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Friday - October 31, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comBrowse letter: l

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ID Word Definition
31947 l L, the twelfth letter of the English alphabet, is usually denominated a semi-vowel, or a liquid. ...
31948 la LA, exclam. [perhaps corrupted from look, but this is doubtful.] Look; see; behold.LA, in music, ...
31949 lab LAB, n. a great talker; a blabber. Obs.
31950 labadist LAB'ADIST, n. the Labadists were followers of Jean de Labadie, who lived in the 17th century. ...
31951 labdanum LABDANUM. [See Ladanum.]
31952 labefaction LABEFAC'TION, n. [L. labefactio, from labefacio, labo, to totter, and facio, to make.]A weakening ...
31953 labefy LAB'EFY, v.t. To weaken or impair. [Not used.]
31954 label LA'BEL, n.1. A narrow slip of silk, paper or parchment, containing a name or title, and affixed to ...
31955 labeled LA'BELED, pp. Furnished with a label.
31956 labeling LA'BELING, ppr. Distinguishing by a label.
31957 labent LA'BENT, a. [L. labens.] Sliding; gliding.
31958 labial LA'BIAL, a. [L. labium, a lip. See Lip.]Pertaining to the lips; formed by the lips; as a labial ...
31959 labiate LA'BIATE,
31960 labiated LA'BIATED, a. [from L. labium, lip.] In botany, a labiate corol is irregular, monopetalous, with ...
31961 labile LA'BILE, a. [Low L. labilis.] Liable to err, fall or apostatize. [Not used.]
31962 labiodental LABIODENT'AL, a. [labium, a lip, and dens, a tooth.]Formed or pronounced by the cooperation of the ...
31963 labor LA'BOR, n. [L. labor, from labo, to fail.] 1. Exertion of muscular strength, or bodily exertion ...
31964 laborant LA'BORANT, n. A chimist. [Not used.]
31965 laboratory LAB'ORATORY, n.1. A house or place where operations and experiments in chimistry, pharmacy, ...
31966 labored LA'BORED, pp. Tilled; cultivated; formed with labor.
31967 laborer LA'BORER, n. One who labors in a toilsome occupation; a man who does work that requires little ...
31968 laboring LA'BORING, ppr.1. Exerting muscular strength or intellectual power; toiling; moving with pain or ...
31969 laborious LABO'RIOUS, a. [L. laboriosus.]1. Using exertion; employing labor; diligent in work or service; ...
31970 laboriously LABO'RIOUSLY, adv. With labor, toil or difficulty.
31971 laboriousness LABO'RIOUSNESS, n.1. The quality of being laborious, or attended with toil; toilsomeness; ...
31972 laborless LA'BORLESS, a. Not laborious.
31973 laborsome LA'BORSOME, a. Made with great labor and diligence. [Not in use.]
31974 laburnum LABURN'UM, n. A tree of the genus Cytisus.
31975 labyrinth LAB'YRINTH, n. [L. labyrinthus; Gr.]1. Among the ancients, an edifice or place full of ...
31976 labyrinthian LABYRINTH'IAN, a. Winding; intricate; perplexed.
31977 lac LAC, n. Gum-lac, so called, but improperly, not being a gum, but a resin. It is deposited on ...
31978 laccic LAC'CIC, a. Pertaining to lac, or produced from it; as laccic acid.
31980 lace-bark LA'CE-BARK, n. A shrub in the West Indies, the Daphue lagetto, so called from the texture of its ...
31979 lace LACE, n. [L. laqueus.]1. A work composed of threads interwoven into a net, and worked on a pillow ...
31981 laced LA'CED, pp. Fastened with lace or a string; also, tricked off with lace.Laced coffee, coffee with ...
31982 laceman LA'CEMAN, n. A man who deals in lace.
31983 lacerable LAC'ERABLE, a. [See Lacerate.] That may be torn.
31984 lacerate LAC'ERATE, v.t. [L. lacero, to tear.] To tear; to rend; to separate a substance by violence or ...
31985 lacerated LAC'ERATED, pp. or a. 1. Rent; torn.2. In botany, having the edge variously cut into irregular ...
31986 laceration LACERA'TION, n. The act of tearing or rending; the breach made by rending.
31987 lacerative LAC'ERATIVE, a. Tearing; having the power to tear; as lacerative humors.
31988 lacertine LAC'ERTINE, a. [L. lacertus.] Like a lizard.
31989 lacertus LACER'TUS, n. The girroc, a fish of the gar-fish kind; also, the lizard-fish.
31990 lacewoman LA'CEWOMAN, n. A woman who makes or sells lace.
31991 lache LACHE,
31992 laches LACH'ES, n. [L. laxus, lax, slow.] In law, neglect; negligence.
31993 lachrymable LACH'RYMABLE, a. Lamentable.
31994 lachrymal LACH'RYMAL, a. [L. lachryma, a tear.]1. Generating or secreting tears; as the lachrymal gland.2. ...
31995 lachrymary LACH'RYMARY, a. Containing tears.
31996 lachrymation LACHRYMA'TION, n. The act of shedding tears.
31997 lachrymatory LACH'RYMATORY, n. A vessel found in sepulchers of the ancients, in which it has been supposed the ...
31998 lacing LAC'ING, ppr. Fastening with a string; adorned or trimmed with lace.
31999 laciniate LACIN'IATE,
32000 laciniated LACIN'IATED, a. [L. lacinia, a hem.]1. Adorned with fringes.2. In botany, jagged.
32002 lack-a-day LACK-A-DAY, exclam. of sorrow or regret; alas.
32001 lack LACK, v.t. [L. deliquium, which seems to be connected with linquo, to leave, to faint, and with ...
32003 lackbrain LACK'BRAIN, n. One that wants brains, or is deficient in understanding.
32004 lacker LACK'ER,
32005 lackered LACK'ERED, pp. Covered with lacker; varnished.
32006 lackey LACK'EY, n. [L. lego, to send.]An attending servant; a footboy or footman.LACK'EY, v.t. To attend ...
32007 lacklinen LACK'LINEN, a. Wanting shirts. [Little used.]
32008 lackluster LACK'LUSTER, a. Wanting luster or brightness.
32009 lacmus LAC'MUS, n. A blue pigment, formed from archil, a species of lichen. [See Archil.] It is ...
32010 laconic LACON'IC,
32011 laconical LACON'ICAL, a. [l. laconicus, from Laconia or Lacomes, the Spartans.]1. Short; brief; pithy; ...
32012 laconically LACON'ICALLY, adv. Briefly; concisely; as a sentiment laconically expressed.
32013 laconicism LACON'ICISM, n. [L. lacomismus.]1. A concise style.2. A brief sententious phrase or expression.
32014 laconics LACON'ICS, n. A book of Pausanias, which treats of Lacedemonia.
32015 laconism LA'CONISM,
32016 lacquer LAC'QUER, n. A kind of varnish. The basis of lackers is a solution of the substance called ...
32017 lactage LAC'TAGE,n. The produce of animals yielding milk.
32018 lactant LAC'TANT, a. [L. lactans, from lacto, to give suck; lac, milk.] Suckling; giving suck. [Little ...
32019 lactary LAC'TARY, a. [L. lactarius, from lacto; lac, milk.]Milky; full of white juice like milk. [Little ...
32020 lactate LAC'TATE, n. In chimistry, a salt formed by the lactic acid, or acid of milk, with a base.
32021 lactation LACTA'TION, n. [L. lacto, to give suck.] The act of giving suck; or the time of suckling.
32022 lacteal LAC'TEAL, a. 1. Pertaining to milk.2. Conveying chyle; as a lacteal vessel.LAC'TEAL, n. A ...
32023 lacteous LAC'TEOUS, a. [L. lacteus, from lac, milk.1. Milky; resembling milk.2. Lacteal; conveying chyle; ...
32024 lactescence LACTES'CENCE, n. [L. lactescens, lactescp, from lacto; lac, milk.]1. Tendency to milk; milkiness ...
32025 lactescent LACTES'CENT, a.1. Producing milk or white juice.2. Abounding with a thick colored juice.
32026 lactic LAC'TIC, a. Pertaining to milk, or procured from sour milk or whey; as the lactic acid.
32027 lactiferous LACTIF'EROUS, a. [L. lac, milk, and fero, to bear.]1. Bearing or conveying milk or white juice; ...
32028 lacunar LAC'UNAR, n. [L.] An arched roof or ceiling.
32029 lacunose LACUNO'SE, a. [L. lacunosus, from lacuna, a ditch or hollow.]Furrowed or pitted. A lacunose leaf ...
32030 lacunous LACU'NOUS,
32031 lad LAD, n. [Heb. to procreate or bear young.] A young man or boy; a stripling.
32032 ladanum LAD'ANUM, n. The resinous juice which exsudes from the leaves of the Cistus ladanifera, a shrub ...
32033 ladder LAD'DER, n.1. A frame of wood, consisting of two side pieces, connected by rounds inserted in them ...
32034 lade LADE, v.t. pret. laded; pp. laded, laden.1. To load; to put on or in, as a burden or freight. We ...
32035 laded LA'DED,
32036 laden LA'DEN, pp. 1. Loaded; charged with a burden or freight.2. a. Oppressed; burdened.
32037 lading LA'DING, ppr. Loading; charging with a burden or freight; throwing or dipping out.LA'DING, n. ...
32038 ladkin LAD'KIN, n. A little lad; a youth. [Little used.]
32040 ladle-ful LA'DLE-FUL, n. The quantity contained in a ladle.
32039 ladle LA'DLE, n. 1. A utensil somewhat like a dish, with a long handle, used for throwing or dipping ...
32042 lady-bird LA'DY-BIRD,
32043 lady-bug LA'DY-BUG,
32044 lady-cow LA'DY-COW,
32045 lady-day LA'DY-DAY, n. The day of the annunciation of the holy virgin, March 25th.
32046 lady-fly LA'DY-FLY, n. A small red vaginopennous or sheath-winged insect.A coleopterous insect of the genus ...
32047 lady-like LA'DY-LIKE, a. 1. Like a lady in manners; genteel; well bred.2. Soft; tender; delicate.
32041 lady LA'DY, n.1. A woman of distinction. Originally, the title of lady was given to the daughters of ...
32048 ladyship LA'DYSHIP, n. The title of a lady.
32049 lag LAG, a. [This word belongs to the root of slack, slow, sluggish, languish, long; Gr. See the ...
32050 laggard LAG'GARD, n. Slow; sluggish; backward. [Not used.]
32051 lagger LAG'GER, a. A loiterer; an idler; one who moves slowly and falls behind.
32052 lagging LAG'GING, ppr. Loitering; moving slowly and falling behind.The nurse went lagging after with the ...
32053 lagoon LAGOON',
32054 lagune LAGU'NE, n. A fen, moor, marsh, shallow pond or lake; as the lagunes of Venice.
32055 laic LA'IC,
32056 laical LA'ICAL, a. [L. laicus, Gr. from people.]Belonging to the laity or people, in distinction from the ...
32057 laid LAID, pret. and pp. of lay; so written for layed.
32058 lain LAIN, pp. of lie. Lien would be a more regular orthography, but lain is generally used.
32059 lair LAIR, n. [L. locus.]1. A place of rest; the bed or couch of a boar or wild beast.2. Pasture; the ...
32060 laird LAIRD, n. In the Scots dialect, a lord; the proprietor of a manor.
32061 laity LA'ITY, n. [Gr. people. See Laic.]1. The people, as distinguished from the clergy; the body of ...
32062 lake LAKE, v.i. To play; to sport. North of England. This is play, without a prefix.LAKE, n. [L. ...
32063 laky LA'KY, a. Pertaining to a lake or lakes.
32064 lama LAMA, n.1. The sovereign pontiff, or rather the god of the Asiatic Tartars.2. A small species of ...
32065 lamantin LAM'ANTIN,
32066 lamb LAMB, n. lam.1. The young of the sheep kind.2. The Lamb of God, in Scripture, the Savior Jesus ...
32067 lambative LAM'BATIVE, a. [L. lambo, to lick.]Taken by licking. [Little used.]LAM'BATIVE, n. A medicine ...
32068 lambent LAM'BENT, a. [L. lambens, lambo, to lick.] Playing about; touching lightly; gliding over; as a ...
32069 lambkin LAMBKIN, n. lam'kin. A small lamb.
32070 lamblike LAMBLIKE, a. lam'like. Like a lamb; gentle; humble; meek; as a lamblike temper.
32071 lamdoidal LAMDOID'AL, a. [Gr. the name of the letter A, form.]In the form of the Greek A, the English L; as ...
32072 lame LAME, a. 1. Crippled or disabled in a limb, or otherwise injured so as to be unsound and impaired ...
32073 lamel LAM'EL, n. [L. lamella. See Lamin.] A thin plate or scale of any thing.
32074 lamellar LAM'ELLAR, a. [from lamel.] Disposed in thin plates or scales.
32075 lamellarly LAM'ELLARLY, adv. In thin plates or scales.
32076 lamellate LAM'ELLATE,
32077 lamellated LAM'ELLATED, a. Formed in thin plates or scales, or covered with them.
32078 lamelliferous LAMELLIF'EROUS, a. [L. lamella and fero, to produce.Producing plates; an epithet of polypiers ...
32079 lamelliform LAM'ELLIFORM, a. [L. lamella, a plate, and form.] Having the form of a plate.
32080 lamely LA'MELY, adv. [See Lame.]1. Like a cripple; with impaired strength; in a halting manner; as, to ...
32081 lameness LA'MENESS, n. 1. An impaired state of the body or limbs; loss of natural soundness and strength ...
32082 lament LAMENT', v.i. [L. lamentor.] 1. To mourn; to grieve; to weep or wail; to express sorrow.Jeremiah ...
32083 lamentable LAM'ENTABLE, a. [L. lamentabilis.]1. To be lamented; deserving sorrow; as a lamentable declension ...
32084 lamentably LAM'ENTABLY, adv.1. Mournfully; with expressions or tokens of sorrow.2. So as to cause sorrow.3. ...
32085 lamentation LAMENTA'TION, n. [L. lamentatio.]1. Expression of sorrow; cries of grief; the act of bewailing.In ...
32086 lamented LAMENT'ED, pp. Bewailed; mourned for.
32087 lamenter LAMENT'ER, n. One who mourns, or cries out with sorrow.
32088 lamentin LAM'ENTIN, n. A species of the walrus or sea-cow, the Trichechus manatus.
32089 lamenting LAMENT'ING, ppr. Bewailing; mourning; weeping.LAMENT'ING, n. A mourning; lamentation.
32090 lamia LA'MIA, n. [L.] A hag; a witch; a demon.
32091 lamin LAM'IN,
32092 lamina LAM'INA, n. [L. lamina.]1. A thin plate or scale; a layer or coat lying over another; applied to ...
32093 laminable LAM'INABLE, a. Capable of being formed into thin plates.
32094 laminar LAM'INAR, a. In plates; consisting of thin plates or layers.
32095 laminate LAM'INATE,
32096 laminated LAM'INATED, a. Plated; consisting of plates, scales or layers, one over another.
32097 lamm LAMM, v.t. To beat. [Not in use.]
32098 lammas LAM'MAS, n. The first day of August.
32099 lamp LAMP, n. [L. lampas; Gr. to shine; Heb.]1. A vessel for containing oil to be burned by means of a ...
32100 lampas LAM'PAS, n. A lump of flesh of the size of a nut, in the roof of a horse's mouth, and rising above ...
32101 lampblack LAMP'BLACK, n. [lamp and black; being originally made by means of a lamp or torch.]A fine soot ...
32102 lampiate LAMP'IATE, n. A compound salt, composed of lampic acid and a base.
32103 lampic LAMP'IC, a. The lampic acid is obtained by the combustion of ether by means of a lamp.
32104 lamping LAMP'ING, a. Shining; sparkling. [Not used.]
32105 lampoon LAMPOON', n. A personal satire in writing; abuse; censure written to reproach and vex rather than ...
32106 lampooner LAMPOON'ER, n. One who abuses with personal satire; the writer of a lampoon.The squibs are those ...
32107 lampooning LAMPOON'ING, ppr. Abusing with personal satire.
32108 lampoonry LAMPOON'RY, n. Abuse.
32109 lamprey LAM'PREY, n. [L. labor, to slip, and most probably the animal is name from slipping. If, however, ...
32110 lanate LA'NATE,
32111 lanated LAN'ATED, a. [L. lanatus, from lana, wool.] Wooly. In botany, covered with a substance like ...
32112 lance LANCE, n. l'ans. [L. lancea; Gr.]A spear, an offensive weapon in form of a half pike, used by the ...
32113 lancely LANCELY, a. l'ansly. Suitable to a lance.
32114 lanceolar LAN'CEOLAR, a. In botany, tapering towards each end.
32115 lanceolate LAN'CEOLATE,
32116 lanceolated LAN'CEOLATED, a. Shaped like a lance; oblong and gradually tapering toward each extremity; ...
32117 lancepesade LANCEPESA'DE, n. An officer under the corporal.
32118 lancer L'ANCER, n. One who lances; one who carries a lance.
32119 lancet L'ANCET, n. 1. A surgical instrument, sharp-pointed and two-edged; used in venesection, and in ...
32120 lanch L'ANCH, v.t. [from lance.] 1. To throw, as a lance; to dart; to let fly.See whose arm can lanch ...
32121 land LAND, n.1. Earth, or the solid matter which constitutes the fixed part of the surface of the ...
32122 landau LAN'DAU, n. A kind of coach or carriage whose top may be opened and thrown back; so called from a ...
32123 landed LAND'ED, pp.1. Disembarked; set on shore from a ship or boat.2. a. Having an estate in land; as ...
32124 landfall LAND'FALL, n. [land and fall.]1. A sudden translation of property in land by the death of a rich ...
32125 landflood LAND'FLOOD, n. [land and flood.] An overflowing of land by water; an inundation. Properly, a ...
32126 landgrave LAND'GRAVE, n. In Germany, a count or earl; or an officer nearly corresponding to the earl of ...
32127 landgraviate LANDGRA'VIATE, n. The territory held by a landgrave, or his office, jurisdiction or authority.
32128 landholder LAND'HOLDER, n. A holder, owner or proprietor of land.
32130 landing-place LAND'ING-PLACE, n. A place on the shore of the sea or of a lake, or on the bank of a river; where ...
32129 landing LAND'ING, ppr. Setting on shore; coming on shore.LAND'ING,
32131 landjobber LAND'JOBBER, n. A man who makes a business of buying land on speculation, or of buying and selling ...
32132 landlady LAND'LADY, n. [See Landlord.]1. A woman who has tenants holding from her.2. The mistress of an ...
32133 landless LAND'LESS, a. Destitute of land; having no property in land.
32134 landlock LAND'LOCK, v.t. [land and lock.] To inclose or encompass by land.
32135 landlocked LAND'LOCKED, pp. Encompassed by land, so that no point of the compass is open to the sea.
32136 landloper LAND'LOPER, n. [See Leap and Interloper.]A landman; literally, a land runner; a term of reproach ...
32137 landlord LAND'LORD, n.1. The lord of a manor or of land; the owner of land who has tenants under him.2. ...
32138 landman LAND'MAN, n. A man who serves on land; opposed to seaman.
32139 landmark LAND'MARK, n. [land and mark.] 1. A mark to designate the boundary of land; any mark or fixed ...
32140 landscape LAND'SCAPE, n.1. A portion of land or territory which the eye can comprehend in a single view, ...
32141 landslip LAND'SLIP, n. A portion of a hill or mountain, which slips or slides down; or the sliding down of ...
32142 landsman LAND'SMAN, n. In seaman's language, a sailor on board a ship, who has not before been at sea.
32143 landstreight LAND'STREIGHT, n. A narrow slip of land. [Not used.]
32144 landward LAND'WARD, adv. Toward the land.
32145 lane LANE, n.1. A narrow way or passage, or a private passage, as distinguished from a public road or ...
32146 langrage LAN'GRAGE,
32147 langrel LAN'GREL, n. Langrel shot or langrage, is a particular kind of shot used at sea for tearing sails ...
32148 langteraloo LANGTERALOO', n. A game at cards.
32150 language-master LAN'GUAGE-MASTER, n. One whose profession is to teach languages.
32149 language LAN'GUAGE, n. [L. lingua, the tongue, and speech.]1. Human speech; the expression of ideas by ...
32151 languaged LAN'GUAGED, a. Having a language; as many languaged nations.
32152 languet LAN'GUET, n. Any thing in the shape of the tongue. [Not English.]
32153 languid LAN'GUID, a. [L. languidus, from langueo, to droop or flag. See Languish.]1. Flagging; drooping; ...
32154 languidly LAN'GUIDLY, adv. Weakly; feebly; slowly.
32155 languidness LAN'GUIDNESS, n. 1. Weakness from exhaustion of strength; feebleness; dullness; languor.2. ...
32156 languish LAN'GUISH, v.i. [L. langueo, lachinisso; Gr. to flag, to lag. L. laxo, laxus, flacceo.]1. To ...
32157 languisher LAN'GUISHER, n. One who languishes or pines.
32158 languishing LAN'GUISHING, ppr.1. Becoming or being feeble; losing strength; pining; withering; fading.2. a. ...
32159 languishingly LAN'GUISHINGLY, adv.1. Weakly; feebly; dully; slowly.2. With tender softness.
32160 languishment LAN'GUISHMENT, n.1. The state of pining.2. Softness of look or mien, with the head reclined.
32161 languor LAN'GUOR, n. [L. languor.]1. Feebleness; dullness; heaviness; lassitude of body; that state of ...
32162 languorous LAN'GUOROUS, a. Tedious; melancholy. Obs.
32163 langure LAN'GURE, v.t. To languish. [Not in use.]
32164 laniard LANIARD, n. lan'yard.A short piece of rope or line, used for fastening something in ships, as the ...
32165 laniate LA'NIATE, v.t. [L. lanio.] To tear in pieces. [Little used.]
32166 laniation LANIA'TION, n. A tearing in pieces. [Little used.]
32167 laniferous LANIF'EROUS, a. [L. lanifer; lana, wool, and fero, to produce.] Bearing or producing wool.
32168 lanifice LAN'IFICE, n. [L. lanificium; lana, wool, and facio, to make.]Manufacture of wool. [Little used.]
32169 lanigerous LANIG'EROUS, a. [L. laniger; lana, wool, and gero, to bear.] Bearing or producing wool.
32170 lank LANK, a. [Gr. probably allied to flank.]1. Loose or lax and easily yielding to pressure; not ...
32171 lankly LANK'LY, adv. Thinly; loosely; laxly.
32172 lankness LANK'NESS, n. Laxity; flabbiness; leanness; slenderness.
32173 lanky LANK'Y, n. Lank. [Vulgar.]
32174 lanner LAN'NER,
32175 lanneret LAN'NERET, n. [L. laniarius, lanius, a butcher.] A species of hawk.
32176 lansquenet LANS'QUENET, n. [lance and knecht, a boy, a knight.]1. A common foot soldier.2. A game at cards.
32178 lantern-fly LAN'TERN-FLY, n. An insect of the genus Fulgora.
32179 lantern-jaws LAN'TERN-JAWS, n. A thin visage.
32177 lantern LAN'TERN, n. [L. laterna.]1. A case or vessel made of tin perforated with many holes, or of some ...
32180 lanuginous LANU'GINOUS, a. [L. lanuginosus, from lanugo, down, from lana, wool.]Downy; covered with down, or ...
32181 laodicean LAODICE'AN, a. Like the christians of Laodicea: lukewarm in religion.
32182 laodiceanism LAODICE'ANISM, n. Lukewarmness in religion.
32183 lap LAP, n.1. The loose part of a coat; the lower part of a garment that plays loosely.2. The part of ...
32184 lapdog LAP'DOG, n. A small dog fondled in the lap.
32185 lapfull LAP'FULL, n. As much as the lap can contain. 2Kings 4.
32186 lapicide LAP'ICIDE, n. A stone-cutter. [Not used.]
32187 lapidarious LAPIDA'RIOUS, a. [L. lapidarius, from lapis, a stone.] Stony; consisting of stones.
32188 lapidary LAP'IDARY, n. [L. lapidarius, lapis, a stone.]1. An artificer who cuts precious stones.2. A ...
32189 lapidate LAP'IDATE, v.t. [L. lapido.] To stone. [Not used.]
32190 lapidation LAPIDA'TION, n. The act of stoning a person to death.
32191 lapideous LAPID'EOUS, a. [L. lapideus.] Stony; of the nature of stone; as lapideous matter. [Little used.]
32192 lapidescence LAPIDES'CENCE, n. [L. lapidesco, from lapis, a stone.]1. The process of becoming stone; a ...
32193 lapidescent LAPIDES'CENT, a. Growing or turning to stone; that has the quality of petrifying ...
32194 lapidific LAPIDIF'IC, a. [L. lapis, a stone, and facio, to make.] Forming or converting into stone.
32195 lapidification LAPIDIFICA'TION, n. The operation of forming or converting into a stony substance, by means of a ...
32196 lapidify LAPID'IFY, v.t. [L. lapis, a stone, and facio, to form.] To form into stone.LAPID'IFY, v.i. To ...
32197 lapidist LAP'IDIST, n. A dealer in precious stones. [See lapidary.]
32198 lapis LAPIS, in Latin, a stone. Hence,Lapis Bononiensis, the Bolognian stone.Lapis Hepaticus, liver ...
32199 lapped LAP'PED, pp. [See Lap.] Turned or folded over.
32200 lapper LAP'PER, n. 1. One that laps; one that wraps or folds.2. One that takes up with his tongue.
32201 lappet LAP'PET, n. [dim. of lap.] A part of a garment or dress that hangs loose.
32202 lapping LAP'PING, ppr.1. Wrapping; folding; laying on.2. Licking; taking into the mouth with the tongue.
32203 lapse LAPSE, n. laps. [L. lapsus, from labor, to slide, to fall.]1. A sliding, gliding or flowing; a ...
32204 lapsed LAPS'ED, pp. Fallen; passed from one proprietor to another by the negligence of the patron; as a ...
32205 lapsided LAP'SIDED, a. [Lap and side.] Having one side heavier than the other, as a ship.
32206 lapsing LAPS'ING, ppr. Gliding; flowing; failing; falling to one person through the omission of another.
32207 lapwing LAP'WING, n. A bird of the genus Tringa; the tewit.
32208 lapwork LAP'WORK, n. Work in which one part laps over another.
32209 lar L'AR, n. plu. lares. [L.] A household deity.
32210 larboard L'ARBOARD, n. [Board, bord, is a side; but I know the meaning of lar. The Dutch use bakboard, and ...
32211 larceny L'ARCENY, n. [L. latrocinium.]Theft; the act of taking and carrying away the goods or property of ...
32212 larch L'ARCH, n. [L. larix.]The common name of a division of the genus Pinus, species of which are ...
32213 lard L'ARD, n. [L. lardum, laridum.]1. The fat of swine, after being melted and separated from the ...
32214 lardaceous LARDA'CEOUS, a. Of the nature of lard; consisting of lard.
32215 larded L'ARDED, pp. Stuffed with bacon; fattened; mixed.
32216 larder L'ARDER, n. A room where meat is kept or salted.
32217 lardry L'ARDRY, n. A larder. [Not used.]
32218 large L'ARGE, a larj. [L. largus; Gr. wide, copious, and perhaps with floor.]1. Big; of great size; ...
32219 largeheartedness LARGEHE'ARTEDNESS, n. Largeness of heart; liberality. [Not used.]
32220 largely L'ARGELY, adv.1. Widely; extensively.2. Copiously; diffusely; amply. The subject was largely ...
32221 largeness L'ARGENESS, n.1. Bigness; bulk; magnitude; as the largeness of an animal.2. Greatness; ...
32222 largess L'ARGESS, n. [L. largitio; from largus, large.]A present; a gift or donation; a bounty bestowed.
32223 larghetto LARGHET'TO, Musical terms, directing to slow movement. Large is one degree quicker than grave, ...
32224 largish L'ARGISH, a. Somewhat large. [Unusual.]
32225 largo L'ARGO,
32226 lark L'ARK, n. [As the Latin alauda coincides with laudo, Eng. loud so the first syllable of lark, laf, ...
32227 larker L'ARKER, n. A catcher of larks.
32228 larklike L'ARKLIKE, a. Resembling a lark in manners.
32229 larks-heel L'ARK'S-HEEL, n. A flower called Indian cress.
32230 larkspur L'ARKSPUR, n. A plant of the genus Delphinium.
32231 larmier L'ARMIER, n. The flat jutting part of a cornice; literally, the dropper; the eave or drip of a ...
32232 larum LAR'UM, n. Alarm; a noise giving notice of danger. [See Alarm, which is generally used.]
32233 larva L'ARVA,
32234 larvated L'ARVATED, a. Masked; clothed as with a mask.
32235 larve L'ARVE, n. [L. larva, a mask.]An insect in the caterpillar state; eruca; the state of an insect ...
32236 laryngean LARYN'GEAN, a. [See Larynx.] Pertaining to the larynx.
32237 laryngotomy LARYNGOT'OMY, n. [larynx and Gr. to cut.]The operation of cutting the larynx or windpipe; the ...
32238 larynx LAR'YNX, n. [Gr.] In anatomy, the upper part of the windpipe or trachea, a cartilaginous cavity, ...
32239 lascar LAS'CAR, n. In the East Indies, a native seaman, or a gunner.
32240 lasciviency LASCIVIENCY, LASCIVIENT. [Not used. See the next words.]
32241 lascivient LASCIVIENCY, LASCIVIENT. [Not used. See the next words.]
32242 lascivious LASCIV'IOUS, a. [L. lascivus, from laxus, laxo, to relax, to loosen.]1. Loose; wanton; lewd; ...
32243 lasciviously LASCIV'IOUSLY, adv. Loosely; wantonly; lewdly.
32244 lasciviousness LASCIV'IOUSNESS, n.1. Looseness; irregular indulgence of animal desires; wantonness; ...
32245 laserwort LA'SERWORT, n. Laserpitium, a genus of plants of several species, natives of Germany, Italy, ...
32246 lash LASH, n. 1. The thong or braided cord of a whip.I observed that your whip wanted a lash to it.2. ...
32247 lashed LASH'ED, pp.1. Struck with a lash; whipped; tied; made fast by a rope.2. In botany, ciliate; ...
32248 lasher LASH'ER, n. One that whips or lashes.LASH'ER,
32249 lashing LASH'ING, n. A piece of rope for binding or making fast one thing to another.LASH'ING, n. ...
32250 lass L'ASS, n.A young woman; a girl.
32251 lassitude LAS'SITUDE, n. [L. lassitudo, from lassus, and this from laxus, laxo, to relax.]1. Weakness; ...
32252 lasslorn L'ASSLORN, a. Forsaken by his lass or mistress.
32253 last L'AST, a. [See Late and Let.]1. That comes after all the others; the latest; applied to time; as ...
32254 lastage L'ASTAGE, n. [See Last, a load.]1. A duty paid for freight or transportation.[Not used in the ...
32255 lastery L'ASTERY, n. A red color. [Not in use.]
32256 lasting L'ASTING, ppr.1. Continuing in time; enduring; remaining.2. a. Durable; of long continuance; that ...
32257 lastingly L'ASTINGLY, adv. Durably; with continuance.
32258 lastingness L'ASTINGNESS, n. Durability; the quality or state of long continuance.
32259 lastly L'ASTLY, adv. 1. In the last place.2. In the conclusion; at last; finally.
32260 latch LATCH, n. [L. ligula, from ligo, to tie, and with English lock. L. laqueus, from which we have ...
32261 latchet LATCH'ET, n. [from latch.] The string that fastens a shoe. Mark 1.
32262 late LATE, a. [This word is from the root of let, the sense of which is to draw out, extend or prolong, ...
32263 lated LA'TED, a. Belated; being too late. [Not used.]
32264 lateen LAT'EEN, a. A lateen sail is a triangular sail, extended by a lateen yard, which is slung about ...
32265 lately LA'TELY, adv. Not long ago; recently. We called on a gentleman who has lately arrived from Italy.
32266 latency LA'TENCY, n. [See Latent.] The state of being concealed; abstruseness.
32267 lateness LA'TENESS, n.1. The state of being tardy, or of coming after the usual time; as the lateness of ...
32268 latent LA'TENT, a. [L. latens, lateo; Gr; Heb. to cover.]Hid; concealed; secret; not seen; not visible or ...
32269 later LA'TER, a. [comp. deg. of late.] Posterior; subsequent.
32270 lateral LAT'ERAL, a. [L. lateralis, from latus, a side, and broad, Gr., Eng. flat. The primary sense of ...
32271 laterality LATERAL'ITY, n. The quality of having distinct sides. [Not used.]
32272 laterally LAT'ERALLY, adv.1. By the side; sideways.2. In the direction of the side.
32273 lateran LAT'ERAN, n. One of the churches at Rome. The name is said to have been derived from that of a ...
32274 latered LA'TERED, a. Delayed. Obs.
32275 laterifolious LATERIFO'LIOUS, a. [L. latus, side, and folium, leaf.]In botany, growing on the side of a leaf at ...
32276 lateritious LATERI'TIOUS, a. [L. lateritius, from later, a brick.] Like bricks; of the color of ...
32277 lath L'ATH, n.1. A thin, narrow board or slip of wood nailed to the rafters of a building to support ...
32278 lathe LATHE, n. An engine by which instruments of wood, ivory, metals and other materials, are turned ...
32279 lather LATH'ER, v.i.To form a foam with water and soap; to become froth, or frothy matter.LATH'ER, v.t. ...
32280 lathy L'ATHY, a. Thin as a lath; long and slender.L'ATHY, a. Flabby; weak.
32281 latibulize LATIB'ULIZE, v.i. [L. latibulum, a hiding place.]To retire into a den, burrow or cavity, and lie ...
32282 laticlave LAT'ICLAVE, n. [L. laticlavium; latus, broad, and clavus, a stud.]An ornament of dress worn by ...
32283 latin LAT'IN, a. Pertaining to the Latins, a people of Latium, in Italy; Roman; as the Latin ...
32284 latinism LAT'INISM, n. A Latin idiom; a mode of speech peculiar to the Latins.
32285 latinist LAT'INIST, n. One skilled in Latin.
32286 latinity LATIN'ITY, n. Purity of the Latin style or idiom; the Latin tongue.
32287 latinize LAT'INIZE, v.t. To give to foreign words Latin terminations and make them Latin.LAT'INIZE, v.i. ...
32288 latirostrous LATIROS'TROUS, a. [L. latus, broad, and rostrum, beak.] Having a broad beak, as a fowl.
32289 latish LA'TISH, a. [from late.] Somewhat late.
32290 latitancy LAT'ITANCY, n. [L. latitans, latito, to lie hid, from lateo. See Latent.]The state of lying ...
32291 latitant LAT'ITANT, a. Lurking; lying hid; concealed.[These words are rarely used. See latent.]
32292 latitat LAT'ITAT, n. [L. he lurks.] A writ by which a person is summoned into the king's bench to answer, ...
32293 latitude LAT'ITUDE, n. [L. latitudo, breadth; latus, broad.]1. Breadth; width; extent from side to side.2. ...
32294 latitudinal LATITU'DINAL, a. Pertaining to latitude; in the direction of latitude.
32295 latitudinarian LATITUDINA'RIAN, a. Not restrained; not confined by precise limits; free; thinking or acting at ...
32296 latitudinarianism LATITUDINA'RIANISM, n.1. Freedom or liberality of opinion, particularly in theology.2. ...
32297 latrant LA'TRANT, a. [L. latro, to bark.] Barking.
32298 latrate LA'TRATE, v.i. To bark as a dog. [Not used.]
32299 latration LATRA'TION, n. A barking. [Not used.]
32300 latria LA'TRIA, n. [L. from Gr.] The highest kind of worship, or that paid to God; distinguished by the ...
32301 latrobite LATRO'BITE, n. [from Latrobe.] A newly described mineral of a pale pink red color, massive or ...
32302 latrociny LAT'ROCINY, n. [L. latrocinium.] Theft; larceny. [Not in use.]
32304 latten-brass LAT'TEN-BRASS, n. Plates of milled brass reduced to different thicknesses, according to the uses ...
32303 latten LAT'TEN, n. Iron plate covered with tin.
32305 latter LAT'TER, a. [an irregular comparative of late.]1. Coming or happening after something else; ...
32306 latterly LAT'TERLY, adv. Of late; in time not long past; lately.
32307 lattermath LAT'TERMATH, n. The latter mowing; that which is mowed after a former mowing.
32308 lattice LAT'TICE, n. Any work of wood or iron, made by crossing laths, rods or bars, and forming open ...
32309 latticed LAT'TICED, pp. Furnished with a lattice.
32310 laud LAUD, n. [L. laus, laudis; Gr. ; Eng. loud. See Loud.]1. Praise; commendation; an extolling in ...
32311 laudable LAUD'ABLE, a. [L. laudabilis.]1. Praiseworthy; commendable; as laudable motives; laudable ...
32312 laudableness LAUD'ABLENESS, n. The quality of deserving praise; praiseworthiness; as the laudableness of ...
32313 laudably LAUD'ABLY, adv. In a manner deserving praise.
32314 laudanum LAUD'ANUM, n. [from L. laudo, to praise.] Opium dissolved in spirit or wine; tincture of opium.
32315 laudative LAUD'ATIVE, n. [L. laudativus.] A panegyric; an eulogy. [Little used.]
32316 laudatory LAUD'ATORY, a. Containing praise; tending to praise.LAUD'ATORY, n. That which contains praise.
32317 lauder LAUD'ER, n. One who praises.
32319 laugh-worthy LAUGH-WORTHY, a. Deserving to be laughed at.
32318 laugh LAUGH, v.i. l'aff. [Heb.]1. To make the noise and exhibit the features which are characteristic ...
32320 laughable LAUGHABLE, a. l'affable. That may justly excite laughter; as a laughable story; a laughable scene.
32321 laugher LAUGHER, n. l'affer. One who laughs, or is fond of merriment.The laughers are a majority.
32323 laughing-stock LAUGHING-STOCK, n. An object of ridicule; a butt of sport.
32322 laughing LAUGHING, ppr. l'affing. Expressing mirth in a particular manner.
32324 laughingly LAUGHINGLY, adv. l'affingly. In a merry way; with laughter.
32325 laughter LAUGHTER, n. l'affter. Convulsive merriment; an expression of mirth peculiar to man, consisting in ...
32326 laumonite LAU'MONITE, n. Efflorescent zeolite; so called from Laumont, its discoverer. It is found in ...
32327 launch LAUNCH, [See Lanch, the more correct orthography.]
32328 laund LAUND, n. A lawn. [Not used.]
32329 launder LAUNDER, n. l'ander. [from L. lavo, to wash.]A washer-woman; also, a long and hollow trough, used ...
32330 launderer LAUNDERER, n. l'anderer. A man who follows the business of washing clothes.
32331 laundress LAUNDRESS, n. l'andress. [L. lavo.]A washer-woman; a female whose employment is to wash ...
32332 laundry LAUNDRY, n. l'andry.1. A washing.2. The place or room where clothes are washed.
32333 laureate LAU'REATE, a. [L. laureatus, from laurea, a laurel.]Decked or invested with laurel; as laureate ...
32334 laureated LAU'REATED, pp. Honored with a degree and a laurel wreath.
32335 laureation LAUREA'TION, n. The act of conferring a degree in the university, together with a wreath of ...
32336 laurel LAU'REL, n. [L. laurus.]The bay-tree or Laurus, a genus of plants of several species.
32337 laureled LAU'RELED, a. Crowned or decorated with laurel, or with a laurel wreath; laureate.
32338 laurifferous LAURIF'FEROUS, a. [L. laurus and fero, to bear.]Producing or bringing laurel.
32339 laurustin LAU'RUSTIN, n. [L. laurustinus.] A plant of the genus Viburnum, an evergreen shrub or tree, whose ...
32340 lauskraut LAUS'KRAUT, n. A plant of the genus Delphinium.
32341 lautu LAU'TU, n. A band of cotton, twisted and worn on the head of the Inca of Peru, as a badge of ...
32342 lava L'AVA, n. [probably from flowing, and from the root of L. fluo, or lavo.]1. A mass or stream of ...
32343 lavation LAVA'TION, n. [L. lavatio, from lavo.] A washing or cleansing.
32344 lavatory LAV'ATORY, n. [See lave.] 1. A place for washing.2. A wash or lotion for a diseased part.3. A ...
32346 lave-eared LA'VE-EARED, a. Having large pendant ears. [Not in use.]
32345 lave LAVE, v.t. [L. lavo; Gr.]To wash; to bathe; a word used chiefly in poetry or rhetoric.LAVE, v.i.1. ...
32347 laveer LAVEE'R, v.t. In seamen's language, to tack; to sail back and forth. [I believe this word is not ...
32348 lavender LAV'ENDER, n. [L. lavendula.] A plant, or a genus of aromatic plants, Lavandula.
32349 laver LA'VER, n. A vessel for washing; a large basin; in scripture history, a basin placed in the court ...
32350 laverock LAVEROCK. [See lark.]
32351 laving LA'VING, ppr. Washing; bathing.
32352 lavish LAV'ISH, a. [I know not from what source we have received this word. It coincides in elements ...
32353 lavished LAV'ISHED, pp. Expended profusely; wasted.
32354 lavisher LAV'ISHER, n. A prodigal; a profuse person.
32355 lavishing LAV'ISHING, ppr. Expending or laying out with profusion; wasting.
32356 lavishly LAV'ISHLY, adv. With profuse expense; prodigally; wastefully.
32357 lavishness LAV'ISHNESS, n. Profusion; prodigality.
32358 lavolta LAVOL'TA, An old dance in which was much turning and capering.
32360 law-day LAW-DAY, n 1. A day of open court.2. A leet or sheriff's tourn.
32359 law LAW, n. [L. lex; from the root of lay. See lay. A law is that which is laid, set or fixed, like ...
32361 lawful LAW'FUL, a. 1. Agreeable to law; conformable to law; allowed by law; legal; legitimate. That is ...
32362 lawfully LAW'FULLY, adv. Legally; in accordance with law; without violating law. We may lawfully do what ...
32363 lawfulness LAW'FULNESS, n. The quality of being conformable to law; legality. The lawfulness of an action ...
32364 lawgiver LAW'GIVER, n. [law and give.] One who makes or enacts a law; a legislator.
32365 lawgiving LAW'GIVING, a. Making or enacting laws; legislative.
32366 lawing LAW'ING, n. Expeditation; the act of cutting off the claws and balls of the fore feet of mastiffs ...
32367 lawless LAW'LESS, a.1. Not subject to law; unrestrained by law; as a lawless tyrant; lawless men.2. ...
32368 lawlessly LAW'LESSLY, adv. In a manner contrary to law.
32369 lawlessness LAW'LESSNESS, n. The quality or state of being unrestrained by law; disorder.
32370 lawn LAWN, n. An open space between woods, or a plain in a park or adjoining a noble seat.Betwixt them ...
32371 lawny LAWN'Y, a. 1. Level, as a plain; like a lawn.2. Made of lawn.
32372 lawsuit LAW'SUIT, n. [See suit.] a suit in law for the recovery of a supposed right; a process in law ...
32374 lawyer-like LAW'YER-LIKE, a. Like a real lawyer.
32373 lawyer LAW'YER, n. [that is lawer, contracted from law-wer, law-man.]One versed in the laws, or a ...
32375 lawyerly LAW'YERLY, a. Judicial.
32376 lax LAX, a. [L. laxus.]1. Loose; flabby; soft; not tense, firm or rigid; as lax flesh; a lax fiber.2. ...
32377 laxation LAXA'TION, n. [L. laxatio.] The act of loosening or slackening; or the state of being loose or ...
32378 laxative LAX'ATIVE, a. [L. laxo.] Having the power or quality of loosening or opening the bowels, and ...
32379 laxativeness LAX'ATIVENESS, n. The quality of relaxing.
32380 laxity LAX'ITY, n. [L. laxitas.]1. Looseness; slackness; the opposite of tenseness or tension.2. ...
32381 laxly LAX'LY, adv. Loosely; without exactness.
32382 laxness LAX'NESS, n.1. Looseness; softness; flabbiness; as the laxness of flesh or of muscles.2. Laxity; ...
32384 lay-clerk LAY-CLERK, n. A vocal officiate in a cathedral.
32383 lay LAY, pret. of lie. The estate lay in the county of Hartford.When Ahab heard these words, he rent ...
32385 layer LA'YER, n. la'er. [from lay, the verb.]1. A stratum; a bed; a body spread over another; as a ...
32386 laying LA'YING, ppr. Putting; placing; applying; imputing; wagering.
32387 layland LA'YLAND, n. Land lying untilled; fallow ground. [Local.]
32388 layman LA'YMAN, n. la'man. [lay and man.]1. A man who is not a clergyman; one of the laity or people, ...
32389 laystall LA'YSTALL, n. [lay and stall.] A heap of dung, or a place where dung is laid.
32391 lazar-house LA'ZAR-HOUSE, n. A lazaretto; also, a hospital for quarantine.
32392 lazar-like LA'ZAR-LIKE,
32390 lazar LA'ZAR, n. [from Laxarus.] A person infected with nauseous and pestilential disease.
32393 lazaret LAZARET',
32394 lazaretto LAZARETTO, n.A public building, hospital or pest-house for the reception of diseased persons, ...
32395 lazarly LA'ZARLY, a. Full of sores; leprous.
32396 lazarwort LA'ZARWORT,
32397 laze LAZE, v.i. To live in idleness. [Vulgar.]LAZE, v.t. To waste in sloth. [Vulgar.]
32398 lazily LA'ZILY, adv. [from lazy.] In a heavy, sluggish manner; sluggishly.Whether he lazily and ...
32399 laziness LA'ZINESS, n. [from lazy.] 1. The state or quality of being lazy; indisposition to action or ...
32400 lazing LA'ZING, a. Spending time in sluggish inaction.[This is an ill-formed, inelegant word.]
32401 lazuli LAZ'ULI. Lapis Lazuli is a mineral of a fine, azure blue color, usually amorphous, or in rounded ...
32402 lazulite LAZ'ULITE, n. A mineral of a light, indigo blue color, occurring in small masses, or crystallized ...
32403 lazy LA'ZY, a. [L. laxus, and it is doubtful whether this is of the same family.]1. Disinclined to ...
32404 ld LD, stands for lord.
32405 lea LEA,
32407 leach-tub LE'ACH-TUB, n. A wooden vessel or tub in which ashes are leached. It is sometimes written ...
32406 leach LEACH, v.t. [See leak. Perhaps L. lix may be from the same root.]To wash, as ashes, by ...
32408 lead LEAD, n. led.1. A metal of a dull white color, with a cast of blue. It is the least elastic and ...
32410 leaden-hearted LEADEN-HE'ARTED, a. Stupid; destitute of feeling.
32411 leaden-heeled LEADEN-HEE'LED, a. Moving slowly.
32412 leaden-stepping LEADEN-STEP'PING, a. Moving slowly.
32409 leaden LEADEN, a. led'n. [from lead.]1. Made of lead; as a leaden ball.2. Heavy; indisposed to ...
32413 leader LE'ADER, n.1. One that leads or conducts; a guide; a conductor.2. A chief; a commander; a ...
32415 leading-strings LE'ADING-STRINGS, n. Strings by which children are supported when beginning to walk.To be in ...
32414 leading LE'ADING, ppr.1. Guiding; conducting; preceding; drawing; alluring; passing life.2. a. Chief; ...
32416 leadman LE'ADMAN, n. One who begins or leads a dance. Obs.
32417 leadwort LEADWORT, n. led'wort. Plumbago, a genus of plants.
32418 leady LEADY, a. led'dy. Of the color of lead.
32420 leaf-stalk LE'AF-STALK, n. The petiole or stalk which supports a leaf.
32419 leaf LEAF, n. plu. leaves.1. In botany, leaves are organs of perspiration and inhalation in plants. ...
32421 leafage LE'AFAGE, n. Abundance of leaves.
32422 leafed LE'AFED, pp. Having leaves.
32423 leafless LE'AFLESS, a. Destitute of leaves; as a leafless tree.
32424 leaflet LE'AFLET, n. 1. A little leaf.2. In botany, one of the divisions of a compound leaf; a foliole.
32425 leafy LE'AFY, a. Full of leaves; as the leafy forest.
32426 league LEAGUE, n. leeg. [L. ligo, to bind.]1. An alliance or confederacy between princes or states for ...
32427 leagued LE'AGUED, pp. lee'ged. United in mutual compact; confederated.
32428 leaguer LE'AGUER, n. lee'ger. One who unites in a league; a confederate.LE'AGUER, n. Siege; investment of ...
32429 leak LEAK, n. [Gr. a fissure or crevice, L. lacero and loquor, and perhaps Eng. clack. It seems that ...
32430 leakage LE'AKAGE, n.1. A leaking; or the quantity of a liquor that enters or issues by leaking.2. An ...
32431 leaky LE'AKY, a.1. That admits water or other liquor to pass in or out; as a leaky vessel; a leaky ship ...
32432 leamer LE'AMER, n. A dog; a kind of hound.
32433 lean LEAN, v.i. [Gr., L. clino.]1. To deviate or move from a straight or perpendicular line; or to be ...
32434 leanly LE'ANLY, adv. Meagerly; without fat or plumpness.
32435 leanness LE'ANNESS, n.1. Destitution of fat; want of flesh; thinness of body; meagerness; applied to ...
32436 leany LE'ANY, a. Alert; brisk; active. [Not in use.]
32438 leap-frog LE'AP-FROG, n. A play of children in which they imitate the leap of frogs.
32439 leap-year LE'AP-YEAR, n. Blissextile, a year containing 366 days; every fourth year, which leaps over a day ...
32437 leap LEAP, v.i. [L. labor, perhaps. Heb.]1. To spring or rise from the ground with both feet, as man, ...
32440 leaper LE'APER, n. One that leaps. A horse is called a good leaper.
32441 leaping LE'APING, ppr. Jumping; springing; bounding; skipping.
32442 leapingly LE'APINGLY, adv. By leaps.
32443 learn LEARN, v.t. lern.1. To gain knowledge of; to acquire knowledge or ideas of something before ...
32444 learned LEARNED, lern'ed,
32445 learnedly LEARNEDLY, adv. lern'edly. With learning or erudition; with skill; as, to discuss a question ...
32446 learner LEARNER, n. lern'er. A person who is gaining knowledge from instruction, from reading or study, ...
32447 learning LEARNING, ppr. lern'ing. Gaining knowledge by instruction or reading, by study, by experience or ...
32448 learnt LEARNT, lernt. pp. Obtained as knowledge or information.
32449 leasable LE'ASABLE, a. That may be leased.
32450 lease LEASE, n. [See the Verb.]1. A demise or letting of lands, tenements or hereditaments to another ...
32451 leased LE'ASED, pp. Demised or let, as lands or tenements.
32452 leasehold LE'ASEHOLD, a. Held by lease; as a leasehold tenement.
32453 leaser LE'ASER, n. A gleaner; a gatherer after reapers.
32454 leash LEASH, n. [L. laqueus.]1. A thong of leather, or long line by which a falconer holds his hawk, or ...
32455 leasing LE'ASING, n. s as z.Falsehood; lies. [Obsolete or nearly so.]
32456 leasow LE'ASOW, n. A pasture. Obs.
32457 least LEAST, a. Smallest; little beyond others, either in size or degree; as the least insect; the least ...
32458 leasy LE'ASY, a. s as z. Thin; flimsy. It is usually pronounced sleazy.
32459 leat LEAT, n. A trench to conduct water to or from a mill.
32461 leather-coat LEATH'ER-COAT, n. An apple with a tough coat or rind.
32462 leather-dresser LEATH'ER-DRESSER, n. One who dresses leather; one who prepares hides for use.
32463 leather-jacket LEATH'ER-JACKET, n A fish of the Pacific ocean.
32464 leather-mouthed LEATH'ER-MOUTHED, a.By leather-mouthed fish, I mean such as have their teeth in their throat, as ...
32465 leather-seller LEATH'ER-SELLER,
32466 leather-winged LEATH'ER-WINGED,
32460 leather LEATH'ER,
32467 leathern LEATH'ERN,
32468 leathery LEATH'ERY,
32469 leave LEAVE, n. 1. Permission; allowance; license; liberty granted by which restraint or illegality is ...
32470 leaved LE'AVED, a. [from leaf; but leafed would be preferable.]1. Furnished with foliage or leaves.2. ...
32471 leaven LEAVEN, n. lev'n. [L. levo, Eng. to lift.]1. A mass of sour dough, which, mixed with a larger ...
32472 leavened LEAVENED, pp. lev'ened. Taised and made light by fermentation.
32473 leavening LEAVENING, ppr. lev'ening. Making light by fermentation.LEAVENING, n. lev'ening. that which ...
32474 leavenous LEAVENOUS, a. lev'enous. containing leaven; tainted.
32475 leaver LE'AVER, n. [from leave.]One who leaves or relinquishes; one who forsakes.
32476 leaves LEAVES, n. plu. of leaf.
32477 leaving LE'AVING, ppr. Quitting; withdrawing from; relinquishing; suffering to remain; ceasing; desisting ...
32478 leavings LE'AVINGS, n. plu.1. Things left; remnant; relics.The leavings of Pharsalia.2. Refuse; offal.
32479 leavy LE'AVY, a. [from leaf.] Full of leaves; covered with leaves. [An improper word; it ought to be ...
32480 lech LECH, for lick. Obs. [See Lick.]
32481 lecher LECH'ER, n. A man given to lewdness; one addicted, in an exorbitant degree, to the indulgence of ...
32482 lecherous LECH'EROUS, a.1 Addicted to lewdness; prone to indulge lust; lustful; lewd.2. Provoking lust.
32483 lecherously LECH'EROUSLY, adv. Lustfully; lewdly.
32484 lecherousness LECH'EROUSNESS, n. Lust, or strong propensity to indulge the sexual appetite.
32485 lechery LECH'ERY, n. Lewdness; free indulgence of lust; practice of indulging the animal appetite.
32486 lection LEC'TION, n. [L. lectio, from lego, to read, Gr.]1. A reading.2. A difference or variety in ...
32487 lectionary LEC'TIONARY, n. The Romish servicebook, containing portions of Scripture.
32488 lecture LEC'TURE, n. [L. lectura, from lego, to read.]1. A discourse read or pronounced on any subject; ...
32489 lecturer LEC'TURER, n.1. One who reads or pronounces lectures; a professor or an instructor who delivers ...
32490 lectureship LEC'TURESHIP, n. The office of a lecturer.
32491 lecturing LEC'TURING, ppr. Reading or delivering a discourse; reproving.
32492 lecturn LEC'TURN, n. A reading desk. [Not in use.]
32493 led LED, pret. and pp. of lead.
32494 leden LED'EN, n. Language; true meaning. Obs.
32495 ledge LEDGE, n.1. A stratum, layer or row.The lowest ledge or row should be merely of stone.2. A ridge; ...
32496 ledger LEDG'ER, n. The principal book of accounts among merchants; the book into which the accounts of ...
32498 lee-lurch LEE'-LURCH, n. A sudden and violent roll of a ship to leeward in a high sea.
32499 lee-side LEE'-SIDE, n. The side of a ship or boat farthest from the point whence the wind blows; opposed to ...
32497 lee LEE, n. plu. less. Dregs; sediment. [See Lees.]LEE, n.Literally, a calm or sheltered place, a ...
32501 leech-craft LEE'CH-CRAFT, n. The art of healing. Obs.
32502 leech-line LEE'CH-LINE, n. Leech-lines are ropes fastened to the middle of the leeches of the main-sail and ...
32503 leech-rope LEE'CH-ROPE, n. That part of the bolt-rope to which the skirt or border of a sail is sewed.
32500 leech LEECH, n.1. A physician; a professor of the art of healing.[This word, in the United States, is ...
32504 leef LEEF, a. Kind; fond; pleasing; willing. Obs.
32505 leek LEEK, n. A plant of the genus Allium, with a bulbous root. Numb. 11.
32506 leelite LEE'LITE, n. A mineral, so called from Dr. Lee, of St. John's College, Cambridge. It is described ...
32507 leer LEER, v.i. 1. To look obliquely; to turn the eye and cast a look from a corner, either in ...
32508 leering LEE'RING, ppr. Looking obliquely; casting a look askance.
32509 leeringly LEE'RINGLY, adv. With an arch oblique look or smile.
32510 lees LEES, n.The grosser parts of any liquor which have settled on the bottom of a vessel; dregs; ...
32511 leese LEESE, v.t. To lose. Obs. [See Lose.]LEESE, v.t. [L. lasus.] To hurt. Obs.
32513 leet-ale LEET-ALE, n. A feast or merry making in the time of leet.
32512 leet LEET, n. In Great Britain, a court. The court-leet or view of frankpledge, is a court of record ...
32514 leeward LEE'WARD, a. Pertaining to the part towards which the wind blows; as a leeward ship.LEE'WARD, adv. ...
32515 leeway LEE'WAY, n. The lateral movement of a ship to the leeward of her course, or the angle which the ...
32517 left-handed LEFT-HAND'ED, a. 1. Having the left hand or arm more strong and dextrous than the right; using ...
32518 left-handedness LEFT-HAND'EDNESS, n. Habitual use of the left hand, or rather the ability to use the left hand ...
32519 left-handiness LEFT-HAND'INESS, n. Awkwardness.
32516 left LEFT, pret. and pp. of leave.LEFT, a. [L. lavus; Gr. probably from the root of leave, Gr. and ...
32520 leg LEG, n. 1. The limb of an animal, used in supporting the body and in walking and running; ...
32522 legacy-hunter LEG'ACY-HUNTER, n. One who flatters and courts for legacies.
32521 legacy LEG'ACY, [L. legatum, from lego, to send, to bequeath.]A bequest; a particular thing, or certain ...
32523 legal LE'GAL, a. [L. legalis, from lex, legis, law.]1. According to law; in conformity with law; as a ...
32524 legality LEGAL'ITY, n.1. Lawfulness; conformity to law.2. In theology, a reliance on works for salvation.
32525 legalize LE'GALIZE, v.t.1. To make lawful; to render conformable to law; to authorize. What can legalize ...
32526 legally LE'GALLY, adv. Lawfully; according to law; in a manner permitted by law.
32527 legatary LEG'ATARY, n. [L. legatarius, from lego, to bequeath.]A legatee; one to whom a legacy is ...
32528 legate LEG'ATE, n. [L. legatus, from lego, to send. See Lackey.] 1. An embassador; but especially,2. ...
32529 legatee LEGATEE', n. [L. lego, to send.] One to whom a legacy is bequeathed.
32530 legateship LEG'ATESHIP, n. The office of a legate.
32531 legatine LEG'ATINE, a.1. Pertaining to a legate; as legatine power.2. Made by or proceeding from a legate; ...
32532 legation LEGA'TION, n. [L. legatio, from lego, to send.] An embassy; a deputation; properly a sending, but ...
32533 legator LEGA'TOR, n. [L.] A testator; one who bequeaths a legacy. [Little used.]
32534 lege LEGE, v.t. To allege; to lighten. [Not in use.]
32535 legend LEG'END, n. [L. legenda, from lego, to read; originally, in the Romish church, a book of service ...
32536 legendary LEG'ENDARY, a. Consisting of legends; fabulous; strange.LEG'ENDARY, n. A book of legends; a ...
32537 leger LEG'ER, n. Any thing that lies in a place; that which rests or remains; sometimes used as a noun, ...
32538 legerdemain LEG'ERDEMAIN, n. [See Light.]Slight of hand; a deceptive performance which depends on dexterity of ...
32539 legerity LEGER'ITY, n. Lightness; nimbleness. [Not in use.]
32540 legged LEG'GED, a. [from leg.] Having legs; used in composition; as a two-legged animal.
32541 leggin LEG'GIN, n. [from leg.] A cover for the leg; a garment that encloses the leg.
32542 legibility LEGIBIL'ITY, n. Legibleness; the quality or state of being legible.
32543 legible LEG'IBLE, a. [L. legibilis, from lego, to read.]1. That may be read; consisting of letters or ...
32544 legibleness LEG'IBLENESS, n. The quality or state of being legible.
32545 legibly LEG'IBLY, adv. In such a manner as may be read; as a manuscript legibly written.
32546 legion LE'GION, n. [L. legio, from lego, to collect.]1. In Roman antiquity, a body of infantry ...
32547 legionary LE'GIONARY, a.1. Relating to a legion or to legions.2. Consisting of a legion or of legions; as a ...
32548 legislate LEG'ISLATE, v.i. [L. lex, legis, law, and fero, latum, to give, pass or enact.]To make or enact a ...
32549 legislation LEGISLA'TION, n. The act of passing a law or laws; the enacting of laws.Pythagoras joined ...
32550 legislative LEG'ISLATIVE, a.1. Giving or enacting laws; as a legislative body.2. Capable of enacting laws; as ...
32551 legislator LEGISLA'TOR, n. [L.] A lawgiver; one who makes laws for a state or community. This word is ...
32552 legislatorship LEGISLA'TORSHIP, n. the office of a legislator. [Not in use.]
32553 legislatress LEGISLA'TRESS,
32554 legislatrix LEGISLA'TRIX, n. a female who makes laws.
32555 legislature LEG'ISLATURE, n. the body of men in a state or kingdom, invested with power to make and repeal ...
32556 legist LE'GIST, n. One skilled in the laws.
32557 legitimacy LEGIT'IMACY, n. [from legitimate.]1. Lawfulness of birth; opposed to bastardy.2. Genuineness; ...
32558 legitimate LEGIT'IMATE, a. [L. legitimus, from lex, law.]1. Lawfully begotten or born; born in wedlock; as ...
32559 legitimately LEGIT'IMATELY, adv.1. Lawfully; according to law.2. Genuinely; not falsely.
32560 legitimateness LEGIT'IMATENESS, n. legality; lawfulness; genuineness.
32561 legitimation LEGITIMA'TION, n. 1. The act of rendering legitimate, or of investing an illegitimate child with ...
32562 legume LEG'UME,
32563 legumen LEGU'MEN, n. [L. legumen, lego to collect, and signifying that which collects, or holds, or a ...
32564 leguminous LEGU'MINOUS, a. Pertaining to pulse; consisting of pulse. Leguminous plants are such as have a ...
32565 leisurable LEIS'URABLE, a. s as z. [See Leisure.] Vacant of employment; not occupied; as leisurable hours. ...
32566 leisurably LEIS'URABLY, adv. At leisure; without hurry. [Little used.]
32567 leisure LEISURE, n. lezh'ur or lee'zhur. 1. Freedom from occupation or business; vacant time; time free ...
32568 leisurely LEIS'URELY, a. Done at leisure; not hasty; deliberate; slow; as a leisurely walk or march; a ...
32569 leman LE'MAN, n. [See Love and Lief.]A sweetheart; a gallant, or a mistress. Obs.
32570 leme LEME, n. A ray of light. [Not in use.]LEME, v.i. To shine. Obs.
32571 leming LE'MING, n. A species of animal belonging to the genus Mus; a kind of rat, in the north of Europe, ...
32572 lemma LEM'MA, n. [Gr. from to receive.]In mathematics, a previous proposition proved, or a proposition ...
32573 lemming LEM'MING,
32574 lemniscate LEM'NISCATE, n. [L. lemniscus, a ribbon; lemniscatus, adorned with ribbons.] A curve in the form ...
32575 lemon LEM'ON, n.1. The fruit of a tree belonging to the genus Citrus, which grows in warm climates. ...
32576 lemonade LEMONA'DE, n.A liquor consisting of lemon juice mixed with water and sweetened.
32577 lemur LE'MUR, n. [L.] A genus of quadrupeds, the Makis, natives of Africa and the East Indies.
32578 lemures LE'MURES, n. [L.] Hobgoblins; evil spirits. [Not English.]
32579 lend LEND, v.t. pret. and pp. lent.1. To grant to another for temporary use, on the express or implied ...
32580 lendable LEND'ABLE, a. That may be lent.
32581 lender LEND'ER, n.1. One who lends.The borrower is servant to the lender. Prov. 22.2. One who makes a ...
32582 lending LEND'ING, ppr. Granting for temporary use. [See Lend.]LEND'ING, n. 1. The act of loaning.2. ...
32583 lends LENDS, n. Loins. [Not in use.]
32584 length LENGTH, n.1. The extent of anything material from end to end; the longest line which can be drawn ...
32585 lengthen LENGTH'EN, v.t. length'n.1. To extend in length; to make longer; to elongate; as, to lengthen a ...
32586 lengthened LENGTH'ENED, pp. Made longer; drawn out in length; continued in duration.
32587 lengthening LENGTH'ENING, ppr. Making longer; extending in length or in duration.LENGTH'ENING, n. ...
32588 lengthful LENGTH'FUL, a. Of great length in measure.
32589 lengthwise LENGTH'WISE, adv. In the direction of the length; in a longitudinal direction.
32590 lengthy LENGTH'Y, a. Being long or moderately long; not short; not brief; applied mostly to moral ...
32591 lenient LE'NIENT, a. [L. leniens, from lenio, lenis, soft, mild.1. Softening; mitigating; assuasive.Time, ...
32592 lenify LEN'IFY, v.t. To assuage; to soften; to mitigate. [Little used.]
32593 leniment LEN'IMENT, n. An assuasive. [Not used.]
32594 lenitive LEN'ITIVE, a. [L. lenio, to soften.]Having the quality of softening or mitigating, as pain or ...
32595 lenity LEN'ITY, n. [L. lenitas, from lenis, mild, soft.]Mildness of temper; softness; tenderness; mercy. ...
32596 lens LENS, n. plu. lenses. [L. lens, a lentil.] A transparent substance, usually glass, so formed that ...
32597 lent LENT, pp. of lend.LENT, n.The quadragesimal fast, or fast of forty days observed by the christian ...
32598 lenten LENT'EN, a. Pertaining to lent; used in lent; sparing; as a lenten entertainment; a lenten salad.
32599 lenticular LENTIC'ULAR, a. [L. lenticularis, from lens, supra.]1. Resembling a lentil.2. Having the form of ...
32600 lenticularly LENTIC'ULARLY, adv. In the manner of a lens; with a curve.
32601 lenticulite LENTIC'ULITE, n. A petrified shell.
32602 lentiform LENT'IFORM, a. [L. lens and forma, form.] Of the form of a lens.
32603 lentiginous LENTIG'INOUS, a. [L. lentigo, a freckle, from L. lens.] Freckly; scurfy; furfuraceous.
32604 lentigo LENTI'GO, n. A freckly eruption on the skin.
32605 lentil LEN'TIL, n. [L. lens.] A plant of the genus Ervum. It is an annual plant, rising with weak ...
32606 lentiscus LENTIS'CUS, n. [L. lentiscus.]A tree of the genus Pistacia, the mastichtree, a native of Arabia, ...
32607 lentisk LEN'TISK,
32608 lentitude LENT'ITUDE, n. [L. lectus, slow.] Slowness. [Not used.]
32609 lentner LENT'NER, n. A kind of hawk.
32610 lentor LENT'OR, n. [L. from lentus, slow, tough, clammy.]1. Tenacity; viscousness.2. Slowness; delay; ...
32611 lentous LENT'OUS, a. [L. lentus, slow, thick.] Viscid; viscous; tenacious.
32612 lenzinite LEN'ZINITE, n. [from Lenzius, a German mineralogist.]A mineral of two kinds, the opaline and ...
32613 leo LE'O, n. [L.] The Lion, the fifth sign of the zodiac.
32614 leonine LE'ONINE, a. [L. leoninus, from leo, lion.] Belonging to a lion; resembling a lion, or partaking ...
32615 leoninely LE'ONINELY, adv. In the manner of a lion.
32616 leopard LEOPARD, n. lep'ard. [L. leo, lion, and pardus, pard. Gr. from Heb. to separate, that is, ...
32617 leopards-bane LEOP'ARD'S-BANE, n. A plant of the genus Doronicum. The German Leopard's-bane is of the genus ...
32618 leper LEP'ER, n. [L. lepra, leprosy. Gr.] A person affected with leprosy.
32619 lepid LEP'ID, a. [L. lepidus.] Pleasant; jocose. [Little used.]
32620 lepidolite LEP'IDOLITE, n. [Gr. a scale.] A mineral found in scaly masses, ordinarily of a violet or lilac ...
32621 lepidopter LEP'IDOPTER,
32622 lepidoptera LEPIDOP'TERA, n. [Gr. a scale, and a wing.] The Lepidopteras are an order of insects having four ...
32623 lepidopteral LEPIDOP'TERAL, a. Belonging to the order of Lepidopters.
32624 leporine LEP'ORINE, a. [L. leporinus, from lepus, a hare.]Pertaining to a hare; having the nature or ...
32625 leprosity LEPROS'ITY, n. Squamousness. [Little used.]
32626 leprosy LEP'ROSY, n. [See Leper.] A foul cutaneous disease, appearing in dry, white, thin, scurfy scabs, ...
32627 leprous LEP'ROUS, a. [See Leper.] Infected with leprosy; covered with white scales.His hand was leprous ...
32628 leprously LEP'ROUSLY, adv. In an infectious degree.
32629 lere LERE, n. Learning; lesson; lore. Obs.LERE, v.t. To learn; to teach. Obs.
32630 lesion LE'SION, n. le'zhun. [L. lasio, from lado, to hurt.]A hurting; hurt; wound; injury.
32631 less LESS, for unless. [Not in use.]LESS, A terminating syllable of many nouns and some adjectives. ...
32632 lessee LESSEE', n. [from lease.] The person to whom a lease is given, or who takes an estate by lease.
32633 lessen LESS'EN, v.t. les'n. [from less.] 1. To make less; to diminish; to reduce in bulk, size, ...
32634 lessened LESS'ENED, pp. Made smaller; diminished.
32635 lessening LESS'ENING, ppr. Reducing in bulk, amount or degree; degrading.
32636 lesser LESS'ER, a. [This word is a corruption; but too well established to be discarded.]Less; smaller. ...
32637 lesson LES'SON, n. les'n. [L. lectio, from lego, to read.]1. Any thing read or recited to a teacher by ...
32638 lessoned LES'SONED, pp. Taught; instructed.
32639 lessoning LES'SONING, ppr. Teaching.
32640 lessor LES'SOR, n. [from lease.] One who leases; the person who lets to farm, or gives a lease.
32641 lest LEST, con. That not; for fear that.Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. ...
32642 let LET, v.t. pret. and pp. let. Letted is obsolete. [To let out, like L. elocare, is to lease.]1. To ...
32643 lethal LE'THAL, a. [L. lethalis, mortal, from Gr. oblivion.] Deadly; mortal; fatal.
32644 lethality LETHAL'ITY, n. Mortality.
32645 lethargic LETHAR'GIC,
32646 lethargical LETHAR'GICAL, a. [L. lethargicus.] Preternaturally inclined to sleep; drowsy; dull; heavy.
32647 lethargically LETHAR'GICALLY, adv. In a morbid sleepiness.
32648 lethargicalness LETHAR'GICALNESS,
32649 lethargicness LETHAR'GICNESS, n. Preternatural or morbid sleepiness or drowsiness.
32650 lethargied LETH'ARGIED, pp. or a. Laid asleep; entranced.
32651 lethargy LETH'ARGY, n. [L. lethargia; Gr. oblivion and idle.]1. Preternatural sleepiness; morbid ...
32652 lethe LE'THE, n. le'thee. [Gr. forgetfulness; L. lateo, to be hid.] Oblivion; a draught of oblivion.
32653 lethean LETHE'AN, a. Inducing forgetfulness or oblivion.
32655 lether-seller LETH'ER-SELLER, n. A seller or dealer in leather.
32656 lether-winged LETH'ER-WINGED, a. Having wings like leather.
32654 lether LETH'ER, n.1. The skin of an animal dressed and prepared for use.2. Dressed hides in general.3. ...
32657 lethern LETH'ERN, a. Made of leather; consisting of leather; as a lethern purse; a lethern girdle.
32658 lethery LETH'ERY, a. Resembling leather; tough.
32659 lethiferous LETHIF'EROUS, a. [L. lethum, death, and fero, to bring.]Deadly; mortal; bringing death or ...
32661 letter-case LET'TER-CASE, n. A case or book to put letters in.
32662 letter-founder LET'TER-FOUNDER, n. One who casts letters; a type-founder.
32663 letter-press LET'TER-PRESS, n. [letter and press.] Print; letters and words impressed on paper or other ...
32660 letter LET'TER, n. [from let.] 1. One who permits.2. One who retards or hinders.3. One who gives ...
32664 lettered LET'TERED, pp. Stamped with letters.LET'TERED, a. 1. Literate; educated; versed in literature or ...
32665 lettering LET'TERING, ppr. Impressing or forming letters on; as lettering a book on the cover.
32666 letterless LET'TERLESS, a. Illiterate; unlettered; not learned.
32667 lettuce LETTUCE, n. let'tis. [L. lactuca, according to Varro, from lac, milk.]A genus of plants, the ...
32668 leucin LEU'CIN,
32669 leucine LEU'CINE, n. [Gr. white.] A peculiar white pulverulent substance obtained from beef-fibers, ...
32670 leucite LEU'CITE, n. [Gr. white.] A stony substance, so called from its whiteness, found among volcanic ...
32671 leuco-ethiopic LEUCO-ETHIOP'IC, a. [Gr. white, and black.]White and black; designating a white animal of a black ...
32672 leucophlegmacy LEUCOPHLEG'MACY, n. [Gr. white, and phlegm.]A dropsical habit of body, or the commencement of ...
32673 leucophlegmatic LEUCOPHLEGMAT'IC, a. Having a dropsical habit of body with a white bloated skin.
32674 leucothiop LEUCO'THIOP, n. [See Leuco-ethiopic.] An albino; a white man of a black race.
32675 leuthrite LEU'THRITE, n. A substance that appears to be a recomposed rock, or a loose texture, gritty and ...
32676 levant LE'VANT, a. [L. levo.]Eastern; denoting the part of the hemisphere where the sun rises.Forth rush ...
32677 levantine LEV'ANTINE, a. 1. Pertaining to the Levant.2. Designating a particular kind of silk ...
32678 levator LEVA'TOR, n. [L. from levo, to raise.] 1. In anatomy, a muscle that serves to raise some part, as ...
32679 leve LEVE, for believe. Obs.
32680 levee LEV'EE, n. [L. levo.]1. The time of rising.2. The concourse of persons who visit a prince or ...
32681 level LEV'EL, a. [Eng. sleek. L. libella, libra, belong to the root.]1. Horizontal; coinciding with ...
32682 leveled LEV'ELED, pp. 1. Reduced to a plane; made even.2. Reduced to an equal state, condition or ...
32683 leveler LEV'ELER, n.1. One that levels or makes even.2. One that destroys or attempts to destroy ...
32684 leveling LEV'ELING, ppr. 1. Making level or even.2. Reducing to an equality of condition.LEV'ELING, n. ...
32685 levelness LEV'ELNESS, n. 1. Evenness; equality of surface.2. Equality with something else.
32686 leven LEVEN. [See Leaven.]
32687 lever LEV'ER, n. [L. levo, to raise.]In mechanics, a bar of metal, wood, or other substance, turning on ...
32688 leveret LEV'ERET, n. A hare in the first year of her age.
32689 leverock LEV'EROCK, n. A bird, a lark. [See Lark.]
32690 levet LEV'ET, n. A blast of a trumpet; probably that by which soldiers are called in the morning. [Not ...
32691 leviable LEV'IABLE, a. [from levy.] That may be levied; that may be assessed and collected; as sums ...
32692 leviathan LEVI'ATHAN, n. [Heb.]1. An aquatic animal, described in Job 41, and mentioned in other passages ...
32693 levigate LEV'IGATE, v.t. [L. lavigo, from lavis, smooth, Gr.]1. In pharmacy and chimistry, to rub or grind ...
32694 levigated LEV'IGATED, pp. Reduced to a fine impalpable powder.
32695 levigating LEV'IGATING, ppr. Rendering very fine, soft and smooth, by grinding or rubbing.
32696 levigation LEVIGA'TION, n. The act or operation of grinding or rubbing a solid substance to a fine impalpable ...
32697 levitation LEVITA'TION, n. [L. levis, levitas.] Lightness; buoyancy; act of making light.
32698 levite LE'VITE, n. [from Levi, one the sons of Jacob.]One of the tribe or family of Levi; a descendant of ...
32699 levitical LEVIT'ICAL, a.1. Belong to the Levites, or descendants of Levi; as the levitical law, the law ...
32700 levitically LEVIT'ICALLY, adv. After the manner of the Levites.
32701 leviticus LEVIT'ICUS, n. [from Levi, Levite.] A canonical book of the Old Testament, containing the laws ...
32702 levity LEV'ITY, n. [L. levitas, from levis, light; connected perhaps with Eng. lift.]1. Lightness; the ...
32703 levy LEV'Y, v.t. [L. levo; Eng. to lift.]1. To raise; to collect. To levy troops, is to enlist or to ...
32704 lew LEW, a. Tepid; lukewarm; pale; wan. Obs.
32705 lewd LEWD, a. [Heb.]1. Given to the unlawful indulgence of lust; addicted to fornication or adultery; ...
32706 lewdly LEWD'LY, adv. 1. With the unlawful indulgence of lust; lustfully.2. Wickedly; wantonly.
32707 lewdness LEWD'NESS, n. 1. The unlawful indulgence of lust; fornication, or adultery.2. In Scripture, it ...
32708 lewdster LEWD'STER, n. One given to the criminal indulgence of lust; a lecher. [Not used.]
32709 lexicographer LEXICOG'RAPHER, n. [See Lexicography.] The author of a lexicon or dictionary_webster1828.
32710 lexicographic LEXICOGRAPH'IC, a. Pertaining to the writing or compilation of a dictionary_webster1828.
32711 lexicography LEXICOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a dictionary_webster1828, and to write.]1. The act of writing a lexicon or ...
32712 lexicology LEXICOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a dictionary_webster1828, and discourse.]The science of words; that branch of ...
32713 lexicon LEX'ICON, n. [Gr. a dictionary_webster1828, from to speak.]A dictionary_webster1828; a vocabulary ...
32714 lexiconist LEX'ICONIST, n. A writer of a lexicon. [Little used.]
32715 lexigraphy LEX'IGRAPHY, n. [Gr. a word, and to write.] The art or practice of defining words.
32716 ley LEY, n. [See Lay.] A meadow or plain. The Welsh write lle, but as this word is from the root of ...
32717 lherzolite LHER'ZOLITE, n. [from Lherz, in the Pyrenees.]A mineral, a variety of pyroxene. When ...
32718 liability LIABIL'ITY, n. 1. The state of being bound or obliged in law or justice; responsibility. The ...
32719 liable LI'ABLE, a. [L. ligo. See Liege.]1. Bound; obliged in law or equity; responsible; answerable. ...
32720 liableness LI'ABLENESS,
32721 liar LIA'R, n. [from lie.] 1. A person who knowingly utters falsehood; one who declares to another as ...
32722 liard LI'ARD, a. Gray. Obs.
32723 lias LI'AS, n. A species of limestone, occurring in flat, horizontal strata, and supposed to be of ...
32724 lib LIB, v.t. To castrate. [Not in use.]
32725 libation LIBA'TION, n. [L. libatio, from libo, to pour out, to taste.]1. The act of pouring a liquor, ...
32726 libbard LIBBARD, an obsolete spelling of leopard.
32727 libbards-bane LIB'BARD'S-BANE, n. A poisonous plant.
32728 libel LI'BEL, n. [L. libellus, a little book, from liber, a book, from the sense of bark, and this from ...
32729 libelant LI'BELANT, n. One who libels; one who brings a libel or institutes a suit in an admiralty ...
32730 libeled LI'BELED, pp.1. Defamed by a writing or picture made public.2. Charged or declared against in an ...
32731 libeler LI'BELER, n. One who libels or defames by writing or pictures; a lampooner.It is ignorance of ...
32732 libeling LI'BELING, ppr.1. Defaming by a published writing or picture.2. Exhibiting charges against in ...
32733 libelous LI'BELOUS, a. Defamatory; containing that which exposes a person to public hatred, contempt and ...
32734 liberal LIB'ERAL, a. [L. liberalis, from liber, free. See Libe.]1. Of a free heart; free to give or ...
32735 liberality LIBERAL'ITY, n. [L. liberalitas. See Liberal.]1. Munificence; bounty.That liberality is but cast ...
32736 liberalize LIB'ERALIZE, v.t. To render liberal or catholic; to enlarge; to free from narrow views or ...
32737 liberalized LIB'ERALIZED, pp. Freed from narrow views and prejudices; made liberal.
32738 liberalizing LIB'ERALIZING, ppr. Rendering liberal; divesting of narrow views and prejudices.
32739 liberally LIB'ERALLY, adv. 1. Bountifully; freely; largely; with munificence.If any of you lack wisdom, let ...
32740 liberate LIB'ERATE, v.t. [L. libero, from liber, free.]1. To free; to release from restraint or bondage; ...
32741 liberated LIB'ERATED, pp. Freed; released from confinement, restraint or slavery; manumitted.
32742 liberating LIB'ERATING, ppr. Delivering from restraint or slavery.
32743 liberation LIBERA'TION, n. [L. liberatio.] The act of delivering from restraint, confinement or slavery.
32744 liberator LIB'ERATOR, n. One who liberates or delivers.
32745 libertarian LIBERTA'RIAN, a. [L. liber, free; libertas, liberty.]Pertaining to liberty, or to the doctrine of ...
32746 libertinage LIB'ERTINAGE, n. Libertinism, which is most used.
32747 libertine LIB'ERTINE, n. [L. libertinus, from liber, free.]1. Among the Romans, a freedman; a person ...
32748 libertinism LIB'ERTINISM, n.1. State of a freedman. [Little used.]2. Licentiousness of opinion and practice; ...
32749 liberty LIB'ERTY, n. [L. libertas, from liber, free.]1. Freedom from restraint, in a general sense, and ...
32750 libidinous LIBID'INOUS, a. [L. libidinosus, from libido, lubido, lust, from libeo, libet, lubet, to please, ...
32751 libidinously LIBID'INOUSLY, a. Lustfully; with lewd desire.
32752 libidinousness LIBID'INOUSNESS, n. The state or quality of being lustful; inordinate appetite for venereal ...
32753 libidnist LIB'IDNIST, n. One given to lewdness.
32754 libra LI'BRA, n. [L.] The balance; the seventh sign in the zodiac, which the sun enters at the autumnal ...
32755 librarian LIBRA'RIAN, n. [L. librarius, with a different signification, from liber, bark, a book.]1. The ...
32756 library LI'BRARY, n. [L. librarium, libraria, from liber, a book.]1. A collection of books belonging to a ...
32757 librate LI'BRATE, v.t. [L. libro, from libra, a balance, a level; allied perhaps to Eng. level.]To poise; ...
32758 libration LIBRA'TION, n.1. The act of balancing or state of being balanced; a state of equipoise, with equal ...
32759 libratory LI'BRATORY, a. Balancing; moving like a balance, as it tends to an equipoise or level.
32761 lice-bane LICE-BANE, n. A plant.
32760 lice LICE, plu of louse.
32762 license LI'CENSE, n. [L. licentia, from liceo, to be permitted.]1. Leave; permission; authority or ...
32763 licenser LI'CENSER, n. One who grants permission; a person authorized to grant permission to others; as a ...
32764 licentiate LICEN'TIATE, n. [from L. licentia.]1. One who has a license; as a licentiate in physic or ...
32765 licentious LICEN'TIOUS, a. [L. licentiosus.]1. Using license; indulging freedom to excess; unrestrained by ...
32766 licentiously LICEN'TIOUSLY, adv. With excess of liberty; in contempt of law and morality.
32767 licentiousness LICEN'TIOUSNESS, n. Excessive indulgence of liberty; contempt of the just restraints of law, ...
32768 lich LICH, a. [See Like.] Like; even; equal. Obs.LICH, n. [Heb. chalak, smooth. We have here an ...
32769 lichen LICH'EN, n. [L. from Gr.]1. In botany, the name for an extensive division of cryptogamian plants, ...
32770 lichenographic LICHENOGRAPH'IC,
32771 lichenographical LICHENOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to lichenography.
32772 lichenographist LICHENOG'RAPHIST, n. One who describes the lichens.
32773 lichenography LICHENOG'RAPHY, n. [lichen and to write.]A description of the vegetables called lichens; the ...
32774 licit LIC'IT, a. [L. licitus.] Lawful.
32775 licitly LIC'ITLY, adv. Lawfully.
32776 licitness LIC'ITNESS, n. Lawfulness.
32777 lick LICK, v.t. [L. lingo; Gr. See Like and Sleek.]1. To pass or draw the tongue over the surface; ...
32778 licker LICK'ER, n. One that licks.
32779 lickerish LICK'ERISH, a. [Gr. sweet. The sense of watery, smooth, sweet, are allied; likeness is often ...
32780 lickerishly LICK'ERISHLY, adv. Daintly.
32781 lickerishness LICK'ERISHNESS, n. Niceness of palate; daintiness.
32782 licorice LIC'ORICE, n. [L. glycyrrhiza; Gr. sweet, and root.]A plant of the genus Glycyrrhiza. The root of ...
32783 licorous LICOROUS, LICOROUSNESS, for lickerish, &c. not used.
32784 licorousness LICOROUS, LICOROUSNESS, for lickerish, &c. not used.
32785 lictor LIC'TOR, n. [L. lick, to strike.] An officer among the Romans, who bore an ax and fasces or rods, ...
32786 lid LID. n. [L. claudo, cludo; Gr.; Heb.]A cover; that which shuts the opening of a vessel or box; as ...
32787 lie LIE, water impregnated with alkaline salt, is written lye, to distinguish it from lie, a ...
32788 lief LIEF, a. [See Love.] Dear; beloved. Obs.LIEF, adv. [supra. This word coincides with love, L. ...
32790 liege-man LIE'GE-MAN, n. A vassal; a subject. Obs.
32789 liege LIEGE, a. [L. ligo, to bind; Gr. to bind, to bend; a withe.]1. Bound by a feudal tenure; obliged ...
32791 lien LIEN, the obsolete participle of lie. [See Lain.]LIEN, n. [supra.] A legal claim; as a lien ...
32792 lienteric LIENTER'IC, a. [from lientery.] Pertaining to a lientery.
32793 lientery LI'ENTERY, n. [L.; Gr. smooth, and an intestine.]A flux of the bowels, in which the aliments are ...
32794 lier LIER, n. [from lie.] One who lies down; one who rests or remains; as a lier in wait or in ambush. ...
32795 lieu LIEU, n. [L. locus, Eng. ley or lea. See Ley.]Place; room; stead. It is used only with in. Let ...
32796 lieutenancy LIEUTENANCY,n. luten'ancy. [See Lieutenant.]1. The office or commission of a lieutenant.2. The ...
32797 lieutenant LIEUTENANT, n. luten'ant. [L. tenens, holding.]1. An officer who supplies the place of a ...
32798 lieutenantship LIEUTENANTSHIP. [See Lieutenancy.]
32799 lieve LIEVE, for lief, is vulgar. [See Lief.]
32800 lievrite LIE'VRITE, n. A mineral, called also yenite, which see.
32802 life-blood LI'FE-BLOOD, n.1. The blood necessary to life; vital blood.2. That which constitutes or gives ...
32803 life-estate LIFE-ESTA'TE, n. An estate that continues during the life of the possessor.
32804 life-everlasting LIFE-EVERL'ASTING, n. A plant of the genus Gnaphalium.
32805 life-giving LI'FE-GIVING, a. Having power to give life; inspiriting; invigorating.
32801 life LIFE, n. plu lives. [See Live.]1. In a general sense, that state of animals and plants, or of an ...
32806 lifeguard LI'FEGUARD, n. A guard of the life or person; a guard that attends the person of a prince, or ...
32807 lifeless LI'FELESS, a.1. Dead; deprived of life; as a lifeless body.2. Destitute of life; unanimated; as ...
32808 lifelessly LI'FELESSLY, adv. Without vigor; dully; frigidly; heavily.
32809 lifelessness LI'FELESSNESS, n. Destitution of life, vigor and spirit; inactivity.
32810 lifelike LI'FELIKE, a. Like a living person.
32811 liferent LI'FERENT, n. The rent of an estate that continues for life.
32812 lifestring LI'FESTRING, n. a nerve or string that is imagined to be essential to life.
32813 lifetime LI'FETIME, n. The time that life continues; duration of life.
32814 lifeweary LI'FEWEARY, a. Tired of life; weary of living.
32815 lift LIFT, v.t. [We retain this sense in shoplifter. L. levo, elevo.]1. To raise; to elevate; as, to ...
32816 lifted LIFT'ED, pp. Raised; elevated; swelled with pride.
32817 lifter LIFT'ER, n. One that lifts or raises.
32818 lifting LIFT'ING, ppr. Raising; swelling with pride.LIFT'ING, n. The act of lifting; assistance.
32819 lig LIG, v.i. to lie. [See Lie.] Obs.
32820 ligament LIG'AMENT, n. [L. ligamentum, from ligo, to bind, that is, to strain.]1. Any thing that ties or ...
32821 ligamental LIGAMENT'AL,
32822 ligamentous LIGAMENT'OUS, a. Composing a ligament; of the nature of a ligament; binding; as a strong ...
32823 ligation LIGA'TION, n. [L. ligatio.] The act of binding, or state of being bound.
32824 ligature LIG'ATURE, n. [L. ligatura.]1. Any thing that binds; a band or bandage.2. The act of binding; ...
32826 light-armed LI'GHT-ARMED, a. Armed with light weapons.
32827 light-bearer LI'GHT-BEARER, n. A torch-bearer.
32828 light-brain LI'GHT-BRAIN, n. An empty headed person.
32829 light-horse LI'GHT-HORSE, n. Light armed cavalry.
32830 light-house LI'GHT-HOUSE, n. A pharos; a tower or building erected on a rock or point of land, or on an isle ...
32825 light LIGHT, n. lite. [L. lux, light and luceo, to shine. Eng. luck, both in elements and radical ...
32831 lighted LIGHTED, pp. li'ted. Kindled; set on fire; caused to burn. [Lit, for lighted, is inelegant.]
32832 lighten LIGHTEN, v.i. li'tn. [from light, the fluid.]1. To flash; to burst forth or dart, as lightning; ...
32833 lighter LIGHTER, n. li'ter.1. One that lights; as a lighter of lamps.2. A large open flat-bottomed boat, ...
32834 lighterman LIGHTERMAN, n. li'terman. A man who manages a lighter; a boatman.
32835 lightfingered LIGHTFINGERED, a. li'tefingered. Dexterous in taking and conveying away; thievish; addicted to ...
32836 lightfoot LIGHTFOOT, li'tefoot,
32837 lightfooted LIGHTFOOTED, li'tefooted. a. Nimble in running or dancing; active. [Little used.]
32838 lightheaded LI'GHTHEADED, a. [See head.] 1. Thoughtless; heedless; weak; volatile; unsteady.2. Disordered in ...
32839 lightheadedness LI'GHTHEADEDNESS, n. Disorder of the head; dizziness; deliriousness.
32840 lighthearted LI'GHTHE'ARTED, a. Free from grief or anxiety; gay; cheerful; merry.
32841 lightlegged LI'GHTLEGGED, a. Nimble; swift of foot.
32842 lightless LIGHTLESS, li'teless. Destitute of light; dark.
32843 lightly LIGHTLY, adv. li'tely.1. With little weight; as, to tread lightly; to press lightly.2. Without ...
32844 lightminded LIGHTMINDED, a. Unsettled; unsteady; volatile; not considerate.He that is hasty to give credit, is ...
32845 lightness LIGHTNESS, n. li'teness.1. Want of weight; levity; the contrary to heaviness; as the lightness of ...
32846 lightning LIGHTNING, n. li'tening. [that is, lightening, the participle present of lighten.]1. A sudden ...
32847 lightroom LI'GHTROOM, n. In a ship of war, a small apartment, having double glass windows towards the ...
32848 lights LIGHTS, n. lites. plu. [so called from their lightness.]The lungs; the organs of breathing in ...
32849 lightsome LIGHTSOME, a. li'tesome. 1. Luminous; not dark; not obscure.White walls make rooms more lightsome ...
32850 lightsomeness LI'GHTSOMENESS, n.1. Luminousness; the quality of being light; opposed to darkness or ...
32851 lign-aloes LIGN-AL'OES, n. [L. lignum, wood, and aloes.] Aloes-wood. Num. 24.
32852 ligneous LIG'NEOUS, a. [L. ligneus.] Wooden; made of wood; consisting of wood; resembling wood. The ...
32853 lignification LIGNIFICA'TION, n. The process of becoming or of converting into wood, or the hard substance of a ...
32854 ligniform LIG'NIFORM a. [L. lignum, wood, and form.] Like wood; resembling wood.
32855 lignify LIG'NIFY, v.t. [L. lignum, wood, and facio, to make.] To convert into wood.LIG'NIFY, v.i. To ...
32856 lignite LIG'NITE, n. [L. lignum.] Fossil or bituminous wood, a mineral combustible substance.
32857 lignous LIG'NOUS, a. Ligneous. [Little used.]
32858 lignum-vitae LIGNUM-VIT'AE, n. [L.] Guaiacum or pockwood, a genus of plants, natives of warm climates. The ...
32859 ligulate LIG'ULATE,
32860 ligulated LIG'ULATED, a. [L. ligula, a strap.] Like a bandage or strap; as a ligulate flower, a species of ...
32861 ligure LIG'URE, n. A kind of precious stone.
32862 ligurite LIG'URITE, n. [from Liguria.] A mineral occurring in oblique rhombic prisms, of an apple green ...
32864 like-minded LIKE-MINDED, a. Having a like disposition or purpose. Rom. 15.
32863 like LIKE, a. [L., Heb., Gr. See Lick and Lickerish.]1. Equal in quantity, quality or degree; as a ...
32865 likelihood LI'KELIHOOD, n. [likely and hod.]1. Probability; verisimilitude; appearance of truth or reality. ...
32866 likeliness LI'KELINESS, n. [from likely.]1. Probability.2. The qualities that please. [See Likely.]
32867 likely LI'KELY, a. [that is, like-like.]1. Probable; that may be rationally though or believed to have ...
32868 liken LIKEN, v.t. li'kn.To compare; to represent as resembling or similar.Whosoever heareth these sayings ...
32869 likened LI'KENED, pp. Compared.
32870 likeness LI'KENESS, n. 1. Resemblance in form; similitude. The picture is a good likeness of the ...
32871 likening LI'KENING, ppr. Comparing; representing as similar.
32872 likewise LI'KEWISE, adv. [like and wise.] In like manner; also; moreover; too.For he seeth that wise men ...
32873 liking LI'KING, ppr. of like. 1. Approving; being pleased with.2. a. Plump; full; of a good appearance. ...
32874 lilac LI'LAC, n. A plant or shrub of the genus syringa, a native of Persia. The common lilac is ...
32875 lilalite LIL'ALITE, n. A species of earth of the argillaceous kind; called also lepidolite, which see.
32876 liliaceous LILIA'CEOUS, a. [L. liliaceus, from lilium, a lily.]Pertaining to lilies; lily-like. A liliaceous ...
32877 lilied LIL'IED, a. Embellished with lilies.By sandy Ladon's lilied banks.
32878 lill LILL, v.t. [See Loll. But lill is used in New England.]
32879 lilt LILT, v.i.1. To do any thing with dexterity or quickness. [Local.]2. To sing or play on the ...
32881 lily-daffodil LILY-DAF'FODIL, n. A plant and flower.
32882 lily-handed LIL'Y-HANDED, a. Having white delicate hands.
32883 lily-hyacinth LIL'Y-HYACINTH, n. A plant.
32884 lily-livered LILY-LIV'ERED, a. White-livered; cowardly. [Not used.]
32880 lily LIL'Y, n. [L. lilium; Gr.] A genus of plants of many species, which are all bulbous-rooted, ...
32885 limation LIMA'TION, n. [L. limo, to file.] The act of filing or polishing.
32886 limature LI'MATURE, n. [L. limo, to file.] 1. A filing.2. Filings; particles rubbed off by filing.
32887 limb LIMB, n. lim. [L. limbus, edge or border, extremity; limes, limit. The sense of limb is from ...
32888 limbat LIM'BAT, n. A cooling periodical wind in the isle of Cyprus, blowing from the north west from ...
32889 limbec LIM'BEC, n. [contracted from alembic.] A still; a word not now used.LIM'BEC, v.t. To strain or ...
32890 limbed LIMB'ED, a. In composition, formed with regard to limbs; as well-limbed; large-limbed; ...
32891 limber LIM'BER, a. Easily bent; flexible; pliant; yielding. In America, it is applied to material things; ...
32892 limberness LIM'BERNESS, n. The quality of being easily bent; flexibleness; pliancy.
32893 limbers LIM'BERS, n. 1. A two-wheeled carriage, having boxes for ammunition.2. Thills; shafts of a ...
32894 limbilite LIM'BILITE,n. A mineral from Limbourg, in Swabia, of a honey yellow color, and compact texture.
32895 limbless LIMB'LESS, a. Destitute of limbs.
32896 limbo LIM'BO,
32897 limbus LIM'BUS, n. [L. limbus.] 1. A region bordering on hell, or hell itself.Among catholics, a place ...
32899 lime-burner LI'ME-BURNER, n. One who burns stones to lime.
32898 lime LIME, n. [L. limus; Gr. and allied to clammy. On this word is formed slime.]1. A viscous ...
32900 limed LI'MED, pp. Smeared with lime; entangled; manured with lime.
32901 limehound LI'MEHOUND, n. A dog used in hunting the wild boar; a limer.
32902 limekiln LIMEKILN, n. li'mekil. A kiln or furnace in which stones or shells are exposed to a strong heat ...
32903 limestone LI'MESTONE, n. Stone of which lime is made by the expulsion of its carbonic acid, or fixed air. ...
32904 limetwig LI'METWIG, n. A twig smeared with lime.
32905 limetwigged LI'METWIGGED, a. Smeared with lime.
32906 limewater LI'MEWATER, n. Water impregnated with lime.
32907 liming LI'MING, ppr. Daubing with viscous matter; entangling; manuring with lime.
32908 limit LIM'IT, n. [L. limes. See Limb.]1. Bound; border; utmost extent; the part that terminates a ...
32909 limitable LIM'ITABLE, a. That may be limited, circumscribed, bounded or restrained.
32910 limitaneous LIM'ITANEOUS, a. Pertaining to bounds.
32911 limitarian LIMITA'RIAN, a. That limits or circumscribes.LIMITA'RIAN, n. One that limits; one who holds the ...
32912 limitary LIM'ITARY, a. Placed at the limit, as a guard.- Proud limitary cherub.
32913 limitation LIMITA'TION, n. [L. limitatio.] 1. The act of bounding or circumscribing.2. Restriction; ...
32914 limited LIM'ITED, pp.1. Bounded; circumscribed; restrained.2. a. Narrow; circumscribed. Our views of ...
32915 limitedly LIM'ITEDLY, adv. With limitation.
32916 limitedness LIM'ITEDNESS, n. State of being limited.
32917 limiter LIM'ITER, n.1. He or that which limits or confines.2. A friar licensed to beg within certain ...
32918 limitless LIM'ITLESS, a. Having no limits; unbounded.
32919 limmer LIM'MER, n.1. A limehound; a mongrel.2. A dog engendered between a hound and a mastiff.3. A ...
32920 limn LIMN, v.t. lim. [L. lumino.] To draw or paint; or to paint in water colors.
32921 limned LIM'NED, pp. lim'med. Painted.
32922 limner LIM'NER, n. [L. illuminator, in the middle ages, alluminor.]1. One that colors or paints on paper ...
32923 limning LIMN'ING, ppr. Drawing; painting; painting in water colors.
32924 limous LI'MOUS, a. [L. limosus, from limus, slime.] Muddy; slimy; thick.
32925 limp LIMP, v.i. To halt; to walk lamely.LIMP, n. A halt; act of limping.LIMP, a. Vapid; weak. [Not ...
32926 limper LIMP'ER, n. One that limps.
32927 limpet LIM'PET, n. [L. lepas; Gr. from to peel or strip off bark.]A univalve shell of the genus Patella, ...
32928 limpid LIM'PID, a. [L. limpidus.] Pure; clear; transparent; as a limpid stream.
32929 limpidness LIM'PIDNESS, n. Clearness; purity.
32930 limping LIM'PING, ppr. Halting; walking lamely.
32931 limpingly LIM'PINGLY, adv. Lamely; in a halting manner.
32932 limsy LIM'SY, a. Weak; flexible.
32933 limy LI'MY, a. [See lime.]1. Viscous; glutinous; as limy snares.2. Containing lime; as a limy soil.3. ...
32934 lin LIN, v.i. To yield. Obs.LIN, n. A pool or mere. [Not used.]
32935 linchpin LINCH'PIN, n. A pin used to prevent the wheel of a carriage from sliding off the axle-tree.
32936 lincture LINC'TURE, n. [L. lingo, linctus.] Medicine taken by licking.
32937 linden LIN'DEN, n. The lime-tree, or teil-tree, of the genus Tilia.
32938 line LINE, n. [L. linea, linum; Gr. flax.]1. In geometry, a quantity extended in length, without ...
32939 lineage LIN'EAGE, n. Race; progeny; descendants in a line from a common progenitor.
32940 lineal LIN'EAL, a. [L. linealis, from linea, line.]1. Composed of lines; delineated; as lineal ...
32941 lineality LINEAL'ITY, n. The state of being in the form of a line.
32942 lineally LIN'EALLY, adv. In a direct line; as, the prince is lineally descended from the conqueror.
32943 lineament LIN'EAMENT, n. [L. lineamentum.]Feature; form; make; the outline or exterior of a body or figure, ...
32944 linear LIN'EAR, a. [L. linearis.]1. Pertaining to a line; consisting of lines; in a straight ...
32945 lineate LIN'EATE, a. In botany, marked longitudinally with depressed parallel lines; as a lineate leaf.
32946 lineation LINEA'TION, n. Draught; delineation, which see.
32947 lined LI'NED, pp. Covered on the inside.
32949 linen-draper LIN'EN-DRAPER, n. A person who deals in linens.Linener and linen-man, in a like sense, are ...
32948 linen LIN'EN, n. [L. linun, flax, Gr. The sense is probably long, extended or smooth. In the latter ...
32950 ling LING, n. A fish of the genus Gadus, or cod kind, which grows to the length of four feet or more, ...
32951 linger LIN'GER, v.i.1. To delay; to loiter; to remain or wait long; to be slow.Nor cast one longing, ...
32952 lingerer LIN'GERER, n. One who lingers.
32953 lingering LIN'GERING, ppr.1. Delaying; loitering.2. a. Drawing out in time; remaining long; protracted; as ...
32954 lingeringly LIN'GERINGLY, adv. With delay; slowly; tediously.
32955 linget LIN'GET, n. A small mass of metal.
32956 lingle LIN'GLE, n. Shoemaker's thread. [Not in use or local.]
32957 lingo LIN'GO, n. [L. lingua.] Language; speech. [Vulgar.]
32958 linguadental LINGUADENT'AL, a. [L. lingua, tongue, and dens, a tooth.]Formed or uttered by the joint use of the ...
32959 linguaform LIN'GUAFORM a. [lingua and form.] Having the form or shape of the tongue.
32960 lingual LIN'GUAL, a. [L. lingua, the tongue.] Pertaining to the tongue; as the lingual nerves, the ninth ...
32961 linguist LIN'GUIST, n. [L. lingua, tongue.] A person skilled in languages; usually applied to a person ...
32962 lingulate LIN'GULATE, a. [L. lingulatus, from lingua, tongue.]Shaped like the tongue or a strap. [But ...
32963 lingwort LINGWORT, n. An herb.
32964 liniment LIN'IMENT, n. [L. linimentum. from linio, lino, to anoint.]A species of soft ointment; a ...
32965 lining LI'NING, ppr. [See Line.] Covering on the inside, as a garment.LI'NING, n. 1. The inner ...
32966 link LINK, n.1. A single ring or division of a chain.2. Any thing doubled and closed like a link; as a ...
32967 linkboy LINK'BOY,
32968 linked LINK'ED, pp. United; connected.
32969 linking LINK'ING, ppr. Uniting; connecting.
32970 linkman LINK'MAN, n. A boy or man that carries a link or torch to light passengers.
32971 linnet LIN'NET, n. [L. carduelis, from carduus, a thistle.]A small singing bird of the genus Fingilla.
32972 linseed LINSEED. [See Lintseed.]
32973 linsey-woolsey LIN'SEY-WOOLSEY, a. Made of linen and wool; hence, vile; mean; of different and unsuitable parts.
32974 linstock LIN'STOCK, n. [lint and stock.] A pointed staff with a crotch or fork at one end, to hold a ...
32975 lint LINT, n. [L. linteum, linteus, from linium, flax.]Flax; but more generally, linen scraped into a ...
32976 lintel LINT'EL, n. The head-piece of a door-frame or window-frame; the part of the frame that lies on the ...
32977 lintseed LINT'SEED, n. Flaxseed.
32979 lion-mettled LI'ON-METTLED, a. Having the courage and spirit of a lion.
32978 lion LI'ON, n. [L. leo, leonis, Gr.]1. A quadruped of the genus Felis, very strong, fierce and ...
32980 lioness LI'ONESS, n. The female of the lion kind.
32981 lionlike LI'ONLIKE, a. Like a lion; fierce.
32983 lip-devotion LIP-DEVO'TION, n. Prayers uttered by the lips without the desires of the heart.
32982 lip LIP, n. [L. labium, labrum.]1. The edge or border of the mouth. The lips are two fleshy or ...
32984 liplabor LIP'LABOR, n. Labor or action of the lips without concurrence of the mind; words without ...
32985 lipogram LIP'OGRAM, n. [Gr. to leave, and a letter.]A writing in which a single letter is wholly omitted.
32986 lipogrammatist LIPOGRAM'MATIST, n. One who writes any thing, dropping a single letter.
32987 lipothymous LIPOTH'YMOUS, a. [See Lipothymy.] Swooning; fainting.
32988 lipothymy LIPOTH'YMY, n. [Gr. to fail, and soul.]A fainting; a swoon.
32989 lipped LIP'PED, a.1. Having lips.2. In botany, labiate.
32990 lippitude LIP'PITUDE, n. [L. lippitudo, from lippus, blear-eyed.]Soreness of eyes; blearedness.
32991 lipwisdom LIP'WISDOM, n. Wisdom in talk without practice; wisdom in words not supported by experience.
32992 liquable LIQ'UABLE, a. [See Liquate.] That may be melted.
32993 liquate LI'QUATE, v.i. [L. liquo.] To melt; to liquefy; to be dissolved. [Little used.]
32994 liquation LIQUA'TION, n. [L. liquatio. See Liquate.]1. The act or operation of melting.2. The capacity of ...
32995 liquefaction LIQUEFAC'TION, n. [L. liquefactio, from liquefacio.]1. The act or operation of melting or ...
32996 liquefiable LIQ'UEFIABLE, a. That may be melted, or changed from a solid to a liquid state.
32997 liquefier LIQ'UEFIER, n. That which melts any solid substance.
32998 liquefy LIQ'UEFY, v.t. [L. liquefacio. See Liquid.]To melt; to dissolve; to convert from a fixed or solid ...
32999 liquefying LIQ'UEFYING, ppr. Melting; becoming liquid.
33000 liquescency LIQUES'CENCY, n. [L. liquescentia.] Aptness to melt.
33001 liquescent LIQUES'CENT, a. Melting; becoming fluid.
33002 liqueur LIQUEUR, n. A spirituous cordial.
33003 liquid LIQ'UID, a. [L. liquidus, from liquo, to melt; lix and lug.]1. Fluid; flowing or capable of ...
33004 liquidate LIQ'UIDATE, v.t. [L. liquido.] 1. To clear from all obscurity.Time only can liquidate the meaning ...
33005 liquidated LIQ'UIDATED, pp. Settled; adjusted; reduced to certainty; paid.
33006 liquidating LIQ'UIDATING, ppr. Adjusting; ascertaining; paying.
33007 liquidation LIQUIDA'TION, n. The act of settling and adjusting debts, or ascertaining their amount or balance ...
33008 liquidator LIQ'UIDATOR, n. He or that which liquidates or settles.
33009 liquidity LIQUID'ITY, n.1. The quality of being fluid or liquid.2. Thinness.
33010 liquidness LIQ'UIDNESS, n. The quality of being liquid; fluency.
33011 liquor LIQ'UOR, n. lik'or [L. liquor.]A liquid or fluid substance. [See Liquid.] Liquor is a word of ...
33012 liquorice LIQUORICE. [See Licorice.]
33013 lisbon LIS'BON, n. A species of wine exported from Lisbon, in Portugal.
33014 lisne LISNE, n. A cavity or hollow. [Not in use.]
33015 lisp LISP, v.i.To speak with a particular articulation of the tongue and teeth, nearly as in pronouncing ...
33016 lisper LISP'ER, n. One that lisps.
33017 lisping LISP'ING, ppr. Uttering with a lisp.
33018 lispingly LISP'INGLY, adv. With a lisp.
33019 list LIST, n. [L. licium.]1. In commerce, the border, edge or selvage of cloth; a strip of cloth ...
33020 listed LIST'ED, pp. 1. Striped; particolored in stripes.2. Covered with list.3. Inclosed for combat.4. ...
33021 listel LIST'EL, n. A list in architecture; a fillet.
33022 listen LIST'EN, v.i. lis'n.1. To hearken; to give ear; to attend closely with a view to hear.On the ...
33023 listener LIST'ENER, n. One who listens; a hearkener.
33024 lister LIST'ER, n. One who makes a list or roll.
33025 listful LIST'FUL, a. Attentive. Obs.
33026 listing LIST'ING, ppr. Inclosing for combat; covering with list; enlisting.
33027 listless LIST'LESS, a. Not listening; not attending; indifferent to what is passing; heedless; inattentive; ...
33028 listlessly LIST'LESSLY, adv. Without attention; heedlessly.
33029 listlessness LIST'LESSNESS, n. Inattention; heedlessness; indifference to what is passing and may be ...
33030 lit LIT, pret. of light. The bird lit on a tree before me.I lit my pipe with the paper.[This word, ...
33031 litany LIT'ANY, n. [Gr. supplication, to pray.]A solemn form of supplication, used in public ...
33032 lite LITE, a. Little. [Not in use.]
33033 liter LITER, n. [Gr.] A French measure of capacity, being a cubic decimeter, containing, according to ...
33034 literal LIT'ERAL, a. [L. litera, a letter.]1. According to the letter; primitive; real; not figurative or ...
33035 literalism LIT'ERALISM, n. That which accords with the letter.
33036 literality LITERAL'ITY, n. Original or literal meaning.
33037 literally LIT'ERALLY, adv.1. According to the primary and natural import of words; not figuratively. A man ...
33038 literary LIT'ERARY, a. [L. literarius.]1. Pertaining to letters or literature; respecting learning or ...
33039 literate LIT'ERATE, a. [L. literatus.] Learned; lettered; instructed in learning and science.
33040 literati LITERA'TI, n. plu. [L. literatus.] The learned; men of erudition.
33041 literator LIT'ERATOR, n. [L.] A petty schoolmaster.
33042 literature LIT'ERATURE, n. [L. literatura.] Learning; acquaintance with letters or books. Literature ...
33043 lith LITH, n. A joint or limb. Obs.
33044 lithanthrax LITHAN'THRAX, n. [Gr. a stone, and a coal.]Stone-coal, a black, compact, brittle, inflammable ...
33045 litharge LITH'ARGE, n. [L. lithargyros, Gr. the spume or scum of silver.A semi-vitreous oxyd of lead, ...
33046 lithe LITHE, a. That may be easily bent; pliant; flexible; limber; as the elephant's lithe ...
33047 litheness LI'THENESS, n. Flexibility; limberness.
33048 lither LI'THER, a.1. Soft; pliant. Obs.2. Bad; corrupt. Obs.
33049 litherly LI'THERLY, adv. Slowly; lazily. Obs.
33050 litherness LI'THERNESS, n. Idleness; laziness. Obs.
33051 lithia LITH'IA, n. A new alkali, found in a mineral called petalite, of which the basis is a metal called ...
33052 lithiate LITH'IATE, n. [Gr. a stone.] A salt or compound formed by the lithic acid combined with a base.
33053 lithic LITH'IC, a. [supra.] Pertaining to the stone in the bladder. The lithic acid is obtained from a ...
33054 lithobiblion LITHOBIBLION. [See Lithophyl.]
33055 lithocarp LITH'OCARP, n. [Gr. a stone, and fruit.] Fossil fruit; fruit petrified.
33056 lithocolla LITH'OCOLLA, n. [Gr. a stone, and glue.] A cement that unites stones.
33057 lithodendron LITHODEN'DRON, n. [Gr. stone, and tree.] Coral; so called from its resembling a petrified branch.
33058 lithogenesy LITHOGEN'ESY, n. [Gr. stone, and generation.]The doctrine or science of the origin of minerals ...
33059 lithoglyphite LITHOGLYPH'ITE, n. [Gr. stone, and to engrave.]A fossil that presents the appearance of being ...
33060 lithographer LITHOG'RAPHER, n. [See Lithography.] One who practices lithography.
33061 lithographic LITHOGRAPH'IC,
33062 lithographical LITHOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to lithography.
33063 lithographically LITHOGRAPH'ICALLY, adv. By the lithographic art.
33064 lithography LITHOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. stone, and to engrave or write.]The art of engraving, or of tracing letters, ...
33065 lithologic LITHOLOG'IC,
33066 lithological LITHOLOG'ICAL, a. [See Lithology.]Pertaining to the science of stones.
33067 lithologist LITHOL'OGIST, n. A person skilled in the science of stones.
33068 lithology LITHOL'OGY, n. [Gr. stone, and discourse.]1. The science or natural history of stones.2. A ...
33069 lithomancy LITH'OMANCY, n. [Gr. stone, and divination.]Divination or prediction of events by means of stones.
33070 lithomarga LITHOMAR'GA,
33071 lithomarge LITH'OMARGE, n. [Gr. stone, and L. marga, marl.]An earth of two species, friable and indurated, ...
33072 lithontriptic LITHONTRIP'TIC, a. [Gr. stone, and to wear or break.]Having the quality of dissolving the stone in ...
33073 lithontriptor LITH'ONTRIPTOR,
33074 lithontripty LITH'ONTRIPTY,
33075 lithophagous LITHOPH'AGOUS, a. [Gr. stone, and to eat.]Eating or swallowing stones or gravel, as the ostrich.
33076 lithophosphor LITH'OPHOSPHOR, n. [Gr. stone.]
33077 lithophosphoric LITHOPHOSPHOR'IC, a. Pertaining to lithophosphor; becoming phosphoric by heat.
33078 lithophyl LITH'OPHYL, n. [Gr. stone, and a leaf.Bibliolite or lithobiblion, fossil leaves, or the figures of ...
33079 lithophyte LITH'OPHYTE, n. [Gr. stone, and a plant; literally, stone-plant.]Stone-coral; a name given to ...
33080 lithophytic LITHOPHYT'IC, a. Pertaining to lithophytes.
33081 lithophytous LITH'OPHYTOUS, a. Pertaining to or consisting of lithophytes.
33082 lithotome LITH'OTOME, n. [Gr. stone, and to cut.]A stone so formed naturally as to appear as if cut ...
33083 lithotomic LITHOTOM'IC, a. Pertaining to or performed by lithotomy.
33084 lithotomist LITHOT'OMIST, n. [See Lithotomy.] One who performs the operation of cutting for the stone in the ...
33085 lithotomy LITHOT'OMY, n. [Gr. stone, and to cut.]The operation, art or practice of cutting for the stone in ...
33086 lithotritor LITH'OTRITOR, n. An instrument for triturating the stone in the bladder, so that it may be ...
33087 lithotrity LITH'OTRITY, n. The operation of triturating the stone in the bladder, by means of an instrument ...
33088 lithoxyle LITHOX'YLE, n. [Gr. stone, and wood.]Petrified wood. It differs from lignite, being really ...
33089 lithy LITH'Y, a. [See Lithe.] Easily bent; pliable. [This is probably the word which, in our popular ...
33090 litigant LIT'IGANT, a. [See Litigate.] Contending in law; engaged in a lawsuit; as the parties ...
33091 litigate LIT'IGATE, v.t. [L. litigo, from lis, litis, a contest or debate.]To contest in law; to prosecute ...
33092 litigated LIT'IGATED, pp. Contested judicially.
33093 litigating LIT'IGATING, ppr. Contesting in law.
33094 litigation LITIGA'TION, n. The act or process of carrying on a suit in a court of law or equity for the ...
33095 litigious LITIG'IOUS, a. [L. litigiosus.]1. Inclined to judicial contest; given to the practice of ...
33096 litigiously LITIG'IOUSLY, adv. In a contentious manner.
33097 litigiousness LITIG'IOUSNESS, n. A disposition to engage in or carry on lawsuits; inclination to judicial ...
33098 litmus LIT'MUS,
33099 litorn LIT'ORN, n. A bird, a species of thrush, in size and shape resembling the hen-blackbird.
33100 litote LIT'OTE, n. [Gr. slender. diminution; extenuation.
33101 litter LIT'TER, n. [L. lectus, from the root of lego, Eng. lay.]1. A vehicle formed with shafts ...
33102 littered LIT'TERED, pp. 1. Furnished with straw.2. a. Covered or overspread with litter, pieces, shreds, ...
33103 little LIT'TLE, a. 1. Small in size or extent; not great or large; as a little body; a little animal; a ...
33104 littleness LIT'TLENESS, n.1. Smallness of size or bulk; as the littleness of the body or of an animal.2. ...
33105 littoral LIT'TORAL, a. [L. littoralis, from litus, shore.] Belonging to a shore. [Little used.]
33106 lituite LIT'UITE, n. A fossil shell.
33107 liturgical LITUR'GICAL, a. [See Liturgy.] Pertaining to a liturgy.
33108 liturgy LIT'URGY, n. [Gr. public, and work.In a general sense, all public ceremonies that belong to divine ...
33109 live LIVE, v.i. liv.1. To abide; to dwell; to have settled residence in any place. Where do you live? ...
33110 liveless LIVELESS, not used. [See Lifeless.]
33111 liveliness LI'VELINESS, n. [from lively.] 1. The quality or state of being lively or animated; ...
33112 livelode LIVELODE, for livelihood, not used.
33113 livelong LIVELONG, a. liv'long. [live and long.]1. Long in passing. How could she sit the livelong day, ...
33114 lively LI'VELY, a. 1. Brisk; vigorous; vivacious; active; as a lively youth.2. Gay; airy.From grave to ...
33115 liver LIV'ER, n. One who lives.And try if life be worth the liver's care.It is often used with a word of ...
33116 livercolor LIV'ERCOLOR, a. Dark red; of the color of the liver.
33117 livered LIV'ERED, a. Having a liver; as white-livered.
33118 livergrown LIV'ERGROWN, a. Having a large liver.
33119 liverstone LIV'ERSTONE, n. A stone or species of earth of the barytic genus, of a gray or brown color, which, ...
33120 liverwort LIV'ERWORT, n. The name of many species of plants. Several of the lichens are so called. The ...
33122 livery-stable LIV'ERY-STABLE, n. A stable where horses are kept for hire.
33121 livery LIV'ERY, n.1. The act of delivering possession of lands or tenements; a term of English law. It ...
33123 liveryman LIV'ERYMAN, n.1. One who wears a livery; as a servant.2. In London, a freeman of the city, of ...
33124 lives LIVES, n. plu. of life.
33125 livestock LI'VESTOCK, n. [live and stock.] Horses, cattle and smaller domestic animals; a term applied in ...
33126 livid LIV'ID, a. [L. lividus; from liveo, to be black and blue.]Black and blue; of a lead color; ...
33127 lividity LIVID'ITY,
33128 lividness LIV'IDNESS, n. A dark color, like that of bruised flesh. [Lividness is the preferable word.]
33129 living LIV'ING, ppr. [from live.]1. Dwelling; residing; existing; subsisting; having life or the vital ...
33130 livingly LIV'INGLY, adv. In a living state.Livonica terra, a species of fine bole found in Livonia, brought ...
33131 livre LI'VRE, n. [L. libra.] A French money of account, equal to 20 sous, or ten pence sterling.
33132 lixivial LIXIV'IAL,
33133 lixiviate LIXIV'IATE,
33134 lixiviated LIXIV'IATED, a. 1. Pertaining to lye or lixivium; of the quality of alkaline salts.2. ...
33135 lixiviation LIXIVIA'TION, n. The operation or process of extracting alkaline salts from ashes by pouring water ...
33136 lixivious LIXIV'IOUS, a. [L. lixivius, from lix lye.]1. Obtained by lixiviation; impregnated with alkaline ...
33137 lixivium LIXIV'IUM, n. [L. from lix, lye.]Lye; water impregnated with alkaline salts imbibed from wood ...
33139 lizard-tail LIZ'ARD-TAIL, n. A plant of the genus Saururus, and another of the genus Piper.
33138 lizard LIZ'ARD, n. [L. lacertus, lacerta, there has been a change of c into z or s, which may be the ...
33140 lo LO, exclam.Look; see; behold; observe. This word is used to excite particular attention in a ...
33141 loach LOACH,
33142 load LOAD, n. [See lade.]1. A burden; that which is laid on or put in any thing for conveyance. Thus ...
33143 loaded LOADED, pp. 1. Charged with a load or cargo; having a burden; freighted, as a ship; having a ...
33144 loader LOADER, n. One who put on a load.
33145 loading LOADING, ppr. Charging with a load; burdening; encumbering; charging, as a gun.LOADING, n. A ...
33146 loadmanage LOADMANAGE, n. Pilotage; skill of a pilot. [Not in use.]
33147 loadsman LOADSMAN, n. [load and man.] A pilot. Obs.
33148 loadstar LOADSTAR,
33149 loadstone LOADSTONE, n. [from the verb lead and stone. The old orthography, lodestone, is most correct, as ...
33151 loaf-sugar LOAF-SUGAR, n. Sugar refined and formed into a conical mass.
33150 loaf LOAF, n. plu. loaves.1. A mass of bread when baked. It is larger than a cake. The size and ...
33152 loam LOAM, n. [L. limus.]A natural mixture of sand and clay with oxyd of iron; a species of earth or ...
33153 loamy LOAMY, a. Consisting of loam; partaking of the nature of loam, or resembling it.
33155 loan-office LO'AN-OFFICE, n. In America, a public office in which loans of money are negotiated for the ...
33156 loan-officer LO'AN-OFFICER, n. A public officer empowered to superintend and transact the business of a ...
33154 loan LOAN, n. 1. The act of lending; a lending.2. That which is lent; any thing furnished for ...
33157 loath LOATH,
33158 loathe LOATHE,
33159 loather LOATHER, n. One that lothes.
33160 loathful LOATHFUL, a.1. Hating; abhorring through disgust.2. Abhorred; hated.
33161 loathing LOATHING, ppr. Hating from disgust; abhorring.
33162 loathingly LOATHINGLY, adv. In a fastidious manner.
33163 loathly LOATHLY, a. Hateful; exciting hatred. Obs.LOATHLY, adv. Unwillingly; reluctantly. [See Lothly.]
33164 loathness LOATHNESS, n. Unwillingness; reluctance. [See Lothness.]
33165 loathsome LOATHSOME, a. 1. Disgusting; exciting disgust.2. Hateful; abhorred; detestable.3. Causing ...
33166 loathsomeness LOATHSOMENESS, n. The quality which excites disgust, hatred or abhorrence.
33167 loaves LOAVES, plu of loaf.
33168 lob LOB, n.1. A dull, heavy, sluggish person.2. Something thick and heavy; as in lobworm.
33169 lobate LO'BATE,
33170 lobby LOB'BY, n.1. An opening before a room, or an entrance into a principal apartment, where there is a ...
33171 lobe LOBE, n. [L. lobus; Gr.]1. A part or division of the lungs, liver, &c.2. The lower soft part of ...
33172 lobed LO'BED, a. [from lobe.] Consisting of lobes. In botany, divided to the middle into parts distant ...
33173 lobspound LOBSPOUND, n. A prison.
33174 lobster LOB'STER, n. A crustaceous fish of the genus Cancer. Lobsters have large claws and fangs, and ...
33175 lobule LOB'ULE, n. A small lobe.
33176 local LO'CAL, a. [L. localis; from locus, place, loco. See Lay.]1. Pertaining to a place, or to a ...
33177 locality LOCAL'ITY, n. 1. Existence in a place, or in a certain portion of space.It is thought that the ...
33178 locally LO'CALLY, adv. With respect to place; in place; as, to be locally separated or distant.
33179 locate LO'CATE, v.t. [L. loco,locatus.]1. To place; to set in a particular spot or position.2. To ...
33180 located LO'CATED, pp. Placed; situated; fixed in place.
33181 locating LO'CATING, ppr. Placing; designating the place of.
33182 location LOCA'TION, n. 1. The act of placing, or of designating the place of.2. Situation with respect to ...
33183 loch LOCH, n. A lake; a bay or arm of the sea; used in Scotland.LOCH, n. Loch or lohoch, is an Arabian ...
33184 lochage LOCH'AGE, n. [Gr. a body of soldiers, and to lead.]In Greece, an officer who commanded a lochus or ...
33185 loche LOCHE, n. A small fish of the genus Cobitis, inhabiting small clear streams, and esteemed dainty ...
33186 lochia LO'CHIA, n. [Gr.] Evacuations which follow childbirth.
33187 lochial LO'CHIAL, a. Pertaining to evacuations from the womb after childbirth.
33188 lock LOCK, n. [L. floccus, Eng. lock.]1. Lock, in its primary sense, is any thing that fastens; but we ...
33189 lockage LOCK'AGE, n.1. Materials for locks in a canal.2. Works which form a lock on a canal.3. Toll paid ...
33190 locked LOCK'ED, pp. Made fast by a lock; furnished with a lock or locks; closely embraced.
33191 locker LOCK'ER, n. A close place, as a drawer or an apartment in a ship, that may be closed with a lock.A ...
33192 locket LOCK'ET, n. A small lock; a catch or spring to fasten a necklace or other ornament.
33193 lockram LOCK'RAM, n. A sort of coarse linen.
33194 locksmith LOCK'SMITH, n. An artificer whose occupation is to make locks.
33195 locky LOCK'Y, a. Having locks or tufts.
33196 locomotion LOCOMO'TION, n. [L. locus, place, and motio, motion.]1. The act of moving from place to place.2. ...
33197 locomotive LOCOMO'TIVE, a. Moving from place to place; changing place, or able to change place; as a ...
33198 locomotivity LOCOMOTIV'ITY, n. The power of changing place.
33199 loculament LOC'ULAMENT, n. [L. loculamentum, from locus, loculus.]In botany, the cell of a pericarp in which ...
33201 locust-tree LO'CUST-TREE, n. A tree of the genus Hymenaea, and another of the genus Robinia. The ...
33200 locust LO'CUST, n. [L. locusta.] An insect of the genus Gryllus. These insects are at times so numerous ...
33203 lode-stone LO'DE-STONE, n. [from the verb to lead, and stone.]1. A magnet, an ore of iron; a stone found in ...
33202 lode LODE, n.1. Among miners, a metallic vein, or any regular vein or course, whether metallic or not, ...
33204 lodestar LODESTAR, n. [lead and star.] The star that leads; the polestar; the cynosure. Obs.
33205 lodgable LODG'ABLE, a. Capable of affording a temporary abode. [Not used.]
33206 lodge LODGE, v.t.1. To set, lay or deposit for keeping or preservation, for a longer or shorter time. ...
33207 lodged LODG'ED, pp. Placed at rest; deposited; infixed; furnished with accommodations for a night or ...
33208 lodger LODG'ER,n.1. One who lives at board, or in a hired room, or who has a bed in another's house for a ...
33209 lodging LODG'ING, ppr. 1. Placing at rest; depositing; furnishing lodgings.2. Resting for a night; ...
33210 lodgment LODG'MENT, n.1. The act of lodging, or the state of being lodged; a being placed or deposited at ...
33211 loffe LOFFE, v.i. To laugh. [Not used.]
33212 loft LOFT, n. 1. Properly, an elevation; hence, in a building, the elevation of one story or floor ...
33213 loftily LOFT'ILY, adv. [from lofty.] 1. On high; in an elevated place.2. Proudly; haughtily.They are ...
33214 loftiness LOFT'INESS, n. 1. Height; elevation in place or position; altitude; as the loftiness of a ...
33215 lofty LOFTY, a.1. Elevated in place; high; as a lofty tower; a lofty mountain. [But it expresses more ...
33217 log-board LOG'-BOARD, n. In navigation, two boards, shutting like a book, and divided into columns, ...
33218 log-book LOG'-BOOK, n. A book into which are transcribed the contents of the log-board.
33219 log-reel LOG'-REEL, n. A reel in the gallery of a ship, on which the log line is wound.
33216 log LOG, n. 1. A bulky piece or stick of timer unhewed. Pine logs are floated down rivers in ...
33220 logarithm LOG'ARITHM, n. [Gr. ratio, and number.]Logarithms are the exponents of a series of powers and ...
33221 logarithmetic LOGARITHMET'IC,
33222 logarithmetical LOGARITHMET'ICAL,
33223 logarithmic LOGARITH'MIC, a. Pertaining to logarithms; consisting of logarithms.
33224 loggats LOG'GATS, n. The name of a play or game, the same as is now called kittle-pins. It was prohibited ...
33225 loggerhead LOG'GERHEAD, n. [log and head.] 1. A blockhead; a dunce; a dolt; a thick-skull.2. A spherical ...
33226 loggerheaded LOG'GERHEADED, a. Dull; stupid; doltish.
33227 logic LOG'IC, n. [L. id; Gr. from reason, to speak.]The art of thinking and reasoning justly.Logic is ...
33228 logical LOG'ICAL, a.1. Pertaining to logic; used in logic; as logical subtitles.2. According to the rules ...
33229 logically LOG'ICALLY, adv. According to the rules of logic; as, to argue logically.
33230 logician LOGI'CIAN, n. A person skilled in logic, or the art of reasoning.Each fierce logician still ...
33231 logistic LOGIS'TIC, a. Relating to sexagesimal fractions.
33232 logman LOG'MAN, n.1. A man who carries logs.2. One whose occupation is to cut and convey logs to a mill. ...
33233 logographic LOGOGRAPH'IC,
33234 logographical LOGOGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to logography.
33235 logography LOGOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a word, and to write.]A method of printing, in which a type represents a ...
33236 logogriphe LOG'OGRIPHE, n. [Gr.] A sort of riddle. Obs.
33237 logomachist LOGOM'ACHIST, n. One who contends about words.
33238 logomachy LOGOM'ACHY, n. [Gr. word, and contest, altercation.]Contention in words merely, or rather a ...
33239 logometric LOGOMET'RIC, a. [Gr. ratio, and to measure.]A logometric scale is intended to measure or ascertain ...
33240 logwood LOG'WOOD, n. A species of tree and wood, called also Campeachy-wood, from the bay of Campeachy in ...
33241 lohoch LO'HOCH,
33242 lohock LO'HOCK, n. A medicine of a middle consistence between a soft electuary and a syrup. [See Loch.]
33243 loin LOIN, n. [L. clumis.]The loins are the space on each side of the vertebrae, between the lowest of ...
33244 loiter LOIT'ER, v.i.To linger; to be slow in moving; to delay; to be dilatory; to spend time idly.If we ...
33245 loiterer LOIT'ERER, n. A lingerer; one that delays or is slow in motion; an idler; one that is sluggish or ...
33246 loitering LOIT'ERING, ppr. Lingering; delaying; moving slowly.
33247 loke LOKE, n. [Gr. darkness.]1. In the Scandinavian mythology, the evil deity, the author of all ...
33248 loll LOLL, v.i. [The sense of this word is to throw, to send. Hence it coincides with the Gr..]1. To ...
33249 lollard LOLL'ARD, n. The Lollards were a sect of early reformers in Germany and England, the followers of ...
33250 lollardy LOLL'ARDY, n. The doctrines of the Lollards.
33251 lolling LOLL'ING, ppr. Throwing down or out; reclining at ease; thrusting out the tongue.
33252 lombardic LOMBARD'IC, a. Pertaining to the Lombards; an epithet applied to one of the ancient alphabets ...
33253 loment LO'MENT, n. [L. lomentum.] An elongated pericarp, which never bursts. It consists, like the ...
33254 lomentaceous LOMENTA'CEOUS, a. [L. lomentum, bean meal, a color.]Furnished with a loment. The lomentaceae are ...
33255 lomonite LOM'ONITE, n. Laumonite, or di-prismatic zeolite.
33256 lomp LOMP, n. A kind of roundish fish.
33257 londonism LON'DONISM, n. A mode of speaking peculiar to London.
33258 lone LONE, a. 1. Solitary; retired; unfrequented; having no company.And leave you in lone woods or ...
33259 loneliness LO'NELINESS, n.1. Solitude; retirement; seclusion from company. He was weary of the loneliness of ...
33260 lonely LO'NELY, a.1. Solitary; retired; sequestered from company or neighbors; as a lonely situation; a ...
33261 loneness LO'NENESS, n. Solitude; seclusion.
33262 lonesome LO'NESOME, a. Solitary; secluded from society.How horrid will these lonesome seats appear!
33263 lonesomeness LO'NESOMENESS, n. The state of being solitary; solitude.
33265 long-headed LONG'-HEADED, a. Having a great extent of thought.
33266 long-measure LONG-MEASURE, n. Lineal measure; the measure of length.
33267 long-sight LONG-SIGHT, n. Long-sightedness.
33268 long-sighted LONG-SIGHTED, a. Able to see at a great distance; used literally of the eyes, and figuratively of ...
33269 long-sightedness LONG-SIGHTEDNESS, n.1. The faculty of seeing objects at a great distance.2. In medicine, ...
33270 long-sufferance LONG-SUF'FERANCE, n. Forbearance to punish; clemency; patience.
33271 long-suffering LONG-SUF'FERING, n. Long endurance; patience of offense.Despisest thou the riches of his goodness, ...
33272 long-winded LONG-WIND'ED, a. Long breathed; tedious in speaking, argument or narration; as a long-winded ...
33264 long LONG, a. [L. longus.]1. Extended; drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; opposed to ...
33273 longanimity LONGANIM'ITY, n. [L. longanimitas; longus, long, and animus, mind.]Forbearance; patience; ...
33274 longboat LONG'BOAT, n. The largest and strongest boat belonging to a ship.
33275 longer LON'GER, a. [comp. of long.] More long; of greater length; as a longer course.LON'GER, adv. For ...
33276 longest LON'GEST, a. Of the greatest extent; as the longest line.LON'GEST, adv. For the greatest ...
33277 longeval LONGE'VAL, a. [L. longus and avum.] Long lived.
33278 longevity LONGEV'ITY, n. [L. longavitas; longus, long, and avum, age.]Length or duration of life; more ...
33279 longevous LONGE'VOUS, a. [L. longavus, supra.] Living a long time; of great age.
33280 longimanous LONGIM'ANOUS, a. [L. longus, long, and manus, hand.] Having long hands.
33281 longimetry LONGIM'ETRY, n. [L. longus, long, and Gr. measure.]The art or practice of measuring distances or ...
33282 longing LONG'ING, ppr. Earnestly desiring; having a craving or preternatural appetite.LONG'ING, n. An ...
33283 longingly LONG'INGLY, adv. With eager wishes or appetite.
33284 longinquity LONGIN'QUITY, n. [L. longinquitas.] Great distance.
33285 longish LONG'ISH, a. Somewhat long; moderately long.
33286 longitude LON'GITUDE, n. [L. longitudo, from longus, long.]1. Properly length; as the longitude of a room; ...
33287 longitudinal LONGITU'DINAL, a.1. Pertaining to longitude or length; as longitudinal distance.2. Extending in ...
33288 longitudinally LONGITU'DINALLY, adv. In the direction of length.Some of the fibers of the human body are placed ...
33289 longlegged LONG'LEGGED, a. Having long legs.
33290 longlived LONG'LIVED, a. Having along life or existence; living long; lasting long.
33291 longly LONG'LY, adv. With longing desire. [Not used.]
33292 longness LONG'NESS, n. Length. [Little used.]
33293 longprimer LONG'PRIM'ER, n. A printing type of a particular size, between small pica and bourgeois.
33294 longshanked LONG'SHANKED, a. Having long legs.
33295 longsome LONG'SOME, a. Extended in length; tiresome; tedious; as a longsome plain. Obs.
33296 longspun LONG'SPUN, a. Spun or extended to a great length.
33297 longsuffering LONG'SUF'FERING, a. Bearing injuries or provocation for a long time; patient; not easily ...
33298 longways LONGWAYS, a mistake for longwise.
33299 lonish LO'NISH, a. Somewhat solitary. [Not used and inelegant.]
33300 loo LOO, n. A game at cards.
33301 loobily LOOB'ILY, adv. [See Looby.] Like a looby; in an awkward, clumsy manner.
33302 looby LOOB'Y, n. An awkward, clumsy fellow; a lubber.Who could give the looby such airs?
33303 loof LOOF, n. The after part of a ship's bow, or the part where the planks begin to be incurvated, as ...
33304 loofed LOOF'ED, a. [See Aloof.] Gone to a distance. [Not used.]
33306 look-out LOOK'-OUT, n. A careful looking or watching for any object or event.
33305 look LOOK, v.i. [See Light. The primary sense is to stretch, to extend, to shoot, hence to direct the ...
33307 looker LOOK'ER, n. One who looks.A looker on, a mere spectator; one that looks on, but has no agency or ...
33308 looking-glass LOOK'ING-GLASS, n. A glass which reflects the form of the person who looks on it; a mirror.There ...
33309 lool LOOL, n. In metallurgy, a vessel used to receive the washings of ores of metals.
33311 loom-gale LOOM'-GALE, n. A gentle gale of wind.
33310 loom LOOM, n.1. In composition, heir-loom, in law, is a personal chattel that by special custom ...
33312 looming LOOM'ING, ppr. Appearing above the surface, or indistinctly, at a distance.
33313 loon LOON, n.1. A sorry fellow; a rogue; a rascal.2. A sea-fowl of the genus colymbus.
33314 loop LOOP, n.1. A folding or doubling of a string or a noose, through which a lace or cord may be run ...
33315 looped LOOP'ED, a. Full of holes.
33316 loophole LOOP'HOLE, n.1. A small aperture in the bulk-head and other parts of a merchant ship, through ...
33317 loopholed LOOP'HOLED, a. Full of holes or openings for escape.
33318 looping LOOP'ING, n. In metallurgy, the running together of the matter of an ore into a mass, when the ore ...
33319 loord LOORD, n. A dull stupid fellow; a drone. [Not in use.]
33320 loose LOOSE, v.t. loos. [Gr.; Heb.]1. To untie or unbind; to free from any fastening.Canst thou loose ...
33321 loosed LOOS'ED, pp. Untied; unbound; freed from restraint.
33322 loosely LOOSELY, adv. loos'ly.1. Not fast; not firmly; that may be easily disengaged; as things loosely ...
33323 loosen LOOS'EN, v.t. loos'n. [from loose.]1. To free from tightness, tension, firmness or fixedness; ...
33324 loosened LOOS'ENED, pp. Freed from tightness or fixedness; rendered loose.
33325 looseness LOOSENESS, n. loos'ness. 1. The state of being loose or relaxed; a state opposite to that of ...
33326 loosening LOOS'ENING, ppr. Freeing from tightness, tension or fixedness; rendering less compact.
33327 loosestrife LOOSESTRIFE, n. loos'strife. In botany, the name of several species of plants, of the genera ...
33328 loosing LOOS'ING, ppr. Setting free from confinement.
33329 lop LOP, v.t. [Eng. flap. The primary sense is evidently to fall or fell, or to strike down, and I ...
33330 lope LOPE, pret. of leap. Obs.LOPE, n. [See leap.]A leap; a long step. [A word in popular use in ...
33331 loping LO'PING, ppr. Leaping; moving or running with a long step.
33332 lopped LOP'PED, pp. cut off; shortened by cutting off the top or end; bent down.
33333 lopper LOP'PER, n. One that lops.
33334 lopping LOP'PING, ppr. Cutting off; shortening by cutting off the extremity; letting fall.LOP'PING, n. ...
33335 loquacious LOQUA'CIOUS, a. [L. loquax, from loquor, to speak. Eng. to clack.]1. Talkative; given to ...
33336 loquaciousness LOQUA'CIOUSNESS,
33337 loquacity LOQUAC'ITY, n. [L. loquacitas.] Talkativeness; the habit or practice of talking continually or ...
33338 lord LORD, n. 1. A master; a person possessing supreme power and authority; a ruler; a governor.Man ...
33339 lording LORD'ING, n. A little lord; a lord, in contempt or ridicule. [Little used.]
33340 lordlike LORD'LIKE, a. 1. Becoming a lord.2. Haughty; proud; insolent.
33341 lordliness LORD'LINESS, n. [from lordly.] 1. Dignity; high station.2. Pride; haughtiness.
33342 lordling LORD'LING, n. A little or diminutive lord.
33343 lordly LORD'LY, a. [lord and like.]1. Becoming a lord; pertaining to a lord.Lordly sins require lordly ...
33344 lordship LORD'SHIP, n.1. The state of quality of being a lord; hence, a title of honor given to noblemen, ...
33345 lore LORE, n. Learning; doctrine; lesson; instruction.The law of nations, or the lore of war.Lo! Rome ...
33346 lorel LOR'EL, n. An abandoned scoundrel; a vagrant. Obs.
33347 loresman LO'RESMAN, n. [lore and man.] An instructor. Obs.
33348 loricate LOR'ICATE, v.t. [L. lorico, loricatus, from lorica, a coat of mail.]1. To plate over; to spread ...
33349 loricated LOR'ICATED, pp. Covered or plated over; encrusted.
33350 loricating LOR'ICATING, ppr. Covering over with a plate or crust.
33351 lorication LORICA'TION, n. The act or operation of covering any thing with a plate or crust for defense; as ...
33352 lorimer LOR'IMER, n. [L. lorum, a thong.]A bridle-maker; one that makes bits for bridles, &c. [Not used.]
33353 loring LO'RING, n. Instructive discourse. Obs.
33354 loriot LO'RIOT, n. A bird called witwal; the oriole.
33355 loris LO'RIS, n. A small quadruped of Ceylon.
33356 lorn LORN, a. [See Forlorn.] Lost; forsaken; lonely.
33357 lory LO'RY, n. A subordinate genus of fowls of the parrot kind, forming the link between the parrot and ...
33358 losable LOSABLE, a. That may be lost. [Little used.]
33359 lose LOSE, v.t. looz. pret. and pp. lost.1. To mislay; to part or be separated from a thing, so as to ...
33360 losel LOS'EL, n. s as z. [from the root of loose.] a wasteful fellow, one who loses by sloth or ...
33361 losenger LOS'ENGER, n. a deceiver. Obs.
33362 loser LOSER, n. looz'er. One that loses, or that is deprived of any thing by defeat, forfeiture or the ...
33363 losing LOS'ING, ppr. looz'ing. Parting from; missing; forfeiting; wasting; employing to no good purpose.
33364 loss LOSS, n.1. privation, as the loss of property; loss of money by gaming; loss of health or ...
33365 lossful LOSS'FUL, a. Detrimental. [Not used.
33366 lossless LOSS'LESS, a. Free from loss. [Not used.]
33367 lost LOST, pp. [from lose.]1. Mislaid or left in a place unknown or forgotten; that cannot be found; ...
33368 lot LOT, n. 1. That which, in human speech, is called chance, hazard, fortune; but in strictness of ...
33369 lote LOTE, n. [L. lotus, lotos.] 1. A plant of the genus Celtis, the lote-tree, of several species. ...
33370 loth LOTH, a. [In America, the primitive pronunciation of lath, that is, lawth, is retained in the ...
33371 lothe LOTHE, v.t. To hate; to look on with hatred or abhorrence; particularly, to feel disgust at food ...
33372 lothed LO'THED, pp. Hatred; abhorred; turned from with disgust.
33373 lother LO'THER, n. One that lothes or abhors.
33374 lothful LO'THFUL, a. 1. Hating; abhorring.Which he did with lothful eyes behold.2. Disgusting; hated; ...
33375 lothing LO'THING, ppr. 1. Feeling disgust at; having extreme aversion to; as lothing food.2. Hating; ...
33376 lothingly LO'THINGLY, adv. With extreme disgust or abhorrence; in a fastidious manner.
33377 lothly LOTH'LY, adv. Unwillingly; reluctantly.This shows that you from nature lothly stray.
33378 lothness LOTH'NESS, n. Unwillingness; reluctance.There grew among them a general silence and lothness to ...
33379 lothsome LO'THSOME, a. 1. Causing an extreme aversion of appetite; exciting fastidiousness. Num. 11.2. ...
33380 lothsomeness LO'THSOMENESS, n. the quality of exciting extreme disgust or abhorrence.
33381 lotion LO'TION, n. [L. lotio, from lavo, to wash.]1. A washing; particularly, a washing of the skin for ...
33382 lottery LOT'TERY, n. [See Lot.]1. A scheme for the distribution of prizes by chance, or the distribution ...
33383 loud LOUD, a. [L. laudo, to praise, and with a prefix, plaudo. Heb.]1. Having a great sound; high ...
33384 loudly LOUD'LY, adv. 1. With great sound or noise; noisily.Who long and loudly in the schools ...
33385 loudness LOUD'NESS, n.1. Great sound or noise; as the loudness of a voice or of thunder.2. Clamor; ...
33386 lough LOUGH, n. lok. a lake; a different orthography of loch and lake.
33387 lounge LOUNGE, v.i. to live in idleness; to spend time lazily.
33388 lounger LOUNG'ER, n. An idler; one who loiters away his time in indolence.
33389 lour LOUR. [See Lower.]
33391 louse-wort LOUSE-WORT, n. lous'-wort. A plant of the genus Pedicularis. The yellow louse-wort is of the ...
33390 louse LOUSE, n. lous. plu. lice. A small insect of the genus Pediculus. It has six feet, two eyes, with ...
33392 lousily LOUS'ILY, adv. s as z. [from lousy.] In a mean, paltry manner; scurvily.
33393 lousiness LOUS'INESS, n. s as z. The state of abounding with lice.
33394 lousy LOUS'Y, a. s as z. [louse.] 1. Swarming with lice; infested with lice.2. Mean; low; ...
33395 lout LOUT, n. A mean awkward fellow; a bumpkin; a clown.LOUT, v.i. To end; to bow; to stoop. ...
33396 loutish LOUT'ISH, a. Clownish; rude; awkward.
33397 loutishly LOUT'ISHLY, adv. Like a clown; in a rude, clumsy, awkward manner.
33398 louver LOUVER, n. loo'ver. An opening in the roof of a cottage for the smoke to escape.
33399 lovable LOV'ABLE, a. Worthy of love; amiable.
33400 lovage LOV'AGE, n. A plant of the genus Ligusticum.
33402 love-broker LOVE-BROKER, n. A third person who acts as agent between lovers.
33403 love-darting LOVE-DARTING, a. Darting love.
33404 love-day LOVE-DAY, n. A day formerly appointed for an amicable adjustment of differences.
33405 love-favor LOVE-FAVOR, n. Something given to be worn in token of love.
33406 love-knot LOVE-KNOT, n. luv'-not. A knot so called, used as a token of love or representing mutual affection.
33407 love-labored LOVE-LABORED, a. Labored by love.
33408 love-lass LOVE-LASS, n. A sweetheart.
33409 love-letter LOVE-LETTER, n. A letter professing love; a letter of courtship.
33410 love-lock LOVE-LOCK, n. A curl or lock of hair so called; worn by men of fashion in the reigns of Elizabeth ...
33411 love-lorn LOVE-LORN, a. [love and lorn.] Forsaken by one's love; as the love-lorn nightingale.
33412 love-monger LOVE-MONGER, n. [love and monger.] One who deals in affairs of love. [Not used.]
33413 love-pined LOVE-PINED, a. Wasted by love.
33414 love-secret LOVE-SECRET, n. A secret between lovers.
33415 love-shaft LOVE-SHAFT, n. Cupid's arrow.
33416 love-sick LOVE-SICK, a. 1. Sick or languishing with love or amorous desire; as a love-sick maid.To the dear ...
33417 love-song LOVE-SONG, n. A song expressing love.
33418 love-suit LOVE-SUIT, n Courtship; solicitation of union in marriage.
33419 love-tale LOVE-TALE, n. A narrative of love.Cato's proper person to entrust a love-tale with.
33420 love-thought LOVE-THOUGHT, n. Amorous fancy. [Not used.]
33421 love-token LOVE-TOKEN, n. A present in token of love.
33422 love-toy LOVE-TOY, n. A small present from a lover.
33423 love-trick LOVE-TRICK, n. Art or artifice expressive of love.Other love-tricks than glancing with the eyes.
33401 love LOVE, v.t. luv. [L. libeo, lubeo. See Lief. The sense is probably to be prompt, free, willing, ...
33424 loveapple LOVE'APPLE, n. A plant of the genus Solanum.
33425 loved LOVED, pp. Having the affection of any one.
33426 loveless LOVELESS, a. Void of love; void of tenderness or kindness.
33427 lovelily LOVELILY, adv. luv'lily. [from lovely.] Amiably; in a manner to excite love.
33428 loveliness LOVELINESS, n. luv'liness. [from lovely.]Amiableness; qualities of body or mind that may excite ...
33429 lovely LOVELY, a. luv'ly. Amiable; that may excite love; possessing qualities which may invite ...
33430 lover LOV'ER, n.1. One who loves; one who has a tender affection, particularly for a female.Love is ...
33431 lovesome LOVESOME, a. Lovely. [Not used.]
33433 loving-kindness LOVING-KINDNESS, n. Tender regard; mercy; favor; a scriptural word.My loving-kindness will I not ...
33432 loving LOVING, ppr.1. Entertaining a strong affection for; having tender regard for.2. a. Fond; ...
33434 lovingly LOVINGLY, adv. With love; with affection; affectionately.It is no great matter to live lovingly ...
33435 lovingness LOVINGNESS, n. Affection; kind regard.The only two bands of good will, loveliness and lovingness.
33437 low-born LOW-BORN, a. Born in low life.
33438 low-bred LOW-BRED, a. Bred in a low condition or manner; vulgar.
33439 low-spirited LOW-SPIR'ITED, a. Not having animation and courage; dejected; depressed; not lively or sprightly. ...
33440 low-spiritedness LOW-SPIR'ITEDNESS, n. Dejection of mind or courage; a state of low spirits.
33441 low-thoughted LOW-THOUGHT'ED, a. Having the thoughts employed on low subjects; not having sublime and elevated ...
33442 low-wines LOW-WINES, n. [low and wine.] The liquor produced by the first distillation of molasses, or ...
33436 low LOW, a. 1. Not high or elevated; depressed below any given surface or place. Low ground or land, ...
33443 lowbell LOWBELL, n.A kind of fowling in the night, in which the birds are wakened by a bell, and blinded by ...
33444 lowe LOWE, A termination of names, as in Bed-low.
33445 lower LOWER, v.t. [from low.]1. To cause to descend; to let down; to take or bring down; as, to lower ...
33446 loweringly LOW'ERINGLY, adv. with cloudiness or threatening gloom.
33447 lowermost LOWERMOST, a. [from low.] Lowest.
33448 lowery LOW'ERY, a. cloudy; gloomy.
33449 lowest LOWEST, a. [superl. of low.] Most low; deepest; most depressed or degraded, &c.
33450 lowing LOWING, ppr. Bellowing, as an ox.LOWING, n. the bellowing or cry of cattle.
33451 lowland LOWLAND, n. land which is low with respect to the neighboring country; a low or level country. ...
33452 lowlihood LOWLIHOOD, n. a humble state. Obs.
33453 lowliness LOWLINESS, n. [from lowly.]1. Freedom from pride; humility; humbleness of mind.Walk - with all ...
33454 lowly LOWLY, a. [low and like.]1. Having a low esteem of one's own worth; humble; meek; free from ...
33455 lown LOWN, n. [See Loon. a low fellow; a scoundrel.
33456 lowness LOWNESS, n.1. The state of being low or depressed; the state of being less elevated than something ...
33457 loxodromic LOXODROM'IC, a. [Gr. oblique, and a course.]Pertaining to oblique sailing by the rhomb; as ...
33458 loxodromics LOXODROM'ICS, n. The art of oblique sailing by the rhomb, which always makes an equal angle with ...
33459 loyal LOY'AL, a. [L. lex, law.]Faithful to a prince or superior; true to plighted faith, duty or love; ...
33460 loyalist LOY'ALIST, n. A person who adheres to his sovereign; particularly, one who maintains his ...
33461 loyally LOY'ALLY, adv. With fidelity to a prince or sovereign, or to a husband or lover.
33462 loyalty LOY'ALTY, n. Fidelity to a prince or sovereign, or to a husband or lover.He had such loyalty to ...
33463 lozenge LOZ'ENGE, n. [Gr. oblique, and a corner.]1. Originally, a figure with four equal sides, having ...
33464 lozenged LOZ'ENGED, a. Made into the shape of lozenges.
33465 lozengy LOZ'ENGY, a. In heraldry, having the field or charge covered with lozenges.
33466 lp LP, a contraction of lordship.
33467 lu LU. [See Loo.]
33468 lubbard LUBBARD. [Not used. See Lubber.]
33469 lubber LUB'BER, n.A heavy, clumsy fellow; a sturdy drone; a clown.And lingering lubbers lose many a penny.
33470 lubberly LUB'BERLY, a. Properly, tall and lank without activity; hence, bulky and heavy; clumsy; lazy; as a ...
33471 lubric LU'BRIC, a. [L. lubricus, slippery.] 1. Having a smooth surface; slippery; as a lubric throat.2. ...
33472 lubricant LU'BRICANT, n. [See Lubricate.] That which lubricates.
33473 lubricate LU'BRICATE, v.t. [L. lubrico, from lubricus, slippery; allied to labor, to slip or slide.]To make ...
33474 lubricated LU'BRICATED, pp. Made smooth and slippery.
33475 lubricating LU'BRICATING, ppr. Rendering smooth and slippery.
33476 lubricator LU'BRICATOR, n. That which lubricates.
33477 lubricous LU'BRICOUS, a. [L. lubricus.]1. Smooth; slippery.2. Wavering; unstable; as lubricous opinions.
33478 lubrictiy LUBRIC'TIY, n.1. Smoothness of surface; slipperiness.2. Smoothness; aptness to glide over any ...
33479 lubrifaction LUBRIFAC'TION, n. [infra.] The act of lubricating or making smooth.
33480 lubrification LUBRIFICA'TION, n. [L. lubricus and facio, to make.]The act or operation of making smooth and ...
33481 luce LUCE, n. A pike full grown.
33482 lucent LU'CENT, a. [L. lucens, from luceo, to shine. See light.]Shining; bright; resplendent; as the ...
33483 lucern LU'CERN, n. A plant of the genus Medicago, cultivated for fodder.
33484 lucid LU'CID, a. [L. lucidus, from luceo, to shine. See Light.]1. Shining; bright; resplendent; as the ...
33485 lucidity LUCID'ITY, n. Brightness. [Not used.]
33486 lucidness LU'CIDNESS, n. Brightness; clearness.
33487 lucifer LU'CIFER, n. [L. lux, lucis, light, and fero, to bring.]1. The planet Venus, so called from its ...
33488 luciferian LUCIFE'RIAN, a. Pertaining to Lucifer, or to the Luciferians.
33489 luciferians LUCIFE'RIANS, n. A sect that followed Lucifer, bishop of Cagliari, in the fourth century. They ...
33490 luciferous LUCIF'EROUS, a. [L. lucifer, supra.] Giving light; affording light or means of discovery.
33491 lucific LUCIF'IC, a. [L. lux, light, and facio, to make.]Producing light.
33492 luciform LU'CIFORM, a. [L. lux, light, and forma, form.]Having the form of light; resembling light.The ...
33493 luck LUCK, n. That which happens to a person; an event, good or ill, affecting a man's interest or ...
33494 luckily LUCK'ILY, adv. [from lucky.] Fortunately; by good fortune; with a favorable issue; in a good ...
33495 luckiness LUCK'INESS, n.1. The state of being fortunate; as the luckiness of a man or of an event.2. Good ...
33496 luckless LUCK'LESS, a.1. Unfortunate; meeting with ill success; as a luckless gamester; a luckless maid.2. ...
33497 lucky LUCK'Y, a.1. Fortunate; meeting with good success; as a lucky adventurer.2. Fortunate; producing ...
33498 lucrative LU'CRATIVE, a. [L. lucrativus, from lucror, to gain profit.]Gainful; profitable; making increase ...
33499 lucre LU'CRE, n. lu'ker. [L. lucrum.] Gain in money or goods; profit; usually in an ill sense, or with ...
33500 lucriferous LUCRIF'EROUS, a. [L. lucrum, gain, and fero, to produce.] Gainful; profitable. [Little used.]
33501 lucrific LUCRIF'IC, a. [L. lucrum, gain, and facio to make.] Producing profit; gainful. [Not used.]
33502 luctation LUCTA'TION, n. [L. luctatio, from luctor, to wrestle or strive.]Struggle; contest; effort to ...
33503 luctual LUC'TUAL, a. [L. luctus, grief.] Producing grief. [Not used.]
33504 lucubrate LU'CUBRATE, v.i. [L. lucubro, to study by candle-light, from lucubrum, from lux, light.]To study ...
33505 lucubration LUCUBRA'TION, n.1. Study by a lamp or by candle-light; nocturnal study.2. That which is composed ...
33506 lucubratory LU'CUBRATORY, a. Composed by candle-light or by night.
33507 luculent LU'CULENT, a. [L. luculentus, from luceo, to shine.]1. Lucid; clear; transparent; as luculent ...
33508 lucullite LU'CULLITE, n. A subspecies of carbonate of lime, of three kinds.
33509 ludibrious LUDIB'RIOUS, a. [L. ludibriosus, from ludo, to sport.] Sportive; wanton.
33510 ludicrous LU'DICROUS, a. [L. ludicer, from ludo, to sport.]Sportive; burlesque; adapted to raise laughter, ...
33511 ludicrously LU'DICROUSLY, adv. Sportively; in burlesque; in a manner to raise laughter without contempt.
33512 ludicrousness LU'DICROUSNESS, n. Sportiveness; the quality of exciting laughter without contempt; merry cast.
33513 ludification LUDIFICA'TION, n. [L. ludificor.] The act of deriding.
33514 ludificatory LUDIF'ICATORY, a. Making sport; tending to excite derision.
33515 luff LUFF, n. The palm of the hand.LUFF, n. Weather-gage, or part towards the wind; or the sailing of a ...
33516 lug LUG, v.t. [See Pluck.]1. To haul; to drag; to pull with force, as something heavy and moved with ...
33517 luggage LUG'GAGE, n. [from lug.]1. Any thing cumbersome and heavy to be carried; traveling baggage.I am ...
33518 lugger LUG'GER, n. A vessel carrying three masts with a running bowsprit and lug-sails.
33519 luggs LUGGS, n. An insect like an earth-worm, but having legs.
33520 lugubrious LUGU'BRIOUS, a. [L. lugubris, from lugeo, to weep.]Mournful; indicating sorrow; as a lugubrious ...
33521 lukewarm LU'KEWARM, a.1. Moderately warm; tepid; as lukewarm water; lukewarm heat.2. Not ardent; not ...
33522 lukewarmly LU'KEWARMLY, adv.1. With moderate warmth.2. With indifference; coolly.
33523 lukewarmness LU'KEWARMNESS, n.1. A mild or moderate heat.2. Indifference; want of zeal or ardor; coldness.The ...
33524 lull LULL, v.t. [L. lallo. The sense is to throw down, to still, to appease. Seamen say, the wind ...
33525 lullaby LULL'ABY, n. [lull and by. See By.]A song to quiet babes; that which quiets.
33526 lulled LULL'ED, pp. Quieted; appeased; composed to rest.
33527 luller LULL'ER, n. One that lulls; one that fondles.
33528 lulling LULL'ING, ppr. Stilling; composing to rest.
33529 lum LUM, n. The chimney of a cottage.
33530 lumachel LUM'ACHEL,
33531 lumachella LUMACHEL'LA, n. A calcarious stone composed of shells and coral conglutinated, but so far ...
33532 lumbaginous LUMBAG'INOUS, a. Pertaining to lumbago.
33533 lumbago LUMBA'GO, n. [L. lumbus, loins.] A pain in the loins and small of the back, such as precedes ...
33534 lumbar LUM'BAR, a. [L. lumbus, loins.] Pertaining to the loins. The lumbar region is the posterior ...
33536 lumber-room LUM'BER-ROOM, n. A place for the reception of lumber or useless things.
33535 lumber LUM'BER, n.1. Any thing useless and cumbersome, or things bulky and thrown aside as of no use.The ...
33537 lumbric LUM'BRIC, n. [L. lumbricus, a worm.] A worm.
33538 lumbrical LUM'BRICAL, a. [L. lumbricus, a worm.] Resembling a worm; as the lumbrical muscles.LUM'BRICAL, a. ...
33539 lumbriciform LUMBRIC'IFORM, n. [L. lumbricus, a worm, and form.] Resembling a worm in shape.
33540 luminary LU'MINARY, n. [L. luminare, from lumen, light.]1. Any body that gives light, but chiefly one of ...
33541 lumination LUMINATION. [See Illumination.]
33542 lumine LU'MINE, v.t. To enlighten. [Not used. See Illumine.]
33543 luminiferous LUMINIF'EROUS, a. [L. lumen, light, and fero, to produce.]Producing light.
33544 luminous LU'MINOUS, a. [L. luminosus.]1. Shining; emitting light. The sun is a most luminous body.2. ...
33545 luminously LU'MINOUSLY, adv. With brightness or clearness.
33546 luminousness LU'MINOUSNESS, n.1. The quality of being bright or shining; brightness; as the luminousness of the ...
33547 lump LUMP, n. 1. A small mass of matter of no definite shape; as a lump of earth; a lump of butter; a ...
33548 lumpen LUMP'EN, n. A long fish of a greenish color, and marked with lines.
33549 lumpfish LUMP'FISH, n. A thick fish of the genus Cyclopterus. The back is sharp and elevated; the belly ...
33550 lumping LUMP'ING, ppr.1. Throwing into a mass or sum.2. a. Bulky; heavy. [A low word.]
33551 lumpish LUMP'ISH, a. 1. Like a lump; heavy; gross; bulky.2. Dull; inactive.
33552 lumpishly LUMP'ISHLY, adv. Heavily; with dullness or stupidity.
33553 lumpishness LUMP'ISHNESS, n. Heaviness; dullness; stupidity.
33554 lumpy LUMP'Y, a. Full of lumps or small compact masses.Luna cornea, muriate of silver.
33555 lunacy LU'NACY, n. [from L. luna, the moon.]1. A species of insanity of madness, supposed to be ...
33556 lunar LU'NAR,
33557 lunarian LUNA'RIAN, n. An inhabitant of the moon.
33558 lunary LU'NARY, a. [L. lunaris.1. Pertaining to the moon; as lunar observations.2. Measured by the ...
33559 lunated LU'NATED, a. Formed like a half-moon.
33560 lunatic LU'NATIC, a. Affected by a species of madness, supposed to be influenced by the moon.LU'NATIC, n. ...
33561 lunation LUNA'TION, n. [L. lunatio.] A revolution of the moon.
33562 lunch LUNCH,
33563 luncheon LUNCH'EON, n. Literally, a swallow; but in usage, a portion of food taken at any time, except at ...
33564 lune LUNE, n. [L. luna, the moon.] 1. Any thing in the shape of a half-moon. [Little used.]2. A fit ...
33565 lunet LU'NET,
33566 lunette LUNETTE, n. 1. In fortification, an enveloped counterguard, or elevation of earth made beyond the ...
33567 lung LUNG, n.1. The lungs are the organs of respiration in man and many other animals. There are two ...
33568 lunge LUNGE, n. [See Allonge.] A sudden push or thrust.
33569 lunged LUNG'ED, a. Having lungs, or the nature or resemblance of lunged; drawing in and expelling air.
33570 lungis LUN'GIS, n. A lingerer; a dull drowsy fellow.
33571 lungwort LUNG'WORT, n. A plant of the genus Pulmonaria.
33572 luniform LU'NIFORM a. [L. luna, the moon, and form.] Resembling the moon.
33573 lunisolar LUNISO'LAR, a. [L. luna, moon, and solaris, sol, sun.]Compounded of the revolutions of the sun and ...
33574 lunistice LU'NISTICE, n. [L. luna, the moon, and sto, steti, or sisto, to stand.]The farthest point of the ...
33575 lunt LUNT, n. The match-cord used for firing cannon.
33576 lunular LU'NULAR, a. [from L. luna, the moon.] In botany, like the new moon; shaped like a small ...
33577 lunulate LU'NULATE, a. [from L. luna, the moon.] In botany, resembling a small crescent.
33578 lupercal LU'PERCAL, a. Pertaining to the Lupercalia, or feasts of the Romans in honor of Pan; as a noun, ...
33579 lupine LU'PINE, n. [L. lupinus.] A kind of pulse. The genus Lupinus contains several species, mostly ...
33580 lupulin LU'PULIN, n. [L. lupulus, hops.] The fine yellow powder of hops.
33581 lurch LURCH, n. [This is the same word radically as lurk. The primary sense is to run, start, leap or ...
33582 lurcher LURCH'ER, n. 1. One that lies in wait or lurks; one that watches to pilfer, or to betray or ...
33583 lurdan LUR'DAN, a. Blockish. [Not used.]LUR'DAN, n. A clown; a blockhead. [Not used.]
33584 lure LURE, n.1. Something held out to call a hawk; hence,2. Any enticement; that which invites by the ...
33585 lured LU'RED, pp. Enticed; attracted; invited by the hope of pleasure or advantage.
33586 lurid LU'RID, a. [L. luridus.] Gloomy; dismal.
33587 luring LU'RING, ppr. Enticing; calling.
33588 lurk LURK, v.i.1. To lie hid; to lie in wait.Let us lay wait for blood; let us lurk privily for the ...
33589 lurker LURK'ER, n. One that lurks or keeps out of sight.
33591 lurking-place LURK'ING-PLACE, n. A place in which one lies concealed; a secret place; a hiding place; a den. ...
33590 lurking LURK'ING, ppr. Lying concealed; keeping out of sight.
33592 luscious LUS'CIOUS, a. [I know not the origin and affinities of this word.]1. Sweet or rich so as to cloy ...
33593 lusciously LUS'CIOUSLY, adv. 1. With sweetness or richness that cloys or nauseates.2. Obscenely.
33594 lusciousness LUS'CIOUSNESS, n. Immoderate richness or sweetness that cloys or offends.
33595 lusern LU'SERN, n. A lynx.
33596 lush LUSH, a. Of a dark, keep, full color.How lush and lusty the grass looks; how green! Obs.
33597 lusk LUSK, a. Lazy; slothful. [Not in use.]LUSK, n. A lazy fellow; a lubber. [Not in use.]
33598 luskish LUSK'ISH, a. Inclined to be lazy.
33599 luskishly LUSK'ISHLY, adv. Lazily.
33600 luskishness LUSK'ISHNESS, n. Disposition to indolence; laziness. Obs.
33601 lusorious LUSO'RIOUS, a. [L. lusorius, from ludo, lusi, to sport.]Used in play; sportive. [Little used.]
33602 lusory LU'SORY, a. [L. lusorius, as above.] Used in play; playful; as lusory methods of instructing ...
33603 lust LUST, n.1. Longing desire; eagerness to possess or enjoy; as the lust of gain.My lust shall be ...
33604 luster LUS'TER, n. [L. lustrum, lustro to purify.]1. Brightness; splendor; gloss; as the luster of the ...
33605 lustful LUST'FUL, a.1. Having lust, or eager desire of carnal gratification; libidinous; as an intemperate ...
33606 lustfully LUST'FULLY, ad. With concupiscence or carnal desire.
33607 lustfulness LUST'FULNESS, n. The state of having carnal desires; libidinousness.
33608 lustihood LUST'IHOOD, n. [lusty and hood.] Vigor of body. Obs.
33609 lustily LUST'ILY, adv. With vigor of body; stoutly; with vigorous exertion.I determine to fight lustily ...
33610 lustiness LUST'INESS, n. Vigor of body; stoutness; strength; robustness; sturdiness.Cappadocian slaves were ...
33611 lusting LUST'ING, ppr. Having eager desire; having carnal appetite.LUST'ING, n. Eager desire; inordinate ...
33612 lustless LUST'LESS, a.1. Listless; not willing. Obs.2. Not vigorous.
33613 lustral LUS'TRAL, a. [L. lustralis, from lustro, to purify.]1. Used in purification; as lustral water; ...
33614 lustrate LUS'TRATE, v.t. [L. lustro, to cleanse. See Luster.]1. To make clear or pure; to purify. [See ...
33615 lustration LUSTRA'TION, n.1. The act or operation of making clear or pure; a cleansing or purifying by ...
33616 lustrical LUS'TRICAL, a. Pertaining to purification.
33617 lustring LUS'TRING, n. A species of glossy silk cloth. [Corruptly written and pronounced lutestring.]
33618 lustrous LUS'TROUS, a. Bright; shining; luminous.Good sparks and lustrous.
33619 lustrum LUS'TRUM, n. In ancient Rome, the space of five years.
33620 lustwort LUST'WORT, n. [lust and wort.] A plant of the genus Drosera.
33621 lusty LUST'Y, a. [from lust.]1. Stout; vigorous; robust; healthful; able of body. this is the correct ...
33622 lutanist LU'TANIST, n. [from lute.] A person that plays on the lute.A celebrated lutanist was playing to a ...
33623 lutarious LUTA'RIOUS, a. [L. lutarius,from lutum, mud.]1. Pertaining to mud; living in mud.2. Of the color ...
33624 lutation LUTA'TION, n. [See Lute.] The act or method of luting vessels.
33626 lute-case LU'TE-CASE, n. A case for a lute.
33627 lute-string LU'TE-STRING, n. The string of a lute.
33625 lute LUTE, n. [L. laudo.]An instrument of music with strings. It consists of four parts, viz; the ...
33628 luted LU'TED, pp. Closed with lute.
33629 lutenist LU'TENIST, n. A performer on the lute.
33630 luter LU'TER,
33631 lutheran LU'THERAN, a. Pertaining to Luther, the reformer; as the Lutheran church.LU'THERAN, n. A disciple ...
33632 lutheranism LU'THERANISM, n. The doctrines of religion as taught by Luther.
33633 luthern LU'THERN, n. In architecture, a kind of window over the cornice, in the roof of a building, to ...
33634 luting LU'TING, n. [L. lutum, mud, clay.] Among chimists, a composition of clay or other tenacious ...
33635 lutist LU'TIST, n. One who plays on a lute.
33636 lutulent LU'TULENT, a. [L. lutulentus, from lutum, mud.] Muddy; turbid; thick.
33637 luxate LUX'ATE, v.t. [L. luxo, laxo, laxus.]To displace, or remove from its proper place, as a joint; to ...
33638 luxated LUX'ATED, pp. Put out of joint; dislocated.
33639 luxating LUX'ATING, ppr. Removing or forcing out of its place, as a joint; dislocating.
33640 luxation LUXA'TION, n.1. That act of moving or forcing a joint from its proper place or articulation; or ...
33641 luxe LUXE, n. Luxury. [Not used.]
33642 luxuriance LUXU'RIANCE,
33643 luxuriancy LUXU'RIANCY, n. [L. luxurians, luxurio, to grow rank, or to wanton.]1. Rank growth; strong, ...
33644 luxuriant LUXU'RIANT, a.1. Exuberant in growth; abundant; as a luxuriant growth of grass.2. Exuberant in ...
33645 luxuriantly LUXU'RIANTLY, adv. With exuberant growth.
33646 luxuriate LUXU'RIATE, v.i. To grow exuberantly, or to grow to superfluous abundance.
33647 luxuriation LUXURIA'TION, n. The process of growing exuberantly, or beyond the natural growth.
33648 luxurious LUXU'RIOUS, a. [L. luxuriosus, from luxo, to loosen; luxor, to riot.]1. Voluptuous; indulging ...
33649 luxuriously LUXU'RIOUSLY, adv. In abundance of rich diet, dress or equipage; deliciously; voluptuously.
33650 luxurist LUX'URIST, n. One given to luxury.
33651 luxury LUX'URY, n. [L. luxuria, from luxo, to loosen.]1. A free or extravagant indulgence in the ...
33652 lvelihood L'VELIHOOD, n. [lively and hood, or lifelode, from lead. Means of living; support of life; ...
33653 ly LY, a termination of adjectives, is a contraction of Sax.lie, G.lich, D.lyk, Dan.lige, Sw.lik, ...
33654 lyam LY'AM, n. A leash for holding a hound.
33655 lycanthropy LYCAN'THROPY, n. [Gr. a wolf, and man.] A kind of erratic melancholy.
33656 lycostom LYCOS'TOM, n. A Baltic fish resembling a herring.
33657 lydian LYD'IAN, a. [from Lydia.]Noting a kind of soft slow music anciently in vogue.Lydian stone, flinty ...
33658 lye LYE, n. [L. lix, whence lixivium; Ant.L. lixa, whence Lugdunum, Leyden, Lyons, that is ...
33659 lying LY'ING, ppr. of lie. Being prostrate. [See Lie.]LY'ING, ppr. of lie. Telling falsehood.Lying in, ...
33660 lymnite LYM'NITE, n. A kind of freshwater snail, found fossil.
33661 lymph LYMPH, n. [L. lympha.] Water, or a colorless fluid in animal bodies,separated from the blood and ...
33662 lymphate LYMPH'ATE
33663 lymphated LYMPH'ATED, a. Frightened into madness; raving.
33664 lymphatic LYMPHAT'IC, a. Pertaining to lymph.1. Enthusiastic. [Not used.]LYMPHAT'IC, n. A vessel of animal ...
33665 lympheduct LYMPH'EDUCT, n. [L. lympha, lymph, and ductus, a duct.]A vessel of animal bodies which conveys the ...
33666 lymphography LYMPHOG'RAPHY, n. [L. lympha, lymph; Gr. to describe.]A description of the lymphatic vessels, their ...
33667 lynx LYNX, n. [L. lynx.] A quadruped of the genus Felis, resembling the common cat, but his ears are ...
33668 lyrate LY'RATE
33669 lyrated LY'RATED, a. [from lyre.] In botany, divided transversely into several jags, the lower ones ...
33670 lyre LYRE, n. [L. lyra.] A stringed instrument of music, a kind of harp much used by the ancients.
33671 lyric LYR'IC
33672 lyrical LYR'ICAL, a. [L. lyricus.] Pertaining to a lyre or harp. Lyric poetry is such as is sung to the ...
33673 lyricism LYR'ICISM, n. A lyric composition.
33674 lyrist LY'RIST, n. A musician who plays on the harp or lyre.
33675 lys LYS, n. A chinese measure of length, equal to 533 yards.
33676 lyterian LYTE'RIAN, a. [Gr. to loosen.] In medical science, terminating a disease; indicating the solution ...
33677 lythrode LYTH'RODE, n. A mineral found in Norway; its color, an aurora-red, passing into brownish red or ...
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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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