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Friday - August 22, 2014

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord stick

1828 edition of Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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stick

STICK, n. [G. This word is connected with the verb to stick, with stock, stack, and other words having the like elements. The primary sense of the root is to thrust, to shoot, and to set.]

1. The small shoot or branch of a tree or shrub, cut off; a rod; also, a staff; as, to strike one with a stick.

2. Any stem of a tree, of any size, cut for fuel or timber. It is applied in America to any long and slender piece of timber, round or square, from the smallest size to the largest, used in the frames of buildings; as a stick of timber for a post, a beam or a rafter.

3. Many instruments, long and slender, are called sticks; as the composing stick of printers.

4. A thrust with a pointed instrument that penetrates a body; a stab.

Stick of eels, the number of twenty five eels. A bind contains ten sticks.

STICK, v.t. pret. and pp. stuck. [G., to sting or prick, to stick, to adhere.]

1. To pierce; to stab; to cause to enter, as a pointed instrument; hence, to kill by piercing; as, to stick a beast in slaughter. [A common use of the word.]

2. To thrust in; to fasten or cause to remain by piercing; as, to stick a pin on the sleeve.

3. To fasten; to attach by causing to adhere to the surface; as, to stick on a patch or plaster; to stick on a thing with paste or glue.

4. To set; to fix in; as, to stick card teeth.

5. To set with something pointed; as, to stick cards.

6. To fix on a pointed instrument; as, to stick an apple on a fork.

STICK, v.i.

1. To adhere; to hold to by cleaving to the surface, as by tenacity or attraction; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall, and causes paper to stick.

I will cause the fish of thy rivers to stick to thy scales. Ezekiel 29.

2. To be united; to be inseparable; to cling fast to, as something reproachful.

If on your fame our sex a blot has thrown, twill ever stick, through malice of your own.

3. To rest with the memory; to abide.

4. To stop; to be impeded by adhesion or obstruction; as, the carriage sticks in the mire.

5. To stop; to be arrested in a course.

My faltering tongue sticks at the sound.

6. To stop; to hesitate. He sticks at no difficulty; he sticks at the commission of no crime; he sticks at nothing.

7. To adhere; to remain; to resist efforts to remove.

I had most need of blessing, and amen stuck in my throat.

8. To cause difficulties or scruples; to cause to hesitate.

This is the difficulty that sticks with the most reasonable--

9. To be stopped or hindered from proceeding; as, a bill passed the senate, but stuck in the house of representatives.

They never doubted the commons; but heard all stuck in the lords house.

10. To be embarrassed or puzzled.

They will stick long at part of a demonstration, for want of perceiving the connection between two ideals.

11. To adhere closely in friendship and affection.

There is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother. Proverbs 18.

To stick to, to adhere closely; to be constant; to be firm; to be persevering; as, to stick to a party or cause.

The advantage will be on our side, if we stick to its essentials.

To stick by,

1. To adhere closely; to be constant; to be firm in supporting.

We are your only friends; stick by us, and we will stick by you.

2. To be troublesome by adhering.

I am satisfied to trifle away my time, rather than let it stick by me.

To stick upon, to dwell upon; not to forsake.

If the matter be knotty, the mind must stop and buckle to it, and stick upon it with labor and thought. [Not elegant.]

To stick out, to project; to be prominent.

His bones that were not seen, stick out. Job 33.

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Why 1828?

because words like gay and sodomite does not mean what it meant back in the 1800's

— Leslie (Fishers, IN)

Word of the Day

society

SOCI'ETY, n. [L. societas, from socius, a companion. See Sociable.]

1. The union of a number of rational beings; or a number of persons united, either for a temporary or permanent purpose. Thus the inhabitants of a state or of a city constitute a society, having common interests; and hence it is called a community. In a more enlarged sense, the whole race or family of man is a society, and called human society. The true and natural foundation of society, are the wants and fears of individuals.

2. Any number of persons associated for a particular purpose, whether incorporated by law, or only united by articles of agreement; a fraternity. Thus we have bible societies for various objects; societies for mechanics, and leaned societies; societies for encouraging arts, &c.

3. Company; a temporary association of persons for profit or pleasure. In this sense, company is more generally used.

4. Conpany; fellowship. We frequent the society of those we love and esteem.

5. Partnership; fellowship; union on equal terms. Among unequals what society can sort? Heav'n's greatness no society can bear.

6. Persons living in the same neighborhood, who frequently meet in company and have fellowship. Literary society renders a place interesting and agreeable.

7. In Connecticut, a number of families united and incorporated for the purpose of supporting public worship, is called an exxlesiastical society. This is a parish, except that it has not territorial limits. In Massachusetts, such as incorporated society is usually called a parish, though consisting of persons only, without regard to territory.

Random Word

meadow-saxifrage

MEAD'OW-SAXIFRAGE, n. A plant of the genus Peucedanum.

About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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