as z. [re and dispose.] To dispose or adjust again.
45333 redisposed REDISPO'SED, pp. Disposed anew.
45334 redisposing REDISPO'SING, ppr. Disposing or adjusting anew.
45335 redisseizin REDISSE'IZIN, n. [re and disseizin.] In law, a writ of redisseizin, is a writ to recover seizin ...
45336 redisseizor REDISSE'IZOR, n. [re and disseizor.] A person who disseizes lands or tenements a second time, or ...
45337 redissolve REDISSOLVE, v.t. redizolv'. [re and dissolve.] To dissolve again.
45338 redissolved REDISSOLV'ED, pp. Dissolved a second time.
45339 redissolving REDISSOLV'ING, ppr. Dissolving again.
45340 redistribute REDISTRIB'UTE, v.t. [re and distribute.] To distribute again; to deal back again.
45341 redistributed REDISTRIB'UTED, pp. Distributed again or back.
45342 redistributing REDISTRIB'UTING, pp. Distributing again or back.
45343 redistribution REDISTRIBU'TION, n. A dealing back, or a second distribution.
45344 redly RED'LY, adv. With redness.
45345 redness RED'NESS, n. [See Red.] The quality of being red; red color.
45346 redolence RED'OLENCE,
45347 redolency RED'OLENCY, n. [from redolent.] Sweet scent.
45348 redolent RED'OLENT, a. [L. redolens, redoleo; red, re, and oleo, to smell.]Having or diffusing a sweet ...
45349 redouble REDOUBLE, v.t. redub'l. [re and double.]1. To repeat in return.2. To repeat often; as, to ...
45350 redoubled REDOUBLED, pp. redub'ld. Repeated in return; repeated over and over; increased by repeated or ...
45351 redoubling REDOUBLING, ppr. redub'ling. Repeating in return; repeating again and again; increasing by ...
45352 redound REDOUND, v.i. [L. redundo; red, re, and undo, to rise or swell, as waves.]1. To be sent, rolled ...
45353 redounding REDOUND'ING, ppr. Conducing; contributing; resulting.
45354 redout REDOUT', n. [L. reductus, reduco, to bring back; literally a retreat. The usual orthography, ...
45355 redoutable REDOUT'ABLE, a.Formidable; that is to be dreaded; terrible to foes; as a redoubtable hero. Hence ...
45356 redouted REDOUT'ED, a. Formidable. [Not in use.]
45357 redpole RED'POLE, n. A bird with a red head or poll, of the genus Fringilla.
45358 redraft REDR'AFT, v.t. [re and draft.] To draw or draft anew.REDR'AFT, n.1. A second draft or copy.2. ...
45359 redrafted REDR'AFTED, pp. Drafted again; transcribed into a new copy.
45360 redrafting REDR'AFTING, ppr. Redrawing; drafting or transcribing again.
45361 redraw REDRAW', v.t. [re and draw.]1. To draw again. In commerce, to draw a new bill of exchange, as ...
45362 redress REDRESS', v.t.1. To set right; to amend.In yonder spring of roses, find what to redress till ...
45363 redressed REDRESS'ED, pp. Remedied; set right; relieved; indemnified.
45364 redresser REDRESS'ER, n. One who gives redress.
45365 redressing REDRESS'ING, ppr. Setting right; relieving; indemnifying.
45366 redressive REDRESS'IVE, a. Affording relief.
45367 redressless REDRESS'LESS, a. Without amendment; without relief.
45368 redsear REDSE'AR, v.i. [red and sear.] To break or crack when too hot, as iron under the hammer; a term ...
45369 redshank RED'SHANK, n.1. A bird of the genus Scolopax.2. A contemptuous appellation for bare legged ...
45370 redshort RED'SHORT, a. [red and short.] Brittle, or breaking short when red hot, as a metal; a term of ...
45371 redstart RED'START,
45372 redstreak RED'STREAK, n. [red and streak.] 1. A sort of apple, so called from its red streaks.2. Cider ...
45373 redtail RED'TAIL, n. [red and start.] A bird of the genus Motacilla.
45374 reduce REDU'CE, v.t. [L. reduco; re and duco, to lead or bring.]1. Literally, to bring back; as, to ...
45375 reduced REDU'CED, pp. Brought back; brought to a former state; brought into any state or condition; ...
45376 reducement REDU'CEMENT, n. The act of bringing back; the act of diminishing; the act of subduing; ...
45377 reducer REDU'CER, n. One that reduces.
45378 reducible REDU'CIBLE, a. That may be reduced.All the parts of painting are reducible into these mentioned by ...
45379 reducibleness REDU'CIBLENESS, n. The quality of being reducible.
45380 reducing REDU'CING, ppr. Bringing back; bringing to a former state, or to a different state or form; ...
45381 reduct REDUCT', v.t. [L. reductus, reduco.] To reduce. [Not in use.]REDUCT', n. In building, a little ...
45382 reduction REDUC'TION, n. [L. reductio.]1. The act of reducing, or state of being reduced; as the reduction ...
45383 reductive REDUC'TIVE, a. Having the power of reducing.REDUC'TIVE, n. That which has the power of reducing.
45384 reductively REDUC'TIVELY, adv. By reduction; by consequence.
45385 redundance REDUND'ANCE,
45386 redundancy REDUND'ANCY, n. [L. redundantia, red-undo. See Redound.]1. Excess or superfluous quantity; ...
45387 redundant REDUND'ANT, a. 1. Superfluous; exceeding what is natural or necessary; superabundant; exuberant; ...
45388 redundantly REDUND'ANTLY, adv. With superfluity or excess; superfluously; superabundantly.
45389 reduplicate REDU'PLICATE, v.t. [L. reduplico; re and duplico. See Duplicate.] To double.
45390 reduplication REDUPLICA'TION, n. The act of doubling.
45391 reduplicative REDU'PLICATIVE, a. Double.
45392 redwing RED'WING, n. [red and wing.] A bird of the Turdus.
45393 ree REE,
45394 reechy REECH'Y, a. [a mis-spelling of reeky. See Reek.]Tarnished with smoke; sooty; foul; as a reechy ...
45395 reed REED, n.1. The common name of many aquatic plants; most of them large grasses, with hollow jointed ...
45396 reeded REE'DED, a.1. Covered with reeds.2. Formed with channels and ridges like reeds.
45397 reeden REEDEN, a. ree'dn. Consisting of a reed or reeds' as reeden pipes.
45398 reedgrass REE'DGRASS, n. A plant, bur-reed, of the genus Sparganium.
45399 reedless REE'DLESS, a. Destitute of reeds; as reedless banks.
45400 reedmace REE'DMACE, n. A plant of the genus Typha.
45401 reedy REE'DY, a. Abounding with reeds; as a reedy pool.
45403 reef-bank REE'F-BANK, n. A piece of canvas sewed across a sail, to strengthen it in the part where the ...
45404 reef-line REE'F-LINE, n. A small rope formerly used to reef the courses by being passed through the holes of ...
45405 reef-tackle REE'F-TACKLE, n. A tackle upon deck, communicating with its pendant, and passing through a block ...
45402 reef REEF, n. A certain portion of a sail between the top or bottom and a row of eyelet holes, which is ...
45406 reefed REE'FED, pp. Having a portion of the top or bottom folded and made fast to the yard.
45407 reefing REE'FING, ppr. Folding and making fast to the yard, as a portion of a sail.
45408 reek REEK, n.1. Vapor; steam.2. A rick, which see.REEK, v.i. [L. fragro. The primary sense is to ...
45409 reeking REE'KING, ppr. Steaming; emitting vapor.
45410 reeky REE'KY, a. Smoky; soiled with smoke or steam; foul.
45411 reel REEL, n. [See Reel, to stagger.]1. A frame or machine turning on an axis, and on which yarn is ...
45412 reermouse RE'ERMOUSE, n. A rearmouse; a bat.
45413 reeve REEVE, n. A steward. Obs.REEVE, n. A bird, the female of the ruff.REEVE, v.t. In seamen's ...
45414 refect REFECT', v.t. [L. refectus, reficio; re and facio, to make.]To refresh; to restore after hunger or ...
45415 refection REFEC'TION, n. [L. refectio.]1. Refreshment after hunger or fatigue.2. A spare meal or repast.
45416 refective REFECT'IVE, a. Refreshing; restoring.REFECT'IVE, n. That which refreshes.
45417 refectory REFECT'ORY, n. A room of refreshment; properly, a hall or apartment in convents and monasteries, ...
45418 refel REFEL', v.t. [L. refello.] To refute; to disprove; to repress; as, to refel the tricks of a ...
45419 refer REFER', v.t. [L. refero; re and fero, to bear.]1. To direct, leave or deliver over to another ...
45420 referable REF'ERABLE, a.1. That may be referred; capable of being considered in relation to something ...
45421 referee REFEREE', n. One to whom a thing is referred; particularly, a person appointed by a court to hear, ...
45422 reference REF'ERENCE, n.1. A sending, dismission or direction to another for information.2. Relation; ...
45423 referendary REFEREND'ARY, n. 1. One to whose decision a cause is referred. [Not in use.]2. An officer who ...
45424 referment REFER'MENT, n. Reference for decision. [Not used.]
45425 referred REFER'RED, pp. Dismissed or directed to another; assigned, as to a class, order or cause; assigned ...
45426 referrible REFER'RIBLE, a. That may be referred; referable.
45427 referring REFER'RING, ppr. Dismissing or directing to another for information; alluding; assigning, as to a ...
45428 refine REFI'NE, v.t.1. To purify; in a general sense; applied to liquors, to depurate; to defecate; to ...
45429 refined REFI'NED, pp. Purified; separated from extraneous matter; assayed, as metals; clarified, as ...
45430 refinedly REFI'NEDLY, adv. With affected nicety or elegance.
45431 refinedness REFI'NEDNESS, n. State of being refined; purity; refinement; also, affected purity.
45432 refinement REFI'NEMENT, n.1. The act of purifying by separating from a substance all extraneous matter; a ...
45433 refiner REFI'NER, n.1. One that refines metals or other things.2. An improver in purity and elegance; as ...
45434 refinery REFI'NERY, n. The place and apparatus for refining metals.
45435 refining REFI'NING, ppr. Purifying; separating from alloy or any extraneous matter; polishing; improving in ...
45436 refit REFIT', v.t. [re and fit.] To fit or prepare again; to repair; to restore after damage or decay; ...
45437 refitted REFIT'TED, pp. Prepared again; repaired.
45438 refitting REFIT'TING, ppr. Repairing after damage or decay.
45439 reflect REFLECT', v.t. [L. reflecto; re and flecto, to bend.]To throw back; to return. In the rainbow, ...
45440 reflected REFLECT'ED, pp. Thrown back; returned; as reflected light.
45441 reflectent REFLECT'ENT, a. Bending or flying back; as the ray descendent, and ray reflectent.
45442 reflectible REFLECT'IBLE, a. That may be reflected or thrown back.
45443 reflecting REFLECT'ING, ppr.1. Throwing back.2. Turning back, as thoughts upon themselves or upon past ...
45444 reflectingly REFLECT'INGLY, adv. With reflection; with censure.
45445 reflection REFLEC'TION, n. [from reflect.]1. The act of throwing back; as the reflection of light or colors. ...
45446 reflective REFLECT'IVE, a.1. Throwing back images; as a reflective mirror.In the reflective stream the ...
45447 reflector REFLECT'OR, n.1. One who reflects or considers.2. That which reflects.
45448 reflex RE'FLEX, a. [L. reflexus.]1. Directed back; as a reflex act of the soul, the turning of the ...
45449 reflexibility REFLEXIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being reflexible or capable of being reflected; as the ...
45450 reflexible REFLEX'IBLE, a. Capable of being reflected or thrown back.The light of the sun consists of rays ...
45451 reflexion REFLEX'ION. [See Reflection.]
45452 reflexity REFLEX'ITY, n. Capacity of being reflected.
45453 reflexive REFLEX'IVE, a. Having respect to something past.Assurance reflexive cannot be a divine faith.
45454 reflexively REFLEX'IVELY, adv. In a direction backward.
45455 refloat RE'FLOAT, n. [re and float.] Reflux; ebb; a flowing back. [Little used.]
45456 reflorescence REFLORES'CENCE, n. [re and florescence.] A blossoming anew.
45457 reflourish REFLOURISH, v.i. reflur'ish. [re and flourish.] To flourish anew.
45458 reflourishing REFLOUR'ISHING, ppr. Flourishing again.
45459 reflow REFLOW, v.i. [re and flow.] To flow back; to ebb.
45460 reflowing REFLOWING, ppr. Flowing backing; ebbing.
45461 refluctuation REFLUCTUA'TION, n. A flowing back.
45462 refluence REF'LUENCE,
45463 refluency REF'LUENCY, n. [from refluent.] A flowing back.
45464 refluent REF'LUENT, a. [L. refluens; re and fluo.]1. Flowing back; ebbing; as the refluent tide.2. ...
45465 reflux RE'FLUX, n. [L. refluxus.] A flowing back; the returning of a fluid; as the flux and reflux of ...
45466 refocillate REFO'CILLATE, v.t. [L. refocillo; re and the root of focus.] To refresh; to revive; to give new ...
45467 refocillation REFOCILLA'TION, n. The act of refreshing or giving new vigor; restoration of strength by ...
45468 refoment REFOMENT', v.t. [re and foment.]1. To foment anew; to warm or cherish again.2. To excite anew.
45469 refomented REFOMENT'ED, pp. Fomented or incited anew.
45470 refomenting REFOMENT'ING, ppr. Fomenting anew; exciting again.
45471 reform REFORM', v.t. [L. reformo; re and formo, to form.]1. To change from worse to better; to amend; to ...
45472 reformation REF'ORMATION, n.1. The act of reforming; correction or amendment of life, manners, or of any thing ...
45473 reformed REFORM'ED, pp. Corrected; amended; restored to a good state; as a reformed profligate; the ...
45474 reformer REFORM'ER, n.1. One who effects a reformation or amendment; as a reformer of manners or of ...
45475 reforming REFORM'ING, ppr. Correcting what is wrong; amending; restoring to a good state.
45476 reformist REFORM'IST, n. 1. One who is of the reformed religion.2. One who proposes or favors a political ...
45477 refortification REFORTIFICA'TION, n. A fortifying a second time.
45478 refortify REFOR'TIFY, v.t. [re and fortify.] To fortify anew.
45479 refossion REFOS'SION, n. The act of digging up.
45480 refound REFOUND', v.t. [re and found.] To found or cast anew.
45481 refract REFRACT', v.t. [L. refractus, refringo; re and frango, to break.]To break the natural course of ...
45482 refractarias REFRACTA'RIAS, n. A mineral.
45483 refracted REFRACT'ED, pp. 1. Turned from a direct course, as rays of light.2. a. In botany, bent back at ...
45484 refracting REFRACT'ING, ppr.1. Turning from a direct course.2. a. That turns rays from a direct course; as ...
45485 refraction REFRAC'TION, n. The deviation of a moving body, chiefly rays of light, from a direct course. This ...
45486 refractive REFRACT'IVE, a. That refracts or has power to refract or turn from a direct course; as refractive ...
45487 refractoriness REFRACT'ORINESS, n. [from refractory.] Perverse or sullen obstinacy in opposition or ...
45488 refractory REFRACT'ORY, a. [L. refractarius, from refragor, to resist; re and fragor, from frango.]1. Sullen ...
45489 refragable REFRA'GABLE, a. [L. refragor; re and frango.]That may be refuted that is, broken.
45490 refrain REFRA'IN, v.t. [L. refaeno; re and fraeno, to curb; fraenum, a rein. See Rein.]To hold back; to ...
45491 refrained REFRA'INED, pp. Held back; restrained.
45492 refraining REFRA'INING, ppr. Holding back; forbearing.
45493 reframe REFRA'ME, v.t. [re and frame.] To frame again.
45494 refrangibility REFRANGIBIL'ITY, n. [from refrangible.]The disposition of rays of light to be refracted or turned ...
45495 refrangible REFRAN'GIBLE, a. [L. re and frango, to break.]Capable of being refracted or turned out of a direct ...
45496 refrenation REFRENA'TION, n. [See refrain.] The act of restraining. [Not used.]
45497 refresh REFRESH', v.t. [See Fresh.]1. To cool; to allay heat.A dew coming after a heat refresheth.2. To ...
45498 refreshed REFRESH'ED, pp. Cooled; invigorated; revived; cheered.
45499 refresher REFRESH'ER, n. He or that which refreshes, revives or invigorates.
45500 refreshing REFRESH'ING, ppr. or a. Cooling; invigorating; reviving; reanimating.REFRESH'ING, n. Refreshment; ...
45501 refreshment REFRESH'MENT, n.1. Act of refreshing; or new strength or vigor received after fatigue; relief ...
45502 refret REFRET', n. The burden of a song.
45503 refrigerant REFRIG'ERANT, a. [See Refrigerate.]Cooling; allaying heat.REFRIG'ERANT, n. Among physicians, a ...
45504 refrigerate REFRIG'ERATE, v.t. [L. refrigero; re and frigus, cold.] To cool; to allay the heat of; to ...
45505 refrigerated REFRIG'ERATED, pp. Cooled.
45506 refrigerating REFRIG'ERATING, ppr. Allaying heat; cooling.
45507 refrigeration REFRIGERA'TION, n. The act of cooling; the abatement of heat; state of being cooled.
45508 refrigerative REFRIG'ERATIVE, a. Cooling.REFRIG'ERATIVE, n. A remedy that allays heat.
45509 refrigeratory REFRIG'ERATORY, a. Cooling; mitigating heat.REFRIG'ERATORY, n. 1. In distillation, a vessel ...
45510 refrigerium REFRIGE'RIUM, n. [L.] Cooling refreshment; refrigeration. [Not in use.]
45511 reft REFT, pp. of reave.1. Deprived; bereft. [Not in use.]2. pret. of reave. Took away. [Not in ...
45512 refuge REF'UGE, n. [L. refugium, refugio; re and fugio, to flee.]1. Shelter or protection from danger or ...
45513 refugee REFUGEE', n. 1. One who flies to a shelter or place of safety.2. One who, in times of ...
45514 refulgence REFUL'GENCE,
45515 refulgency REFUL'GENCY, n. [L. refulgens, refulgeo; re and fulgeo, to shine.] A flood of light; splendor.
45516 refulgent REFUL'GENT, a. Casting a bright light; shining; splendid; as refulgent beams; refulgent light; ...
45517 refulgently REFUL'GENTLY, adv. With a flood of light; with great brightness.
45518 refund REFUND', v.t. [L. refundo; re and fundo, to pour.]1. To pour back.Were the humors of the eye ...
45519 refunded REFUND'ED, pp. Poured back; repaid.
45520 refunding REFUND'ING, ppr. Pouring back; returning by payment or compensation.
45521 refusable REFU'SABLE, a. s as z. [from refuse.] That may be refused.
45522 refusal REFU'SAL, n. s as z.1. The act of refusing; denial of any thing demanded, solicited or offered ...
45523 refuse REFU'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. recuso; re and the root of causor, to accuse; causa, cause. The primary ...
45524 refused REFU'SED, pp. Denied; rejected; not accepted.
45525 refuser REFU'SER, n. One that refuses or rejects.
45526 refusing REFU'SING, ppr. Denying; declining to accept; rejecting.
45527 refutable REFU'TABLE, a. [from refute.] That may be refuted or disproved; that may be proved false or ...
45528 refutal REFU'TAL, n. Refutation. [Not used.]
45529 refutation REFUTA'TION, n. [L. refutatio. See Refute.]The act or process of refuting or disproving; the act ...
45530 refute REFU'TE, v.t. [L. refuto; re and futo, Obs. The primary sense of futo, is to drive or thrust, to ...
45531 refuted REFU'TED, pp. Disproved; proved to be false or erroneous.
45532 refuter REFU'TER, n. One that refutes.
45533 refuting REFU'TING, ppr. Proving to be false or erroneous; confuting.
45534 regain REGA'IN, v.t. [re and gain.]To gain anew; to recover what has escaped or been lost.
45535 regained REGA'INED, pp. Recovered; gained anew.
45536 regaining REGA'INING, ppr. Gaining anew; recovering.
45537 regal RE'GAL, a. [L. regalis, from rex, L. rectus. See Reck and Reckon.]Pertaining to a king; kingly; ...
45538 regale REGA'LE, n. The prerogative of monarchy.REGA'LE, n. [See the verb, below.] A magnificent ...
45539 regaled REGA'LED, pp. Refreshed; entertained; gratified.
45540 regalement REGA'LEMENT, n. Refreshment; entertainment; gratification.
45541 regalia REGA'LIA, n. [L. from rex, king.] 1. Ensigns of royalty; the apparatus of a coronation; as the ...
45542 regaling REGA'LING, ppr. Refreshing; entertaining; gratifying.
45543 regality REGAL'ITY, n. [from L. regalis.] Royalty; sovereignty; kingship.He came partly in by the sword ...
45544 regally RE'GALLY, adv. In a royal manner.
45545 regard REG'ARD, v.t.1. To look towards; to point or be directed.It is a peninsula which regardeth the ...
45546 regardable REG'ARDABLE, a. Observable; worthy of notice.
45547 regardant REG'ARDANT, a. 1. In law, a villain regardant is one annexed to the manor or land.2. In ...
45548 regarded REG'ARDED, pp. Noticed; observed; esteemed; respected.
45549 regarder REG'ARDER, n.1. One that regards.2. In law, the regarder of the forest is an officer whose ...
45550 regardful REG'ARDFUL, a. Taking notice; heedful; observing with care; attentive.Let a man be very tender and ...
45551 regardfully REG'ARDFULLY, adv.1. Attentively; heedfully.2. Respectfully.
45552 regarding REG'ARDING, ppr. 1. Noticing; considering with care; attending to; observing; esteeming; caring ...
45553 regardless REG'ARDLESS, a. 1. Not looking or attending to; heedless; negligent; careless; as regardless of ...
45554 regardlessly REG'ARDLESSLY, adv. Heedlessly; carelessly; negligently.
45555 regardlessness REG'ARDLESSNESS, n. Heedlessness; inattention; negligence.
45556 regata REGA'TA,
45557 regather REGATH'ER, v.t. To gather or collect a second time.
45558 regathered REGATH'ERED, pp. Collected again.
45559 regathering REGATH'ERING, ppr. Gathering a second time.
45560 regatta REGAT'TA, n. In Venice, a grand rowing match in which many boats are rowed for a prize.
45561 regel REG'EL,
45562 regency RE'GENCY, n. [L. regens, from rego, to govern.]1. Rule' authority; government.2. Vicarious ...
45563 regeneracy REGEN'ERACY, n. [See Regenerate.] The state of being regenerated.
45564 regenerate REGEN'ERATE, v.t. [L. regenero; re and genero. See Generate.]1. To generate or produce anew; to ...
45565 regenerated REGEN'ERATED, pp.1. Reproduced.2. Renewed; born again.
45566 regenerateness REGEN'ERATENESS, n. The state of being regenerated.
45567 regenerating REGEN'ERATING, ppr.1. Reproducing.2. Renovating the nature by the implantation of holy affections ...
45568 regeneration REGENERA'TION, n.1. Reproduction; the act of producing anew.2. In theology, new birth by the ...
45569 regeneratory REGEN'ERATORY, a. Renewing; having the power to renew; tending to reproduce or renovate.
45570 regent RE'GENT, a. [L. regens, from rego, to rule.1. Ruling; governing; as a regent principle.2. ...
45571 regentess RE'GENTESS, n. A protectress of a kingdom.
45572 regentship RE'GENTSHIP, n.1. The power of governing, or the office of a regent.2. Deputed authority.
45573 regerminate REGERM'INATE, v.i. [re and germinate.]To germinate again.Perennial plants regerminate several ...
45574 regerminating REGERM'INATING, ppr. Germinating anew.
45575 regermination REGERMINA'TION, n. A sprouting or germination anew.
45576 regest REGEST', n. A register. [Not in use.]
45577 regible REG'IBLE, a. Governable. [Not in use.]
45578 regicide REG'ICIDE, n. [L. rex, king, and caedo, to slay.]1. A king-killer; one who murders a king.2. The ...
45579 regil REG'IL, n. A fixed star of the first magnitude in Orion's left foot.
45580 regimen REG'IMEN, n. [L. from rego, to govern.]1. In medicine, the regulation of diet with a view to the ...
45581 regiment REG'IMENT, n. [L. regimen.]1. In military affairs, a body of men, either horse, foot or ...
45582 regimental REGIMENT'AL, a. Belonging to a regiment; as regimental officers; regimental clothing.
45583 regimentals REGIMENT'ALS, n. plu. The uniform worn by the troops of a regiment.
45584 regimented REG'IMENTED, pp. Formed into a regiment; incorporated with a regiment.
45585 region REGION, n. re'jun. [L. regio, rego.]1. A tract of land or space of indefinite extent, usually a ...
45586 register REG'ISTER, n. [Low L. registrum, from regero, to set down in writing; re and gero, to carry.]1. A ...
45587 registership REG'ISTERSHIP, n. The office of register.
45588 registrar REG'ISTRAR, n. An officer in the English universities, who has the keeping of all the public ...
45589 registration REGISTRA'TION, n. The act of inserting in a register.
45590 registry REG'ISTRY, n.1. The act of recording or writing in a register.2. The place where a register is ...
45591 reglement REG'LEMENT, n. Regulation. [Not used.]
45592 reglet REG'LET, n. [L. regula, rego.]A ledge of wood exactly planed, used by printers to separate lines ...
45593 regnant REG'NANT, a. [L. regno, to reign.]1. Reigning; exercising regal authority; as a queen regnant. ...
45594 regorge REGORGE, v.t. regorj'.1. To vomit up; to eject from the stomach; to throw back or out again.2. To ...
45595 regrade REGRA'DE, v.i. [L. regredior; re and gradior, to go.] To retire; to go back. [Not used.]
45596 regraft REGR'AFT, v.t. [re and graft.] To graft again.
45597 regrafted REGR'AFTED, pp. Grafted again.
45598 regrafting REGR'AFTING, ppr. Grafting anew.
45599 regrant REGR'ANT, v.t. [re and grant.] To grant back.REGR'ANT, n. The act of granting back to a former ...
45600 regranted REGR'ANTED, pp. Granted back.
45601 regranting REGR'ANTING, ppr. Granting back.
45602 regrate REGRA'TE, v.t.1. To offend; to shock. [Little used.]2. To buy provisions and sell them again in ...
45603 regrater REGRA'TER, n. One who buys provisions and sells them in the same market or fair.
45604 regrating REGRA'TING, ppr. Purchasing provisions and selling them in the same market.
45605 regreet REGREE'T, v.t. [re and greet.] To greet again; to resalute.
45606 regreeted REGREE'TED, pp. Greeting again or in return.
45607 regreeting REGREE'TING, ppr. Greeting again; resaluting.
45608 regress RE'GRESS, n. [L. regressus, regredior.]1. Passage back; return; as ingress and regress.2. The ...
45609 regression REGRES'SION, n. The act of passing back or returning.
45610 regressive REGRESS'IVE, a. Passing back; returning.
45611 regressively REGRESS'IVELY, adv. In a backward way or manner; by return.
45612 regret REGRET', n. 1. Grief; sorrow; pain of mind. We feel regret at the loss of friends, regret for ...
45613 regretful REGRET'FUL, a. Full of regret.
45614 regretfully REGRET'FULLY, adv. With regret.
45615 regretted REGRET'TED, pp. Lamented.
45616 regretting REGRET'TING, ppr. Lamenting; grieving at; repenting.
45617 reguerdon REGUERDON, n. regerd'on. [See Reward.]A reward; a recompense. [Not in use.]REGUERDON, v.t. ...
45618 regular REG'ULAR, a. [L. regularis, from regula, a rule, from rego, to rule.]1. Conformed to a rule; ...
45619 regularity REGULAR'ITY, n. 1. Agreeableness to a rule or to established order; as the regularity of legal ...
45620 regularly REG'ULARLY, adv.1. In a manner accordant to a rule or established mode; as a physician or lawyer ...
45621 regulate REG'ULATE, v.t.1. To adjust by rule, method or established mode; as, to regulate weights and ...
45622 regulated REG'ULATED, pp. Adjusted by rule, method or forms; put in good order; subjected to rules or ...
45623 regulating REG'ULATING, ppr. Adjusting by rule, method or forms; reducing to order; subjecting to rules or ...
45624 regulation REGULA'TION, n. 1. The act of regulating or reducing to order.2. A rule or order prescribed by a ...
45625 regulator REG'ULATOR, n.1. One who regulates.2. The small spring of a watch, which regulates its motions by ...
45626 reguline REG'ULINE, a. [See Regulus.] Pertaining to regulus or pure metal.Bodies which we can reduce to ...
45627 regulize REG'ULIZE, v.t. To reduce to regulus or pure metal; to separate pure metal from extraneous matter.
45628 regulus REG'ULUS, n. [L. a petty king.]In chimistry, the finer or pure part of a metallic substance, ...
45629 regurgitate REGURG'ITATE, v.t. [L. re and gurges.]To throw or pour back as from a deep or hollow place; to ...
45630 regurgitated REGURG'ITATED, pp. Thrown or poured back.
45631 regurgitating REGURG'ITATING, ppr. Throwing or pouring back.
45632 regurgitation REGURGITA'TION, n.1. The act of pouring back.2. The act of swallowing again; reabsorption.
45633 rehabilitate REHABIL'ITATE, v.t.To restore to a former capacity; to reinstate; to qualify again; to restore, as ...
45634 rehabilitated REHABIL'ITATED, pp. Restored to a former rank, right privilege or capacity; reinstated.
45635 rehabilitating REHABIL'ITATING, ppr. Restoring to a former right, rank, privilege or capacity; reinstating.
45636 rehabilitation REHABILITA'TION, n. The act of reinstating in a former rank or capacity; restoration to former ...
45637 rehear REHE'AR, v.t. pret. and pp. reheard. [re and hear.]To hear again; to try a second time; as, to ...
45638 reheard REHE'ARD, pp. Heard again.
45639 rehearing REHE'ARING, ppr. Hearing a second time.REHE'ARING, n.1. A second hearing.2. In law, a second ...
45640 rehearsal REHEARSAL, n. rehers'al. [from rehearse.]1. Recital; repetition of the words of another or of a ...
45641 rehearse REHEARSE, v.t. rehers.'1. To recite; to repeat the words of a passage or composition; to repeat ...
45642 rehearsed REHEARSED, pp. rehers'ed. Recited; repeated; as words; narrated.
45643 rehearser REHEARSER, n. rehers'er. One who recites or narrates.
45644 rehearsing REHEARSING, ppr. rehers'ing. Reciting; repeating words; recounting; telling; narrating.
45645 reigle RE'IGLE, n. A hollow cut or channel for guiding any thing; as the reigle of a side post for a ...
45646 reign REIGN, v.i. rane. [L. regno, a derivative of rego, regnum.]1. To possess or exercise sovereign ...
45647 reigning REIGNING, ppr. ra'ning. 1. Holding or exercising supreme power; ruling; governing as king, queen ...
45648 reimbark REIMBARK. [See Re-embark.]
45649 reimbody REIMBOD'Y, v.i. [re and imbody or embody.]To imbody again; to be formed into a body anew.
45650 reimbursable REIMBURS'ABLE, a. That may be repaid.A loan has been made of two million of dollars, reimbursable ...
45651 reimburse REIMBURSE, v.t. reimburs'.To refund; to replace in a treasury or in a private coffer, an equivalent ...
45652 reimbursed REIMBURS'ED, pp. Repaid; refunded; made good, as loss or expense.
45653 reimbursement REIMBURSEMENT, n. reimburs'ment. The act of repaying or refunding; repayment; as the reimbursement ...
45654 reimburser REIMBURS'ER, n. One who repays or refunds what has been lost or expended.
45655 reimbursing REIMBURS'ING, ppr. Repaying; refunding; making good, as loss or expense.
45656 reimplant REIMPLANT', v.t. [re and implant.] To implant again.
45657 reimplanted REIMPLANT'ED, pp. Implanted anew.
45658 reimplanting REIMPLANT'ING, ppr. Implanting again.
45659 reimportune REIMPORTU'NE, v.t. [re and importune.] To importune again.
45660 reimportuned REIMPORTU'NED, pp. Importuned again.
45661 reimportuning REIMPORTU'NING, ppr. Importuning again.
45662 reimpregnate REIMPREG'NATE, v.t. [re and impregnate.]To impregnate again.
45663 reimpregnated REIMPREG'NATED, pp. Impregnated again.
45664 reimpregnating REIMPREG'NATING, ppr. Impregnating again.
45665 reimpress REIMPRESS', v.t. [re and impress.] To impress anew.
45666 reimpressed REIMPRESS'ED, pp. Impressed again.
45667 reimpressing REIMPRESS'ING, ppr. Impressing again.
45668 reimpression REIMPRES'SION, n. A second or repeated impression.
45669 reimprint REIMPRINT', v.t. [re and imprint.] To imprint again.
45670 reimprinted REIMPRINT'ED, pp. Imprinted again.
45671 reimprinting REIMPRINT'ING, ppr. Imprinting anew.
45672 rein REIN, n. [L. retina, retinaculum. If contracted from the Latin, it is from retineo, otherwise ...
45673 reindeer REINDEER, n.A species of the cervine genus; more correctly written ranedeer, or rather rane, which ...
45674 reinfect REINFECT', v.t [re and infect.] To infect again.
45675 reinfected REINFECT'ED, pp. Infected again.
45676 reinfecting REINFECT'ING, ppr. Infecting again.
45677 reinfectious REINFEC'TIOUS, a. Capable of infecting again.
45678 reinforce REINFORCE, v.t. [re and enforce.] To give new force to; to strengthen by new assistance or ...
45679 reinforced REINFORCED, pp. Strengthened by additional force.
45680 reinforcement REINFORCEMENT, n. New force added; fresh supplies of strength; particularly, additional troops or ...
45681 reinforcing REINFORCING, ppr. Adding fresh force to.
45682 reingratiate REINGRA'TIATE, v.t. To ingratiate again.REINGRA'TIATE, v.t. [re and ingratiate.] To ingratiate ...
45683 reingratiated REINGRA'TIATED, pp. Reinstated in favor.
45684 reingratiating REINGRA'TIATING, ppr. Ingratiating again.
45685 reinhabit REINHAB'IT, v.t. [re and inhabit.] To inhabit again.
45686 reinhabited REINHAB'ITED, pp. Inhabited again.
45687 reinhabiting REINHAB'ITING, ppr. Inhabiting a second time.
45688 reinless REINLESS, a. Without rein; without restraint; unchecked.
45689 reinlist REINLIST',v.t. or i. [re and inlist.] To inlist again.[It is written also re-enlist.]
45690 reinlisted REINLIST'ED, pp. Inlisted anew.
45691 reinlisting REINLIST'ING, ppr. Inlisting anew.
45692 reinlistment REINLIST'MENT, n. The act of inlisting anew; the act of engaging again in military service.
45693 reinquire REINQUI'RE, v.t. To inquire a second time.
45694 reins REINS, n. plu. [L. ren, renes.]1. The kidneys; the lower part of the back.2. In Scripture, the ...
45695 reinsert REREPLACE', v.t. [re and insert.] To insert a second time.
45696 reinserted REREPLACE'ED, pp. Inserted again.
45697 reinserting REREPLACE'ING, ppr. Inserting again.
45698 reinsertion REINSER'TION, n. A second insertion.
45699 reinspect REINSPECT', v.t. [re and inspect.] To inspect again, as provisions.
45700 reinspection REINSPEC'TION, n. The act of inspecting a second time.
45701 reinspire REINSPI'RE, v.t. [re and inspire.] To inspire anew.
45702 reinspired REINSPI'RED, pp. Inspired again.
45703 reinspiring REINSPI'RING, ppr. Inspiring again.
45704 reinstall REINSTALL', v.t. [re and install.] To install again; to seat anew.
45705 reinstalled REINSTALL'ED, pp. Installed anew.
45706 reinstalling REINSTALL'ING, ppr. Installing again.
45707 reinstallment REINSTALL'MENT, n. A second installment.
45708 reinstate REINSTA'TE, v.t. [re and instate.] To place again in possession or in a former state; to restore ...
45709 reinstated REINSTA'TED, pp. Replaced in possession or in a former state.
45710 reinstatement REINSTA'TEMENT, n. The act of putting in a former state; re-establishment.
45711 reinstating REINSTA'TING, ppr. Replacing in a former state; putting again in possession.
45712 reinsurance REINSU'RANCE, n. [re and insurance. See Sure.]An insurance of property already insured; a second ...
45713 reinsure REINSU'RE, v.t. [re and insure.] To insure the same property a second time by other ...
45714 reinsured REINSU'RED, pp. Insured a second time by other persons.
45715 reinsuring REINSU'RING, ppr. Insuring a second time by other persons.
45716 reintegrate REIN'TEGRATE, v.t. [L. redintegro; red, re, and integro, from integer.]To renew with regard to any ...
45717 reinterrogate REINTER'ROGATE, v.t. [re and interrogate.]To interrogate again; to question repeatedly.
45718 reinthrone REINTHRO'NE, v.t. [re and inthrone. See Enthrone.]To replace on the throne.
45719 reinthroned REINTHRO'NED, pp. Placed again on the throne.
45720 reinthroning REINTHRO'NING, ppr. Replacing on the throne.
45721 reinthronize REINTHRO'NIZE, v.t. To reinthrone. [Not in use.]
45722 reinvest REINVEST', v.t. [re and invest.] To invest anew.
45723 reinvested REINVEST'ED, pp. Invested again.
45724 reinvesting REINVEST'ING, ppr. Investing anew.
45725 reinvestment REINVEST'MENT, n. The act of investing anew; a second or repeated investment.
45726 reinvigorate REINVIG'ORATE, v.t. To revive vigor in; to reanimate.
45727 reit REIT, n. Sedge; sea weed.
45728 reiterate REIT'ERATE, v.t. [L. re and itero.]To repeat; to repeat again and again; as reiterated crimes; to ...
45729 reiterated REIT'ERATED, pp. Repeated again and again.
45730 reiterating REIT'ERATING, ppr. Repeating again and again.
45731 reiteration REITERA'TION, n. Repetition.
45732 reject REJECT', v.t. [L. rejicio, rejectus, re and jacio, to throw.]1. To throw away, as any thing ...
45733 rejectable REJECT'ABLE, a. That may be rejected.
45734 rejectamenta REJECTAMENT'A, n. [from L. rejecto.] Things thrown out or away. [Ill formed.]
45735 rejectaneous REJECTA'NEOUS, a. [from the L.] Not chosen or received; rejected.
45736 rejected REJECT'ED, pp. Thrown away; cast off; refused; slighted.
45737 rejecter REJECT'ER, n. One that rejects or refuses.
45738 rejecting REJECT'ING, ppr. Throwing away; casting off; refusing to grant or accept; slighting.
45739 rejection REJEC'TION, n. [L. rejectio.] The act of throwing away; the act of casting off or forsaking; ...
45740 rejective REJECT'IVE, a. That rejects, or tends to cast off.
45741 rejectment REJECT'MENT, n. Matter thrown away.
45742 rejoice REJOICE, v.i. rejois'.To experience joy and gladness in a high degree; to be exhilarated with ...
45743 rejoiced REJOIC'ED, pp. Made glad; exhilarated.
45744 rejoicer REJOIC'ER, n. One that rejoices.
45745 rejoicing REJOIC'ING, ppr. Animating with gladness; exhilarating; feeling joy.REJOIC'ING, ppr. Animating ...
45746 rejoicingly REJOIC'INGLY, adv. With joy or exultation.
45747 rejoin REJOIN', v.t. [re and join.]1. To join again; to unite after separation.2. To meet one ...
45748 rejoinder REJOIND'ER, n.1. An answer to a reply; or in general, an answer.2. In law pleadings, the ...
45749 rejoined REJOIN'ED, pp. Joined again; reunited.
45750 rejoining REJOIN'ING, ppr. Joining again; answering a plaintiff's replication.
45751 rejoint REJOINT', v.t. [re and joint.] To reunite joints.
45752 rejolt REJOLT, n. [re and jolt.] A reacting jolt or shock. [Not used.]
45753 rejourn REJOURN, v.t. rejurn'. [See Adjourn.]To adjourn to another hearing or inquiry. [Not used.]
45754 rejudge REJUDGE, v.t. rejuj'. [re and judge.] To judge again; to re-examine; to review; to call to a new ...
45755 rejudged REJUDG'ED, pp. Reviewed; judged again.
45756 rejudging REJUDG'ING, ppr. Judging again.
45757 rejuvenescence REJUVENES'CENCE,'CENCY, n. [L. re and juvenescens; juvenis, a youth.]A renewing of youth; the ...
45758 rekindle REKIN'DLE, v.t. [re and kindle.]1. To kindle again; to set on fire anew.2. To inflame again; to ...
45759 rekindled REKIN'DLED, pp. Kindled again; inflamed anew.
45760 rekindling REKIN'DLING, ppr. Kindling again; inflaming anew.
45761 relaid RELA'ID, pp. Laid a second time.
45762 reland RELAND', v.t. [re and land.] To land again; to put on land what had been shipped or ...
45763 relanded RELAND'ED, pp. Put on shore again.
45764 relanding RELAND'ING, ppr. Landing again.
45765 relapse RELAPSE, v.i. relaps'. [L. relapsus, relabor, to slide back; re and labor, to slide.]1. To slip ...
45766 relapser RELAPS'ER, n. One that relapses into vice or error.
45767 relapsing RELAPS'ING, ppr. Sliding or falling back, as into disease or vice.
45768 relate RELA'TE, v.t. [L. relatus, refero; re and fero, to produce.]1. To tell; to recite; to narrate the ...
45769 related RELA'TED, pp. 1. Recited; narrated.2. a. Allied by kindred; connected by blood or alliance, ...
45770 relater RELA'TER, n. One who tells, recites or narrates; a historian.
45771 relating RELA'TING, ppr.1. Telling; reciting; narrating.2. a. Having relation or reference; concerning.
45772 relation RELA'TION, n. [L. relatio, refero.]1. The act of telling; recital; account; narration; narrative ...
45773 relational RELA'TIONAL, a. Having relation or kindred.We might be tempted to take these two nations for ...
45774 relationship RELA'TIONSHIP, n. The state of being related by kindred, affinity or other alliance.[This word is ...
45775 relative REL'ATIVE, a. [L. relativus.]1. Having relation; respecting. The arguments may be good, but they ...
45776 relatively REL'ATIVELY, adv. In relation or respect to something else; not absolutely.Consider the absolute ...
45777 relativeness REL'ATIVENESS,n. The state of having relation.
45778 relator RELA'TOR, n., In law, one who brings an information in the nature of a quo warranto.
45779 relax RELAX', v.t. [L. relaxo; re and laxo, to slacken.]1. To slacken; to make less tense or rigid; as, ...
45780 relaxable RELAX'ABLE, a. That may be remitted.
45781 relaxation RELAXA'TION, n. [L. relaxatio.]1. The act of slackening or remitting tension; as a relaxation of ...
45782 relaxative RELAX'ATIVE, a. Having the quality of relaxing. [See Laxative.]
45783 relaxed RELAX'ED, pp. Slackened; loosened; remitted or abated in rigor or in closeness; made less ...
45784 relaxing RELAX'ING, ppr. Slackening; loosening; remitting or abating in rigor, severity or attention; ...
45785 relay RELA'Y, n. 1. A supply of horses placed on the road to be in readiness to relieve others, that a ...
45786 relaying RELA'YING, ppr. Laying a second time.
45787 release RELE'ASE, v.t.1. To set free from restraint of any kind, either physical or moral; to liberate ...
45788 released RELE'ASED, pp. Set free from confinement; freed from obligation or liability; freed from pain; ...
45789 releasement RELE'ASEMENT, n. The act of releasing from confinement or obligation.
45790 releaser RELE'ASER, n. One who releases.
45791 releasing RELE'ASING, ppr. Liberating from confinement or restraint; freeing from obligation or ...
45792 relegate REL'EGATE, v.t. [L. relego; re and lego, to send.] To banish; to send into exile.
45793 relegated REL'EGATED, pp. Sent into exile.
45794 relegating REL'EGATING, ppr. Banishing.
45795 relegation RELEGA'TION, n. [L. relegatio.] The act of banishment; exile.
45796 relent RELENT', v.i. [L. blandus, which unites the L. blandus with lentus. The English is from re and L. ...
45797 relenting RELENT'ING, ppr. Softening in temper; becoming more mild or compassionate.RELENT'ING, n. The act ...
45798 relentless RELENT'LESS, a. Unmoved by pity unpitying; insensible to the distress of others; destitute of ...
45799 relessee RELESSEE', n. [See Release.] The person to whom a release is executed.
45800 relessor RELESSOR', n. The person who executes a release.There must be a privity of estate between the ...
45801 relevance REL'EVANCE,
45802 relevancy REL'EVANCY, n. [See Relevant.]1. The state of being relevant, or of affording relief or aid.2. ...
45803 relevant REL'EVANT, a. [L. relever, to relieve, to advance, to raise; re and lever, to raise.]1. ...
45804 relevation RELEVA'TION, n. A raising or lifting up. [Not in use.]
45805 reliance RELI'ANCE, n. [from rely.] Rest or repose of mind, resulting from a full belief of the veracity ...
45806 relic REL'IC, n. [L. reliquiae, from relinquo, to leave; re and linquo.]1. That which remains; that ...
45807 relict REL'ICT, n. [L. relictus, relicta, from relinquo, to leave.]A widow; a woman whose husband is ...
45808 relief RELIE'F, n.1. The removal, in whole or in part, of any evil that afflicts the body of mind; the ...
45809 relier RELI'ER, n. [from rely.] One who relies, or places full confidence in.
45810 relievable RELIE'VABLE, a. Capable of being relieved; that may receive relief.
45811 relieve RELIE'VE, v.t. [L. relevo. See Relief.]1. To free, wholly or partially, from pain, grief, want, ...
45812 relieved RELIE'VED, pp.1. Freed from pain or other evil; eased or cured; aided; succored; dismissed from ...
45813 reliever RELIE'VER, n. One that relieves; he or that which gives ease.
45814 relieving RELIE'VING, ppr. Removing pain or distress, or abating the violence of it; easing; curing; ...
45815 relievo RELIE'VO, n. Relief; prominence of figures in statuary, architecture, &c.; apparent prominence of ...
45816 relight RELIGHT, v.t. reli'te. [re and light.] 1. To light anew; to illuminate again.2. To rekindle; to ...
45817 relighted RELIGHTED, pp. Lighted anew; rekindled.
45818 relighting RELIGHTING, ppr. Lighting again; rekindling.
45819 religion RELIGION, n. relij'on. [L. religio, from religo, to bind anew; re and ligo, to bind. This word ...
45820 religionary RELIG'IONARY, a. Relating to religion; pious. [Not used.]
45821 religionist RELIG'IONIST, n. A bigot to any religious persuasion.
45822 religious RELIG'IOUS, a. [L. religiosus.]1. Pertaining or relating to religion; as a religious society; a ...
45823 religiously RELIG'IOUSLY, adv.1. Piously; with love and reverence to the Supreme Being; in obedience to the ...
45824 religiousness RELIG'IOUSNESS, n. The quality or state of being religious.
45825 relinquish RELIN'QUISH, v.t. [L. relinquo, re and linquo, to leave, to fail or faint; from the same root as ...
45826 relinquished RELIN'QUISHED, pp. Left; quitted; given up.
45827 relinquisher RELIN'QUISHER, n. One who leaves or quits.
45828 relinquishing RELIN'QUISHING, ppr. Quitting; leaving; giving up.
45829 relinquishment RELIN'QUISHMENT, n. The act of leaving or quitting; a forsaking; the renouncing a claim to.
45830 reliquary REL'IQUARY, n. [L. relinquo.]A depository for relics; a casket in which relics are kept.
45831 reliquidate RELIQ'UIDATE, v.t. [re and liquidate.]To liquidate anew; to adjust a second time.
45832 reliquidated RELIQ'UIDATED, pp. Liquidated again.
45833 reliquidating RELIQ'UIDATING, ppr. Liquidating again.
45834 reliquidation RELIQUIDA'TION, n. A second or renewed liquidation; a renewed adjustment.
45835 relish REL'ISH, n.1. Taste; or rather, a pleasing taste; that sensation of the organs which is ...
45836 relishable REL'ISHABLE, a. Gustable; having an agreeable taste.
45837 relished REL'ISHED, pp. Giving an agreeable taste; received with pleasure.
45838 relive RELIVE, v.i. reliv'. [re and live.] To live again; to revive.RELIVE, v.t. reliv'. To recall to ...
45839 reloan RELOAN, v.t. [re and loan.] To loan again; to lend what has been lent and repaid.RELOAN, n. A ...
45840 reloaned RELOANED, pp. Loaned again.
45841 reloaning RELOANING, ppr. Loaning again.
45842 relove RELOVE, v.t. [re and love.] To love in return. [Not in use.]
45843 relucent RELU'CENT, a. [L. relucens, relucco; re and lucco, to shine.]Shining; transparent; clear; ...
45844 reluct RELUCT', v.i. [L. reluctor; re and luctor, to struggle.] To strive or struggle against. [Little ...
45845 reluctance RELUCT'ANCE,
45846 reluctancy RELUCT'ANCY, n. [literally a straining or striving against.]Unwillingness; great opposition of ...
45847 reluctant RELUCT'ANT, a. 1. Striving against; unwilling; much opposed in heart.Reluctant now I touch'd the ...
45848 reluctantly RELUCT'ANTLY, adv. With opposition of heart; unwillingly. What is undertaken reluctantly is ...
45849 reluctate RELUCT'ATE, v.t. To resist; to struggle against.
45850 reluctation RELUCTA'TION, n. Repugnance; resistance.
45851 relucting RELUCT'ING, ppr. 1. Striving to resist.2. a. Averse; unwilling.
45852 relume RELU'ME, v.t. [L. re and lumen, light.] To rekindle; to light again.
45853 relumed RELU'MED, pp. Rekindled; lighted again.
45854 relumine RELU'MINE, v.t. [re and lumino; re and lumen, light, from lucco, to shine.]1. To light anew; to ...
45855 relumined RELU'MINED, pp. Rekindled; illuminated anew.
45856 reluming RELU'MING, ppr. Kindling or lighting anew.
45857 relumining RELU'MINING, ppr. Rekindling; enlightening anew.
45858 rely RELY', v.i. [re and lie, or from the root of lie, lay.]To rest on something, as the mind when ...
45859 relying RELY'ING, ppr. Reposing on something, as the mind; confiding in; trusting in; depending.
45860 remade REMA'DE, pret. and pp. of remake.
45861 remain REMA'IN, v.i. [L. remaneo; re and maneo, Gr.]1. To continue; to rest or abide in a place for a ...
45863 remainder-man REMA'INDER-MAN, n. In law, he who has an estate after a particular estate is determined.
45862 remainder REMA'INDER, n. 1. Any thing left after the separation and removal of a part.If these decoctions ...
45864 remaining REMA'INING, ppr. Continuing; resting; abiding for an indefinite time; being left after separation ...
45865 remains REMA'INS, n. plu. 1. That which is left after a part is separated, taken away or destroyed; as the ...
45866 remake REMA'KE, v.t. pret. and pp. remade. [re and make.] To make anew.
45867 remand REM'AND, v.t. [L. re and mando.]To call or send back him or that which is ordered to a place; as, ...
45868 remanded REM'ANDED, pp. Called or sent back.
45869 remanding REM'ANDING, ppr. Calling or sending back.
45870 remanent REM'ANENT, n. [L. remanens.] The part remaining. [Little used. It is contracted into ...
45871 remark REM'ARK, n. Notice or observation, particularly notice or observation expressed in words or ...
45872 remarkable REM'ARKABLE, a.1. Observable; worthy of notice.'Tis remarkable that they talk most, who have the ...
45873 remarkableness REM'ARKABLENESS, n. Observableness; worthiness of remark; the quality of deserving particular ...
45874 remarkably REM'ARKABLY, adv. 1. In a manner or degree worthy of notice; as, the winters of 1825, 1826 and ...
45875 remarked REM'ARKED, pp. Noticed; observed; expressed in words or writing.
45876 remarker REM'ARKER, n. An observer; one who makes remarks.
45877 remarking REM'ARKING, ppr. Observing; taking notice of; expressing in words or writing.
45878 remarried REMAR'RIED, pp. Married again or a second time.
45879 remarry REMAR'RY, v.t. [re and marry.] To marry again or a second time.
45880 remarrying REMAR'RYING, ppr. Marrying again or a second time.
45881 remasticate REMAS'TICATE, v.t. [re and masticate.] To chew or masticate again; to chew over and over, as in ...
45882 remasticated REMAS'TICATED, pp. Chewed again or repeatedly.
45883 remasticating REMAS'TICATING, ppr. Chewing again or over and over.
45884 remastication REMASTICA'TION, n. The act of masticating again or repeatedly.
45885 remediable REME'DIABLE, a. [from remedy.] That may be remedied or cured. The evil is believed to be ...
45886 remedial REME'DIAL, a. [L. remedialis.] Affording a remedy; intended for a remedy, or for the removal of ...
45887 remediate REME'DIATE, in the sense of remedial, is not in use.
45888 remedied REM'EDIED, pp. [from remedy.] Cured; healed; repaired.
45889 remediless REMED'ILESS, a. [In modern books, the accent is placed on the first syllable, which would be well ...
45890 remedilessly REMED'ILESSLY, adv. In a manner or degree that precludes a remedy.
45891 remedilessness REMED'ILESSNESS, n. Incurableness.
45892 remedy REM'EDY, n. [L. remedium; re and medeor, to heal.]1. That which cures a disease; any medicine or ...
45893 remedying REM'EDYING, ppr. Curing; healing; removing; restoring from a bad to a good state.
45894 remelt REMELT', v.t. [re and melt.] To melt a second time.
45895 remelted REMELT'ED, pp. Melted again.
45896 remelting REMELT'ING, ppr. Melting again.
45897 remember REMEM'BER, v.t. [Low L. rememoror; re and memoror. See Memory.]1. To have in the mind an idea ...
45898 remembered REMEM'BERED, pp. Kept in mind; recollected.
45899 rememberer REMEM'BERER, n. One that remembers.
45900 remembering REMEM'BERING, ppr. Having in mind.
45901 remembrance REMEM'BRANCE, n. 1. The retaining or having in mind an idea which had been present before, or an ...
45902 remembrancer REMEM'BRANCER, n.1. One that reminds, or revives the remembrance of any thing.God is present in ...
45903 rememorate REMEM'ORATE, v.t [L. rememoratus, rememoror.]To remember; to revive in the memory. [Not in use.]
45904 rememoration REMEMORA'TION, n. Remembrance. [Not in use.]
45905 remercie REMER'CIE,
45906 remercy REMER'CY, v.t. To thank. [Not in use.]
45907 remigrate REM'IGRATE, v.i. [L. remigro; re and migro, to migrate.]To remove back again to a former place or ...
45908 remigration REMIGRA'TION, n. Removal back again; a migration to a former place.
45909 remind REMIND, v.t. [re and mind.]1. To put in mind; to bring to the remembrance of; as, to remind a ...
45910 reminded REMINDED, pp. Put in mind.
45911 reminding REMINDING, ppr. Putting in mind; calling attention to.
45912 reminiscence REMINIS'CENCE, n. [L. reminiscens, reminiscor, Gr. See Memory.]1. That faculty of the mind by ...
45913 reminiscential REMINISCEN'TIAL, a. Pertaining to reminiscence or recollection.
45914 remise REMI'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. remissus, remitto; re and mitto, to send.]To give or grant back; to ...
45915 remised REMI'SED, pp. Released.
45916 remising REMI'SING, ppr. Surrendering by deed.
45917 remiss REMISS', a. [L. remissus, supra.]1. Slack; dilatory; negligent; not performing duty or business; ...
45918 remissible REMISS'IBLE, a. That may be remitted or forgiven.
45919 remission REMIS'SION, n. [L. remissio, from remitto, to send back.]1. Abatement; relaxation; moderation; as ...
45920 remissly REMISS'LY, adv. 1. Carelessly; negligently; without close attention.2. Slowly; slackly; not ...
45921 remissness REMISS'NESS, n. Slackness; slowness; carelessness; negligence; want of ardor or vigor; coldness; ...
45922 remit REMIT', v.t. [L. remitto, to send back; re and mitto, to send.]1. To relax, as intensity; to make ...
45923 remitment REMIT'MENT, n.1. The act of remitting to custody.2. Forgiveness; pardon.
45924 remittal REMIT'TAL, n. A remitting; a giving up; surrender; as the remittal of the first fruits.
45925 remittance REMIT'TANCE, n. 1. In commerce, the act of transmitting money, bills or the like, to a distant ...
45926 remitted REMIT'TED, pp. Relaxed; forgiven; pardoned; sent back; referred; given up; transmitted in payment.
45927 remitter REMIT'TER, n.1. One who remits, or makes remittance for payment.2. In law, the restitution of a ...
45928 remnant REM'NANT, n. [contracted from remanent. See Remain.]1. Residue; that which is left after the ...
45929 remodel REMOD'EL, v.t. [re and model.] To model or fashion anew.
45930 remodeled REMOD'ELED, pp. Modeled anew.
45931 remodeling REMOD'ELING, ppr. Modeling again.
45932 remold REMOLD, v.t. [re and mold.] To mold or shape anew.
45933 remolded REMOLDED, pp. Molded again.
45934 remolding REMOLDING, ppr. Molding anew.
45935 remolten REMOLTEN, a or pp. [re and molten, from melt.] Melted again.
45936 remonstrance REMON'STRANCE, n. 1. Show; discovery. [Not in use.]2. Expostulation; strong representation of ...
45937 remonstrant REMON'STRANT, a. Expostulatory; urging strong reasons against an act.REMON'STRANT, n. One who ...
45938 remonstrate REMON'STRATE, v.i. [L. remonstro; re and monstro, to show. See Muster.]1. To exhibit or present ...
45939 remonstrating REMON'STRATING, ppr. Urging strong reasons against a measure.
45940 remonstration REMONSTRA'TION, n. The act of remonstrating. [Little used.]
45941 remonstrator REMON'STRATOR, n. One who remonstrates.
45942 remora REM'ORA, n. [L. from re and moror, to delay.]1. Delay; obstacle; hinderance. [Not in use.]2. ...
45943 remorate REM'ORATE, v.t. [L. remoror.] To hinder; to delay. [Not in use.]
45944 remord REMORD', v.t. [L. remordeo; re and mordeo, to gnaw.]To rebuke; to excite to remorse. [Not in ...
45945 remordency REMORD'ENCY, n. Compunction; remorse.
45946 remorse REMORSE, n. remors'. [L. remorsus, from remordeo.]1. The keen pain or anguish excited by a sense ...
45947 remorsed REMORS'ED, a. Feeling remorse or compunction. [Not used.]
45948 remorseful REMORSEFUL, a. remors'ful.1. Full of remorse.2. Compassionate; feeling tenderly. [Not in ...
45949 remorseless REMORSELESS, a. remors'less. Unpitying; cruel; insensible to distress; as the remorseless ...
45950 remorselessly REMORSELESSLY, adv. remors'lessly. Without remorse.
45951 remorselessness REMORSELESSNESS, n. remors'lessness. Savage cruelty; insensibility to distress.
45952 remote REMO'TE, a. [L. remotus, removeo; re and moveo, to move.]1. Distant in place; not near; as a ...
45953 remotely REMO'TELY, adv.1. At a distance in space or time; not nearly.2. At a distance in consanguinity or ...
45954 remoteness REMO'TENESS, n.1. State of being distant in space or time; distance; as the remoteness of a ...
45955 remotion REMO'TION, n. The act of removing; the state of being removed to a distance. [Little used.]
45956 remount REMOUNT', v.t. To mount again; as, to remount a horse.REMOUNT', v.i. To mount again; to reascend.
45957 removability REMOVABIL'ITY, n. The capacity of being removable from an office or station; capacity of being ...
45958 removable REMOVABLE, a. [from remove.]1. That may be removed from an office or station.Such curate is ...
45959 removal REMOVAL, n.1. The act of moving from one place to another for residence; as the removal of a ...
45960 remove REMOVE, v.t. [L. removeo; re and moveo, to move.]1. To cause to change place; to put from its ...
45961 removed REMOVED, pp. 1. Changed in place; carried to a distance; displaced from office; placed far off.2. ...
45962 removedness REMOVEDNESS, n. State of being removed; remoteness.
45963 remover REMOVER, n. One that removes; as a remover of landmarks.
45964 removing REMOVING, ppr. changing place; carrying or going from one place to another; displacing; banishing.
45965 remunerability REMUNERABIL'ITY, n. the capacity of being rewarded.
45966 remunerable REMU'NERABLE, a. [from remunerate.] That may be rewarded; fit or proper to be recompensed.
45967 remunerate REMU'NERATE, v.t. [L. remunero; re and munero, from munus, a gift.]to reward; to recompense; to ...
45968 remunerated REMU'NERATED, pp. Rewarded; compensated.
45969 remunerating REMU'NERATING, ppr. Rewarding; recompensing.
45970 remuneration REMUNERA'TION, n.1. Reward; recompense; the act of paying an equivalent for services, loss or ...
45971 remunerative REMU'NERATIVE, a. Exercised in rewarding; that bestows rewards; as remunerative justice.
45972 remuneratory REMU'NERATORY, a. Affording recompense; rewarding.
45973 remurmur REMUR'MUR, v.t. [L. remurmuro; re and murmuro.]to utter back in murmurs; to return in murmurs; to ...
45974 remurmured REMUR'MURED, pp. Uttered back in murmurs.
45975 remurmuring REMUR'MURING, ppr. uttering back in low sounds.
45976 renal RE'NAL, a. [L. renalis, from renes, the kidneys.]Pertaining to the kidneys or reins; as the renal ...
45977 renard REN'ARD, n. a fox; a name used in fables, but not in common discourse.
45978 renascency RENAS'CENCY, n. The state of springing or being produced again.
45979 renascent RENAS'CENT, a. [L. renascens, renascor; re and nascor, to be born.]Springing or rising into being ...
45980 renascible RENAS'CIBLE, a. That may be reproduced; that may spring again into being.
45981 renavigate RENAV'IGATE, v.t. [re and navigate.] To navigate again; as, to renavigate the Pacific ocean.
45982 renavigated RENAV'IGATED, pp. Navigated again; sailed over anew.
45983 renavigating RENAV'IGATING, ppr. Navigating again.
45984 rencounter RENCOUN'TER, n. Literally, a meeting of two bodies. Hence,1. A meeting in opposition or ...
45985 rend REND, v.t. pret. and pp. rent. [Eng. cranny, L. crena, Gr.]1. To separate any substance into ...
45986 render REND'ER, n. [from rend.] One that tears by violence.
45987 renderable REN'DERABLE, a. That may be rendered.
45988 rendered REN'DERED, pp. Returned; paid back; given; assigned; made; translated; surrendered; afforded.
45989 rendering REN'DERING, ppr. Returning; giving back; assigning; making; translating; surrendering; ...
45990 rendezvous REN'DEZVOUS, n. [This word is anglicized, and may well be pronounced as an English word.]1. A ...
45991 rendezvousing REN'DEZVOUSING, ppr. Assembling at a particular place.
45992 rendible REN'DIBLE, a. 1. That may be yielded or surrendered.2. That may be translated. [little used in ...
45993 rendition RENDI'TION, n. [from render.] 1. The act of yielding possession; surrender.2. Translation.
45994 renegade REN'EGADE,
45995 renegado RENEGA'DO, n. [L. re and nego, to deny.]1. An apostate from the faith.2. One who deserts to an ...
45996 renege RENE'GE, v.t. [L. renego.] To deny; to disown. Obs.RENE'GE, v.i. To deny. Obs.
45997 renerve RENERVE, v.t. renerv'. [re and nerve.] To nerve again; to give new vigor to.
45998 renerved RENERV'ED, pp. Nerved anew.
45999 renerving RENERV'ING, ppr. Giving new vigor to.
46000 renew RENEW', v.t. [L. renovo; re and novo, or re and new.]1. To renovate; to restore to a former ...
46001 renewable RENEW'ABLE, a. That may be renewed; as a lease renewable at pleasure.
46002 renewal RENEW'AL, n. 1. The act of renewing; the act of forming anew; as the renewal of a treaty.2. ...
46003 renewed RENEW'ED, pp. Made new again; repaired; re-established; repeated; revived; renovated; regenerated.
46004 renewedness RENEW'EDNESS, n. State of being renewed.
46005 renewer RENEW'ER, n. One who renews.
46006 renewing RENEW'ING, ppr.1. Making new again; repairing; re-establishing; repeating; reviving; renovating.2. ...
46007 reniform REN'IFORM, a. [L. renes, the kidneys, and form.]Having the form or shape of the kidneys.
46008 renitence REN'ITENCE,
46009 renitency REN'ITENCY, n. [L. renitens, renitor, to resist; re and nitor, to struggle or strive.]1. The ...
46010 renitent REN'ITENT, a. Resisting pressure or the effect of it; acting against impulse by elastic force.
46011 rennet REN'NET, n.The concreted milk found in the stomach of a sucking quadruped, particularly of the ...
46012 renneting REN'NETING, n. A kind of apple.
46013 renounce RENOUNCE, v.t. renouns'. [L. renuncio; re and nuncio, to declare, from the root of nomen, name.]1. ...
46014 renounced RENOUN'CED, pp. Disowned; denied; rejected; disclaimed.
46015 renouncement RENOUNCEMENT, n. renouns'ment. The act of disclaiming or rejecting; renunciation.
46016 renouncer RENOUN'CER, n. One who disowns or disclaims.
46017 renouncing RENOUN'CING, ppr. Disowning; disclaiming; rejecting.RENOUN'CING, n. The act of disowning, ...
46018 renovate REN'OVATE, v.t. [L. renovo; re and novo, to make new; novus, new.]To renew; to restore to the ...
46019 renovated REN'OVATED, pp. Renewed; made new, fresh or vigorous.
46020 renovating REN'OVATING, ppr. Renewing.
46021 renovation RENOVA'TION, n. [L. renovatio.]1. The act of renewing; a making new after decay, destruction or ...
46022 renown RENOWN', n.Fame; celebrity; exalted reputation derived from the extensive praise of great ...
46023 renowned RENOWN'ED, a. Famous; celebrated for great and heroic achievements, for distinguished qualities or ...
46024 renownedly RENOWN'EDLY, adv. With fame or celebrity.
46025 renownless RENOWN'LESS, a. Without renown; inglorious.
46026 rent RENT, pp. of rend. Torn asunder; split or burst by violence; torn.RENT, n. [from rend. 1. A ...
46027 rentable RENT'ABLE, a. That may be rented.
46028 rentage RENT'AGE, n. Rent. [Not used.]
46029 rental RENT'AL, n. A schedule or account of rents.
46030 rented RENT'ED, pp. Leased on rent.
46031 renter RENT'ER, n. One who leases an estate; more generally, the lessee or tenant who takes an estate or ...
46032 rentered REN'TERED, pp. Fine-drawn; sewed artfully together.
46033 renterer REN'TERER, n. a Fine-drawer.
46034 rentering REN'TERING, ppr. Fine-drawing; sewing artfully together.
46035 renting RENT'ING, ppr. Leasing on rent; taking on rent.
46036 rentroll RENT'ROLL, n. [rent and roll.] A rental; a list or account of rents or income.
46037 renunciation RENUNCIA'TION, n. [L. renunciatio.] The act of renouncing; a disowning; rejection. [See ...
46038 renverse RENVERSE, v.t. renvers'. To reverse. [Not used.]RENVERSE, a. renvers'. In heraldry, inverted; ...
46039 renversement RENVERSEMENT, n. renvers'ment. The act of reversing. [Not in use.]
46040 reobtain REOBTA'IN, v.t. [re and obtain.] To obtain again.
46041 reobtainable REOBTA'INABLE, a. That may be obtained again.
46042 reobtained REOBTA'INED, pp. Obtained again.
46043 reobtaining REOBTA'INING, ppr. Obtaining again.
46044 reoppose REOPPO'SE, v.t. s as z. To oppose again.
46045 reordain REORDA'IN, v.t. [re and ordain.]To ordain again, as when the first ordination is defective.
46046 reordained REORDA'INED, pp. Ordained again.
46047 reordaining REORDA'INING, ppr. Ordaining again.
46048 reordination REORDINA'TION, n. A second ordination.
46049 reorganization REORGANIZA'TION, n. The act of organizing anew; as repeated reorganization of the troops.
46050 reorganize REOR'GANIZE, v.t. [re and organize.] To organize anew; to reduce again to a regular body, or to a ...
46051 reorganized REOR'GANIZED, pp. Organized anew.
46052 reorganizing REOR'GANIZING, ppr. Organizing anew.
46053 repacified REPAC'IFIED, pp. Pacified or appeased again.
46054 repacify REPAC'IFY, v.t. [re and pacify.] To pacify again.
46055 repacifying REPAC'IFYING, ppr. Pacifying again.
46056 repack REPACK', v.t. [re and pact.] To pack a second time; as, to repack beef or pork.
46057 repacked REPACK'ED, pp. Packed again.
46058 repacker REPACK'ER, n. One that repacks.
46059 repacking REPACK'ING, ppr. Packing anew.
46060 repaid REPA'ID, pp. of repay. Paid back.
46061 repair REPA'IR, v.t. [L. reparo; re and paro, to prepare. See Pare.]1. To restore to a sound or good ...
46062 repairable REPA'IRABLE, a. That may be repaired; reparable.
46063 repaired REPA'IRED, pp. Restored to a good or sound state; rebuilt; made good.
46064 repairer REPA'IRER, n. One who repairs, restores or makes amends; as the repairer of decay.
46065 repairing REPA'IRING, ppr. Restoring to a sound state; rebuilding; making amends for loss or injury.
46066 repand REPAND', a. [L. repandus.] In botany, a repand leaf is one, the rim of which is terminated by ...
46067 repandous REPAND'OUS, a. [supra.] Bent upwards; convexedly crooked.
46068 reparable REP'ARABLE, a. [L. reparabilis. See Repair.]1. That may be repaired or restored to a sound or ...
46069 reparably REP'ARABLY, adv. In a manner admitting of restoration to a good state, or of amends, supply or ...
46070 reparation REPARA'TION, n.1. That act of repairing; restoration to soundness or a good state; as the ...
46071 reparative REPAR'ATIVE, a. That repairs; restoring to a sound or good state; that amends defect or makes ...
46072 repartee REPARTEE', n. A smart, ready and witty reply.Cupid was as bad as he; hear but the youngster's ...
46073 repass REP'ASS, v.t.To pass again; to pass or travel back; as, to repass a bridge or a river; to repass ...
46074 repassed REP'ASSED, pp. Passed or traveled back.
46075 repassing REP'ASSING, ppr. Passing back.
46076 repast REP'AST, n. [L. re and pasco, to feed.]1. The act of taking food; or the food taken; a meal.From ...
46077 repasture REP'ASTURE, n. Food; entertainment. [not in use.]
46078 repay REPA'Y, v.t. 1. To pay back; to refund; as, to repay money borrowed or advanced.2. To make ...
46079 repayable REPA'YABLE, a. That is to be repaid or refunded; as money lent, repayable at the end of sixty ...
46080 repaying REPA'YING, ppr. Paying back; compensating; requiting.
46081 repayment REPA'YMENT, n.1. The act of paying back; reimbursement.2. The money or other thing repaid.
46082 repeal REPE'AL, v.t. [L. appello; ad and pello.]1. To recall. [Obsolete as it respects persons.]2. To ...
46083 repealability REPEALABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being repealable.
46084 repealable REPEA'LABLE, a. Capable of being repealed; revocable by the same power that enacted. It is held ...
46085 repealed REPE'ALED, pp. Revoked; abrogated.
46086 repealer REPE'ALER, n. One that repeals.
46087 repealing REPE'ALING, ppr. Revoking; abrogating.
46088 repeat REPE'AT, v.t. [L. repeto; re and peto, to make at or drive towards. this verb ought to be written ...
46089 repeated REPE'ATED, pp. done, attempted or spoken again; recited.
46090 repeatedly REPE'ATEDLY, adv. More than once; again and again, indefinitely. He has been repeatedly warned of ...
46091 repeater REPE'ATER, n. 1. One that repeats; one that recites or rehearses.2. A watch that strikes the ...
46092 repeating REPE'ATING, ppr. Doing or uttering again.
46093 repedation REPEDA'TION, n. [Low L. repedo; re and pes, the foot.] A stepping or going back. [Not in use.]
46094 repel REPEL', v.t. [l. repello; re and pello, to drive.]1. to drive back; to force to return; to check ...
46095 repelled REPEL'LED, pp. Driven back; resisted.
46096 repellency REPEL'LENCY, n.1. The principle of repulsion; the quality of a substance which expands or ...
46097 repellent REPEL'LENT, a. Driving back; able or tending to repel.REPEL'LENT, n. In medicine, a medicine ...
46098 repeller REPEL'LER, n. He or that which repels.
46099 repelling REPEL'LING, ppr. Driving back; resisting advance or approach effectually.
46100 repent RE'PENT, a. [L. repo, to creep.] Creeping; as a repent root.
46101 repentance REPENT'ANCE, n.1. Sorrow for any thing done or said; the pain or grief which a person experiences ...
46102 repentant REPENT'ANT, a. 1. Sorrowful for past conduct or words.2. Sorrowful for sin.3. Expressing or ...
46103 repenter REPENT'ER, n. One that repents.
46104 repenting REPENT'ING, ppr. Grieving for what is past; feeling pain or contrition for sin.REPENT'ING, n. Act ...
46105 repentingly REPENT'INGLY, adv. With repentance.
46106 repeople REPEOPLE, v.t. [re and people.]To people anew; to furnish again with a stock of people. The world ...
46107 repeopled REPEOPLED, pp. Stocked anew with inhabitants.
46108 repeopling REPEOPLING, ppr. Furnishing again with a stock of inhabitants.REPEOPLING, n. [supra.] The act of ...
46109 repercuss REPERCUSS', v.t. [L. repercutio; re and percutio; per and quatio, to shake, to beat.] To beat ...
46110 repercussion REPERCUS'SION, n. [L. repercussio.]1. The act of driving back; reverberation; as the repercussion ...
46111 repercussive REPERCUSS'IVE, a. 1. Driving back; having the power of sending back; causing to reverberate; as ...
46112 repertitious REPERTI'TIOUS, a. [from L. repertus, reperio.] Found; gained by finding. [Not in use.]
46113 repertory REP'ERTORY, n. [L. repertorium, from reperio, to find again; re and aperio, to uncover.]1. A ...
46114 repetend REPETEND;, n. [L. repetendus, repeto.] The parts of decimals continually repeated.
46115 repetition REPETI'TION, n. [L. repetitio. See Repeat.]1. The act of doing or uttering a second time; ...
46116 repetitional REPETI'TIONAL,
46117 repetitionary REPETI'TIONARY, a. Containing repetition. [Little used.]
46118 repine REPI'NE, v.i. [re and pine.] 1. To fret one's self; to be discontented; to feel inward ...
46119 repiner REPI'NER, n. One that repines or murmurs.
46120 repining REPI'NING, ppr. 1. Fretting one's self; feeling discontent that preys on the spirits; complaining; ...
46121 repiningly REPI'NINGLY, adv. With murmuring or complaint.
46122 replace REPLA'CE, v.t.1. To put again in the former place; as, to replace a book.The earl - was replaced ...
46123 replaced REPLA'CED, pp. Put again in a former place; supplied by a substitute. Thus in petrification, the ...
46124 replacement REPLA'CEMENT, n. The act of replacing.
46125 replacing REPLA'CING, ppr. Putting again in a former place; supplying the place of with a substitute.
46126 replait REPLA'IT, v.t. [re and plait.] To plait or fold again; to fold one part over another again and ...
46127 replaited REPLA'ITED, pp. Folded again or often.
46128 replaiting REPLA'ITING, ppr. Folding again or often.
46129 replant REPLANT', v.t. To plant again.
46130 replantable REPLANT'ABLE, a. That may be planted again.
46131 replantation REPLANTA'TION, n. The act of planting again.
46132 replanted REPLANT'ED, pp. Planted anew.
46133 replanting REPLANT'ING, ppr. Planting again.
46134 replead REPLE'AD, v.t. [re and plead.] To plead again.
46135 repleader REPLE'ADER, n. In law, a second pleading or course of pleadings; or the power of pleading ...
46136 replenish REPLEN'ISH, v.t. [L. re and plenus, full.]1. To fill; to stock with numbers or abundance. The ...
46137 replenished REPLEN'ISHED, pp. Filled; abundantly supplied.
46138 replenishing REPLEN'ISHING, ppr. Filling; supplying with abundance.
46139 replete REPLE'TE, a. [L. repletus; re and pleo, to fill.] Completely filled; full.His words replete with ...
46140 repletion REPLE'TION, n. [L. repletio.]1. The state of being completely filled; or superabundant ...
46141 repletive REPLE'TIVE, a. Filling; replenishing.
46142 repleviable REPLEV'IABLE, a. [See Replevy.] In law, that may be replevied.
46143 replevied REPLEV'IED, pp. Taken by a writ of replevin.
46144 replevin REPLEV'IN, n. [See Replevy.]1. An action or remedy granted on a distress, by which a person whose ...
46145 replevisable REPLEV'ISABLE, a. That may be replevied; but little used, being superseded by repleviable.
46146 replevy REPLEV'Y, v.t. [re and pledge. Law L. replegiabilis and replegiare.]1. To take back, by a writ ...
46147 replevying REPLEV'YING, ppr. Retaking a distress. [See Replevy.]
46148 replication REPLICA'TION, n. [L. replicatio. See Reply.] 1. An answer; a reply. Particularly,2. In law ...
46149 replier REPLI'ER, n. One who answers; he that speaks or writes in return to something spoken or written.
46150 reply REPLY', v.i. [L. replico; re and plico, to fold, that is, to turn or send to. See apply, Employ ...
46151 replying REPLY'ING, ppr. Answering either in words or writing.
46152 repolish REPOL'ISH, v.t. To polish again.
46153 repolished REPOL'ISHED, pp. Polished again.
46154 repolishing REPOL'ISHING, ppr. Polishing anew.
46155 report REPORT, v.t. [l. reporto, to carry back; re and porto, to bear.]1. To bear or bring back an ...
46156 reported REPORTED, pp. Told, related or stated in answer to inquiry or direction; circulated in popular ...
46157 reporter REPORTER, n.1. One that gives an account, verbal or written, official or unofficial.2. An officer ...
46158 reporting REPORTING, ppr. Giving account; relating; presenting statements of facts or of adjudged cases in ...
46159 reportingly REPORTINGLY, adv. By report or common fame.
46160 reposal REPO'SAL, n. s as z. [from repose.] The act of reposing or resting.
46161 repose REPO'SE, v.t. s as z. [l. repono, reposui.]1. To lay at rest.- After the toil of battle, to ...
46162 reposed REPO'SED, pp. Laid at rest; placed in confidence.
46163 reposedness REPO'SEDNESS, n. State of being at rest.
46164 reposing REPO'SING, ppr. Laying at rest; placing in confidence; lying at rest; sleeping.
46165 reposit REPOS'IT, v.t. [L. repositus, repono.] To lay up; to lodge, as for safety or preservation.Others ...
46166 reposited REPOS'ITED, pp. Laid up; deposited for safety or preservation.
46167 repositing REPOS'ITING, ppr. Laying up or lodging for safety or preservation.
46168 reposition REPOSI'TION, n. The act of replacing; as the reposition of a bone.
46169 repository REPOS'ITORY, n. [L. repositorium, from repono.]A place where things are or may be deposited for ...
46170 repossess REPOSSESS', v.t. [re and possess.] To possess again.Nor shall my father repossess the land.To ...
46171 repossessed REPOSSESS'ED, pp. Possessed again.
46172 repossessing REPOSSESS'ING, ppr. Possessing again; obtaining possession again.
46173 repossession REPOSSES'SION, n. The act of possessing again; the state of possessing again.
46174 repour REPOUR, v.t. [re and pour.] To pour again.
46175 reprehend REPREHEND', v.t. [l. reprehendo; re and prehendo, to seize.]1. To chide; to reprove.Pardon me for ...
46176 reprehended REPREHEND'ED, pp. Reproved; blamed.
46177 reprehender REPREHEND'ER, n. One that reprehends; one that blames or reproves.
46178 reprehending REPREHEND'ING, ppr. Reproving; blaming.
46179 reprehensible REPREHEN'SIBLE, a. [L. reprehensus.]Blamable; culpable; censurable; deserving reproof; applied to ...
46180 reprehensibleness REPREHEN'SIBLENESS, n. Blamableness; culpableness.
46181 reprehensibly REPREHEN'SIBLY, adv. Culpably; in a manner to deserve censure or reproof.
46182 reprehension REPREHEN'SION, n. [L. reprehensio.] Reproof; censure; open blame. Faults not punishable, may ...
46183 reprehensive REPREHEN'SIVE, a. Containing reproof.
46184 reprehensory REPREHEN'SORY, a. Containing reproof.
46185 represent REPRESENT', v.t. s as z. [L. repraesento; re and Low L. praesenter, from praesens, present.]1. To ...
46186 representance REPRESENT'ANCE, n. Representation; likeness. [Not used.]
46187 representant REPRESENT'ANT, n. A representative. [Not in use.]
46188 representation REPRESENTA'TION, n.1. The act of representing, describing or showing.2. That which exhibits by ...
46189 representative REPRESENT'ATIVE, a.1. Exhibiting a similitude.They own the legal sacrifices, though ...
46190 representatively REPRESENT'ATIVELY, adv.1. In the character of another; by a representative.2. By substitution; by ...
46191 representativeness REPRESENT'ATIVENESS, n. The state or quality of being representative.Dr. Burnet observes that ...
46192 represented REPRESENT'ED, pp. Shown; exhibited; personated; described; stated; having substitutes.
46193 representer REPRESENT'ER, n.1. One who shows, exhibits or describes.2. A representative; one that acts by ...
46194 representing REPRESENT'ING, ppr. Showing; exhibiting; describing; acting in another's character; acting in the ...
46195 representment REPRESENT'MENT, n. Representation; image; an idea proposed as exhibiting the likeness of ...
46196 repress REPRESS', v.t. [L. repressus, reprimo; re and premo, to press.]1. To crush; to quell; to put ...
46197 repressed REPRESS'ED, pp. Crushed; subdued.
46198 represser REPRESS'ER, n. One that crushes or subdues.
46199 repressing REPRESS'ING, ppr. Crushing; subduing; checking.
46200 repression REPRES'SION, n.1. The act of subduing; as the repression of tumults.2. Check; restraint.
46201 repressive REPRESS'IVE, a. Having power to crush; tending to subdue or restrain.
46202 reprieval REPRIE'VAL, n. Respit; reprieve. [Not in use.]
46203 reprieve REPRIE'VE, v.t. [I know not the origin of this word.]1. To respit after sentence of death; to ...
46204 reprieved REPRIE'VED, pp. Respited; allowed a longer time to live than the sentence of death permits.
46205 reprieving REPRIE'VING, ppr. Respiting; suspending the execution of for a time.
46206 reprimand REP'RIMAND, v.t. [If this word is from L. reprimo, it must be formed from the participle ...
46207 reprimanded REP'RIMANDED, pp. Severely reproved.
46208 reprimanding REP'RIMANDING, ppr. Reproving severely.
46209 reprint REPRINT', v.t. [re and print.]1. To print again; to print a second or any new edition.2. To ...
46210 reprinted REPRINT'ED, pp. Printed anew; impressed again.
46211 reprinting REPRINT'ING, ppr. Printing again; renewing an impression.
46212 reprisal REPRI'SAL, n. s as z. [L. prendo.]1. The seizure or taking of any thing from an enemy by way of ...
46213 reprise REPRI'SE, n. s as z. A taking by way of retaliation. Obs.REPRI'SE, v.t. s as z. 1. To take ...
46214 reprizes REPRI'ZES, n. plu. In law, yearly deductions out of a manor, as rent-charge, rent-seek, &c.
46215 reproach REPROACH, v.t. [L. prox, in proximus.]1. To censure in terms of opprobrium or contempt.Mezentius ...
46216 reproachable REPROACHABLE, a. 1. Deserving reproach.2. Opprobrious; scurrilous. [Not proper.]
46217 reproached REPROACHED, pp. Censured in terms of contempt; upbraided.
46218 reproachful REPROACHFUL, a. 1. Expressing censure with contempt; scurrilous; opprobrious; as reproachful ...
46219 reproachfully REPROACHFULLY, adv.1. In terms of reproach; opprobriously; scurrilously 1Tim. 5.2. Shamefully; ...
46220 reprobate REPROBATE, a. [L. reprobatus, reprobo, to disallow; re and probo, to prove.]1. Not enduring proof ...
46221 reprobated REP'ROBATED, pp. Disapproved with abhorrence; rejected; abandoned to wickedness or to destruction.
46222 reprobateness REP'ROBATENESS, n. The state of being reprobate.
46223 reprobater REP'ROBATER, n. One that reprobates.
46224 reprobating REP'ROBATING, ppr. Disapproving with extreme dislike; rejecting; abandoning to wickedness or to ...
46225 reprobation REPROBA'TION, n. [L. reprobatio.]1. The act of disallowing with detestation, or of expressing ...
46226 reprobationer REPROBA'TIONER, n. One who abandons others to eternal destruction.
46227 reproduce REPRODU'CE, v.t. [re and produce.] To produce again; to renew the production of a thing ...
46228 reproduced REPRODU'CED, pp. Produced anew.
46229 reproducer REPRODU'CER, n. One or that which reproduces.
46230 reproducing REPRODU'CING, ppr. Producing anew.
46231 reproduction REPRODUC'TION, n. The act or process of reproducing that which has been destroyed; as the ...
46232 reproof REPROOF', n. [from reprove. 1. Blame expressed to the face; censure for a fault; ...
46233 reprovable REPROVABLE, a. [from reprove.] Worthy of reproof; deserving censure; blamable.
46234 reprove REPROVE, v.t. [L. reprobo; re and probo, to prove.]1. To blame; to censure.I will not reprove ...
46235 reproved REPROVED, pp. Blamed; reprehended; convinced of a fault.
46236 reprover REPROVER, n. One that reproves; he or that which blames. Conscience is a bold reprover.
46237 reproving REPROVING, ppr. Blaming; censuring.
46238 reprune REPRU'NE, v.t. [re and prune.] To prune a second time.
46239 repruned REPRU'NED, pp. Pruned a second time.
46240 repruning REPRU'NING, ppr. Pruning a second time.
46241 reptile REP'TILE, a. [L. reptilis, from repo, to creep, Gr. See Creep.]1. Creeping; moving on the belly, ...
46242 republic REPUB'LIC, n. [L. respublica; res and publica; public affairs.]1. A commonwealth; a state in ...
46243 republican REPUB'LICAN, a.1. Pertaining to a republic; consisting of a commonwealth; as a republican ...
46244 republicanism REPUB'LICANISM, n. 1. A republican form or system of government.2. Attachment to a republican ...
46245 republicanize REPUB'LICANIZE, v.t. To convert to republican principles; as, to republicanize the rising ...
46246 republication REPUBLICA'TION, n. [re and publication.]1. A second publication, or a new publication of ...
46247 republish REPUB'LISH, v.t. [re and publish.]1. To publish a second time, or to publish a new edition of a ...
46248 republished REPUB'LISHED, pp. Published anew.
46249 republisher REPUB'LISHER, n. One who republishes.
46250 republishing REPUB'LISHING, ppr. Publishing again.
46251 repudiable REPU'DIABLE, a. [from repudiate.] That may be rejected; fit or proper to be put away.
46252 repudiate REPU'DIATE, v.t. [L. repudio.]1. To cast away; to reject; to discard.Atheists - repudiate all ...
46253 repudiated REPU'DIATED, pp. Cast off; rejected; discarded; divorced.
46254 repudiating REPU'DIATING, ppr. Casting off; rejecting; divorcing.
46255 repudiation REPUDIA'TION, n. [L. repudiatio.]1. Rejection.2. Divorce; as the repudiation of a wife.
46256 repugn REPUGN, n. repu'ne. [L. repugno; re and pugno.To oppose; to resist. [Not used.]
46257 repugnance REPUG'NANCE,