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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord style

1828 edition of Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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style

STYLE, n. [L., Gr., a column, a pen or bodkin; from the root of the Teutonic stellen, to set or place.]

1. Manner of writing with regard to language, or the choice and arrangement of words; as a harsh style; a dry style; a tumid or bombastic style; a loose style; a terse style; a laconic or verbose style; a flowing style; a lofty style; an elegant style; an epistolary style. The character of style depends chiefly on a happy selection and arrangement of words.

Proper words in proper places, make the true definition of style.

Let some lord but own the happy lines, how the wit brightens and the style refines!

2. Manner of speaking appropriate to particular characters; or in general, the character of the language used.

Not style is held for base, where love well named is.

According to the usual style of dedications.

So we say, a person addresses another in a style of haughtiness, in a style or rebuke.

3. Mode of painting; any manner of painting which is characteristic or peculiar.

The ornamental style also possesses its own peculiar merit.

4. A particular character of music; as a grave style.

5. Title; appellation; as the style of majesty.

Propitious hear our prayr, whether the style of Titan please thee more--

6. Course of writing. [Not in use.]

7. Style of court, is properly the practice observed by any court in its way of proceeding.

8. In popular use, manner; form; as, the entertainment was prepared in excellent style.

9. A pointed instrument formerly used in writing on tables of wax; an instrument of surgery.

10. Something with a sharp point; a graver; the pin of a dial; written also stile.

11. In botany, the middle portion of the pistil, connecting the stigma with the germ; sometimes called the shaft. The styles of plants are capillary, filiform, cylindric, subulate, or clavate.

12. In chronology, a mode of reckoning time, with regard to the Julian and Gregorian calendar. Style is Old or New. The Old Style follows the Julian manner of computing the months and days, or the calendar as established by Julius Cesar, in which the year consists of 365 days and 6 hours. This is something more than 11 minutes too much, and in the course of time, between Cesar and pope Gregory XIII, this surplus amounted to 11 days. Gregory reformed the calendar by retrenching 11 days; this reformation was adopted by act of parliament in Great Britain in 1751, by which act eleven days in September, 1752 were retrenched, and the 3rd day was reckoned the 14th. This mode of reckoning is called New Style.

STYLE, v.t. To call; to name; to denominate; to give a title to in addressing. The emperor of Russia is styled autocrat; the king of Great Britain is styled defender of the faith.


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TRIPER'SONAL, a. [L. tres and persona.] Consisting of three persons.

About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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Filing and Examination Process The USPTO accepts applications filed electronically as well as paper applications delivered by mail. However, since 2011, the USPTO charges an additional fee for non-electronic applications. Fees cover the USPTO's cost to examine your application and are non-refundable regardless of whether the examiner grants your application. Fees vary depending on the size of your organization and the number of claims you make. Because the amount changes every year, the USPTO recommends checking the current fee schedule before you file your application. The backlog of applications means it can take one to two years before an examiner takes his first action on your application. If he rejects any or all of your claims, you have the opportunity to reply and amend your application before a final decision is made. If the examiner grants your patent, you must pay additional fees for the patent to be issued and published.
How to Conduct a Patent Search To get a basic understanding of patent searches read Searching For Students and in particular read Searching Using Key Words . It was written for students; however, if you can look past the cute language it will quickly get you reading and searching patents online within minutes. It will not be enough to do a diligent (complete) search for prior art by only using the Internet. For that you would need to understand the patent classification system and be prepared to do days or even weeks of research.
Patenting and USPTO Patent Applications - What is a patent? What kinds of patents are there? What is the USPTO? Some people may confuse patents, copyrights, and trademarks. Although there may be some similarities, they are different and serve different purposes. Read What Do I Need? or Understanding Intellectual Property if you need to understand the differences better. Patents and trademarks are both issued by the USPTO.
Who can apply for a patent? A patent must be applied for only in the name(s) of the actual inventor(s). However, the inventor can sell or assign the patent to someone else. Prior art includes any patents related to your invention, any published articles about your invention, and any public demonstrations. This determines if your idea has been patented before or publicly disclosed making it unpatentable.
You Can't Be Too Obvious Even if you don't find the prior art to prove it - you will not get a patent if your invention is not different enough from similiar inventions that are already out there. A patent maybe refused if the differences between your invention and another invention are too obvious. Your invention must be sufficiently different from what has been used or described before that it may be said to be nonobvious to a person having ordinary skill in the area of technology related to your invention . For example, the substitution of one material for another, or changes in size, are ordinarily not patentable. You can't paint it red and make it twice as big and expect a patent. Another example of "nonobvious to a person having ordinary skill in the area of technology related to your invention" could be the following. An electronics engineer looks at a circuit board and observes that it is just like another circuit board except that a few parts are substituted. Someone who is not familiar with circuit boards may not understand that the two boards are very similar, however, someone with training thinks that it is obvious. You would want the electronics engineer to look at the circuit board that you want to patent and say, "heah, why didn't I think of that!"

Learn more about U.S. patents:

Patent # 7,654,321 ()
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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