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Sunday - August 30, 2015

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed.. .No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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press

PRESS, v.t. [L.pressus.]

1. To urge with force or weight; a word of extensive use, denoting the application of any power, physical or moral, to something that is to be moved or affected. We press the ground with the feet when we walk; we press the couch on which we repose; we press substances with the hands, fingers or arms; the smith presses iron with his vise; we are pressed with the weight of arguments or of cares, troubles and business.

2. To squeeze; to crush; as, to press grapes. Gen.40.

3. To drive with violence; to hurry; as, to press a horse in motion, or in a race.

4. To urge; to enforce; to inculcate with earnestness; as, to press divine truth on an audience.

5. To embrace closely; to hug.

Leucothoe shook

And press'd Palemon closer in her arms.

6. To force into service, particularly into naval service; to impress.

7. To straiten; to distress; as, to be pressed with want or with difficulties.

8. To constrain; to compel; to urge by authority or necessity.

The posts that rode on mules and camels went out, being hastened and pressed on by the king's commandment. Esth.8.

9. To urge; to impose by importunity.

He pressed a letter upon me, within this hour, to deliver to you.

10. To urge or solicit with earnestness or importunity. He pressed me to accept of his offer.

11. To urge; to constrain.

Paul was pressed in spirit, and testified to the Jews that Jesus was Christ. Acts.18.

Wickedness pressed with conscience, forecasteth grievous things.

12. To squeeze for making smooth; as cloth or paper.

Press differs from drive and strike, in usually denoting a slow or continued application of force; whereas drive and strike denote a sudden impulse of force.

PRESS, v.i. To urge or strain in motion; to urge forward with force.

I press towards the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus. Phil.3.

Th' insulting victor presses on the more.

1. To bear on with force; to encroach.

On superior powers

Were we to press, inferior might on ours.

2. To bear on with force; to crowd; to throng.

Thronging crowds press on you as you pass.

3. To approach unseasonably or importunately.

Nor press too near the throne.

4. To urge with vehemence and importunity.

He pressed upon them greatly, and they turned in to him. Gen.19.

5. To urge by influence or moral force.

When arguments press equally in matters indifferent, the safest method is to give up ourselves to neither.

6. To push with force; as, to press against the door.

PRESS, n.

1. An instrument or machine by which any body is squeezed, crushed or forced into a more compact form; as a wine-press, cider-press or cheese-press.

2. A machine for printing; a printing-press. Great improvements have been lately made in the construction of presses.

3. The art or business of printing and publishing. A free press is a great blessing to a free people; a licentious press is a curse to society.

4. A crowd; a throng; a multitude of individuals crowded together.

And when they could not come nigh to him for the press--Mark 2.

5. The act of urging or pushing forward.

Which in their throng and press to the last hold,

Confound themselves.

6. A wine-vat or cistern. Hag.2.

7. A case of closet for the safe keeping of garments.

8. Urgency; urgent demands of affairs; as a press of business.

9. A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy; for impress.

Press of sail, in navigation, is as much sail as the state of the wind will permit.

Liberty of the press, in civil policy, is the free right of publishing books, pamphlets or papers without previous restraint; or the unrestrained right which every citizen enjoys of publishing his thoughts and opinions, subject only to punishment for publishing what is pernicious to morals or to the peace of the state.














1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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August 30, 2015
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