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Thursday - August 25, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

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ID Word Definition

25591

h
H, is the eighth letter of the English Alphabet. It is properly the representative of the Chaldee, ...

25592

ha
HA, an exclamation, denoting surprise, joy or grief. With the first or long sound of a, it is used ...

25593

haak
HAAK, n. A fish.Habeas Corpus, [L. have the body.] A writ for delivering a person from false ...

25594

haberdasher
HAB'ERDASHER, n. A seller of small wares; a word little used or not at all in the U. States.

25595

haberdashery
HAB'ERDASHERY, n. The goods and wares sold by a haberdasher.

25596

haberdine
HAB'ERDINE, n. A dried salt cod.

25597

habergeon
HAB'ERGEON, n. A coat of mail or armor to defend the neck and breast. It was formed of little ...

25598

habile
HAB'ILE, a. Fit; proper. [Not in use.]

25599

habiliment
HABIL'IMENT, n. [L. habeo, to have.] A garment; clothing; usually in the plural, habiliments, ...

25600

habilitate
HABIL'ITATE, v.t. To qualify. [Not used.]

25601

habilitation
HABILITA'TION, n. Qualification. [Not in use.]

25602

hability
HABILITY. [See Ability.]

25603

habit
HAB'IT, n. [L. habitus, from habeo,to have to hold. See Have.]1. Garb; dress; clothes or garments ...

25604

habitable
HAB'ITABLE, a. [L. habitabilis, from habito, to dwell.]That may be inhabited or dwelt in; capable ...

25605

habitableness
HAB'ITABLENESS, n. Capacity of being inhabited.

25606

habitably
HAB'ITABLY, adv. In such a manner as to habitable.

25607

habitance
HAB'ITANCE, n. Dwelling; abode; residence. [Not now used.]

25608

habitancy
HAB'ITANCY, n. Legal settlement or inhabitancy. [See Inhabitancy.]

25609

habitant
HAB'ITANT, n. [L. habitans.] An inhabitant; a dweller; a resident; one who has a permanent abode ...

25610

habitat
HAB'ITAT, n. Habitation.

25611

habitation
HABITA'TION, n. [L. habitatio, from habito, to dwell, from habeo, to hold, or as we say in ...

25612

habitator
HAB'ITATOR, n. [L.] A dweller; an inhabitant. [Not used.]

25613

habited
HAB'ITED, a. Clothed; dressed. He was habited like a shepherd.1. Accustomed. [Not usual.]

25614

habitual
HABIT'UAL, a. Formed or acquired by habit, frequent use or custom.Art is properly an habitual ...

25615

habitually
HABIT'UALLY, adv. By habit; customarily; by frequent practice or use; as habitually profane; ...

25616

habituate
HABIT'UATE, v.t.1. To accustom; to make familiar by frequent use or practice. Men may habituate ...

25617

habituated
HABIT'UATED, pp. Accustomed; made familiar by use.

25618

habituating
HABIT'UATING, ppr. Accustoming; making easy and familiar by practice.

25619

habitude
HAB'ITUDE, n. [L. habitudo, from habitus.]1. Relation; respect; state with regard to something ...

25620

habnab
HAB'NAB, adv. [hap ne hap, let it happen or not.]At random; by chance; without order or rule.

25621

hack
HACK, v.t.1. To cut irregularly and into small pieces; to notch; to mangle by repeated strokes of ...

25622

hacked
HACK'ED, pp. Chopped; mangled.

25623

hacking
HACK'ING, ppr. Chopping into small pieces; mangling; mauling.

25624

hackle
HACK'LE, v.t. 1. To comb flax or hemp; to separate the coarse part of these substances from the ...

25625

hackly
HACK'LY, a. [from hack.] Rough; broken as if hacked.In mineralogy, having fine,short,and sharp ...

25626

hackmatack
HACK'MATACK, n. The popular name of the red larch, the Pinus microcarpa.

25627

hackney
HACK'NEY, n.1. A pad; a nag; a pony.2. A horse kept for hire; a horse much used.3. A coach or ...

25628

hackney-coach
HACK'NEY-COACH. [See Hackney.]

25629

hackney-coachman
HACKNEY-COACHMAN, n. A man who drives a hackney-coach.

25630

hackneyed
HACK'NEYED, pp. Used much or in common.1. Practiced; accustomed. He is long hackneyed in the ways ...

25631

hackneying
HACK'NEYING, ppr. Using much; accustoming.

25632

hackneyman
HACK'NEYMAN, n. A man who lets horses and carriages for hire.

25633

hackster
HACK'STER, n. A bully; a ruffian or assassin.

25634

hacqueton
HAC'QUETON, n. A stuffed jacket formerly worn under armor, sometimes made of leather. [Not used.]

25635

had
HAD, pret. and pp. of have; contracted from Sax.haefd, that is, haved; as, I had; I have had. In ...

25636

hadder
HAD'DER, n. Heath. [Not in use. See Heath.]

25637

haddock
HAD'DOCK, n. A fish of the genus Gadus or cod, and order of Jugulars. It has a long body, the ...

25638

hade
HADE, n. Among miners, the steep descent of a shaft; also, the descent of a hill.In mining, the ...

25639

haft
H`AFT, n. [L. capio.] A handle; that part of an instrument or vessel which is taken into the ...

25640

hafter
H`AFTER, n. A caviller; a wrangler. [Not in use.]

25641

hag
HAG, n.1. An ugly old woman; as an old hag of threescore.2. A witch; a sorceress; an ...

25642

hagard
HAG'ARD, a.1. Literally, having a ragged look, as if hacked or gashed. Hence, lean; meager; ...

25643

hagardly
HAG'ARDLY, adv. In a hagard or ugly manner; with deformity.

25644

hagborn
HAG'BORN, n. Born of a hag or witch.

25645

haggard
HAG'GARD, n. A stack-yard.

25646

haggess
HAG'GESS, n. [from hack.] A mess of meat, generally pork, chopped and inclosed in a membrane.1. ...

25647

haggle
HAG'GLE, v.t. To cut into small pieces; to notch or cut in an unskillful manner; to make rough by ...

25648

haggled
HAG'GLED, pp. Cut irregularly into notches; made rough by cutting; mangled.

25649

haggler
HAG'GLER, n. One who haggles.1. One who cavils, hesitates and makes difficulty in bargaining.

25650

haggling
HAG'GLING, ppr. Hacking; mangling; caviling and hesitating in bargaining.

25651

hagiographal
HAGIOG'RAPHAL, n. Pertaining to hagiography, which see.

25652

hagiographer
HAGIOG'RAPHER, n. [See the next word.] A writer of holy or sacred books.

25653

hagiography
HAGIOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. holy, and a writing.]Sacred writings. The Jews divide the books of the ...

25654

hagish
HAG'ISH, a. Of the nature of a hag; deformed; ugly; horrid.

25655

hagship
HAG'SHIP, n. The state or title of a hag or witch.

25656

haguebut
HAGUEBUT. [See Arquebuse.]

25657

hah
HAH, an exclamation expressing surprise or effort.

25658

hail
HAIL, n. Masses of ice or frozen vapor, falling from the clouds in showers or storms. These ...

25659

hailed
HA'ILED, pp. Called to from a distance; accosted.

25660

hailing
HA'ILING, ppr. Saluting; calling to from a distance.1. Pouring down hail.

25661

hailshot
HA'ILSHOT, n. Small shot which scatter like hailstones. [Not used.]

25662

hailstone
HA'ILSTONE, n. A single mass of ice falling from a cloud.

25663

haily
HA'ILY, a. Consisting of hail; as haily showers.

25664

hainous
HA'INOUS, a. Properly, hateful; odious. Hence, great, enormous, aggravated; as a hainous sin or ...

25665

hainously
HA'INOUSLY, adv. Hatefully; abominably; enormously.

25666

hainousness
HA'INOUSNESS, n. Odiousness; enormity; as the hainousness of theft or robbery of any crime.

25667

hair
HAIR, n.1. A small filament issuing from the skin of an animal, and from a bulbous root. Each ...

25668

hair-brained
HA'IR-BRAINED. [See Hare-brained.]

25669

hair-breadth
HA'IR-BREADTH, n. [See Breadth.] The diameter or breadth of a hair; a very small distance. ...

25670

hair-salt
HA'IR-SALT, n. A mixture of the sulphates of magnesia and iron; its taste resembles that of alum.

25671

hairbell
HA'IRBELL, n. A plant, a species of hyacinth.

25672

haircloth
HA'IRCLOTH, n. Stuff or cloth made of hair, or in part with hair. In military affairs,pieces of ...

25673

hairhung
HA'IRHUNG, a. Hanging by a hair.

25674

hairiness
HA'IRINESS, n. [from hairy.] The state of abounding or being covered with hair.

25675

hairlace
HA'IRLACE, n. A fillet for tying up the hair of the head.

25676

hairless
HA'IRLESS, a. Destitute of hair; bald; as hairless scalps.

25677

hairpin
HA'IRPIN, n. A pin used in dressing the hair.

25678

hairpowder
HA'IRPOWDER, n. A fine powder of flour for sprinkling the hair of the head.

25679

hairworm
HA'IRWORM, n. A genus of worms [vermes,] called Gordius; a filiform animal found in fresh water or ...

25680

hairy
HA'IRY, a. [from hair.] Overgrown with hair; covered with hair; abounding with hair. Esau, my ...

25681

hake
HAKE, n. A kind of fish, the Gadus merlucius; called by some authors lucius marinus. It was ...

25682

hakot
HAK'OT, n. A fish.

25683

hal
HAL, in some names, signifies hall.

25684

halberd
HAL'BERD, n. A military weapon, consisting of a pole or shaft of wood, with a head armed with a ...

25685

halberdier
HALBERDIE'R, n. One who is armed with a halberd.

25686

halcyon
HAL'CYON, n. hal'shon. [L. halcyon; Gr. a king-fisher.]The name anciently given to the ...

25687

halcyonian
HALCYO'NIAN, a. Halcyon; calm.

25688

hale
HALE, a. Sound; entire; healthy; robust; not impaired; as a hale body.HALE, n. Welfare. [Not in ...

25689

half
H`ALF, n. h`af. plu.halves, pron. h`avz.One equal part of a thing which is divided into two parts, ...

25690

half-blooded
H`ALF-BLOODED, a. Mean; degenerate. [Little used.]1. Proceeding from a male and female, each of ...

25691

half-bred
H`ALF-BRED, a. Mixed; mongrel; mean.

25692

half-cap
H`ALF-CAP, n. A cap not wholly put on.

25693

half-dead
H`ALF-DEAD, a. Almost dead; nearly exhausted.

25694

half-faced
H`ALF-FACED, a. Showing only part of the face.

25695

half-hatched
H`ALF-HATCHED, a. Imperfectly hatched; as half-hatched eggs.

25696

half-heard
H`ALF-HEARD, a. Imperfectly heard; not heard to the end. And leave half-heard the melancholy tale.

25697

half-learned
H`ALF-LEARNED, a. Imperfectly learned.

25698

half-lost
H`ALF-LOST, a. Nearly lost.

25699

half-mark
H`ALF-MARK, n. A coin; a noble, or 6s.8d. sterling.

25700

half-moon
H`ALF-MOON, n. The moon at the quarters, when half its disk appears illuminated.1. Any thing in ...

25701

half-part
H`ALF-PART, n. An equal part.

25702

half-pay
H`ALF-PAY, n. Half the amount of wages or salary; as, an officer retires on half-pay.H`ALF-PAY, a. ...

25703

half-penny
H`ALF-PENNY, n. hap'penny or ha'penny. A copper coin of the value of half a penny; also, the value ...

25704

half-penny-worth
H`ALF-PENNY-WORTH, n. The value of a half-penny.

25705

half-pike
H`ALF-PIKE, n. A small pike carried by officers.1. A small pike used in boarding ships.

25706

half-pint
H`ALF-PINT, n. The half of a pint, or fourth of a quart.

25707

half-read
H`ALF-READ, a. Superficially informed by reading.

25708

half-scholar
H`ALF-SCHOLAR, n. One imperfectly learned.Half-seas over, a low expression denoting half drunk.

25709

half-sighted
H`ALF-SIGHTED, a. Seeing imperfectly; having weak discernment.

25710

half-sphere
H`ALF-SPHERE, n. Hemisphere.

25711

half-starved
H`ALF-STARVED, a. Almost starved.

25712

half-strained
H`ALF-STRAINED, a. Half-bred; imperfect.

25713

half-sword
H`ALF-SWORD, n. Within half the length of a sword; close fight.

25714

half-way
H`ALF-WAY, adv. In the middle; at half the distance.H`ALF-WAY, a. Equally distant from the ...

25715

half-wit
H`ALF-WIT, n. A foolish person; a dolt; a blockhead.

25716

half-witted
H`ALF-WITTED, a. Weak in intellect; silly; foolish.

25717

halfblood
H`ALFBLOOD, n. Relation between persons born of the same father or of the same mother, but not of ...

25718

halfen
H`ALFEN, a. Wanting half its due qualities. [Not used.]

25719

halfer
H`ALFER, n. One that possesses half only.1. A male fallow deer gelded.

25720

halibut
HAL'IBUT, n. A fish of the genus Pleuronectes, and order of Thoracics. This fish has a compressed ...

25721

halidom
HAL'IDOM, n. Adjuration by what is holy.

25722

haling
HALING. [See Hauling.]

25723

halituous
HALIT'UOUS, a. [L.halitus, breath.] Like breath; vaporous.

25724

hall
HALL, n. [L. aula; Heb. a tent, a palace.]1. In architecture, a large room at the entrance of a ...

25725

halleluiah
HALLELU'IAH, n. [Heb. praise ye Jah or Jehovah, to praise,that is, to throw, or raise the voice, ...

25726

halliard
HAL'LIARD, n. [from hale,haul.] A rope or tackle for hoisting or lowering a sail.

25727

hallier
HAL'LIER, n. A particular kind of net for catching birds.

25728

halloo
HAL'LOO, v.i. To cry out; to exclaim with a loud voice; to call to by name, or by the word halloo. ...

25729

hallooing
HAL'LOOING, ppr. Crying out; as a noun, a loud outcry.

25730

hallow
HAL'LOW, v.t. [L. calleo, to be able.]1. To make holy; to consecrate; to set apart for holy or ...

25731

hallowed
HAL'LOWED, pp. Consecrated to a sacred use, or to religious exercises; treated as sacred; ...

25732

hallowing
HAL'LOWING, ppr. Setting apart for sacred purposes; consecrating; devoting to religious exercises; ...

25733

hallowmas
HAL'LOWMAS,n. [See Mass.] The feast of All Souls.

25734

hallucination
HALLUCINA'TION, n. [L.hallucinatio, from hallucinor, to blunder.]1. Error; blunder; mistake. ...

25735

halm
HALM, n. haum. [L. culmus.] Straw. [See Haum.]

25736

halo
HA'LO, n. A circle appearing round the body of the sun, moon or stars, called also Corona, or ...

25737

halse
HALSE, n. The neck or throat.HALSE, v.i. hals. To embrace about the neck; to adjure; to greet.

25738

halsening
HAL'SENING, a. Sounding harshly in the throat or tongue.

25739

halser
HALSER, n. hawz'er. A large rope of a size between the cable and the tow-line. [See Hawser.]

25740

halt
HALT, v.i.1. To stop in walking; to hold. In military affairs, the true sense is retained, to stop ...

25741

halter
HALT'ER, n. One who halts or limps.HALT'ER, n. 1. A rope or strap and head-stall for leading or ...

25742

halting
HALT'ING, ppr. Stopping; limping.

25743

haltingly
HALT'INGLY, adv. With limping; slowly.

25744

halve
H`ALVE, v.t. h`av. [from half.] To divide into two equal parts; as, to halve an apple.

25745

halved
H`ALVED, a. In botany, hemispherical; covering one side; placed on one side.

25746

halves
H`ALVES, n. plu. of half. Two equal parts of a thing. To cry halves, is to claim an equal share. ...

25747

ham
HAM, Sax.ham, a house, is our modern word home, G.heim. It is used in hamlet, and in the names of ...

25748

hama
A'MA, or HA'MA, n. In church affairs, a vessel to contain wine for the eucharist; also, a wine ...

25749

hamadryad
HAM'ADRYAD, n. [Gr. together, and a tree.] A wood nymph, feigned to live and die with the tree to ...

25750

hamate
HAM'ATE, a. [L. hamatus.] Hooked; entangled.

25751

hamated
HAM'ATED, a. [L. hamatus, from hama, a hook.]Hooked or set with hooks.

25752

hamble
HAM'BLE, v.t. To hamstring. [Not used.]

25753

hame
HAME, n. plu. hames. A kind or collar for a draught horse, consisting of two bending pieces of ...

25754

hamite
HAM'ITE, n. The fossil remains of a curved shell.

25755

hamlet
HAM'LET, n. A small village; a little cluster of houses in the country.This word seems originally ...

25756

hamleted
HAM'LETED, a. Accustomed to a hamlet, or to a country life.

25757

hammer
HAM'MER, n. An instrument for driving nails, beating metals, and the like. It consists of an iron ...

25758

hammer-man
HAM'MER-MAN, n. One who beats or works with a hammer.

25759

hammer-wort
HAM'MER-WORT, n. An herb.

25760

hammerable
HAM'MERABLE, a. That may be shaped by a hammer.

25761

hammercloth
HAM'MERCLOTH, n. The cloth which covers a coach-box, so called from the old practice of carrying a ...

25762

hammered
HAM'MERED, pp. Beaten with a hammer.

25763

hammerer
HAM'MERER, n. One who works with a hammer.

25764

hammerhard
HAM'MERHARD, n. Iron or steel hardened by hammering.

25765

hammering
HAM'MERING, ppr. Beating with a hammer; working; contriving.

25766

hammite
HAMMITE. [See Ammite.]

25767

hammoc
HAM'MOC, n. A kind of hanging bed, suspended between trees or posts, or by hooks. It consists of ...

25768

hamous
HAM'OUS, [L. hamus, a hook.] Hooked; having the end hooked or curved; a term of botany.

25769

hamper
HAM'PER, n. [contracted form hanaper, or from hand pannier.]1. A large basket for conveying ...

25770

hampered
HAM'PERED, pp. Shackled; entangled; ensnared; perplexed.

25771

hampering
HAM'PERING, ppr. Shackling; entangling; perplexing.

25772

hamster
HAM'STER, n. A species of rat, the Mus cricetus, or German marmot. This rat is of the size of the ...

25773

hamstring
HAM'STRING, n. The tendons of the ham.HAM'STRING, v.t. pret. and pp. hamstrung or hamstringed. To ...

25774

han
HAN, for have, in the plural.

25775

hanaper
HAN'APER, n. The hanaper was used in early days by the kings of England, for holding and carrying ...

25776

hance
HANCE, HAUNCE, for enhance. [See Enhance.]

25777

hances
HAN'CES, n. plu. [L. ansa.] In architecture, the ends of elliptical arches, which are the arches ...

25778

hand
HAND, n. [L. hendo, in prehendo.]1. In man, the extremity of the arm, consisting of the palm and ...

25779

hand-grenade
HAND-GRENA'DE, n. A grenade to be thrown by the hand.

25780

handball
HAND'BALL, n. An ancient game with a ball.

25781

handbarrow
HAND'BARROW, n. A barrow or vehicle borne by the hands of men, and without a wheel.

25782

handbasket
HAND'BASKET, n. A small or portable basket.

25783

handbell
HAND'BELL, n. A small bell rung by the hand; a table bell.

25784

handbreadth
HAND'BREADTH, n. A space equal to the breadth of the hand; a palm. Ex.25.

25785

handcloth
HAND'CLOTH, n. A handkerchief.

25786

handcraft
HAND'CR`AFT, n. Work performed by the hands; usually written handicraft.

25787

handcuff
HAND'CUFF, n. A manacle, consisting of iron rings for the wrists, and a connecting chain to ...

25788

handed
HAND'ED, pp. Given or transmitted by the hands; conducted; furled.HAND'ED, a. With hands ...

25789

hander
HAND'ER, n. One who hands or transmits; a conveyer in succession.

25790

handfast
HAND'F`AST, n. Hold; custody; power of confining or keeping.HAND'F`AST, a. Fast by contract; ...

25791

handfasting
HAND'F`ASTING, n. A kind of betrothing, or marriage contract.

25792

handful
HAND'FUL, n. As much as the hand will grasp or contain.1. As much as the arms will embrace.2. A ...

25793

handgallop
HAND'GALLOP, n. A slow and easy gallop, in which the hand presses the bridle to hinder increase of ...

25794

handglass
HAND'GL`ASS, n. In gardening, a glass used for placing over, protecting and forwarding various ...

25795

handgun
HAND'GUN, n. A gun to be used by the hand.

25796

handicraft
HAND'ICR`AFT, n. Manual occupation; work performed by the hand.1. A man who obtains his living by ...

25797

handicraftsman
HAND'ICR`AFTSMAN, n. A man skilled or employed in manual occupation; a manufacturer.

25798

handily
HAND'ILY, adv. [See Handy.] With dexterity or skill; dexterously; adroitly.1. With ease or ...

25799

handiness
HAND'INESS, n. The ease of performance derived from practice; dexterity; adroitness.

25800

handiwork
HAND'IWORK, n. [for hand-work.] Work of the hands; product of manual labor; manufacture.1. Work ...

25801

handkerchief
HAND'KERCHIEF, n. [hand and kerchief. See Kerchief.]1. A piece of cloth, usually silk or linen, ...

25802

handlanguage
HAND'LANGUAGE, n. The art of conversing by the hands. [Not in use.]

25803

handle
HAND'LE, v.t. [L. manus.]1. To touch; to feel with the hand; to use or hold with the hand. The ...

25804

handlead
HAND'LEAD, n. A lead for sounding.

25805

handled
HAND'LED, pp. Touched; treated; managed.

25806

handless
HAND'LESS, a. Without a hand.

25807

handling
HAND'LING, ppr. Touching; feeling; treating; managing.

25808

handmaid
HAND'MAID

25809

handmaiden
HAND'MAIDEN, n. A maid that waits at hand; a female servant or attendant.

25810

handmill
HAND'MILL, n. A mill moved by the hand.

25811

handsails
HAND'SAILS, n. Sails managed by the hand.

25812

handsaw
HAND'SAW, n. A saw to be used with the hand.

25813

handscrew
HAND'SCREW, n. An engine for raising heavy timbers or weights; a jack.

25814

handsel
HAND'SEL, n.1. The first act of using any thing; the first sale.2. An earnest; money for the first ...

25815

handsome
HAND'SOME, a. 1. Properly, dexterous; ready; convenient. For a thief it is so handsome, as it may ...

25816

handsomely
HAND'SOMELY, adv. Dexterously; cleverly; with skill.1. Gracefully; with propriety and ease.2. ...

25817

handsomeness
HAND'SOMENESS, n. A moderate degree of beauty or elegance; as the handsomeness of the person or of ...

25818

handspike
HAND'SPIKE, n. A wooden bar, used with the hand as a lever, for various purposes, as in raising ...

25819

handstaff
HAND'ST`AFF, n. A javelin; plu. handstaves. Ezek.39.

25820

handvise
HAND'VISE, n. A vise used by hand, or for small work.

25821

handweapon
HAND'WEAPON,n. Any weapon to be wielded by the hand. Numb.35.

25822

handwriting
HAND'WRITING, n. The cast or form of writing peculiar to each hand or person.1. Any writing.

25823

handy
HAND'Y, a.1. Performed by the hand. They came to handy blows.2. Dexterous; ready; adroit; skilled ...

25824

handy-dandy
HAND'Y-DANDY, n. A play in which children change hands and places.

25825

handyblow
HAND'YBLOW, n. A blow with the hand; an act of hostility.

25826

handygripe
HAND'YGRIPE, n. Seizure by the hand.

25827

handystroke
HAND'YSTROKE, n. A blow inflicted by the hand.

25828

hang
HANG, v.t. pret. and pp. hanged or hung.1. To suspend; to fasten to some fixed object above, in ...

25829

hangby
HANG'BY, n. A dependent, in contempt.

25830

hanged
HANG'ED, pp. Suspended; put to death by being suspended by the neck.

25831

hanger
HANG'ER, n. That by which a thing is suspended.1. A short broad sword, incurvated towards the ...

25832

hanger-on
HANG'ER-ON, n. One who besets another importunately in soliciting favors.1. A dependant; one who ...

25833

hanging
HANG'ING, ppr. Suspending to something above.1. Being suspended; dangling; swinging.2. ...

25834

hanging-side
HANG'ING-SIDE, n. In mining, the overhanging side of an inclined or hading vein.

25835

hanging-sleeves
HANG'ING-SLEEVES, n. Strips of the same stuff with the gown, hanging down the back from the ...

25836

hangman
HANG'MAN, n. One who hangs another; a public executioner; also, a term of reproach.

25837

hangnest
HANG'NEST, n. The name of certain species of birds, which build nests suspended from the branches ...

25838

hank
HANK, n.1. A skein of thread; as much thread as is tied together; a tie.2. In ships. a wooden ...

25839

hanker
HANK'ER, v.i.1. To long for with a keen appetite and uneasiness; in a literal sense; as, to hanker ...

25840

hankering
HANK'ERING, ppr. Longing for with keen appetite or ardent desire.HANK'ERING,n. A keen appetite ...

25841

hankle
HANK'LE, v.t. [See Hank.] To twist. [Not in use.]

25842

hanseatic
HANSEAT'IC, a. Pertaining to the Hanse towns, or to their confederacy.

25843

hant
HA'NT, a contraction of have not, or has not; as, I ha'nt, he ha'nt, we ha'nt.Hanse Towns. Hanse ...

25844

hap
HAP, n. [L. capio.]1. That which comes suddenly or unexpectedly; chance; fortune; accident; casual ...

25845

hap-hazard
HAP-HAZ'ARD, n. [This is tautological. See Hazard.] Chance; accident. We take our principles at ...

25846

hapless
HAP'LESS, a. Luckless; unfortunate; unlucky; unhappy; as hapless youth; hapless maid.

25847

haply
HAP'LY, adv. By chance; perhaps; it may be. Lest haply ye be found to fight against God. ...

25848

happen
HAP'PEN, v.i. hap'n.1. To come by chance; to come without one's previous expectation; to fall out. ...

25849

happily
HAP'PILY, adv. [See Happy.] By good fortune; fortunately; luckily; with success. Preferr'd by ...

25850

happiness
HAP'PINESS, n. [from happy.] The agreeable sensations which spring from the enjoyment of good; ...

25851

happy
HAP'PY a. [from hap.]1. Lucky; fortunate; successful. Chimists have been more happy in finding ...

25852

har
HAR, HARE, HERE, in composition, signify an army, Sax. here, G. heer, D. heir. So Harold is a ...

25853

harangue
HARANGUE, n. harang'. har'ang.1. A speech addressed to an assembly or an army; a popular oration; ...

25854

haranguer
HARANG'UER, n. harang'er. An orator; one who addresses an assembly or army; a noisy declaimer.

25855

haranguing
HARANG'UING, ppr. Declaiming; addressing with noisy eloquence.

25856

harass
HAR'ASS, v.t.1. To weary; to fatigue to excess; to tire with bodily labor; as, to harass an army ...

25857

harassed
HAR'ASSED, pp. Wearied; tired; teased.

25858

harasser
HAR'ASSER, n. One who harasses or teases; a spoiler.

25859

harassing
HAR'ASSING, ppr. Tiring; fatiguing; teasing.

25860

harbinger
H`ARBINGER, n. [See Harbor. Harbinger is properly a person who goes to provide harbor or lodgings ...

25861

harbor
H`ARBOR, n. 1. A lodging; a place of entertainment and rest. For harbor at a thousand doors they ...

25862

harbor-master
H`ARBOR-M`ASTER, n. An officer who has charge of the mooring of ships,and executes the regulations ...

25863

harborage
H`ARBORAGE, n. Shelter; entertainment. [Not used.]

25864

harbored
H`ARBORED, pp. Entertained; sheltered.

25865

harborer
H`ARBORER, n. One who entertains or shelters another.

25866

harboring
H`ARBORING, ppr. Entertaining; sheltering.

25867

harborless
H`ARBORLESS, a. Without a harbor; destitute of shelter or a lodging.

25868

harborough
HAR'BOROUGH, n. A harbor or lodging. [Not in use.]

25869

harborous
HAR'BOROUS, a. Hospitable. [Not in use.]

25870

hard
H`ARD, a.1. Firm; solid; compact; not easily penetrated, or separated into parts; not yielding to ...

25871

hard-besetting
HARD-BESET'TING, a. Closely besetting or besieging.

25872

hard-labored
HARD-LA'BORED, a. Wrought with severe labor; elaborate; studies; as a hard-labored poem.

25873

hard-mouthed
H`ARD-MOUTHED, a. Not sensible to the bit; not easily governed; as a hard-mouthed horse.

25874

hardbound
H`ARDBOUND, a. Costive; fast or tight; as hardbound brains.

25875

hardearned
H`ARDEARNED, a. Earned with toil and difficulty.

25876

harden
H`ARDEN, v.t. h`ardn. To make hard or more hard; to make firm or compact; to indurate; as, to ...

25877

hardened
H`ARDENED, pp. Made hard, or more hard or compact; made unfeeling; made obstinate; confirmed in ...

25878

hardener
H`ARDENER, n. He or that which makes hard, or more firm and compact.

25879

hardening
H`ARDENING, ppr. Making hard or more compact; making obdurate or unfeeling; confirming; becoming ...

25880

hardfavored
HARDFA'VORED, a. Having coarse features; harsh of countenance.

25881

hardfavoredness
HARDFA'VOREDNESS, n. Coarseness of features.

25882

hardfeatured
H`ARDFEATURED, a. Having coarse features.

25883

hardfisted
H`ARDFISTED, a. Close fisted; covetous.

25884

hardfought
H`ARDFOUGHT, a. Vigorously contested; as a hard-fought battle.

25885

hardgotten
H`ARDGOTTEN, a. Obtained with difficulty.

25886

hardhanded
H`ARDHANDED, a. Having hard hands, as a laborer.

25887

hardhead
H`ARDHEAD, n. Clash or collision of heads in contest.

25888

hardhearted
HARDHE`ARTED, a. Cruel; pitiless; merciless; unfeeling; inhuman; inexorable.

25889

hardheartedness
HARDHE`ARTEDNESS, n. Want of feeling or tenderness; cruelty; inhumanity.

25890

hardihood
H`ARDIHOOD, n. [See Hardy and Hood.] Boldness, united with firmness and constancy of mind; ...

25891

hardily
H`ARDILY, adv. With great boldness; stoutly.1. With hardship; not tenderly.

25892

hardiness
H`ARDINESS, n.1. Boldness; firm courage; intrepidity; stoutness; bravery; applied to the mind, it ...

25893

hardly
H`ARDLY, adv. [See Hard.] With difficulty; with great labor. Recovering hardly what he lost ...

25894

hardness
H`ARDNESS, n. [See Hard.] Firmness; close union of the component parts; compactness; solidity; ...

25895

hardnibbed
H`ARDNIBBED, a. Having a hard nib or point.

25896

hardock
H`ARDOCK, n. Probably hoardock, dock with whitish leaves.

25897

hards
H`ARDS, n. The refuse or coarse part of flax; tow.

25898

hardship
H`ARDSHIP, n. Toil; fatigue; severe labor or want; whatever oppresses the body.1. Injury; ...

25899

hardvisaged
H`ARDVISAGED, a. Having coarse features; of a harsh countenance.

25900

hardware
H`ARDWARE, n. Wares made of iron or other metal, as pots,kettles, saws, knives, &c.

25901

hardwareman
H`ARDWAREMAN, n. A maker or seller of hardwares.

25902

hardy
H`ARDY, a.1. Bold; brave; stout; daring; resolute; intrepid. Who is hardy enough to encounter ...

25903

hare
HARE, n. A quadruped of the genus Lepus, with long ears, a short tail, soft hair, and a divided ...

25904

harebell
HA'REBELL, n. A plant of the genus Hyacinthus, with campaniform or bell-shaped flowers.

25905

harebrained
HA'REBRAINED, a. [hare and brain.] Wild; giddy; volatile; heedless.

25906

harefoot
HA'REFOOT, n. A bird; a plant.

25907

harehearted
HA'REHE`ARTED, a. Timorous; easily frightened.

25908

harehound
HA'REHOUND, n. A hound for hunting hares.

25909

harehunter
HA'REHUNTER, n. One who hunts or is used to hunting hares.

25910

harehunting
HA'REHUNTING, n. The hunting of hares.

25911

harelip
HA'RELIP, n. A divided upper lip, like that of a hare.

25912

harelipped
HA'RELIPPED, a. Having a harelip.

25913

harem
HAR'EM, n. A seraglio; a place where Eastern princes confine their women, who are prohibited from ...

25914

haremint
HA'REMINT, n. A plant.

25915

harengiform
HAREN'GIFORM, a. [See Herring.] Shaped like a herring.

25916

harepipe
HA'REPIPE, n. A snare for catching hares.

25917

hares-ear
HA'RE'S-EAR, n. A plant of the genus Bupleurum. The Bastard Hare's Ear is of the genus Phyllis.

25918

hares-lettuce
HARE'S-LETTUCE, n. A plant of the genus Sonchus.

25919

harewort
HA'REWORT, n. A plant.

25920

haricot
HAR'ICOT, n. A kind of ragout of meat and roots.1. In French, beans.

25921

harier
HAR'IER

25922

hariolation
HARIOLA'TION, n. [L. harioltio.] Sooth-saying. [Not in use.]

25923

hark
H`ARK, v.t. [contracted from hearken, which see.]To listen; to lend the ear.This word is rarely or ...

25924

harl
H`ARL

25925

harlequin
H`ARLEQUIN, n. A buffoon, dressed in party-colored clothes, who plays tricks, like a merry-andrew, ...

25926

harlock
H`ARLOCK, n. A plant.

25927

harlot
H`ARLOT, n. 1. A woman who prostitutes her body for hire; a prostitute; a common woman.2. In ...

25928

harlotry
H`ARLOTRY, n. The trade or practice of prostitution; habitual or customary lewdness.

25929

harm
H`ARM, n.1. Injury; hurt; damage; detriment. Do thyself no harm. Acts.16. He shall make amends ...

25930

harmattan
HARMAT'TAN, n. A dry easterly wind in Africa, which destroys vegetation.

25931

harmed
H`ARMED, pp. Injured; hurt; damaged.

25932

harmel
H`ARMEL, n. The wild African rue.

25933

harmful
H`ARMFUL, a. Hurtful; injurious; noxious; detrimental; mischievous. The earth brought forth fruit ...

25934

harmfully
H`ARMFULLY, adv. Hurtfully; injuriously; with damage.

25935

harmfulness
H`ARMFULNESS, n. Hurtfulness; noxiousness.

25936

harming
H`ARMING, ppr. Hurting; injuring.

25937

harmless
H`ARMLESS, a. Not hurtful or injurious; innoxious. Ceremonies are harmless in themselves.1. ...

25938

harmlessly
H`ARMLESSLY, adv. Innocently; without fault or crime; as, to pass the time harmlessly in ...

25939

harmlessness
H`ARMLESSNESS, n. The quality of being innoxious; freedom from a tendency to injure.1. Innocence.

25940

harmonic
HARMON'IC

25941

harmonica
HARMON'ICA, n. A collection of musical glasses of a particular form, so arranged as to produce ...

25942

harmonical
HARMON'ICAL, a. [See Harmony.] Relating to harmony or music; as harmonical use.1. ...

25943

harmonics
HARMON'ICS,n. Harmonious sounds; consonances.1. The doctrine or science of musical sounds.2. ...

25944

harmonious
HARMO'NIOUS, a. Adapted to each other; having the parts proportioned to each other; symmetrical. ...

25945

harmoniously
HARMO'NIOUSLY, adv. With just adaptation and proportion of parts to each other. Distances, ...

25946

harmoniousness
HARMO'NIOUSNESS, n. Proportion and adaption of parts; musicalness.1. Agreement; concord.

25947

harmonist
H`ARMONIST, n. A musician; a composer of music.1. One who brings together corresponding passages, ...

25948

harmonize
H`ARMONIZE, v.i. To be in concord; to agree in sounds.1. To agree; to be in peace and friendship; ...

25949

harmonized
H`ARMONIZED, pp. Made to be accordant.

25950

harmonizer
H`ARMONIZER, n. One that brings together or reconciles.1. In music, a practical harmonist.

25951

harmonizing
H`ARMONIZING, ppr. Causing to agree.

25952

harmonometer
HARMONOM'ETER, n. An instrument or monochord for measuring the harmonic relations of sounds.

25953

harmony
H`ARMONY, n. [L. harmonia; Gr. a setting together, a closure or seam, agreement, concert, to fit ...

25954

harmost
H`ARMOST, n. [Gr. to regulate.] In ancient Greece, a Spartan governor, regulator or perfect.

25955

harmotome
H`ARMOTOME, n. [Gr. a joint, and to cut.] In mineralogy, cross-stone, or staurolite, called also ...

25956

harness
H`ARNESS, n.1. Armor; the whole accouterments or equipments of a knight or horseman; originally ...

25957

harnessed
H`ARNESSED, pp. Equipped with armor; furnished with the dress for draught; defended.

25958

harnesser
H`ARNESSER, n. One who puts on the harness of a horse.

25959

harnessing
H`ARNESSING, ppr. Putting on armor or furniture for draught.

25960

harp
H`ARP, n.1. An instrument of music of the stringed kind, of a triangular figure, held upright and ...

25961

harper
H`ARPER, n. A player on the harp.

25962

harping
H`ARPING, ppr. Playing on a harp; dwelling on continually.H`ARPING, n. A continual dwelling on. ...

25963

harping-iron
H`ARPING-IRON, n. A harpoon, which see.

25964

harpist
H`ARPIST, n. A harper.

25965

harpoon
HARPOON', n. [Gr. to seize with the claws; probably L. rapio, by transposition of letters.]A ...

25966

harpooned
HARPOON'ED, pp. Struck, caught or killed with a harpoon.

25967

harpooner
HARPOON'ER, n. One who uses a harpoon; the man in a whale-boat who throws the harpoon.

25968

harpooning
HARPOON'ING, ppr. Striking with a harpoon.

25969

harpsichord
H`ARPSICHORD, n. [harp and chord.] An instrument of music with strings of wire, played by the ...

25970

harpy
H`ARPY, n. [L. harpyia; Gr. to seize or claw.]1. In antiquity, the harpies were fabulous winged ...

25971

harquebuse
HARQUEBUSE. [See Arquebuse.]

25972

harrateen
HARRATEE'N, n. A kind of stuff or cloth.

25973

harridan
HAR'RIDAN, n. A decayed strumpet.

25974

harrier
HAR'RIER, n. [from hare.] A dog for hunting hares; a kind of hound with an acute sense of ...

25975

harrow
HAR'ROW, n. An instrument of agriculture, formed of pieces of timber sometimes crossing each ...

25976

harrowed
HAR'ROWED, pp. Broken or smoothed by a harrow.

25977

harrower
HAR'ROWER, n. One who harrows.1. A hawk.

25978

harrowing
HAR'ROWING, ppr. Breaking or leveling with a harrow.

25979

harry
HAR'RY, v.t.1. To strip; to pillage. [See Harrow.]2. To harass; to agitate; to tease.HAR'RY, ...

25980

harsh
H`ARSH, a.1. Rough to the touch; rugged; grating; as harsh sand; harsh cloth; opposed to smooth.2. ...

25981

harshly
H`ARSHLY, adv. Roughly; in a harsh manner.1. Sourly; austerely.2. Severely; morosely; crabbedly; ...

25982

harshness
H`ARSHNESS, n. Roughness to the touch; opposed to softness and smoothness.1. Sourness; ...

25983

harslet
H`ARSLET

25984

hart
H`ART, n. A stag or male deer, an animal of the cervine genus.

25985

hartbeest
H`ARTBEEST, n. The quanga, or cervine antelope of Africa.

25986

hartroyal
H`ARTROY'AL, n. A plant.

25987

hartshorn
H`ARTSHORN, n. The horn of the hart or male deer. The scrapings or raspings of this horn are ...

25988

hartstongue
H`ARTSTONGUE, n. [See Tongue.] A plant, a species of Asplenium.

25989

hartwort
H`ARTWORT, n. The name of certain plants of the genera, Seseli, Tordylium, and Buplerum.

25990

haruspice
HAR'USPICE,n. [L. haruspex, from specio, to view.]In Roman history, a person who pretended to ...

25991

haruspicy
HAR'USPICY, n. Divination by the inspection of victims.

25992

harvest
H`ARVEST, n. [L. acerbus.]1. The season of reaping and gathering in corn or other crops. It ...

25993

harvest-fly
H`ARVEST-FLY, n. A large four-winged insect of the cicada kind, common in Italy.

25994

harvest-home
H`ARVEST-HOME, n. The time of harvest.1. The song sung by reapers at the feast made at the ...

25995

harvest-lord
H`ARVEST-LORD, n. The head-reaper at the harvest.

25996

harvest-man
H`ARVEST-MAN, n. A laborer in harvest.

25997

harvest-queen
H`ARVEST-QUEEN, n. An image representing Ceres, formerly carried about on the last day of harvest.

25998

harvested
H`ARVESTED, pp. Reaped and collected, as ripe corn and fruits.

25999

harvester
H`ARVESTER, n. A reaper; a laborer in gathering grain.

26000

harvesting
H`ARVESTING, ppr. Reaping and collecting, as ripe corn and other fruits.

26001

hash
HASH, v.t. [Eng. to hack. See Hack.] To chop into small pieces; to mince and mix; as, to hash ...

26002

hask
HASK, n. A case made of rushes or flags. [Not used.]

26003

haslet
HAS'LET, n. The heart, liver, lights, &c. of a hog.

26004

hasp
H`ASP, n.1. A clasp that passes over a staple to be fastened by a padlock.2. A spindle to wind ...

26005

hassoc
HAS'SOC, n. A thick mat or bass on which persons kneel in church. And knees and hassocs are well ...

26006

hast
HAST, the second person singular of have, I have, thou hast, contracted from havest. It is used ...

26007

hastate
HAS'TATE

26008

hastated
HAS'TATED, a. [L. hastatus, from hasta, a spear.] In botany, spear-shaped; resembling the head of ...

26009

haste
HASTE, n.1. Celerity of motion; speed; swiftness; dispatch; expedition; applied only to voluntary ...

26010

hasted
HASTED

26011

hasten
HASTEN, v.t. To press; to drive or urge forward; to push on; to precipitate; to accelerate ...

26012

hastened
HASTENED, pp. Moved rapidly; accelerated; urged with speed.

26013

hastener
HASTENER, n. One that hastens or urges forward.

26014

hastening
HASTENING, ppr. Urging forward; pushing on; proceeding rapidly. That state is hastening to ruin, ...

26015

hastily
HASTILY, adv. [See Hasty.] In haste; with speed or quickness; speedily; nimbly. Half clothed, ...

26016

hastiness
HASTINESS, n. Haste; speed; quickness or celerity in motion or action, as of animals.1. Rashness; ...

26017

hasting
HASTING

26018

hasting-pear
HASTING-PEAR, n. An early pear, called also green chissel.

26019

hastings
HASTINGS, n. [from hasty.] Peas that come early.

26020

hastive
HASTIVE, a. Forward; early; as fruit. [Not much used.]

26021

hasty
HASTY, a. Quick; speedy; opposed to slow. Be not hasty to go out of his sight. Eccles.8.1. Eager ...

26022

hastypudding
HASTYPUDDING, n. A pudding made of the meal of maiz moistened with water and boiled, or of milk ...

26023

hat
HAT, n.1. A covering for the head; a garment made of different materials, and worn by men or women ...

26024

hatable
HA'TABLE, a. [from hate.] That may be hated; odious.

26025

hatch
HATCH, v.t.1. To produce young from eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat. In Egypt, chickens ...

26026

hatchel
HATCH'EL, n. An instrument formed with long iron teeth set in a board, for cleaning flax or hemp ...

26027

hatcheled
HATCH'ELED, pp. Cleansed by a hatchel; combed.

26028

hatcheler
HATCH'ELER, n. One who uses a hatchel.

26029

hatcheling
HATCH'ELING, ppr. Drawing through the teeth of a hatchel.

26030

hatchet
HATCH'ET, n. A small ax with a short handle, to be used with one hand.To take up the hatchet, a ...

26031

hatchet-face
HATCH'ET-FACE, n. A prominent face, like the edge of a hatchet.

26032

hatchetine
HATCH'ETINE, n. A substance of the hardness of soft tallow, of a yellowish white or greenish ...

26033

hatchment
HATCH'MENT, n. [corrupted from achievement.] An armorial escutcheon on a herse at funerals, or in ...

26034

hatchway
HATCH'WAY, n. In ships, a square or oblong opening in the deck, affording a passage from one deck, ...

26035

hate
HATE, v.t. [L. odi, for hodi.]1. To dislike greatly; to have a great aversion to. It expresses ...

26036

hated
HA'TED, pp. Greatly disliked.

26037

hateful
HA'TEFUL, a. Odious; exciting great dislike, aversion or disgust. All sin is hateful in the sight ...

26038

hatefully
HA'TEFULLY, adv. Odiously; with great dislike.1. Malignantly; maliciously. Ezek. 23.

26039

hatefulness
HA'TEFULNESS, n. Odiousness; the quality of being hateful, or of exciting aversion or disgust.

26040

hater
HA'TER, n. One that hates. An enemy to God, and hater of all good.

26041

hating
HA'TING, ppr. Disliking extremely; entertaining a great aversion for.

26042

hatred
HA'TRED, n. Great dislike or aversion; hate; enmity. Hatred is an aversion to evil, and may ...

26043

hatted
HAT'TED, a. [from hat.] Covered with a hat; wearing a hat.

26044

hatter
HAT'TER, v.t. To harass. [Not in use.]

26045

hattock
HAT'TOCK, n. [Erse, attock.] A shock of corn. [Not in use.]

26046

hauberk
HAU'BERK, n. A coat of mail without sleeves.

26047

haught
HAUGHT, a. haut. [L. altus, that is, haltus, changed to haut.]High; elevated; hence, proud; ...

26048

haughtily
HAUGHTILY, adv. hau'tily. [See Haught and Haughty.]Proudly; arrogantly; with contempt or disdain; ...

26049

haughtiness
HAUGHTINESS, n. hau'tiness. The quality of being haughty; pride mingled with some degree of ...

26050

haughty
HAUGHTY, a. hau'ty. [from haught.]1. Proud and disdainful; having a high opinion of one's self, ...

26051

haul
HAUL, v.t.1. To pull or draw with force; to drag; as, to haul a heavy body along on the ground; to ...

26052

hauled
HAUL'ED, pp. Pulled with force; dragged; compelled to move.

26053

hauling
HAUL'ING, ppr. Drawing by force or violence; dragging.

26054

haulm
HAULM

26055

haum
HAUM, n. [L. culmus, the stalk of corn.]1. The stem or stalk of grain, of all kinds, or of peas, ...

26056

haunce
HANCE, HAUNCE, for enhance. [See Enhance.]

26057

haunch
H`AUNCH, n.1. The hip; that part of the body of man and of quadrupeds, which lies between the last ...

26058

haunt
H`AUNT, v.t.1. To frequent; to resort to much or often, or to be much about; to visit customarily. ...

26059

haunted
H`AUNTED, pp. Frequently visited or resorted to, especially by apparitions.1. Troubled by ...

26060

haunter
H`AUNTER, n. One who frequents a particular place, or is often about it.

26061

haunting
H`AUNTING, ppr. Frequenting; visiting often; troubling with frequent visits.

26062

haust
HAUST, n. A dry cough.

26063

hautboy
HAUTBOY,n. ho'boy. A wind instrument, somewhat resembling a flute, but widening towards the ...

26064

hauteur
HAUTEUR, n. Pride, haughtiness; insolent manner or spirit.

26065

hauyne
HAUYNE, n. A mineral, called by Hauy latialite, occurring in grains or small masses, and also in ...

26066

have
HAVE, v.t. hav. pret. and pp. had. Present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they, have. [L. ...

26067

haveless
HAVELESS, a. hav'les. Having little or nothing. [Not in use.]

26068

haven
HA'VEN,n. ha'vn.1. A harbor; a port; a bay, recess or inlet of the sea, or the mouth of a river ...

26069

havener
HA'VENER, n. The overseer of a port; a harbor-master. [Not used.]

26070

haver
HAV'ER, n. One who has or possesses; a possessor; a holder. [Little used.]HAV'ER, n. [L. avena.] ...

26071

haversack
HAV'ERSACK, n. A soldier's knapsack.

26072

having
HAV'ING, ppr. [from have.] Possessing; holding in power or possession; containing; gaining; ...

26073

havock
HAV'OCK, n. Waste; devastation; wide and general destruction. Ye gods! what havock does ambition ...

26074

haw
HAW, n.1. The berry and seed of the hawthorn, that is, hedge-thorn.2. A small piece of ground ...

26075

hawfinch
HAW'FINCH, n. A bird, a species of Loxia.

26076

hawhaw
HAW'HAW, n. [duplication of haw, a hedge.] A fence or bank that interrupts an alley or walk, sunk ...

26077

hawing
HAW'ING, ppr. Speaking with a haw, or with hesitation.

26078

hawk
HAWK, n. A genus of fowls, the Falco, of many species, having a crooked beak, furnished with a ...

26079

hawked
HAWK'ED, pp. Offered for sale by outcry in the street.1. Crooked; curving like a hawk's bill.

26080

hawker
HAWK'ER, n. One who offers goods for sale by outcry in the street; a peddlar.1. A falconer.

26081

hawkeyed
HAWK'EYED, a. Having acute sight; discerning.

26082

hawking
HAWK'ING, ppr. Catching wild birds by hawks.1. Making an effort to discharge phlegm.2. Offering ...

26083

hawknosed
HAWK'NOSED, a. Having an aquiline nose.

26084

hawkweed
HAWK'WEED, n. The vulgar name of several species of plants,of the genera, Hieracium, Crepis, ...

26085

hawse
HAWSE, n. hawz. [See Halser.] The situation of a ship moored with two anchors from the bows, one ...

26086

hawse-hole
HAWSE-HOLE, n. A cylindrical hole in the bow of a ship through which a cable passes.

26087

hawse-piece
HAWSE-PIECE, n. One of the foremost timbers of a ship.

26088

hawser
HAWS'ER, n. [See Halser.] A small cable; or a large rope, in size between a cable and a tow-line.

26089

hawthorn
HAW'THORN, n. A shrub or tree which bears the haw, of the genus Crataegus; the white-thorn. The ...

26090

hawthorn-fly
HAW'THORN-FLY, n. An insect so called.

26091

hay
HAY, n. Grass cut and dried for fodder; grass prepared for preservation. Make hay while the sun ...

26092

haybote
HA'YBOTE,n. Hedge-bote. In English law, an allowance of wood to a tenant for repairing hedges or ...

26093

haycock
HA'YCOCK, n. A conical pile or heap of hay, in the field.

26094

haydenite
HA'YDENITE, n. A mineral discovered by Dr.Hayden, near Baltimore. It occurs in garnet colored ...

26095

hayknife
HA'YKNIFE, n. A sharp instrument used in cutting hay out of a stack or mow.

26096

hayloft
HA'YLOFT, n. A loft or scaffold for hay, particularly in a barn.

26097

haymaker
HA'YMAKER, n. One who cuts and dries grass for fodder.

26098

haymaking
HA'YMAKING, n. The business of cutting grass and curing it for fodder.

26099

haymarket
HA'YMARKET, n. A place for the sale of hay.

26100

haymow
HA'YMOW, n. A mow or mass of hay laid up in a barn for preservation.

26101

hayrick
HA'YRICK, n. A rick of hay; usually a long pile for preservation in the open air.

26102

haystack
HA'YSTACK, n. A stack or large conical pile of hay in the open air, laid up for preservation.

26103

hayward
HA'YWARD, n. [hay and ward, hedgeward.] A person who keeps the common herd or cattle of a town, ...

26104

hazard
HAZ'ARD, n. [L. casus, a fall, and ard, the common termination.]1. Chance; accident; casualty; a ...

26105

hazardable
HAZ'ARDABLE, a. That is liable to hazard or chance.

26106

hazarded
HAZ'ARDED, pp. Put at risk or in danger; ventured.

26107

hazarder
HAZ'ARDER, n. One who ventures or puts at stake.

26108

hazarding
HAZ'ARDING, ppr. Exposing to danger or peril; venturing to bring on.

26109

hazardous
HAZ'ARDOUS, a. Dangerous; that exposes to peril or danger of loss or evil; as a hazardous attempt ...

26110

hazardously
HAZ'ARDOUSLY, adv. With danger of loss or evil; with peril.

26111

hazardry
HAZ'ARDRY, n. Rashness; temerity.1. Gaming in general.

26112

haze
HAZE, n. [The primary sense of this word is probably to mix, or to turn, stir and make thick.]Fog; ...

26113

hazel
HAZEL, n. ha'zl. A shrub of the genus Corylus, bearing a nut containing a kernel of a mild ...

26114

hazel-earth
HA'ZEL-EARTH, n. A kind of red loam.

26115

hazel-nut
HA'ZEL-NUT, n. The nut or fruit of the hazel.

26116

hazelly
HA'ZELLY, a. Of the color of the hazelnut; of a light brown.

26117

hazy
HA'ZY, a. [See Haze.] Foggy; misty; thick with vapor; as hazy weather; the hazy north.

26118

he
HE, pronoun of the third person; nom. he; poss.his; obj. him. [L. id, for hid; hic.]1. A pronoun, ...

26119

head
HEAD, n. hed.1. The uppermost part of the human body, or the foremost part of the body of prone ...

26120

head-pan
HEAD-PAN, n. hed'-pan. The brain-pan. [Not in use.]

26121

head-piece
HEAD-PIECE, n. hed'-pece. Armor for the head; a helmet; a morion.1. Understanding; force of mind. ...

26122

head-rope
HEAD-ROPE, n. hed'-rope. That part of a bolt-rope which terminates any sail on the upper edge, and ...

26123

head-sail
HEAD-SAIL, n. hed'-sail. The head-sails of a ship are the sails which are extended on the ...

26124

head-sea
HEAD-SEA, n. hed'-sea. Waves that meet the head of a ship or roll against her course.

26125

head-wind
HEAD-WIND, n. hed'-wind. A wind that blows in a direction opposite to the ship's course.

26126

head-workman
HEAD-WORK'MAN, n. The chief workman of a party; a foreman in a manufactory.

26127

headach
HEADACH, n. hed'ake. Pain in the head.

26128

headband
HEADBAND, n. hed'band. A fillet; a band for the head; also, the band at each end of a book. Is.3.

26129

headborough
HEADBOROUGH, n. hed'burro. In England, formerly, the chief of a frank-pledge, tithing or ...

26130

headdress
HEAD'DRESS, n. hed'dress. The dress of the head; the covering or ornaments of a woman's head.1. ...

26131

headed
HEADED, pp. hed'ed. Led; directed; furnished with a head; having a top. This is used in ...

26132

header
HEADER,n. hed'er. One who heads nails or pins.1. One who leads a mob or party.2. The first brick ...

26133

headfast
HEADFAST, n. hed'fast. A rope at the head of a ship to fasten it to a wharf or other object.

26134

headfirst
HEADFIRST, adv. hedfurst. With the head foremost.

26135

headgargle
HEADGARGLE, n. hed'gargle. A disease of cattle.

26136

headgear
HEADGEAR, n. hed'gear. The dress of a woman's head.

26137

headiness
HEADINESS, n. hed'iness. [See Heady.] Rashness; precipitation; a disposition to rush forward ...

26138

heading
HEADING, n. hed'ing. Timber for the heads of casks.

26139

headland
HEADLAND, n. hed'land. A cape; a promontory; a point of land projecting from the shore into the ...

26140

headless
HEADLESS, a. hed'less. Having no head; beheaded; as a headless body, neck or carcass.1. Destitute ...

26141

headlong
HEADLONG, adv. hed'long. With the head foremost; as, to fall headlong.1. Rashly; precipitately; ...

26142

headman
HEADMAN, n. hed'man. A chief; a leader.

26143

headmold-shot
HEADMOLD-SHOT, n. A disease in children, in which the sutures of the skull, usually the coronal, ...

26144

headmoney
HEAD'MONEY, n. hed'munny. A capitation-tax.

26145

headmost
HEADMOST, a. hed'most. Most advanced; most forward; first in a line or order of progression; as ...

26146

headquarters
HEADQUART'ERS, n. plu. The quarters or place of residence of the commander-in-chief of an army.1. ...

26147

headshake
HEADSHAKE, n. hed'shake. A significant shake of the head.

26148

headship
HEADSHIP, n. hed'ship. Authority; chief place.

26149

headsman
HEADSMAN, n. hed'sman. One that cuts off heads; an executioner. [Unusual.]

26150

headspring
HEADSPRING, n. hed'spring. Fountain; source; origin.

26151

headstall
HEADSTALL, n. hed'stall. That part of a bridle which encompasses the head.

26152

headstone
HEADSTONE, n. hed'stone. The principal stone in a foundation; the chief or corner stone.1. The ...

26153

headstrong
HEADSTRONG, a. hed'strong. Violent; obstinate; ungovernable; resolute to run his own way; bent on ...

26154

headstrongness
HEAD'STRONGNESS,n. Obstinacy. [Not in use.]

26155

headtire
HEADTIRE, n. hed'tire. Dress or attire for the head. 1 Esdras 3.

26156

headway
HEADWAY, n. hed'way. The motion of an advancing ship. A ship makes headway, when she advances, as ...

26157

heady
HEADY, a. hed'y. [See Head.] Rash; hasty; precipitate; violent; disposed to rush forward in an ...

26158

heal
HEAL, v.t. [L. celo; Heb. to be whole or entire, all.]1. To cure of a disease or wound and ...

26159

healable
HE'ALABLE, a. That may be healed.

26160

healed
HE'ALED, pp. Restored to a sound state.

26161

healer
HE'ALER, n. He or that which cures, or restores to soundness.

26162

healing
HE'ALING, ppr. Curing; restoring to a sound state.1. Tending to cure; mild; mollifying.HE'ALING, ...

26163

health
HEALTH, n. helth. [from heal.] That state of an animal or living body, in which the parts are ...

26164

healthfully
HEALTH'FULLY, adv. In health; wholesomely.

26165

healthfulness
HEALTH'FULNESS, n. A state of being well; a state in which the parts of a living body are sound, ...

26166

healthily
HEALTH'ILY, a. [See Health.] Without disease.

26167

healthiness
HEALTH'INESS, n. The state of health; soundness; freedom from disease; as the healthiness of an ...

26168

healthless
HEALTH'LESS, a. Infirm; sickly.1. Not conducive to health. [Little used.]

26169

healthsome
HEALTH'SOME, a. Wholesome. [Not used.]

26170

healthy
HEALTH'Y, a. Being in a sound state; enjoying health; hale; sound; as a healthy body or ...

26171

heam
HEAM, n. In beasts, the same as afterbirth in women.

26172

heap
HEAP, n.1. A pile or mass; a collection of things laid in a body so as to form an elevation; as a ...

26173

heaped
HE'APED, pp. Piled; amassed; accumulated.

26174

heaper
HE'APER, n. One who heaps, piles or amasses.

26175

heaping
HE'APING, ppr. Piling; collecting into a mass.

26176

heapy
HE'APY, a. Lying in heaps; as heapy rubbish.

26177

hear
HEAR, v.t. pret. and pp. heard, but more correctly heared. [L. audio; auris.]1. To perceive by the ...

26178

heard
HEARD

26179

heared
HEARED, pp. Perceived by the ear. [In pronunciation, this word should not be confounded with ...

26180

hearer
HE'ARER, n. One who hears; one who attends to what is orally delivered by another; an auditor; one ...

26181

hearing
HE'ARING, ppr. Perceiving by the ear, as sound.1. Listening to; attending to; obeying; observing ...

26182

hearken
HE`ARKEN, v.i. h`arken.1. To listen; to lend the ear; to attend to what is uttered, with eagerness ...

26183

hearkener
HE`ARKENER, n. h`arkener. A listener; one who hearkens.

26184

hearkening
HE`ARKENING, ppr. h`arkening. Listening; attending; observing.

26185

hearsal
HEARSAL, for Rehearsal. [Not in use.]

26186

hearsay
HE'ARSAY, n. [hear and say.] Report; rumor; fame; common talk. He affirms without any authority ...

26187

hearse
HEARSE, n. hers. [See Herse.] A temporary monument set over a grave.1. The case or place in ...

26188

hearsecloth
HEARSECLOTH, n. hers'cloth. A pall; a cloth to cover a hearse.

26189

hearselike
HEARSELIKE, a. hers'like. Suitable to a funeral.

26190

heart
HEART, n. [L. cor, cordis, and allied to Eng.core, or named from motion, pulsation.]1. A muscular ...

26191

heart-ach
HE`ART-ACH, n. Sorrow; anguish of mind.

26192

heart-alluring
HE`ART-ALLU'RING, a. Suited to allure the affections.

26193

heart-appalling
HEART-APPALL'ING, a. Dismaying the heart.

26194

heart-blood
HE`ART-BLOOD , n. The blood of the heart; life; essence.

26195

heart-break
HE`ART-BREAK, n. Overwhelming sorrow or grief.

26196

heart-breaker
HE`ART-BREAKER, a. A lady's curl; a love-lock.

26197

heart-breaking
HE`ART-BREAKING, a. Breaking the heart; overpowering with grief or sorrow.HE`ART-BREAKING, n. ...

26198

heart-bred
HE`ART-BRED, a. Bred in the heart.

26199

heart-broken
HE`ART-BROKEN, a. Deeply afflicted or grieved.

26200

heart-buried
HE`ART-BURIED, a. Deeply immersed.

26201

heart-burn
HE`ART-BURN, n. Cardialgy; a disease or affection of the stomach, attended with a sensation of ...

26202

heart-burned
HE`ART-BURNED, a. Having the heart inflamed.

26203

heart-burning
HE`ART-BURNING, a. Causing discontent.HE`ART-BURNING, n. Heart-burn, which see.1. Discontent; ...

26204

heart-chilled
HE`ART-CHILLED, a. Having the heart chilled.

26205

heart-consuming
HE`ART-CONSU'MING, a. Destroying peace of mind.

26206

heart-corroding
HE`ART-CORRO'DING, a. Preying on the heart.

26207

heart-dear
HE`ART-DEAR, a. Sincerely beloved.

26208

heart-deep
HE`ART-DEEP, a. Rooted in the heart.

26209

heart-discouraging
HE`ART-DISCOUR'AGING, a. [See Courage.] Depressing the spirits.

26210

heart-ease
HE`ART-EASE, n. Quiet; tranquillity of mind.

26211

heart-easing
HE`ART-EASING, a. Giving quiet to the mind.

26212

heart-eating
HE`ART-EATING, a. Preying on the heart.

26213

heart-expanding
HE`ART-EXPAND'ING, a. Enlarging the heart; opening the feelings.

26214

heart-felt
HE`ART-FELT, a. Deeply felt; deeply affecting, either as joy or sorrow.

26215

heart-grief
HE`ART-GRIEF, n. Affliction of the heart.

26216

heart-hardened
HE`ART-HARDENED, a. Obdurate; impenitent; unfeeling.

26217

heart-hardening
HE`ART-HARDENING, a. Rendering cruel or obdurate.

26218

heart-heaviness
HE`ART-HEAVINESS, n. Depression of spirits.

26219

heart-offending
HE`ART-OFFEND'ING, a. Wounding the heart.

26220

heart-pea
HE`ART-PEA, n. A plant, the Cardiospermum, with black seeds, having the figure of a heart of a ...

26221

heart-quelling
HE`ART-QUELLING, a. Conquering the affection.

26222

heart-rending
HE`ART-RENDING, a. Breaking the heart; overpowering with anguish; deeply afflictive.

26223

heart-robbing
HE`ART-ROBBING, a. Depriving of thought; ecstatic.1. Stealing the heart; winning.

26224

heart-searching
HE`ART-SEARCHING, a. Searching the secret thoughts and purposes.

26225

heart-sick
HE`ART-SICK, a. Sick at heart; pained in mind; deeply afflicted or depressed.

26226

heart-sore
HE`ART-SORE, n. That which pains the heart.HE`ART-SORE, a. Deeply wounded.

26227

heart-sorrowing
HE`ART-SOR'ROWING, a. Sorrowing deeply in heart.

26228

heart-string
HE`ART-STRING, n. A nerve or tendon, supposed to brace and sustain the heart.

26229

heart-struck
HE`ART-STRUCK, a. Driven to the heart; infixed in the mind.1. Shocked with fear; dismayed.

26230

heart-swelling
HE`ART-SWELLING, a. Rankling in the heart.

26231

heart-whole
HE`ART-WHOLE, a. [See Whole.] Not affected with love; not in love, or not deeply affected.1. ...

26232

heart-wounded
HE`ART-WOUNDED, a. Wounded with love or grief; deeply affected with some passion.

26233

heart-wounding
HE`ART-WOUNDING, a. Piercing with grief.

26234

hearted
HE`ARTED, a. Taken to heart. [Not used.]1. Composed of hearts. [Not used.]2. Laid up in the ...

26235

hearten
HE`ARTEN, v.t. h`artn. To encourage; to animate; to incite or stimulate courage.1. To restore ...

26236

heartener
HE`ARTENER, n. He or that which gives courage or animation.

26237

hearth
HE`ARTH, n. harth. A pavement or floor of brick or stone in a chimney, on which a fire is made to ...

26238

hearth-money
HE`ARTH-MONEY

26239

hearth-penny
HE`ARTH-PENNY, n. A tax on hearths.

26240

heartily
HE`ARTILY, adv. [from hearty.] From the heart; with all the heart; with sincerity; really. I ...

26241

heartiness
HE`ARTINESS, n. Sincerity; zeal; ardor; earnestness.1. Eagerness of appetite.

26242

heartless
HE`ARTLESS, a. Without courage; spiritless; faint-hearted. Heartless they fought, and quitted soon ...

26243

heartlessly
HE`ARTLESSLY, adv. Without courage or spirit; faintly; timidly; feebly.

26244

heartlessness
HE`ARTLESSNESS, n. Want of courage or spirit; dejection of mind; feebleness.

26245

hearts-blood
HE`ART'S-BLOOD

26246

hearts-ease
HE`ART'S-EASE, n. A plant, a species of Viola.

26247

hearty
HE`ARTY, a. Having the heart engaged in any thing; sincere; warm; zealous; as, to be hearty in ...

26248

hearty-hale
HE`ARTY-HALE, a. Good for the heart.

26249

heat
HEAT, n. [L. aestus, for haestus, or caestus.]1. Heat, as a cause of sensation, that is, the ...

26250

heated
HE'ATED, pp. Made hot; inflamed; exasperated.

26251

heater
HE'ATER,n. He or that which eats.1. A triangular mass of iron, which is heated and put into a ...

26252

heath
HEATH, n.1. A plant of the genus Erica, of many species. It is a shrub which is used in Great ...

26253

heathcock
HE'ATHCOCK, n. A large fowl which frequents heaths, a species of grouse.

26254

heathen
HE'ATHEN, n. [Gr. from heath, that is, one who lives in the country or woods, as pagan from pagus, ...

26255

heathenish
HE'ATHENISH, a. Belonging to Gentiles or pagans; as heathenish rites.1. Rude; illiterate; wild; ...

26256

heathenishly
HE'ATHENISHLY, adv. After the manner of heathens.

26257

heathenism
HE'ATHENISM, n. Gentilism; paganism; ignorance of the true God; idolatry; the rites or system of ...

26258

heathenize
HE'ATHENIZE, v.t. To render heathen or heathenish.

26259

heather
HE'ATHER, n. Heath.

26260

heathful
HEATH'FUL, a. helth'ful. Being in a sound state, as a living or organized being; having the parts ...

26261

heathpea
HE'ATHPEA,, n. A species of bitter vetch, Orobus.

26262

heathpout
HE'ATHPOUT, n. A bird, the same as the heath-cock.

26263

heathrose
HE'ATHROSE, n. A plant.

26264

heathy
HE'ATHY, a. [from heath.] Full of heath; abounding with heath; as heathy land.

26265

heating
HE'ATING, ppr. Making warm or hot; inflaming; rousing the passions; exasperating.1. Tending to ...

26266

heatless
HEAT'LESS, a. Destitute of heat; cold.

26267

heave
HEAVE, v.t. heev. pret. heaved, or hove; pp. heaved, hove, formerly hoven. [Gr. to breathe.]1. To ...

26268

heave-offering
HE'AVE-OFFERING, n. Among the Jews, an offering consisting of the tenth of the tithes which the ...

26269

heaven
HEAVEN, n. hev'n.1. The region or expanse which surrounds the earth, and which appears above and ...

26270

heaven-aspiring
HEAVEN-ASPI'RING,a. Aspiring to heaven.

26271

heaven-banished
HEAV'EN-BANISHED, a. Banished from heaven.

26272

heaven-begot
HEAVEN-BEGOT', a. Begot by a celestial being.

26273

heaven-born
HEAV'EN-BORN, a. Born from heaven; native of heaven, or of the celestial regions; as heaven-born ...

26274

heaven-bred
HEAV'EN-BRED, a. Produced or cultivated in heaven; as heaven-bred poesy.

26275

heaven-built
HEAV'EN-BUILT, a. Built by the agency or favor of the gods; as a heaven-built wall.

26276

heaven-directed
HEAVEN-DIRECT'ED, a. Pointing to the sky; as a heaven-directed spire.1. Taught or directed by the ...

26277

heaven-fallen
HEAV'EN-FALLEN, a. Fallen from heaven; having revolted from God.

26278

heaven-gifted
HEAV'EN-GIFTED, a. Bestowed by heaven.

26279

heaven-inspired
HEAVEN-INSPI'RED, a. Inspired by heaven.

26280

heaven-instructed
HEAVEN-INSTRUCT'ED, a. Taught by heaven.

26281

heaven-kissing
HEAV'EN-KISSING, a. Touching as it were the sky.

26282

heaven-loved
HEAV'EN-LOVED, a. Beloved by heaven.

26283

heaven-saluting
HEAVEN-SALU'TING, a. Touching the sky.

26284

heaven-warring
HEAV'EN-WARRING, a. Warring against heaven.

26285

heavenize
HEAVENIZE, v.t. hev'nize. To render like heaven. [Unauthorized.]

26286

heavenliness
HEAV'ENLINESS, n. [from heavenly.] Supreme excellence.

26287

heavenly
HEAV'ENLY, a. Pertaining to heaven; celestial; as heavenly regions; heavenly bliss.1. Resembling ...

26288

heavenly-minded
HEAVENLY-MINDED, a. Having the affections place on heaven, and on spiritual things.

26289

heavenly-mindednes
HEAVENLY-MINDEDNESS, n. The state of having the affections placed on heavenly things and spiritual ...

26290

heavenward
HEAV'ENWARD, adv. Toward heaven.

26291

heaver
HE'AVER, n. One who heaves or lifts. Among seamen, a staff for a lever.

26292

heaves
HEAVES, n. heevz. A disease of horses, characterized by difficult and laborious respiration.

26293

heavily
HEAV'ILY, adv. hev'ily. [from heavy.] With great weight; as, to bear heavily on a thing; to be ...

26294

heaviness
HEAV'INESS, n. hev'iness. Weight; ponderousness; gravity; the quality of being heavy; as the ...

26295

heaving
HE'AVING, ppr. Lifting; swelling; throwing; panting; making an effort to vomit.HE'AVING, n. A ...

26296

heavnely
HEAV'NELY, adv. In a manner resembling that of heaven. Where heavenly pensive contemplation ...

26297

heavy
HEAV'Y, a. hev'y. 1. Weighty; ponderous; having great weight; tending strongly to the center of ...

26298

heavy-handed
HEAV'Y-HANDED, a. Clumsy; not active or dexterous.

26299

heavy-laden
HEAVY-LA'DEN, a. Laden with a heavy burden.

26300

hebdomad
HEB'DOMAD, n. [Gr. seven days; L. hebdomada.]A week; a period of seven days. [Not used.]

26301

hebdomadal
HEBDOM'ADAL

26302

hebdomadary
HEBDOM'ADARY, a. Weekly; consisting of seven days, or occurring every seven days.HEBDOM'ADARY, n. ...

26303

hebdomatical
HEBDOMAT'ICAL, a. Weekly.

26304

heben
HEB'EN, n. Ebony.

26305

hebetate
HEB'ETATE, v.t. [L. hebeto, from hebes, dull, blunt, heavy.]To dull; to blunt; to stupefy; as, to ...

26306

hebetated
HEB'ETATED, ppr. Made blunt, dull or stupid.

26307

hebetating
HEB'ETATING, pp. Rendering blunt, dull or stupid.

26308

hebetation
HEBETA'TION, n. The act of making blunt, dull or stupid.1. The state of being dulled.

26309

hebete
HEBE'TE, a. Dull; stupid.

26310

hebetude
HEB'ETUDE, n. [L. hebetudo.] Dullness; stupidity.

26311

hebraic
HEBRA'IC, a. [from Hebrew.] Pertaining to the Hebrews; designating the language of the Hebrews.

26312

hebraically
HEBRA'ICALLY, adv. After the manner of the Hebrew language; from right to left.

26313

hebraism
HE'BRAISM, n. A Hebrew idiom; a peculiar expression or manner of speaking in the Hebrew language.

26314

hebraist
HE'BRAIST, n. One versed in the Hebrew language.

26315

hebraize
HE'BRAIZE, v.t. To convert into the Hebrew idiom; to make Hebrew.HE'BRAIZE, v.i. To speak Hebrew, ...

26316

hebrew
HE'BREW, n. [Heb. Eber, either a proper name, or a name denoting passage, pilgrimage, or coming ...

26317

hebrewess
HE'BREWESS, n. An Israelitish woman.

26318

hebrician
HEBRI'CIAN, n. One skilled in the Hebrew language.

26319

hebridian
HEBRID'IAN, a. Pertaining to the isles called Hebrides, west of Scotland.

26320

hecatomb
HEC'ATOMB, n. [L. hecatombe; Gr. a hundred, and an ox.]In antiquity, a sacrifice of a hundred ...

26321

heck
HECK, n. [See Hatch.] An engine or instrument for catching fish; as a salmon heck.1. A rack for ...

26322

heckle
HECK'LE, v.t. A different orthography of hackle, or hetchel.

26323

hectare
HEC'TARE, n. [Gr. a hundred, and L. area.] A French measure containing a hundred ares, or ten ...

26324

hectic
HEC'TIC

26325

hectical
HEC'TICAL, a. [Gr. habit of body, to have.] Habitual; denoting a slow, continual fever, marked by ...

26326

hectically
HEC'TICALLY, adv. Constitutionally.

26327

hectogram
HEC'TOGRAM, n. [Gr. a hundred; and a gram.] In the French system of weights and measures, a weight ...

26328

hectoliter
HEC'TOLITER, n. [Gr. a hundred, and a pound.] A French measure of capacity for liquids, containing ...

26329

hectometer
HECTOM'ETER, n. [Gr. a hundred, and measure.] A French measure equal to a hundred meters; the ...

26330

hector
HEC'TOR, n. [from Hector, the son of Priam, a brave Trojan warrior.]1. A bully; a blustering, ...

26331

hectored
HEC'TORED, pp. Bullied; teased.

26332

hectoring
HEC'TORING, ppr. Bullying; blustering; vexing.

26333

hectorism
HEC'TORISM, n. The disposition or practice of a hector; a bullying.

26334

hectorly
HEC'TORLY, a. Blustering; insolent.

26335

hedenbergite
HEDENBERG'ITE, n. [from Hedenberg, who first analyzed it.]A mineral, or ore of iron, in masses, ...

26336

hederaceous
HEDERA'CEOUS, a. [L. hederaceus, from hedera, ivy.]1. Pertaining to ivy.2. Producing ivy.

26337

hederal
HED'ERAL, a. Composed of ivy; belonging to ivy.

26338

hederiferous
HEDERIF'EROUS, a. [L. hedera, ivy, and fero, to bear.]Producing ivy.

26339

hedge
HEDGE, n. hej. [Eng. haw] Properly, a thicket of thorn-bushes or other shrubs or small trees; but ...

26340

hedge-bill
HEDGE-BILL

26341

hedge-born
HEDGE-BORN, a. Of low birth, as if born in the woods; outlandish; obscure.

26342

hedge-bote
HEDGE-BOTE, n. Wood for repairing hedges.

26343

hedge-creeper
HEDGE-CREEPER, n. One who skulks under hedges for bad purposes.

26344

hedge-fumitory
HEDGE-FU'MITORY, n. A plant.

26345

hedge-hyssop
HEDGE-HYSSOP, n. A plant, the Gratiola.

26346

hedge-mustard
HEDGE-MUSTARD, n. A plant, the Erysimum.

26347

hedge-nettle
HEDGE-NETTLE, n. A plant, the Galeopsis. The shrubby hedge-nettle is of the genus Prasium.

26348

hedge-note
HEDGE-NOTE, a. A term of contempt for low writing.

26349

hedge-sparrow
HEDGE-SPARROW, n. A bird of the genus Motacilla, frequenting hedges; distinguished from the ...

26350

hedge-writer
HEDGE-WRITER, n. A Grub-street writer or low author.

26351

hedgehog
HEDGEHOG, n. A quadruped, or genus of quadrupeds, the Erinaceus. The common hedgehog has round ...

26352

hedgehog-thistle
HEDGEHOG-THISTLE, n. A plant, the Cactus.

26353

hedgepig
HEDGEPIG, n. A young hedgehog.

26354

hedger
HEDG'ER, n. One who makes hedges.

26355

hedgerow
HEDGEROW, n. A row or series of shrubs or trees planted for inclosure, or separation of fields.

26356

hedging
HEDG'ING, ppr. Inclosing with a hedge; obstructing; confining.

26357

hedging-bill
HEDGING-BILL, n. A cutting hook used in dressing hedges.

26358

heed
HEED, v.t. To mind; to regard with care; to take notice of; to attend to; to observe. With ...

26359

heeded
HEE'DED, pp. Noticed; observed; regarded.

26360

heedfully
HEE'DFULLY, adv. Attentively; carefully; cautiously. Listen heedfully to good advice.1. ...

26361

heedfulness
HEE'DFULNESS, n. Attention; caution; vigilance; circumspection; care to guard against danger, or ...

26362

heedless
HEE'DLESS, a. Inattentive; careless; negligent of the means of safety; thoughtless; regardless; ...

26363

heedlessly
HEE'DLESSLY, adv. Carelessly; negligently; inattentively; without care or circumspection.

26364

heedlessness
HEE'DLESSNESS, n. Inattention; carelessness; thoughtlessness; negligence.

26365

heel
HEEL, n. [L. calx; Gr. a tumor.]1. The hind part of the foot, particularly of man; but it is ...

26366

heel-piece
HEE'L-PIECE, n. Armor for the heels.1. A piece of leather on the heel of a shoe.

26367

heeler
HEE'LER, n. A cock that strikes well with his heels.

26368

heft
HEFT, n.1. Heaving; effort. He cracks his gorge, his sides. With violent hefts. [Not used.]2. ...

26369

hefted
HEFT'ED, a. Heaved; expressing agitation.

26370

hegira
HEGI'RA, n. In chronology, an epoch among the Mohammedans, from which they compute time. The ...

26371

heifer
HEIF'ER, n. hef'er. A young cow.

26372

heigh-ho
HEIGH-HO. hi-ho. An exclamation expressing some degree of languor or uneasiness. Dryden has used ...

26373

height
HEIGHT

26374

heighten
HEIGHTEN, v.t. hitn. To raise higher; but not often used in this literal sense.1. To advance in ...

26375

heightened
HEIGHTENED, pp. hitnd. Raised higher; elevated; exalted; advanced; improved; aggravated; ...

26376

heightening
HEIGHTENING, ppr. hitning. Raising; elevating; exalting; improving; increasing; ...

26377

heinous
HEINOUS, a. An incorrect orthography. [See Hainous.]

26378

heir
HEIR, n. are. [L. haeres, haeredis.]1. The man who succeeds, or is to succeed another in the ...

26379

heir-apparent
HEIR-APPA'RENT, n. The man who, during the life of his ancestor, is entitled to succeed to his ...

26380

heir-loom
HEIR-LOOM, n. are-loom. Any furniture, movable, or personal chattel, which by law descends to the ...

26381

heirdom
HEIRDOM, n. aredom. Succession by inheritance.

26382

heiress
HEIRESS, n. aress. A female heir; a female that inherits, or is entitled to inherit an estate; an ...

26383

heirless
HEIRLESS, a. areless. Destitute of an heir.

26384

heirship
HEIRSHIP, n. areship. The state, character or privileges of an heir; right of inheriting.1. ...

26385

held
HELD, pret. and pp. of hold. A court was held in Westminster hall. At a council held on the first ...

26386

hele
HELE, v.t. [L. celo.] To hide.

26387

heliacal
HELI'ACAL, a. [L. heliacus; Gr. the sun.]Emerging from the light of the sun, or passing into it. ...

26388

heliacally
HELI'ACALLY, adv. A star rises heliacally, when it emerges from the sun's light, so as to be ...

26389

helical
HEL'ICAL, a. [Gr. a scroll, or spiral body.] Spiral; winding; moving round.

26390

helicite
HEL'ICITE, n. [See Helix.] Fossil remains of the helix, a shell.

26391

heling
HE'LING, n. [from hele, obs.; L. celo.] The covering of the roof of a building; written also ...

26392

heliocentric
HELIOCENT'RIC, a. [Gr. the sun, and center.] The heliocentric place of a planet, is the place of ...

26393

heliolater
HELIOL'ATER, n. [Gr. the sun, and to worship.]A worship of the sun.

26394

heliolatry
HELIOL'ATRY, n. [Gr. the sun, and service, worship.]The worship of the sun, a branch of Sabianism.

26395

heliometer
HELIOM'ETER, n. [Gr. the sun, and to measure.] An instrument for measuring with exactness the ...

26396

helioscope
HE'LIOSCOPE, n. [Gr. the sun, and to view.] A sort of telescope fitted for viewing the sun without ...

26397

heliostate
HE'LIOSTATE, n. [Gr. the sun.] An instrument by which a sunbeam may be steadily directed to one ...

26398

heliotrope
HE'LIOTROPE, n. [Gr. the sun, and to turn.]1. Among the ancients, an instrument or machine for ...

26399

helispheric
HELISPHER'IC

26400

helispherical
HELISPHER'ICAL, a. [helix and sphere.] Spiral. The helispherical line is the rhomb line in ...

26401

helix
HE'LIX, n. [Gr. a winding.] A spiral line; a winding; or something that is spiral; as a winding ...

26402

hell
HELL, n. 1. The place or state of punishment for the wicked after death. Matt.10. Luke 12. Sin ...

26403

hell-confounding
HELL-CONFOUND'ING, a. Defeating the infernal powers.

26404

hellblack
HELL'BLACK, a. Black as hell.

26405

hellebore
HEL'LEBORE, n. [L. helleborus.] The name of several plants of different genera, the most important ...

26406

helleborism
HEL'LEBORISM, n. A medicinal preparation of hellebore.

26407

hellenian
HELLE'NIAN

26408

hellenic
HELLEN'IC, a. Pertaining to the Hellenes, or inhabitants of Greece, so called from Hellas in ...

26409

hellenism
HEL'LENISM, n. A phrase in the idiom, genius or construction of the Greek language.

26410

hellenist
HEL'LENIST, n. A Grecian Jew; a Jew who used the Greek language.1. One skilled in the Greek ...

26411

hellenistic
HELLENIS'TIC, a. Pertaining to the Hellenists. The Hellenistic language was the Greek spoken or ...

26412

hellenistically
HELLENIS'TICALLY, adv. According to the Hellenistic dialect.

26413

hellenize
HEL'LENIZE, v.i. To use the Greek language.

26414

hellespont
HEL'LESPONT, n. A narrow strait between Europe and Asia, now called the Dardanelles; a part of the ...

26415

hellespontine
HELLESPONT'INE, a. Pertaining to the Hellespont.

26416

hellier
HEL'LIER, n. A tiler or slater. [See Hele.] [Not in use.]

26417

hellish
HELL'ISH, a. Pertaining to hell.1. Like hell in qualities; infernal; malignant; wicked; ...

26418

hellishly
HELL'ISHLY, adv. Infernally; with extreme malignity; wickedly; detestably.

26419

hellishness
HELL'ISHNESS, n. The qualities of hell or of its inhabitants; extreme wickedness,malignity or ...

26420

hellward
HELL'WARD, adv. Towards hell.

26421

helly
HELL'Y, a. Having the qualities of hell.

26422

helm
HELM, a termination, denotes defense; as in Sighelm, victorious defense. [See Helmet.]HELM, n.1. ...

26423

helmed
HELM'ED

26424

helmet
HELM'ET, n. Defensive armor for the head; a head-piece; a morion. The helmet is worn by horsemen ...

26425

helmeted
HELM'ETED, a. Furnished with a helmet.

26426

helminthic
HELMIN'THIC, a. [Gr. a worm.] Expelling worms.HELMIN'THIC, n. A medicine for expelling worms.

26427

helminthologic
HELMINTHOLOG'IC

26428

helminthological
HELMINTHOLOG'ICAL, n. [See Helminthology.] Pertaining to worms or vermes, or to their history.

26429

helminthologist
HELMINTHOL'OGIST, n. One who is versed in the natural history of vermes.

26430

helminthology
HELMINTHOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a worm, and discourse.] The science or knowledge of vermes; the ...

26431

helmless
HELM'LESS, a. Destitute of a helmet.1. Without a helm.

26432

helmsman
HELMS'MAN, n. The man at the helm.

26433

helmwind
HELM'WIND, n. A wind in the mountainous parts of England, so called.

26434

helotism
HE'LOTISM, n. Slavery; the condition of the Helots, slaves in Sparta.

26435

help
HELP, v.t. A regular verb; the old past tense and participle holp and holpen being obsolete.1. To ...

26436

helper
HELP'ER, n. One that helps, aids or assists; an assistant; an auxiliary.1. One that furnishes or ...

26437

helpful
HELP'FUL, a. That gives aid or assistance; that furnishes means of promoting an object; useful.1. ...

26438

helpfulness
HELP'FULNESS, n. Assistance; usefulness.

26439

helpless
HELP'LESS, a. Without help in one's self; destitute of the power or means to succor or relieve ...

26440

helplessly
HELP'LESSLY, adv. Without succor.

26441

helplessness
HELP'LESSNESS, n. Want of strength or ability; inability; want of means in one's self to obtain ...

26442

helter-skelter
HELTER-SKELTER, cant words denoting hurry and confusion. [L. hilariter and celeriter.]

26443

helve
HELVE, n. helv. The handle of an ax or hatchet.HELVE, v.t. helv. To furnish with a helve, as an ...

26444

helvetic
HELVET'IC, a. Designating what pertains to the Helvetii, the inhabitants of the Alps, now ...

26445

helvin
HEL'VIN, n. [From Gr. the sun.] A mineral of a yellowish color, occurring in regular ...

26446

hem
HEM, n.1. The border of a garment, doubled and sewed to strengthen it and prevent the raveling of ...

26447

hemachate
HEM'ACHATE, n. [Gr. blood, and agate.] A species of agate, of a blood color.

26448

hematin
HEM'ATIN, n. [Gr. blood.] The coloring principle of logwood, of a red color and bitterish taste.

26449

hematite
HEM'ATITE, n. [Gr. from blood.] The name of two ores of iron, the red hematite,and the brown ...

26450

hematitic
HEMATIT'IC, a. Pertaining to hematite, or resembling it.

26451

hematope
HEM'ATOPE, n. The sea-pye, a fowl of the grallic order, that feeds on shell-fish.

26452

hemerobaptist
HEMEROBAP'TIST, n. [Gr. day, and to wash.] One of a sect among the Jews who bathed every day.

26453

hemi
HEM'I, in composition, from Gr. which signifies half, like demi and semi.

26454

hemicrany
HEM'ICRANY, n. [Gr. half and the skull.] A pain that affects only one side of the head.

26455

hemicycle
HEM'ICYCLE, n. [Gr.] A half circle; more generally called a semicircle.

26456

hemiditone
HEMID'ITONE, n. In Greek music, the lesser third.

26457

hemina
HEM'INA, n. [L.] In Roman antiquity, a measure containing half a sextary, and according to ...

26458

hemiplegy
HEM'IPLEGY, n. [Gr. half, and a stroke, to strike.] A palsy that affects one half of the body; a ...

26459

hemipter
HEMIP'TER

26460

hemiptera
HEMIP'TERA, n. [Gr. half, and a wing.] The hemipters form an order of insects with the upper wings ...

26461

hemipteral
HEMIP'TERAL, a. Having the upper wings half crustaceous and half membranaceous.

26462

hemisphere
HEM'ISPHERE, n. [Gr.] A half sphere; one half of a sphere or globe, when divided by a plane ...

26463

hemisphericical
HEMISPHER'IC'ICAL, a. Containing half a sphere or globe; as a hemispheric figure or form; a ...

26464

hemistich
HEM'ISTICH, n. [Gr.] Half a poetic verse, or a verse not completed.

26465

hemistichal
HEMIS'TICHAL, a. Pertaining to a hemistich; denoting a division of the verse.

26466

hemitone
HEM'ITONE, n. [Gr.] A half tone in music; now called a semitone.

26467

hemitrope
HEM'ITROPE, a. [Gr. half, and to turn.] Half-turned; a hemitrope crystal is one in which one ...

26468

hemlock
HEM'LOCK, n.1. A plant of the genus Conium, whose leaves and root are poisonous. Also, the Cicuta ...

26469

hemoptoe
HEMOP'TOE, a. [Gr. blood, and a spitting.] A spitting of blood.

26470

hemoptysis
HEMOP'TYSIS

26471

hemorrhage
HEM'ORRHAGE

26472

hemorrhagic
HEM'ORRHAGIC, a. Pertaining to a flux of blood; consisting in hemorrhage.

26473

hemorrhagy
HEMORRHAGY, n. [Gr. blood, and to burst.] A flux of blood, proceeding from the rupture of a ...

26474

hemorrhoidal
HEMORRHOID'AL, a. Pertaining to the hemorrhoids; as the hemorrhoidal vessels.1. Consisting in a ...

26475

hemorrhoids
HEM'ORRHOIDS, n. [Gr. blood, and a flowing.] A discharge of blood from the vessels of the anus; ...

26476

hemp
HEMP, n. [L. cannabis.]1. A fibrous plant constituting the genus Cannabis, whose skin or bark is ...

26477

hemp-agrimony
HEMP-AG'RIMONY, n. A plant, a species of Eupatorium.

26478

hempen
HEMP'EN, a. hemp'n. Made of hemp; as a hempen cord.

26479

hempy
HEMP'Y, a. Like hemp. [Unusual.]

26480

hen
HEN, n. The female of any kind of fowl; but it is particularly applied to the female of the ...

26481

henbane
HEN'BANE, n. [hen and bane.] A plant, the Hyoscyamus, of several species. The roots, leaves and ...

26482

henbit
HEN'BIT, n. A plant, the ivy-leaved speedwell.

26483

hence
HENCE, adv. hens.1. From this place. Arise, let us go hence. John 14. I will send thee far hence ...

26484

henceforth
HENCEFORTH, adv. hens'forth. From this time forward. I never from thy side henceforth will stray.

26485

henceforward
HENCEFORWARD, adv. hensfor'ward. From this time forward; henceforth.

26486

henchboy
HENCH'BOY, n. A page; a servant.

26487

henchman
HENCH'MAN

26488

hend
HEND

26489

hendecagon
HENDEC'AGON, n. [Gr. eleven, and an angle.] In geometry, a figure of eleven sides, and as many ...

26490

hendecasyllable
HENDECASYL'LABLE, n. [Gr.] A metrical line of eleven syllables.

26491

hendiadis
HENDI'ADIS, n. [Gr.] A figure, when two nouns are used instead of a noun and an adjective.

26492

henhouse
HEN'HOUSE, n. A house or shelter for fowls.

26493

henpecked
HEN'PECKED, a. Governed by the wife.

26494

henroost
HEN'ROOST, n. A place where poultry rest at night.

26495

hensfeet
HENS'FEET, n. A plant, hedge-fumitory.

26496

hent
HENT, v.t. To seize; to lay hold on.1. To crowd; to press on.

26497

hep-tree
HEP'-TREE, n. The wild dog-rose, a species of Rosa.

26498

hepar
HE'PAR, n. [L. hepar,the liver.] A combination of sulphur with an alkali was formerly called by ...

26499

hepatic
HEPAT'IC

26500

hepatical
HEPAT'ICAL, a. [L. hepaticus; Gr. the liver.] Pertaining to the liver; as hepatic gall; hepatic ...

26501

hepatite
HEP'ATITE, n. A gem or mineral that takes its name from the liver. Plin. L. 37.11.Hepatite is a ...

26502

hepatize
HEP'ATIZE, v.t. To impregnate with sulphurated hydrogen gas.

26503

hepatized
HEP'ATIZED, pp. Impregnated or combined with sulphurated hydrogen gas. On the right of the river ...

26504

hepatoscopy
HEPATOS'COPY, n. [Gr. the liver, and to view.] The art or practice of divination by inspecting the ...

26505

heps
HEPS, n. The berries of the hep-tree, or wild dog-rose.

26506

heptacapsular
HEPTACAP'SULAR, a. [Gr. seven, and L. capsula, a cell.]Having seven cells or cavities for seeds; a ...

26507

heptachord
HEP'TACHORD, n. [Gr. seven, and chord.] A system of seven sounds. In ancient poetry, verses sung ...

26508

heptagon
HEP'TAGON, n. [Gr. seven, and an angle.]In geometry, a figure consisting of seven sides and as ...

26509

heptagonal
HEPTAG'ONAL, a. Having seven angles or sides. Heptagonal numbers, in arithmetic, a sort of ...

26510

heptagyn
HEP'TAGYN, n. [Gr. seven, and a female.] In botany, a plant that has seven pistils.

26511

heptagynian
HEPTAGYN'IAN, a. Having seven pistils.

26512

heptahexahedral
HEPTAHEXAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr. seven, and hexahedral.] Presenting seven ranges of faces one above ...

26513

heptamerede
HEPTAM'EREDE, n. [Gr. seven, and part.]That which divides into seven parts.

26514

heptander
HEPTAND'ER, n. [Gr. seven, and a male.] In botany, a plant having seven stamens.

26515

heptandrian
HEPTAN'DRIAN, a. Having seven stamens.

26516

heptangular
HEPTAN'GULAR, a. [Gr. seven, and angular.] Having seven angles.

26517

heptaphyllous
HEPTAPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. seven, and a leaf.] Having seven leaves.

26518

heptarchic
HEPTAR'CHIC, a. Denoting a sevenfold government.

26519

heptarchist
HEP'TARCHIST, n. A ruler of one division of a heptarchy.

26520

heptarchy
HEP'TARCHY, n. [Gr. seven and rule.] A government by seven persons, or the country governed by ...

26521

heptateuch
HEP'TATEUCH, n. [Gr. seven, and book.] The first seven books of the Old Testament. [Little used.]

26522

her
HER, pronounced hur, an adjective, or pronominal adjective of the third person. [L. suus.]1. ...

26523

herald
HER'ALD, n. 1. An officer whose business was to denounce or proclaim war,to challenge to battle, ...

26524

heraldic
HER'ALDIC, a. Pertaining to heralds or heraldry; as heraldic delineations.

26525

heraldry
HER'ALDRY, n. The art or office of a herald. Heraldry is the art, practice or science of ...

26526

heraldship
HER'ALDSHIP, n. The office of a herald.

26527

herb
HERB, n. erb. [L. herba.]1. A plant or vegetable with a soft or succulent stalk or stem, which ...

26528

herb-christopher
HERB-CHRISTOPHER, n. A plant, of the genus Actaea.

26529

herb-robert
HERB-ROBERT, n. A plant, a species of Geranium.

26530

herbaceous
HERBA'CEOUS, a. [L. herbaceus.] Pertaining to herbs. Herbaceous plants are such as perish annually ...

26531

herbage
HERB'AGE, n. Herbs collectively; grass; pasture; green food for beasts.The influence of true ...

26532

herbaged
HERB'AGED, a. Covered with grass.

26533

herbal
HERB'AL, n. A book that contains the names and descriptions of plants, or the classes, genera, ...

26534

herbalist
HERB'ALIST, n. A person skilled in plants; one who makes collections of plants.

26535

herbar
HERB'AR, n. An herb.

26536

herbarist
HERB'ARIST, n. A herbalist. [Little used.]

26537

herbarium
HERBA'RIUM, n. A collection of dried plants.

26538

herbarize
HERB'ARIZE. [See Herborize.]

26539

herbary
HERB'ARY, n. A garden of plants.

26540

herbelet
HERB'ELET, n. A small herb.

26541

herbescent
HERBES'CENT, a. [L. herbescens.] Growing into herbs.

26542

herbid
HERB'ID, a. [L. herbidus.] Covered with herbs. [Little used.]

26543

herbivorous
HERBIV'OROUS, a. [L. herba and voro, to eat.] Eating herbs; subsisting on herbaceous plants; ...

26544

herbless
HERB'LESS, a. Destitute of herbs.

26545

herborist
HERB'ORIST. [See Herbalist.]

26546

herborization
HERBORIZA'TION, n. [from herborize.]1. The act of seeking plants in the field; botanical ...

26547

herborize
HERB'ORIZE, v.i. To search for plants, or to seek new species of plants, with a view to ascertain ...

26548

herborized
HERB'ORIZED, pp. Figured; containing the figure of a plant; as a mineral body. Daubenton has shown ...

26549

herborizing
HERB'ORIZING, ppr. Searching for plants.1. Forming the figures of plants in minerals.

26550

herbous
HERB'OUS, a. [L. herbosus.] Abounding with herbs.

26551

herbwoman
HERB'WOMAN, n. erb'woman. A woman that sells herbs.

26552

herby
HERB'Y, a. Having the nature of herbs. [Little used.]

26553

herculean
HERCU'LEAN, a. [from Hercules.] Very great, difficult or dangerous; such as it would require the ...

26554

hercules
HER'CULES, n. A constellation in the northern hemisphere, containing 113 stars.

26555

hercynian
HERCYN'IAN, a. [from Hercynia.] Denoting an extensive forest in Germany, the remains of which are ...

26556

herd
HERD, n.1. A collection or assemblage; applied to beasts when feeding or driven together. We say, ...

26557

herdgroom
HERD'GROOM, n. A keeper of a herd.

26558

herding
HERD'ING, ppr. Associating in companies.

26559

herdless
HERD'LESS, n. A shepherdess.

26560

herdman
HERD'MAN

26561

herdsman
HERDS'MAN, n. A keeper of herds; one employed intending herds of cattle.1. Formerly, the owner of ...

26562

here
HERE, adv.1. In this place; in the place where the speaker is present; opposed to there. Behold, ...

26563

hereaboutreabouts
HE'REABOUT'REABOUTS, adv. About this place.

26564

hereafter
HERE`AFTER, adv. In time to come; in some future time.1. In a future state.HERE`AFTER,n. A future ...

26565

hereat
HEREAT', adv. At this. He was offended hereat, that is, at this saying, that fact, &c.

26566

hereby
HEREBY', adv. By this. Hereby we became acquainted with the nature of things.

26567

hereditable
HERED'ITABLE, a. [from the root of heir; L. haereditas.]That may be inherited. [Not much used. See ...

26568

hereditably
HERED'ITABLY, adv. By inheritance; by right of descent. The one-house-owners belong hereditably to ...

26569

hereditament
HEREDIT'AMENT, n. [L. haeres, haeredium. See Heir.]Any species of property that may be inherited; ...

26570

hereditarily
HERED'ITARILY, adv. By inheritance; by descent from an ancestor.

26571

hereditary
HERED'ITARY, a.1. That has descended from an ancestor. He is in possession of a large hereditary ...

26572

herein
HEREIN', adv. In this. Herein is my Father glorified,that ye bear much fruit. John 15.

26573

hereinto
HEREIN'TO, adv. Into this.

26574

heremit
HER'EMIT, n. A hermit.

26575

heremitical
HEREMIT'ICAL, a. [It should rather be written hermitical.]Solitary; secluded from society.

26576

hereof
HEREOF', adv. Of this; from this. Hereof comes it that prince Harry is valiant.

26577

hereon
HEREON', adv. On this.

26578

hereout
HEREOUT', adv. Out of this place.

26579

heresiarch
HER'ESIARCH, n. s as z. [Gr. heresy, and chief.] A leader in heresy; the chief of a sect of ...

26580

heresiarchy
HER'ESIARCHY, n. Chief heresy.

26581

heresy
HER'ESY, n. [Gr. to take, to hold; L. haeresis.]1. A fundamental error in religion, or an error of ...

26582

heretic
HER'ETIC, n.1. A person under any religion, but particularly the christian, who holds and teaches ...

26583

heretical
HERET'ICAL, a. Containing heresy; contrary to the established faith, or to the true faith.

26584

heretically
HERET'ICALLY, adv. In an heretical manner; with heresy.

26585

heretoch
HER'ETOCH, n. [L. duco, dux; Eng. to tug.] Among our Saxon ancestors,the leader or commander of an ...

26586

heretofore
HERETOFO'RE, adv. In times before the present; formerly.

26587

heretog
HER'ETOG

26588

hereunto
HEREUNTO', adv. To this.

26589

hereupon
HEREUPON', adv. On this.

26590

herewith
HEREWITH', adv. With this.Most of the compounds of here and a preposition, are obsolete or ...

26591

heriot
HER'IOT, n. In English law, a tribute or fine payable to the lord of the fee on the decease of the ...

26592

heriotable
HER'IOTABLE, a. Subject to the payment of a heriot.

26593

herisson
HER'ISSON, n. In fortification, a beam or bar armed with iron spikes pointing outwards, and a ...

26594

heritable
HER'ITABLE, a. [from the root of heir, L. haeres.]1. Capable of inheriting, or taking by descent. ...

26595

heritage
HER'ITAGE, n.1. Inheritance; an estate that passes from an ancestor to an heir by descent or ...

26596

herl
HERL, n. The skin of flax; the filaments of flax or hemp.1. A filamentous substance.[In New ...

26597

hermaphrodeity
HERMAPHRODE'ITY, n. Hermaphrodism.

26598

hermaphrodism
HERMAPH'RODISM, n. [infra.] The union of the two sexes in the same individual.

26599

hermaphrodite
HERMAPH'RODITE, n. [Gr. Mercury, and Venus.]1. A human being, having the parts of generation both ...

26600

hermaphroditic
HERMAPHRODIT'IC, a. Partaking of both sexes.

26601

hermaphroditically
HERMAPHRODIT'ICALLY, adv. After the manner of hermaphrodites.

26602

hermeneutic
HERMENEU'TIC

26603

hermeneutical
HERMENEU'TICAL, a. [Gr. an interpreter, from Mercury.]Interpreting; explaining; unfolding the ...

26604

hermeneutically
HERMENEU'TICALLY, adv. According to the true art of interpreting words.

26605

hermeneutics
HERMENEU'TICS, n. The art of finding the meaning of an author's words and phrases, and of ...

26606

hermetic
HERMET'IC

26607

hermetical
HERMET'ICAL, a. [Gr. Mercury, the fabled inventor of chimistry.]1. Designating chimistry; ...

26608

hermetically
HERMET'ICALLY, adv. According to the hermetic art; chimically; closely; accurately; as a vessel ...

26609

hermit
HER'MIT, n. [Gr. solitary, destitute.]1. A person who retires from society and lives in solitude; ...

26610

hermitage
HER'MITAGE, n. The habitation of a hermit; a house or hut with its appendages, in a solidary ...

26611

hermitary
HER'MITARY, n. A cell for the religious annexed to some abbey.

26612

hermitess
HER'MITESS, n. A female hermit.

26613

hermitical
HERMIT'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a hermit, or to retired life.1. Suited to a hermit.

26614

hermodactyl
HERMODAC'TYL, n. [Gr. Mercury, and a finger; Mercury's finger.]In the Materia Medic, a root brought ...

26615

hermogenians
HERMOGE'NIANS, n. A sect of ancient heretics, so called from their leader Hermogenes, who lived ...

26616

hern
HERN, n. A heron, which see.

26617

hernhill
HERN'HILL, n. A plant.

26618

hernia
HERN'IA, n. [L.] In surgery, a rupture; a descent of the intestines or omentum from their natural ...

26619

hernshaw
HERN'SHAW, n. A heron.

26620

hero
HE'RO, n. [L. heros; Gr. a demigod.]1. A man of distinguished valor, intrepidity or enterprise in ...

26621

herodians
HERO'DIANS, n. A sect among the Jews,which took this name from Herod; but authors are not agreed ...

26622

heroi-comic
HEROI-COM'IC, a. [See Hero and Comic.] Consisting of the heroic and the ludicrous; denoting the ...

26623

heroic
HERO'IC, a. Pertaining to a hero or heroes; as heroic valor.1. Becoming a hero; bold; daring; ...

26624

heroical
HERO'ICAL, a. The same as heroic. [Little used.]

26625

heroically
HERO'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of a hero; with valor; bravely; courageously; intrepidly. The wall ...

26626

heroine
HER'OINE, n. her'oin. A female hero; a woman of a brave spirit. [Heroess is not in use.]

26627

heroism
HER'OISM, n. The qualities of a hero; bravery; courage; intrepidity; particularly in war.

26628

heron
HER'ON, n. A large fowl of the genus Ardea, a great devourer of fish.

26629

heronry
HER'ONRY

26630

heronshaw
HER'ONSHAW, n. A place where herons breed.

26631

heroship
HE'ROSHIP, n. The character of a hero.

26632

herpes
HER'PES,n. [Gr. to creep.] Tetters; an eruption on the skin; erysipelas; ringworm, &c. This ...

26633

herpetic
HERPET'IC, a. Pertaining to the herpes or cutaneous eruptions; resembling the herpes, or partaking ...

26634

herpetologic
HERPETOLOG'IC

26635

herpetological
HERPETOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to herpetology.

26636

herpetologist
HERPETOL'OGIST, n. A person versed in herpetology, or the natural history of reptiles.

26637

herpetology
HERPETOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a reptile, and discourse.] A description of reptiles; the natural history of ...

26638

herring
HER'RING,n. A fish of the genus Clupea. Herrings, when they migrate, move in vast shoals, and it ...

26639

herring-fishery
HERRING-FISHERY, n. The fishing for herrings, which constitutes an important branch of business ...

26640

hers
HERS, pron. hurz, pron. fem. possessive; as, this house is hers,that is, this is the house of her. ...

26641

herschel
HERSCHEL, n. her'shel. A planet discovered by Dr. Herschel, in 1781.

26642

herse
HERSE, n. hers.1. In fortification, a lattice or portcullis in the form of a harrow, set with iron ...

26643

herself
HERSELF', pron. [her and self.] This denotes a female,the subject of discourse before mentioned, ...

26644

herselike
HERSELIKE, a. hers'like. Funereal; suitable to funerals.

26645

hersillon
HERS'ILLON, n. [from herse.] In the military art, a plank or beam, whose sides are set with spikes ...

26646

hery
HER'Y, v.t. To regard as holy.

26647

hesitancy
HES'ITANCY, n. [See Hesitate.] A doubting; literally, a stopping of the mind; a pausing to ...

26648

hesitant
HES'ITANT, a. Hesitating; pausing; wanting volubility of speech.

26649

hesitate
HES'ITATE, v.i. s as z. [L. haesito, haereo, to hang.]1. To stop or pause respecting decision or ...

26650

hesitating
HES'ITATING, ppr. Doubting; pausing; stammering.

26651

hesitatingly
HES'ITATINGLY, adv. With hesitation or doubt.

26652

hesitation
HESITA'TION, n. A pausing or delay in forming an opinion or commencing action; doubt;suspension of ...

26653

hesperian
HESPE'RIAN. [L. hesperius, western, from hesperus, vesper, the evening star, Venus.]Western; ...

26654

hest
HEST, n. Command; precept; injunction; order. [Now obsolete,but it is retained in the compound, ...

26655

heterarchy
HET'ERARCHY, n. [Gr. another, and rule.] The government of an alien.

26656

heteroclite
HET'EROCLITE,n. [Gr. another, or different, to incline, to lean.]1. In grammar, a word which is ...

26657

heteroclitic
HETEROCLIT'IC

26658

heteroclitical
HETEROCLIT'ICAL, a. Irregular; anomalous; deviating from ordinary forms or rules.

26659

heteroclitous
HETEROC'LITOUS, a. Heteroclitic. [Not in use.]

26660

heterodox
HET'ERODOX, a. [Gr. another, different, and opinion.]1. In theology, heretical; contrary to the ...

26661

heterodoxy
HET'ERODOXY, n. Heresy; an opinion or doctrine contrary to the doctrines of the Scriptures, or ...

26662

heterogene
HET'EROGENE, a. [See the next word.]

26663

heterogeneal
HETEROGE'NEAL

26664

heterogeneity
HETEROGENE'ITY, n. Opposition of nature; contrariety or dissimilitude of qualities. [Ill ...

26665

heterogeneous
HETEROGE'NEOUS, a. [Gr. other, and kind.] Of a different kind or nature; unlike or dissimilar in ...

26666

heterogeneousness
HETEROGE'NEOUSNESS, n. Difference of nature and quality; dissimilitude or contrariety in kind, ...

26667

heterophyllous
HETEROPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. diverse, and leaf.]Producing a diversity of leaves; as a heterophyllous ...

26668

heteroptics
HETEROP'TICS, n. [See Optics.] False optics.

26669

heteroscian
HETEROS'CIAN, n. [Gr. other, and shadow.]Those inhabitants of the earth are called Heteroscians, ...

26670

heulandite
HEU'LANDITE, a. [from M. Heuland.] A mineral, occurring massive, frequently globular, or ...

26671

hew
HEW, v.t. pret. hewed; pp. hewed or hewn.1. To cut with an ax, or other like instrument, for the ...

26672

hewed
HEW'ED, pp. Cut and made smooth or even; chopped; hacked; shaped by cutting or by a chisel.

26673

hewer
HEW'ER, n. One who hews wood or stone.

26674

hewing
HEW'ING, ppr. Cutting and making smooth or even; chopping; hacking; forming by the chisel.

26675

hewn
HEWN, pp. The same as hewed.

26676

hexachord
HEX'ACHORD, n. [Gr. six and a chord.] In ancient music, an imperfect chord called a sixth. Also, ...

26677

hexadactylous
HEXADACTYLOUS, a. [Gr.] Having six toes.

26678

hexade
HEX'ADE, n. [Gr. six.] A series of six numbers.

26679

hexagon
HEX'AGON, n. [Gr. six and an angle.] In geometry, a figure of six sides and six angles. If the ...

26680

hexagonal
HEXAG'ONAL, a. Having six sides and six angles.

26681

hexagony
HEXAG'ONY, for hexagon, is not used.

26682

hexagyn
HEX'AGYN, n. [Gr. six, and a female.] In botany, a plant that has six pistils.

26683

hexagynian
HEXAGYN'IAN, a. Having six pistils.

26684

hexahedral
HEXAHE'DRAL, a. Of the figure of a hexahedron; having six equal sides.

26685

hexahedron
HEXAHE'DRON, n. [Gr. six, and a base or seat.] A regular solid body of six sides; a cube.

26686

hexahemeron
HEXAHEM'ERON, n. [Gr. six, and day.] The term of six days.

26687

hexameter
HEXAM'ETER, n. [Gr. six, and measure.] In ancient poetry, a verse of six feet, the first four of ...

26688

hexametric
HEXAMET'RIC

26689

hexametrical
HEXAMET'RICAL, a. Consisting of six metrical feet.

26690

hexander
HEXAN'DER, n. [Gr. six and male.] In botany, a plant having six stamens.

26691

hexandrian
HEXAN'DRIAN, a. Having six stamens.

26692

hexangular
HEXAN'GULAR, a. [Gr. six, and angular.] Having six angles or corners.

26693

hexaped
HEX'APED, a. [Gr. six; L. pes, pedis, the foot.]Having six feet.HEX'APED, n. An animal having six ...

26694

hexapetalous
HEXAPET'ALOUS, a. [Gr. six, and a leaf, a petal.] Having six petals or flower-leaves.

26695

hexaphyllous
HEXAPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. six, and a leaf.] Having six leaves.

26696

hexaplar
HEX'APLAR, a. [Gr. six, and to unfold.] Sextuple; containing six columns; from Hexapla, the work ...

26697

hexastich
HEXAS'TICH, n. [Gr. six, and a verse.]A poem consisting of six verses.

26698

hexastyle
HEX'ASTYLE, n. [Gr. six, and a column.]A building with six columns in front.

26699

hey
HEY. An exclamation of joy or mutual exhortation, the contrary to the L.hei.

26700

heyday
HEYDAY, exclam. An expression of frolick and exultation, and sometimes of wonder.HEYDAY, n. A ...

26701

hiation
HIA'TION, n. [L. hio, to gape.] The act of gaping. [Not used.]

26702

hiatus
HIA'TUS, n. [L. from hio, to open or gape.]1. An opening; an aperture; a gap; a chasm.2. The ...

26703

hibernacle
HI'BERNACLE, n. [L. hibernacula, winter-quarters.]1. In botany, the winter-quarters of a plant, ...

26704

hibernal
HIBERN'AL, a. [L. hibernus.] Belonging or relating to winter.

26705

hibernate
HI'BERNATE, v.i. [L. hiberno.] To winter; to pass the season of winter in close quarters or in ...

26706

hibernation
HIBERNA'TION, n. The passing of winter in a close lodge, as beasts and fowls that retire in cold ...

26707

hibernian
HIBER'NIAN, a. Pertaining to Hibernia, now Ireland.HIBER'NIAN, n. A native of Ireland.

26708

hibernicism
HIBERN'ICISM, n. An idiom or mode of speech peculiar to the Irish.

26709

hiberno-celtic
HIBERNO-CELTIC, n. The native language of the Irish; the Gaelic.Hiccius Doccius. A cant word for ...

26710

hiccough
HIC'COUGH

26711

hickory
HICK'ORY, n. A tree, a species of Juglans or walnut. Its nut is called hickory-nut.

26712

hickup
HICK'UP, n. [The English is a compound of hic and cough; and hic may be allied to hitch, to catch. ...

26713

hickwall
HICK'WALL

26714

hickway
HICK'WAY, n. A small species of woodpecker.

26715

hid
HID

26716

hidage
HI'DAGE, n. [from hide, a quantity of land.] An extraordinary tax formerly paid to the kings of ...

26717

hidalgo
HIDAL'GO, n. In Spain, a man of noble birth.

26718

hidden
HID'DEN, pp. of hide. Concealed; placed in secrecy.1. Secret; unseen.2. Mysterious.

26719

hiddenly
HID'DENLY, adv. In a hidden or secret manner.

26720

hide
HIDE, v.t. pret. hid; pp. hid, hidden. 1. To conceal; to withhold or withdraw from sight; to place ...

26721

hidebound
HI'DEBOUND, a. A horse is hidebound, when his skin sticks so closely to his ribs and back, as not ...

26722

hideous
HID'EOUS, a.1. Frightful to the sight; dreadful; shocking to the eye; applied to deformity; as a ...

26723

hideously
HID'EOUSLY, adv. In a manner to frighten; dreadfully; shockingly.

26724

hideousness
HID'EOUSNESS, n. Frightfulness to the eye; dreadfulness; horribleness.

26725

hider
HI'DER, n. [from hide.] One who hides or conceals.

26726

hiding
HI'DING, ppr. Concealing; covering or withdrawing from view; keeping close or secret.HI'DING, n. ...

26727

hiding-place
HI'DING-PLACE, n. A place of concealment.

26728

hie
HIE, v.i.1. To hasten; to move or run with haste; to go in haste; a word chiefly used in poetry. ...

26729

hierarch
HI'ERARCH, n. [Gr. sacred, and a ruler or prince.]The chief of a sacred order; particularly, the ...

26730

hierarchal
HIERARCH'AL, a. Belonging to a hierarch.

26731

hierarchical
HIERARCH'ICAL, a. Belonging to a sacred order, or to ecclesiastical government.

26732

hierarchy
HI'ERARCHY, n. An order or rank of angels or celestial beings; or a subordination of holy beings. ...

26733

hieroglyph
HI'EROGLYPH

26734

hieroglyphic
HIEROGLYPH'IC, n. [Gr. sacred, and to carve.]1. In antiquity, a sacred character; a mystical ...

26735

hieroglyphical
HIEROGLYPH'ICAL, a. Emblematic; expressive of some meaning by characters, pictures or figures, as ...

26736

hieroglyphically
HIEROGLYPH'ICALLY, adv. Emblematically; by characters or pictures expressive of facts or moral ...

26737

hierogram
HI'EROGRAM, n. [Gr. sacred, and letter.]A species of sacred writing.

26738

hierogrammatic
HIEROGRAMMAT'IC, a. [Gr. sacred, and letter.] Denoting a kind of writing in sacred or sacerdotal ...

26739

hierogrammatist
HIEROGRAM'MATIST, n. A writer of hieroglyphics.

26740

hierographical
HIEROGRAPH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to sacred writing.

26741

hierographiic
HIEROGRAPHI'IC

26742

hierography
HIEROG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. holy, and to write.]Sacred writing. [Little used.]

26743

hierology
HIEROL'OGY, n. [Gr.] A discourse on sacred things.

26744

hieromancy
HIEROM'ANCY, n. [Gr. sacred, and divination.] Divination by observing the various things offered ...

26745

hieromnemon
HIEROM'NEMON, n. [Gr. sacred, and preserving memory.]In ancient Greece, a magistrate who presided ...

26746

hierophant
HI'EROPHANT, n. [Gr. sacred,and to show.] A priest; one who teaches the mysteries and duties of ...

26747

higgle
HIG'GLE, v.i. [L. cocio.]1. To carry provisions about and offer them for sale.2. To chaffer; to ...

26748

higgledy-piggledy
HIGGLEDY-PIGGLEDY, adv. In confusion; a low word.

26749

higgler
HIG'GLER, n. One who carries about provisions for sale.1. One who chaffers in bargaining.

26750

high
HIGH, a. hi.1. Extending a great distance above the surface of the earth; elevated; lofty; of ...

26751

high-aimed
HIGH-AIMED, a. Having grand or lofty designs.

26752

high-arched
HIGH-ARCHED, a. Having elevated arches.

26753

high-aspiring
HIGH-ASPI'RING, a. Having elevated views; aiming at elevated objects.

26754

high-blest
HIGH-BLEST, a. Supremely happy.

26755

high-blown
HIGH-BLOWN, a. Swelled much with wind; inflated, as with pride or conceit.

26756

high-born
HIGH-BORN, a. Being of noble birth or extraction.

26757

high-built
HIGH-BUILT, a. Of lofty structure.1. Covered with lofty buildings. The high-built elephant his ...

26758

high-climbing
HIGH-CLIMBING, a. Climbing to a great height.1. Difficult to be ascended.

26759

high-colored
HIGH-COLORED, a. Having a strong, deep or glaring color.1. Vivid; strong or forcible in ...

26760

high-day
HIGH-DAY, a. Fine; befitting a holiday.

26761

high-designing
HIGH-DESIGNING, a. Forming great schemes.

26762

high-embowed
HIGH-EMBOWED, a. Having lofty arches.

26763

high-engendered
HIGH-ENGEN'DERED, a. Engendered aloft, or in the air.

26764

high-fed
HIGH-FED, a. Pampered; fed luxuriously.

26765

high-flaming
HIGH-FLAMING, a. Throwing flame to a great highth.

26766

high-flier
HIGH-FLIER, n. One that carries his opinions to extravagance.

26767

high-flown
HIGH-FLOWN, a. Elevated; swelled; proud; as high-flown hopes.1. Turgid; swelled; extravagant; as ...

26768

high-flushed
HIGH-FLUSHED, a. Much elated.

26769

high-flying
HIGH-FLYING, a. Extravagant in claims or opinions; as high-flying, arbitrary kings.Highgate Resin. ...

26770

high-gazing
HIGH-GAZING, a. Looking upwards.

26771

high-going
HIGH-GOING, a. Moving rapidly.

26772

high-grown
HIGH-GROWN, a. Having the crop considerably grown.

26773

high-heaped
HIGH-HEAPED, a. Covered with high piles; as a high-heaped table.1. Raised in high piles.

26774

high-hearted
HIGH-HE`ARTED, a. Full of courage.

26775

high-heeled
HIGH-HEELED, a. Having high heels.

26776

high-hung
HIGH-HUNG, a. Hung aloft; elevated.

26777

high-lived
HIGH-LIVED, a. Pertaining to high life.

26778

high-mettled
HIGH-METTLED, a. Having high spirit; ardent; full of fire; as a high-mettled steed.

26779

high-minded
HIGH-MINDED, a. Proud; arrogant. Be not high-minded, but fear. Rom.11.1. Having honorable pride; ...

26780

high-operation
HIGH-OPERATION, n. In surgery, a method of extracting the stone from the human bladder, by cutting ...

26781

high-place
HIGH-PLACE, n. In Scripture, an eminence or mound on which sacrifices were offered. Before the ...

26782

high-placed
HIGH-PLACED, a. Elevated in situation or rank.

26783

high-priest
HIGH-PRIEST, n. A chief priest.

26784

high-principled
HIGH-PRINCIPLED, a. Extravagant in notions of politics.

26785

high-raised
HIGH-RAISED, a. Elevated; raised aloft.1. Raised with great expectations or conceptions.

26786

high-reaching
HIGH-REACHING, a. Reaching to a great highth.1. Reaching upwards.2. Ambitious; aspiring.

26787

high-reared
HIGH-REARED, a. Raised high; of lofty structure.

26788

high-red
HIGH-RED, a. Having a strong red color; deeply red.

26789

high-repented
HIGH-REPENT'ED, a. Deeply repented.

26790

high-resolved
HIGH-RESOLV'ED, a. Very resolute.

26791

high-roofed
HIGH-ROOFED, a. Having a lofty or sharp roof.

26792

high-seasoned
HIGH-SEASONED, a. Enriched with spices or other seasoning.

26793

high-seated
HIGH-SEATED, a. Fixed on high; seated in an elevated place.

26794

high-sighted
HIGH-SIGHTED, a. Always looking upward.

26795

high-sounding
HIGH-SOUNDING, a. Pompous; noisy; ostentatious; as high-sounding words or titles.

26796

high-spirited
HIGH-SPIRITED, a. Full of spirit or natural fire; easily irritated; irascible.1. Full of spirit; ...

26797

high-stomached
HIGH-STOMACHED, a. Having a lofty spirit; proud; obstinate.

26798

high-swelling
HIGH-SWELLING, a. Swelling greatly; inflated; boastful.

26799

high-swoln
HIGH-SWOLN, a. Greatly swelled.

26800

high-taper
HIGH-TAPER, n. A plant of the genus Verbascum.

26801

high-tasted
HIGH-TASTED, a. Having a strong relish; piquant.

26802

high-towered
HIGH-TOWERED, a. Having lofty towers.

26803

high-viced
HIGH-VICED, a. Enormously wicked.

26804

high-wrought
HIGH-WROUGHT, a. Wrought with exquisite art or skill; accurately finished.1. Inflamed to a high ...

26805

highland
HIGHLAND, n. Elevated land; a mountainous region.Highlands of Scotland, mountainous regions ...

26806

highlander
HIGHLANDER, n. An inhabitant of the mountains; as the Highlanders of Scotland.

26807

highlandish
HIGHLANDISH, a. Denoting high or mountainous land.

26808

highly
HIGHLY, adv. hi'ly. With elevation in place.1. In a great degree. We are highly favored. Exercise ...

26809

highmost
HIGHMOST, a. Highest. [Not used.]

26810

highness
HIGHNESS, n. hi'ness. Elevation above the surface; loftiness; altitude; highth.1. Dignity; ...

26811

hight
HIGHT , n. hite, or hith.1. Elevation above the ground; any indefinite distance above the earth. ...

26812

highth
HIGHTH

26813

highwater
HIGHWATER, n. The utmost flow or greatest elevation of the tide; also, the time of such elevation.

26814

highwater-mark
HIGHWATER-MARK, n. The line made on the shore by the tide at its utmost highth.

26815

highway
HIGHWA'Y, n. A public road; a way open to all passengers; so called, either because it is a great ...

26816

highwayman
HIGHWA'YMAN, n. One who robs on the public road, or lurks in the highway for the purpose of ...

26817

hilarate
HILARATE, is not in use. [See Exhilarate.]

26818

hilarity
HILAR'ITY, n. [L. hilaritas; Gr. joyful, merry.]Mirth; merriment; gayety. Hilarity differs from ...

26819

hilary-term
HIL'ARY-TERM, n. The term of courts, &c., which begins January 23.

26820

hild
HILD, G. and D. held, Dan.heldt, a hero, is retained in names, as Hildebert, a bright hero; ...

26821

hilding
HILD'ING, n. A mean, sorry, paltry man or woman.

26822

hill
HILL, n. [L. collis.]1. A natural elevation of land, or a mass of earth rising above the common ...

26823

hilled
HILL'ED, pp. or a. Having hills.

26824

hilling
HILL'ING, n. A covering.1. The act of raising the earth around plants.

26825

hillock
HILL'OCK, n. A small hill.

26826

hillside
HILL'SIDE, n. The side or declivity of a hill.

26827

hilly
HILL'Y, a. Abounding with hills; as a hilly country.

26828

hilt
HILT, n. The handle of any thing; but chiefly applied to the handle of a sword.

26829

hilted
HILT'ED, a. Having a hilt.

26830

hilum
HI'LUM, n. The eye of a bean or other seed; the mark or scar of the umbilical chord,by which the ...

26831

him
HIM, pron. The objective case of he, L. eum, anciently em or im. Him that is weak in the faith ...

26832

himself
HIMSELF', pron. In the nominative or objective case. [him and self.]1. He; but himself is more ...

26833

hin
HIN, n. [Heb.] A Hebrew measure of capacity containing the sixth part of an ephah, or about five ...

26834

hind
HIND, n. The female of the red deer or stag.HIND, n. A domestic; a servant.1. A peasant; a ...

26835

hindberry
HINDBERRY, n. A species of Rubus.

26836

hinder
HINDER, a. comp. of hind. That is in a position contrary to that of the head or fore part; ...

26837

hinderance
HIN'DERANCE, n. The act of impeding or restraining motion.1. Impediment; that which stops ...

26838

hindered
HIN'DERED, pp. Stopped; impeded; obstructed; retarded.

26839

hinderer
HIN'DERER, n. One who stops or retards; that which hinders.

26840

hindering
HIN'DERING, ppr. Stopping; impeding; obstructing; retarding.

26841

hindermost
HINDERMOST, a. That which is behind all others; the last. [but we now use hindmost.]

26842

hindmost
HINDMOST, a. The last; that is in the rear of all others. He met thee in the way, and smote the ...

26843

hindoo
HIN'DOO, n. An aboriginal of Hindoostan, or Hindostan.

26844

hinge
HINGE, n. hinj. [This word appears to be connected with hang,and with angle,the verb.] 1. The hook ...

26845

hinging
HING'ING, ppr. Depending; turning.

26846

hint
HINT, v.t. To bring to mind by a slight mention or remote allusion; to allude to; to suggest by a ...

26847

hip
HIP, n. The projecting part of an animal formed by the osilium or haunch bone; the haunch, or the ...

26848

hiphalt
HIP'HALT, a. [hip and halt.] Lame; limping.

26849

hipped
HIP, HIPPED, HIPPISH. [See Hyp.]

26850

hippelaph
HIP'PELAPH, n. An animal of the deer kind, in Norway, about the size of the elk, and partaking of ...

26851

hippish
HIP, HIPPED, HIPPISH. [See Hyp.]

26852

hippocamp
HIP'POCAMP, n. [Gr. a horse, and to bend.] A name given to the sea-horse.

26853

hippocentaur
HIPPOCEN'TAUR, n. [Gr. a horse, to spur, and a bull.]In ancient fable, a supposed monster, half man ...

26854

hippocras
HIP'POCRAS, n. A medicinal drink, composed of wine with an infusion of spices and other ...

26855

hippocratism
HIPPOC'RATISM, n. The philosophy of Hippocrates, as it regards medicine.

26856

hippodame
HIP'PODAME, n. A sea-horse.

26857

hippodrome
HIP'PODROME, n. [Gr. a horse, and a course, to run.] Anciently, a circus, or place in which horse ...

26858

hippogriff
HIP'POGRIFF, n. [Gr. a horse,and a griffon.] A fabulous animal or monster, half horse and half ...

26859

hippolith
HIP'POLITH, n. [Gr. a horse, and a stone.] A stone found in the stomach or intestines of a horse.

26860

hippomane
HIP'POMANE, n. [Gr. a horse, and madness.]1. A sort of poisonous substance, used anciently as a ...

26861

hippophagous
HIPPOPH'AGOUS, a. Feeding on horses, as the Tartars.

26862

hippophagy
HIPPOPH'AGY, n. [Gr. a horse, and to eat.] The act or practice of feeding on horses.

26863

hippopotamus
HIPPOPOT'AMUS, n. [Gr. a horse, and a river.] The river-horse, an animal that inhabits the Nile ...

26864

hippopotamy
HIPPOPOT'AMY

26865

hiproof
HIP'ROOF, n. [hip and roof.] A roof that has an angle.

26866

hipshot
HIP'SHOT, a. [hip and shot.] Having the hip dislocated.

26867

hipwort
HIP'WORT, n. A plant.

26868

hire
HIRE, v.t. 1. To procure from another person and for temporary use, at a certain price, or for a ...

26869

hired
HI'RED, pp. Procured or taken for use, at a stipulated or reasonable price; as a hired farm.1. ...

26870

hireling
HI'RELING, n. One who is hired, or who serves for wages.1. A mercenary; a prostitute.HI'RELING, ...

26871

hirer
HI'RER, n. One that hires; one that procures the use of any thing for a compensation; one who ...

26872

hiring
HI'RING, ppr. Procuring the use of for a compensation.

26873

hirsute
HIRSU'TE, a. [L. hirsutus.]1. Hairy; rough with hair; shaggy; set with bristles.2. In botany, it ...

26874

hirsuteness
HIRSU'TENESS, n. Hairiness.

26875

his
HIS, pron. possessive of he,and pronounced hiz.1. Of him. Thus in Alfred's Orosius, "Sume for his ...

26876

hisingerite
HIS'INGERITE, n. A mineral found in the cavities of calcarious spar, in Sudermanland.

26877

hispid
HIS'PID, a. [L. hispidus.] Rough.1. In botany, having strong hairs or bristles; beset with stiff ...

26878

hiss
HISS, v.i. 1. To make a sound by driving the breath between the tongue and the upper teeth; to ...

26879

hissing
HISS'ING, ppr. Making the noise of serpents.HISS'ING, n. A hissing sound; an expression of scorn ...

26880

hissingly
HISS'INGLY, adv. With a whistling sound.

26881

hist
HIST, exclam. A word commanding silence; equivalent to hush, be silent.

26882

historial
HISTO'RIAL, a. Historical.

26883

historian
HISTO'RIAN, n. [L. historicus.] A writer or compiler of history; one who collects and relates ...

26884

historic
HISTOR'IC

26885

historical
HISTOR'ICAL, a. [L. historicus.] Containing history, or the relation of facts; as a historical ...

26886

historically
HISTOR'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of history; by way of narration. The Gospels declare ...

26887

historied
HIS'TORIED, a. Recorded in history. [Not much in use.]

26888

historier
HISTO'RIER, n. A historian.

26889

historify
HIS'TORIFY, v.t. To relate; to record in history. [Not used.]

26890

historiographer
HISTORIOG'RAPHER, n. [Gr. history, and to write.] A historian; a writer of history; particularly, ...

26891

historiography
HISTORIOG'RAPHY, n. The art or employment of a historian.

26892

historiology
HISTORIOL'OGY, n. A discourse on history, or the knowledge of history. [Not in use.]

26893

history
HIS'TORY, n. [L. historia; Gr. knowing, learned, and to inquire, to explore, to learn by inspection ...

26894

history-piece
HIS'TORY-PIECE, n. A representative of any remarkable event in painting, which exhibits the actors, ...

26895

histrion
HIS'TRION, n. A player. [Not in use.]

26896

histrionic
HISTRION'IC

26897

histrionical
HISTRION'ICAL, a. [L. histrionicus, from histrio, a buffoon, an actor, or stage player.]Pertaining ...

26898

histrionically
HISTRION'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of a buffoon or pantomime; theatrically.

26899

histrionism
HIS'TRIONISM, n. The acts or practice of buffoons or pantomimes; stage-playing.

26900

hit
HIT, v.t. pret. and pp. hit.1. To strike or touch, either with or without force. We hit a thing ...

26901

hitch
HITCH, v.t. To hook; to catch by a hook; as, to hitch a bridle.1. To fasten by hitching; as, to ...

26902

hitched
HITCH'ED, pp. Caught; hooked; fastened.

26903

hitchel
HITCH'EL, v.t. To hatchel. [Not used. See Hatchel.]

26904

hithe
HITHE, n. A port or small haven; as in Queenhithe, and Lambhithe, now Lambeth.

26905

hither
HITH'ER, adv.1. To this place; used with verbs signifying motion; as, to come hither; to proceed ...

26906

hithermost
HITH'ERMOST, a. Nearest on this side.

26907

hitherto
HITH'ERTO, adv. To this time; yet. The Lord hath blessed me hitherto. Josh.17.1. In any time, or ...

26908

hitherward
HITH'ERWARD

26909

hitherwards
HITH'ERWARDS, adv. This way; towards this place. A puissant and mighty power-- Is marching ...

26910

hive
HIVE, n.1. A box, chest or kind of basket for the reception and habitation of a swarm of ...

26911

hived
HI'VED, pp. Lodged in a hive or shelter.

26912

hiver
HI'VER, n. One that collects bees into a hive.

26913

hives
HIVES, n. A disease, the croup, or cynanche trachealis; rattles.

26914

ho
HO, exclam. A word used by teamsters, to stop their teams. It has been used as a noun, for stop, ...

26915

hoa
HOA, exclam. [L. eho.] A call to excite attention, or to give notice of approach. What noise ...

26916

hoar
HOAR, a.1. White; as hoar frost; hoar cliffs.2. Gray; white with age; hoary; as a matron grave ...

26917

hoar-frost
HOAR-FROST, n. The white particles of ice formed by the congelation of dew or watery vapors.

26918

hoard
HOARD, n. A store, stock or large quantity of any thing accumulated or laid up; a hidden stock; a ...

26919

hoarded
HOARDED, pp. Collected and laid up in store.

26920

hoarder
HOARDER, n. One who lays up in store; one who accumulates and keeps in secret.

26921

hoarding
HOARDING, ppr. Laying up in store.1. Instinctively collecting and laying up provisions for ...

26922

hoared
HOARED, a. Moldy; musty. [Not in use.]

26923

hoarhound
HOARHOUND. [See Horehound.]

26924

hoariness
HOARINESS, n. [from hoary.] The state of being white, whitish or gray; as the hoariness of the ...

26925

hoarse
HOARSE, a. hors.1. Having a harsh, rough, grating voice, as when affected with a cold.2. Rough; ...

26926

hoarsely
HOARSELY, adv. With a rough, harsh, grating voice or sound.

26927

hoarseness
HOARSENESS, n. Harshness or roughness of voice or sound; preternatural asperity of voice.

26928

hoary
HOARY, n. [See Hoar.] White or whitish; as the hoary willows.1. White or gray with age; as hoary ...

26929

hoax
HOAX, n. Something done for deception or mockery; a trick played off in sport.HOAX, v.t. To ...

26930

hob
HOB

26931

hobbism
HOB'BISM, n. The principles of the sceptical Thomas Hobbes.

26932

hobbist
HOB'BIST, n. A follower of Hobbes.

26933

hobble
HOB'BLE, v.i.1. To walk lamely, bearing chiefly on one leg; to limp; to walk with a hitch or hop, ...

26934

hobbledehoy
HOB'BLEDEHOY, n. A cant phrase for a boy at the age of puberty.

26935

hobbler
HOB'BLER, n. One that hobbles.HOB'BLER, n. [from hobby.] One who by his tenure was to maintain a ...

26936

hobbling
HOB'BLING, ppr. Walking with a halting or interrupted step.

26937

hobblingly
HOB'BLINGLY, adv. With a limping or interrupted step.

26938

hobby
HOB'BY, n. A kind of hawk; a hawk of the lure.HOB'BY, n.1. A strong active horse, of a middle ...

26939

hobbyhorse
HOB'BYHORSE, n. [tautological.] A hobby; a wooden horse on which boys ride.1. A character in the ...

26940

hobgoblin
HOB'GOBLIN, n. A fairy; a frightful apparition.

26941

hobit
HO'BIT, n. A small mortar, or short gun for throwing bombs. [See Howitzer, the common ...

26942

hoblike
HOB'LIKE, a. Clownish; boorish.

26943

hobnail
HOB'NAIL, n. A nail with a thick strong head, for shoeing horses.1. A clownish person; in ...

26944

hobnailed
HOB'NAILED, a. Set with hobnails; rough.

26945

hobnob
HOB'NOB, adv. Take, or not take; a familiar invitation to reciprocal drinking.Hobson's choice, a ...

26946

hoboy
HOBOY. [See Hautboy.]

26947

hock
HOCK, n. The joint of an animal between the knee and the fetlock.1. A part of the thigh.HOCK

26948

hockday
HOCK'DAY

26949

hockey
HOCK'EY, n. Harvest-home. [Not used.]

26950

hockherb
HOCK'HERB, n. A plant, the mallows.

26951

hockle
HOCK'LE, v.t. To hamstring; to hough; to disable by cutting the tendons of the ham.

26952

hocuspocus
HOCUSPOCUS, v.t. To cheat.

26953

hod
HOD, n. A kind of tray for carrying mortar and brick,used in bricklaying. It is fitted with a ...

26954

hoddy-doddy
HOD'DY-DODDY, n. An awkward or foolish person.

26955

hodge-podge
HODGE-PODGE

26956

hodiernal
HODIERN'AL, a. [L. hodiernus, from hodie, hoc die,this day.] Of this day; belonging to the ...

26957

hodman
HOD'MAN, n. A man who carries a hod; a mason's tender.

26958

hodmandod
HOD'MANDOD, n. A shell-fish, otherwise called dodman.1. A shell-snail.

26959

hoe
HOE, n. ho. A farmer's instrument for cutting up weeds and loosening the earth in fields and ...

26960

hoed
HO'ED, pp. Cleared from weeds, or loosened by the hoe.

26961

hoeing
HO'EING, ppr. Cutting, scraping or digging with a hoe.1. Clearing of weeds with a hoe.

26962

hoful
HO'FUL, a. Careful.

26963

hog
HOG, n.1. A swine; a general name of that species of animal.2. In England, a castrated sheep of a ...

26964

hogcote
HOG'COTE, n. [hog and cote.] A shed or house for swine; a sty.

26965

hogged
HOG'GED, pp. Scraped under water.1. Curving; having the ends lower than the middle.

26966

hoggerel
HOG'GEREL, n. A sheep of the second year.A two year old ewe.

26967

hogget
HOG'GET, n. A sheep two years old.1. A colt of a year old, called also hog-colt. [Local.]2. A ...

26968

hoggish
HOG'GISH, a. Having the qualities of a hog; brutish; gluttonous; filthy; meanly selfish.

26969

hoggishly
HOG'GISHLY, adv. In a brutish, gluttonous or filthy manner.

26970

hoggishness
HOG'GISHNESS, n. Brutishness; voracious greediness in eating; beastly filthiness; mean ...

26971

hogh
HOGH, n. [See High.] A hill; a cliff.

26972

hogherd
HOG'HERD, n. [hog and herd.] A keeper of swine.

26973

hogpen
HOG'PEN, n. [hog and pen.] A hogsty.

26974

hogs-beans
HOG'S-BEANS, n. A plant.

26975

hogs-fennel
HOG'S-FENNEL, n. A plant of the genus Peucedanum.

26976

hogs-mushrooms
HOG'S-MUSHROOMS, n. A plant.

26977

hogshead
HOGS'HEAD, n. [the English orthography is grossly corrupt.]1. A measure of capacity, containing ...

26978

hogsty
HOG'STY, n. [hog and sty.] A pen or inclosure for hogs.

26979

hogwash
HOG'WASH, n. [hog and wash.] Swill; the refuse matters of a kitchen or brewery, or like matter for ...

26980

hohlspath
HO'HLSPATH, n. The mineral otherwise called macle,and chiastolite.

26981

hoiden
HOI'DEN, n. A rude, bold girl; a romp.1. A rude, bold man. [Not used in the United ...

26982

hoist
HOIST, v.t. [originally hoise; but corrupted, perhaps beyond remedy.]1. To raise; to lift. We'll ...

26983

hoisted
HOIST'ED, pp. Raised; lifted; drawn up.

26984

hoisting
HOIST'ING, ppr. Raising; lifting.

26985

hokeday
HO'KEDAY, n. High day; a day of feasting and mirth, formerly held in England the second Tuesday ...

26986

holcad
HOLC'AD, n. [Gr.] In ancient Greece, a large ship of burden.

26987

hold
HOLD, v.t. pret.held; pp. held. Holden is obsolete in elegant writing. [Gr. to hold or restrain; ...

26988

holdback
HOLDBACK, n. Hinderance; restraint.

26989

holder
HOLDER, n. One who holds or grasps in his hand, or embraces with his arms.1. A tenant; one who ...

26990

holderforth
HOLDERFORTH, n. A haranguer; a preacher.

26991

holdfast
HOLDFAST, n. A thing that takes hold; a catch; a hook.

26992

holding
HOLDING, ppr. Stopping; confining; restraining; keeping; retaining; adhering; maintaining, ...

26993

hole
HOLE, n.1. A hollow place or cavity in any solid body, of any shape or dimensions, natural or ...

26994

holibut
HOLIBUT. [See Halibut.]

26995

holidam
HO'LIDAM, n. [holy and dame.] Blessed lady; an ancient oath.

26996

holiday
HOLIDAY. [See Holyday.]

26997

holily
HO'LILY, adv. [from holy.] Piously; with sanctity.1. Sacredly; inviolably; without breach. ...

26998

holiness
HO'LINESS, n. [from holy.] The state of being holy; purity or integrity of moral character; ...

26999

holing-ax
HO'LING-AX, n. A narrow ax for cutting holes in posts.

27000

holla
HOL'LA

27001

holland
HOL'LAND, n. Fine linen manufactured in Holland.

27002

hollander
HOL'LANDER, n. A native of Holland.

27003

hollen
HOL'LEN, n. [See Holly.]

27004

hollo
HOL'LO, v.i. To call out or exclaim. [See Halloo.]

27005

holloa
HOLLO'A, exclam. A word used in calling. Among seamen, it is the answer to one that hails, ...

27006

hollow
HOL'LOW, a.1. Containing an empty space, natural or artificial, within a solid substance; not ...

27007

hollow-eyed
HOL'LOW-EYED, a. Having sunken eyes.

27008

hollow-hearted
HOL'LOW-HE`ARTED, a. Insincere; deceitful; not sound and true; of practice or sentiment different ...

27009

hollow-root
HOL'LOW-ROOT, n. A plant, tuberous moschatel, or inglorious, constituting the genus Adoxa; a low ...

27010

hollowed
HOL'LOWED, pp. Made hollow; excavated.

27011

hollowing
HOL'LOWING, ppr. Making hollow; excavating.

27012

hollowly
HOL'LOWLY, adv. Insincerely; deceitfully.

27013

hollowness
HOL'LOWNESS, n. The state of being hollow; cavity; depression of surface; excavation.1. ...

27014

holly
HOL'LY, n. [perhaps L. ilex, for hilex; L. celo.]The holm tree, of the genus Ilex, of several ...

27015

hollyhock
HOL'LYHOCK,n. A plant of the genus Alcea, bearing flowers of various colors. It is called also ...

27016

hollyrose
HOL'LYROSE, n. A plant.

27017

holm
HOLM, n. The evergreen oak; the ilex.1. An islet, or river isle.2. A low flat tract of rich land ...

27018

holmite
HOLM'ITE, n. A variety of carbonate of lime; so called from Mr. Holme, who analyzed it.

27019

holocaust
HOL'OCAUST, n. [Gr. whole,and burnt, to burn.] A burnt-sacrifice or offering, the whole of which ...

27020

holograph
HOL'OGRAPH, n. [Gr. whole, and to write.] A deed or testament written wholly by the grantor's or ...

27021

holographiic
HOLOGRAPHI'IC, a. Written wholly by the grantor or testator himself.

27022

holometer
HOLOM'ETER, n. [Gr. all, and to measure.] An instrument for taking all kinds of measures, both on ...

27023

holp
HOLP, HOLPEN, the antiquated pret. and pp. of help.

27024

holpen
HOLP, HOLPEN, the antiquated pret. and pp. of help.

27025

holster
HOLSTER, n. [L. celo.] A leathern case for a pistol, carried by a horseman at the fore part of his ...

27026

holstered
HOLSTERED, a. Bearing holsters; as a holstered steed.

27027

holt
HOLT, n. [L. celo.] A wood or woodland; obsolete, except in poetry.

27028

holy
HO'LY, a.1. Properly, whole, entire or perfect, in a moral sense. Hence, pure in heart, temper or ...

27029

holy-cross
HOLY-CROSS day, n. The fourteenth of September.

27030

holy-one
HO'LY-ONE, n. An appellation of the Supreme Being, by way of emphasis.1. An appellation of ...

27031

holy-rood
HOLY-ROOD day, n. A festival observed by Roman Catholics in memory of the exaltation of our ...

27032

holy-thistle
HO'LY-THISTLE, n. A plant of the genus Cnicus.The blessed thistle, Centaurea benedicta.

27033

holy-thursday
HO'LY-THURSDAY, n. The day on which the ascension of our Savior is commemorated, ten days before ...

27034

holy-week
HO'LY-WEEK, n. The week before Easter, in which the passion of our Savior is commemorated.

27035

holyday
HOL'YDAY, n. A day set apart for commemorating some important event in history; a festival ...

27036

homage
HOM'AGE, n. [L. homo, man.]1. In feudal law, the submission, loyalty and service which a tenant ...

27037

homageable
HOM'AGEABLE, a. Subject to homage.

27038

homager
HOM'AGER, n. One who does homage, or holds land of another by homage.'s Pyrophorus,ignited muriate ...

27039

home
HOME, n. [Gr. a house, a close place, or place or rest.]1. A dwelling house; the house or place in ...

27040

homeborn
HO'MEBORN, a. Native; natural.1. Domestic; not foreign.

27041

homebred
HO'MEBRED, a. Native; natural; as homebred lusts.1. Domestic; originating at home; not foreign; ...

27042

homefelt
HO'MEFELT, a. Felt in one's own breast; inward; private; as homefelt joys or delight.

27043

homekeeping
HO'MEKEEPING, a. Staying at home.

27044

homeless
HO'MELESS, a. Destitute of a home.

27045

homeliness
HO'MELINESS, n. [from homely.] Plainness of features; want of beauty. It expresses less than ...

27046

homelot
HO'MELOT, n. An inclosure on or near which the mansion house stands.

27047

homely
HO'MELY, a. [from home.] Of plain features; not handsome; as a homely face. It expresses less ...

27048

homelyn
HO'MELYN, n. A fish.

27049

homemade
HO'MEMADE, a. Made at home; being of domestic manufacture; made either in private families, or in ...

27050

homer
HO'MER

27051

homeric
HOMER'IC, a. Pertaining to Homer,the great poet of Greece, or to his poetry; resembling Homer's ...

27052

homespeaking
HO'MESPEAKING, n. Forcible and efficacious speaking.

27053

homespun
HO'MESPUN, a. Spun or wrought at home; of domestic manufacture.1. Not made in foreign ...

27054

homestall
HO'MESTALL

27055

homestead
HO'MESTEAD, n. The place of a mansion house; the inclosure or ground immediately connected with ...

27056

homeward
HO'MEWARD

27057

homeward-bound
HO'MEWARD-BOUND, a. Destined for home; returning from a foreign country to the place where the ...

27058

homewards
HO'MEWARDS, adv. Toward home; toward one's habitation, or toward one's native country.

27059

homicidal
HOM'ICIDAL, a. [from homicide.] Pertaining to homicide; murderous bloody.

27060

homicide
HOM'ICIDE, n. [L. homicidium; homo, man, and caedo, to strike, to kill.]1. The killing of one ...

27061

homiletic
HOMILET'IC

27062

homiletical
HOMILET'ICAL, a. [ Gr. to converse in company.]1. Pertaining to familiar intercourse; social; ...

27063

homilist
HOM'ILIST, n. One that preaches to a congregation.

27064

homily
HOM'ILY, n. [Gr. to converse in company, a company or assembly.]A discourse or sermon read or ...

27065

hommoc
HOM'MOC, n. [I suppose this to be an Indian word.]A hillock or small eminence of a conical form, ...

27066

hommony
HOM'MONY, n. [Indian.] In America, maiz hulled and broken, but coarse, prepared for food by being ...

27067

homogeneal
HOMOGE'NEAL

27068

homogenealness
HOMOGE'NEALNESS

27069

homogeneity
HOMOGENE'ITY, Words not to be encouraged; equivalent to.

27070

homogeneous
HOMOGE'NEOUS, a. [Gr. like, and kind.] Of the same kind or nature; consisting of similar parts, ...

27071

homogeneousness
HOMOGE'NEOUSNESS, n. Sameness of kind or nature.

27072

homogeny
HOM'OGENY, n. Joint nature.

27073

homologate
HOMOL'OGATE, v.t. [Gr. like, and to speak.] To approve; to allow.

27074

homologous
HOMOL'OGOUS, a. [Gr. similar, and proportion.] Proportional to each other; a term in geometry, ...

27075

homonymous
HOMON'YMOUS, a. [Gr. like, and name.] Equivocal; ambiguous; that has different significations, or ...

27076

homonymously
HOMON'YMOUSLY, adv. In an equivocal manner.

27077

homonymy
HOMON'YMY, n. [Gr. See Supra.] Ambiguity; equivocation.

27078

homophony
HOMOPH'ONY, n. [Gr. like, sound.] Likeness of sound. Among the Greeks, a kind of music performed ...

27079

homotonous
HOMOT'ONOUS, a. [Gr. like, and tone.] Equable; of the same tenor; applied to diseases which have a ...

27080

hone
HONE, n. A stone of a fine grit, used for sharpening instruments that require a fine edge, and ...

27081

hone-wort
HO'NE-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Sison.

27082

honest
HON'EST, a. on'est. [L. honestus, from honos, honor.]1. Upright; just; fair in dealing with ...

27083

honestation
HONESTA'TION, n. Adornment; grace. [Not used.]

27084

honestly
HON'ESTLY, adv. on'estly. Uprightly; justly; with integrity and fairness; as a contract honestly ...

27085

honesty
HON'ESTY, n. on'esty. [L. honestas.]1. In principle, an upright disposition; moral rectitude of ...

27086

honey
HON'EY, n. hun'y.1. A sweet vegetable juice, collected by bees from the flowers of plants, and ...

27087

honey-bag
HON'EY-BAG, n. The stomach of a honey-bee.

27088

honey-comb
HON'EY-COMB, n. A substance of a firm, close texture, formed by bees into hexagonal cells for ...

27089

honey-combed
HONEY-COMBED, a. Having little flaws or cells.

27090

honey-dew
HON'EY-DEW, n. A sweet saccharine substance, found on the leaves of trees and other plants in ...

27091

honey-flower
HON'EY-FLOWER, n. A plant of the genus Melianthus.

27092

honey-gnat
HON'EY-GNAT, n. An insect.

27093

honey-guide
HON'EY-GUIDE, n. A species of Cuckoo, found in Africa, which will conduct persons to hives of wild ...

27094

honey-harvest
HON'EY-H`ARVEST, n. Honey collected.

27095

honey-locust
HON'EY-LOCUST, n. A plant,the three-thorned Acacia, of the genus Gleditsia.

27096

honey-month
HON'EY-MONTH, n. The first month after marriage.

27097

honey-moon
HON'EY-MOON

27098

honey-mouthed
HON'EY-MOUTHED, a. Soft or smooth in speech.

27099

honey-stalk
HON'EY-STALK, n. Clover-flower.

27100

honey-stone
HON'EY-STONE, n. [See Mellite.]

27101

honey-suckle
HON'EY-SUCKLE, n. A genus of plants, the Lonicera, of many species, one of which is called ...

27102

honey-sweet
HON'EY-SWEET, a. Sweet as honey.

27103

honey-tongued
HON'EY-TONGUED, a. Using soft speech.

27104

honey-wort
HON'EY-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Cerinthe.

27105

honeyed
HON'EYED, a. Covered with honey.1. Sweet; as honeyed words.

27106

honeyless
HON'EYLESS, a. Destitute of honey.

27107

honied
HON'IED, a. [See Honeyed.]

27108

honor
HON'OR, n. on'or. [L. honor, honos.]1. The esteem due or paid to worth; high estimation. A ...

27109

honorable
HON'ORABLE, a. [L. honorabilis.]1. Holding a distinguished rank in society; illustrious or noble. ...

27110

honorableness
HON'ORABLENESS, n. The state of being honorable; eminence; distinction.1. Conformity to the ...

27111

honorably
HON'ORABLY, adv. With tokens of honor or respect. The man was honorably received at court.1. ...

27112

honorary
HON'ORARY, a. Conferring honor, or intended merely to confer honor; as an honorary degree; an ...

27113

honored
HON'ORED, pp. Respected; revered; reverenced; elevated to rank or office; dignified; exalted; ...

27114

honorer
HON'ORER, n. One that honors; one that reveres, reverences or regards with respect.1. One who ...

27115

honoring
HON'ORING, ppr. Respecting highly; reverencing; exalting; dignifying; conferring marks of esteem; ...

27116

honorless
HON'ORLESS, a. Destitute of honor; not honored.

27117

hood
HOOD. [L. fraternitas.]HOOD, n.1. A covering for the head used by females, and deeper than a ...

27118

hood-wink
HOOD'-WINK, v.t. [hood and wink.] To blind by covering the eyes. We will blind and hood-wink ...

27119

hooded
HOOD'ED, pp. Covered with a hood; blinded.

27120

hoodman
HOOD'MAN, blind, n. A play in which a person blinded is to catch another and tell his name; ...

27121

hoof
HOOF, n.1. The horny substance that covers or terminates the feet of certain animals, as horses, ...

27122

hoof-bound
HOOF'-BOUND, a. A horse is said to be hoof-bound when he has a pain in the fore-feet, occasioned ...

27123

hoofed
HOOF'ED, a. Furnished with of hoofs. Of all the hoofed quadrupeds,the horse is the most beautiful.

27124

hook
HOOK, n. 1. A piece of iron or other metal bent into a curve for catching, holding and sustaining ...

27125

hooked
HOOK'ED, a. Bent into the form of a hook; curvated. The claws of a beast are hooked.1. Bent; ...

27126

hookedness
HOOK'EDNESS, n. A state of being bent like a hook.

27127

hooking
HOOK'ING, ppr. Catching with a hook; fastening with a hook.

27128

hooknosed
HOOK'NOSED, a. Having a curvated or aquiline nose.

27129

hooky
HOOK'Y, a. Full of hooks; pertaining to hooks.

27130

hoop
HOOP, n. A band of wood or metal used to confine the staves of casks,tubs, &c. or for other ...

27131

hooper
HOOP'ER, n. One who hoops casks or tubs; a cooper.

27132

hooping
HOOP'ING, ppr. Fastening with hoops.HOOP'ING, ppr. Crying out; shouting.

27133

hooping-cough
HOOP'ING-COUGH, n. A cough in which the patient hoops or whoops,with a deep inspiration of breath.

27134

hoopoe
HOOP'OE

27135

hoopoo
HOOP'OO, n. [L. upupa, epops.] A bird of the genus Upupa, whose head is adorned with a beautiful ...

27136

hoora
HOOR`A

27137

hooraw
HOORAW', exclam. A shout of joy or exultation. [This is the genuine English word, for which we ...

27138

hoot
HOOT, v.i.1. To cry out or shout in contempt. Matrons and girls shall hoot at thee no more.2. To ...

27139

hooting
HOOT'ING, n. A shouting; clamor.

27140

hop
HOP, n. The fruit of the dog-rose, or wild brier.

27141

hopbind
HOP'BIND, n. The stalk or vine on which hops grow.

27142

hope
HOPE, n. [L. cupio.]1. A desire of some good, accompanied with at least a slight expectation of ...

27143

hoped
HO'PED, pp. Desired with expectation.

27144

hopeful
HO'PEFUL, a. Having qualities which excite hope; promising or giving ground to expect good or ...

27145

hopefully
HO'PEFULLY, adv. In a manner to raise hope; in a way promising good. He prosecutes his scheme ...

27146

hopefulness
HO'PEFULNESS, n. Promise of good; ground to expect what is desirable.

27147

hopeless
HO'PELESS, a. Destitute of hope; having no expectation of that which is desirable; despairing. I ...

27148

hopelessly
HO'PELESSLY, adv. Without hope.

27149

hopelessness
HO'PELESSNESS, n. A state of being desperate, or affording no hope.

27150

hoper
HO'PER, n. One that hopes.

27151

hoping
HO'PING, ppr. Having hope; indulging desire of good with the expectation of obtaining it, or a ...

27152

hopingly
HO'PINGLY, adv. With hope or desire of good, and expectation of obtaining it.

27153

hoplite
HOP'LITE, n. [Gr. a weapon.] In ancient Greece, a heavy-armed soldier.

27154

hopoast
HOP'OAST, n. In Kent, a kiln for drying hops.

27155

hopper
HOP'PER, n. [See Hop.] One who hops, or leaps on one leg.1. Properly, a wooden trough through ...

27156

hoppers
HOP'PERS, n. A play in which persons hop or leap on one leg.

27157

hopping
HOP'PING, ppr. Leaping on one leg; dancing.HOP'PING, n. A dancing; a meeting for dancing.

27158

hopple
HOP'PLE, v.t. To tie the feet near together to prevent leaping; as, to hopple an unruly horse.

27159

hoppole
HOP'POLE, n. A pole used to support hops.

27160

hopvine
HOP'VINE, n. The stalk of hops.

27161

horal
HO'RAL, a. [L. hora, an hour. See Hour.]Relating to an hour, or to hours.

27162

horally
HO'RALLY, adv. Hourly. [Not in use.]

27163

horary
HO'RARY, a. [L. horarius; L. hora hour.]1. Pertaining to an hour; noting the hours; as the horary ...

27164

hord
HORD

27165

horde
HORDE, n. A company of wandering people dwelling in tents or wagons, and migrating from place to ...

27166

hore
HORE, n. A woman, married or single, who indulges unlawful sexual intercourse; also, a prostitute; ...

27167

horedom
HO'REDOM, n. The practice of unlawful sexual commerce; habitual or customary lewdness of males or ...

27168

horehound
HO'REHOUND, n. The name of several plants of different genera. The common horehound is the ...

27169

horemaster
HO'REMASTER

27170

horemonger
HO'REMONGER, n. A man who is addicted to lewdness, or frequently indulges in unlawful sexual ...

27171

horeson
HO'RESON, n. [hore and son.] A bastard; the son of a hore; a term of reproach or ...

27172

horish
HO'RISH, a. Lewd, unchaste; loose; given to unlawful sexual intercourse; applied to females only.

27173

horishly
HO'RISHLY, adv. Lewdly; unchastely.

27174

horizon
HOR'IZON, n. [Gr. to bound, a limit.] The line that terminates the view, when extended on the ...

27175

horizontal
HORIZON'TAL, a. Pertaining to the horizon, or relating to it.1. Parallel to the horizon; on a ...

27176

horizontality
HORIZONTAL'ITY, n. The state of being horizontal.

27177

horizontally
HORIZON'TALLY, adv. In a direction parallel to the horizon; on a level; as a ball carried ...

27178

horn
HORN, n. [L. cornu]1. A hard substance growing on the heads of certain animals, and particularly ...

27179

hornbeak
HORN'BEAK, n. A fish. [See Hornfish.]

27180

hornbeam
HORN'BEAM, n. [See Beam.] A genus of trees, the Carpinus, so named from the hardness of the wood.

27181

hornbill
HORN'BILL, n. A fowl of the genus Buceros,which has a flat bony forehead with two horns; a native ...

27182

hornblend
HORN'BLEND, n. A mineral of several varieties, called by Hauy amphibole. It is sometimes in ...

27183

hornblower
HORNBLOWER, n. One that blows a horn.

27184

hornbook
HORN'BOOK, n. The first book of children, or that in which they learn their letters and rudiments; ...

27185

horned
HORN'ED, a. Furnished with horns; as horned cattle.1. Shaped like a crescent, or the new moon.

27186

hornedness
HORN'EDNESS, n. The appearance of horns.

27187

horner
HORN'ER, n. One who works or deals in horns.1. One who winds or blows the horn.

27188

hornet
HORN'ET, n. An insect of the genus Vespa or wasp, the Vespa crabro. It is much larger and ...

27189

hornfish
HORN'FISH, n. The garfish or sea-needle, of the genus Esox.

27190

hornfoot
HORN'FOOT, a. Having a hoof; hoofed.

27191

hornify
HORN'IFY, v.t. To bestow horns upon. [Not used or vulgar.]

27192

horning
HORN'ING, n. Appearance of the moon when increasing, or in the form of a crescent.

27193

hornish
HORN'ISH, a. Somewhat like horn; hard.

27194

hornless
HORN'LESS, a. Having no horns.

27195

hornmercury
HORN'MERCURY, n. Muriate of mercury.

27196

hornowl
HORN'OWL, n. A species of owl, so called from two tufts of feathers on its head like horns.

27197

hornpipe
HORN'PIPE, n. An instrument of music in Wales, consisting of a wooden pipe with horns at the ends; ...

27198

hornshavings
HORN'SHAVINGS, n. Scrapings or raspings of the horns of deer.

27199

hornsilver
HORN'SILVER, n. Muriate of silver, or chlorid of silver.

27200

hornslate
HORN'SLATE, n. A gray siliceous stone.

27201

hornspoon
HORN'SPOON, n. A spoon made of horn.

27202

hornstone
HORN'STONE, n. A siliceous stone, a subspecies of quartz. It is divided by Jameson into splintery, ...

27203

hornwork
HORN'WORK, n. In fortification, an outwork composed of two demi-bastions joined by a curtain.

27204

horny
HORN'Y, a. Consisting of horn or horns.1. Resembling horn.2. Hard; callous.

27205

horography
HOROG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. hour, and to write.]1. An account of hours.2. The art of constructing dials.

27206

horologe
HO'ROLOGE, n. [L. horologium; Gr. hour, and to tell.]An instrument that indicates the hour of the ...

27207

horological
HOROLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the horologe, or to horology.

27208

horologiographic
HOROLOGIOGRAPH'IC, a. Pertaining to the art of dialling.

27209

horologiography
HOROLOGIOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. hour, discourse, and to describe.]An account of instruments that show the ...

27210

horology
HOROL'OGY, n. [Gr. hour, and to indicate. See Horologe.]The art of constructing machines for ...

27211

horometrical
HOROMET'RICAL, a. [from horometry.] Belonging to horometry, or to the measurement of time by hours ...

27212

horometry
HOROM'ETRY, n. [Gr. hour, and measure.]The art or practice of measuring time by hours and ...

27213

horoscope
HOR'OSCOPE, n. [Gr. hour, and to view or consider.]1. In astrology, a scheme or figure of the ...

27214

horoscopy
HOROS'COPY, n. The art or practice of predicting future events by the disposition of the stars and ...

27215

horrent
HOR'RENT, a. [L. horrens. See Horror.] Bristled; standing erect as bristles; pointing outward. ...

27216

horrible
HOR'RIBLE, a. [L. horribilis. See Horror.] Exciting or tending to excite horror; dreadful; ...

27217

horribleness
HOR'RIBLENESS, n. The state or qualities that may excite horror; dreadfulness; terribleness; ...

27218

horribly
HOR'RIBLY, adv. In a manner to excite horror; dreadfully; terribly; as horribly loud; horribly ...

27219

horrid
HOR'RID, a. [L. horridus. See Horror.]1. That does or may excite horror; dreadful; hideous; ...

27220

horridly
HOR'RIDLY, adv. In a manner to excite horror; dreadfully; shockingly.

27221

horridness
HOR'RIDNESS, n. The qualities that do or may excite horror; hideousness; enormity.

27222

horrific
HORRIF'IC, a. [L. horrificus.] Causing horror.

27223

horrisonous
HORRIS'ONOUS, a. [L. horrisonus; horreo, to shake, and sonus, sound.] Sounding dreadfully; ...

27224

horror
HOR'ROR, n. [L. from horreo, to shake or shiver, or to set up the bristles,to be rough.]1. A ...

27225

horse
HORSE, n. hors.1. A species of quadrupeds of the genus Equus, having six erect and parallel ...

27226

horse-chestnut
HORSE-CHESTNUT, n. A large nut,the fruit of a species of Aesculus; or the tree that produces it. ...

27227

horse-cucumber
HORSE-CU'CUMBER, n. A large green cucumber.

27228

horse-emmet
HORSE-EMMET, n. A species of large ant.

27229

horse-keeper
HORSE-KEEPER, n. One who keeps or takes care of horses.

27230

horse-mill
HORSE-MILL, a. A mill turned by a horse.

27231

horse-mint
HORSE-MINT, n. A species of large mint.

27232

horse-muscle
HORSE-MUSCLE, n. A large muscle or shell-fish.

27233

horseback
HORSEBACK, n. hors'back. The state of being on a horse; the posture of riding on a horse. I saw ...

27234

horsebean
HORSEBEAN, n. A small bean usually given to horses.

27235

horseblock
HORSEBLOCK, n. A block or state that assists persons in mounting and dismounting from a horse.

27236

horseboat
HORSEBOAT, n. A boat used in conveying horses over a river or other water.1. A boat moved by ...

27237

horseboy
HORSEBOY, n. A boy employed in dressing and tending horses; a stable boy.

27238

horsebreaker
HORSEBREAKER, n. One whose employment is to break horses, or to teach them to draw or carry.

27239

horsecloth
HORSECLOTH, n. A cloth to cover a horse.

27240

horsecourser
HORSECOURSER, n. One that runs horses,or keeps horses for the race.1. A dealer in horses.

27241

horsecrab
HORSECRAB, n. A crustaceous fish.

27242

horsedealer
HORSEDEALER, n. One who buys and sells horses.

27243

horsedrench
HORSEDRENCH, n. A dose of physic for a horse.

27244

horsedung
HORSEDUNG, n. The dung of horses.

27245

horsefaced
HORSEFACED, a. Having a long coarse face; ugly.

27246

horseflesh
HORSEFLESH, n. The flesh of a horse.

27247

horsefly
HORSEFLY, n. A large fly that stings horses.

27248

horsefoot
HORSEFOOT, n. A plant, called also coltsfoot.

27249

horseguards
HORSEGUARDS, n. A body of cavalry for guards.

27250

horsehair
HORSEHAIR, n. The hair of horses.

27251

horsehoe
HORSEHOE, v.t. To hoe or clean a field by means of horses.

27252

horseknave
HORSEKNAVE, n. A groom.

27253

horselaugh
HORSELAUGH, n. A loud, boisterous laugh.

27254

horseleech
HORSELEECH, n. A large leech. [See Leech.]1. A farrier.

27255

horselitter
HORSELITTER, n. A carriage hung on poles which are borne by and between two horses.

27256

horseload
HORSELOAD, n. A load for a horse.

27257

horseman
HORSEMAN, n. A rider on horseback.1. A man skilled in riding.2. A soldier who serves on ...

27258

horsemanship
HORSEMANSHIP, n. The act of riding, and of training and managing horses.

27259

horsemarten
HORSEMARTEN, n. A kind of large bee.

27260

horsematch
HORSEMATCH, n. A bird.

27261

horsemeat
HORSEMEAT, n. Food for horses; provender.

27262

horsepath
HORSEPATH, n. A path for horses, as by canals.

27263

horseplay
HORSEPLAY, n. Rough, rugged play.

27264

horsepond
HORSEPOND, n. A pond for watering horses.

27265

horsepurslane
HORSEPURSLANE, n. A plant of the genus Trianthema.

27266

horserace
HORSERACE, n. A race by horses; a match of horses in running.

27267

horseracing
HORSERACING, n. The practice or act of running horses.

27268

horseradish
HORSERADISH, n. A plant of the genus Cochlearia, a species of scurvy grass,having a root of a ...

27269

horseshoe
HORSESHOE, n. A shoe for horses, consisting of a plate of iron of a circular form.

27270

horseshoe-head
HORSESHOE-HEAD, n. A disease of infants, in which the sutures of the skull are too open; opposed ...

27271

horseshoe-vetch
HORSESHOE-VETCH, n. A plant of the genus Hippocrepis.

27272

horsestealer
HORSESTEALER

27273

horsetail
HORSETAIL, n. A plant of the genus Equisetum. The shrubby horsetail is of the genus Ephedra.

27274

horsethief
HORSETHIEF, n. A stealer of horses.

27275

horsetongue
HORSETONGUE, n. A plant of the genus Ruscus.

27276

horsevetch
HORSEVETCH

27277

horseway
HORSEWAY, n. A way or road in which horses may travel.

27278

horsewhip
HORSEWHIP, n. A whip for driving or striking horses.

27279

horseworm
HORSEWORM, n. A worm that infests horses; a bott.

27280

hortation
HORTA'TION, n. [L. hortatio, from hortor, to exhort.]The act of exhorting, or giving advice; ...

27281

hortative
HOR'TATIVE, a. Giving exhortation, advisory.HOR'TATIVE, n. Exhortation; a precept given to incite ...

27282

hortatory
HOR'TATORY, a. Encouraging; inciting; giving advice; as a hortatory speech.

27283

hortensial
HORTEN'SIAL, a. [L. hortensis.] Fit for a garden. [Not used.]

27284

horticultor
HOR'TICULTOR, n. [L. hortus, a garden, and cultor, a tiller.]One who cultivates a garden.

27285

horticultural
HORTICUL'TURAL, a. Pertaining to the culture of gardens.

27286

horticulture
HOR'TICULTURE, n. [L. hortus, garden, and cultura, culture, from colo, to till.] The cultivation ...

27287

horticulturist
HORTICUL'TURIST, n. One who is skilled in the art of cultivating gardens.

27288

hortulan
HOR'TULAN, a. [L. hortulanus.] Belonging to a garden; as a hortulan calendar.

27289

hortussiccus
HORTUSSICCUS, n. [L.] Literally, a dry garden; an appellation given to a collection of specimens ...

27290

hortyard
HORT'YARD, n. An orchard, which see.

27291

hosanna
HOSAN'NA, n. s as z. [Heb. save, I beseech you.]An exclamation of praise to God, or an invocation ...

27292

hose
HOSE, n. plu. hosen or hose; pron. hoze, ho'zn.1. Breeches or trowsers.2. Stockings; coverings ...

27293

hosewhip
HOSEWHIP, v.t. To lash; to strike with a horsewhip.

27294

hosier
HO'SIER, n. ho'zhur. One who deals in stockings and socks, &c.

27295

hosiery
HO'SIERY, n. ho'zhury. Stockings in general; socks.

27296

hospitable
HOS'PITABLE, a. [L. hospitalis, from hospes, a guest.]1. Receiving and entertaining strangers,with ...

27297

hospitably
HOS'PITABLY, adv. With kindness to strangers or guests; with generous and liberal entertainment.

27298

hospitage
HOS'PITAGE, n. Hospitality.

27299

hospital
HOS'PITAL, n. [L. hospitalis, supra.]1. A building appropriated for the reception of sick,infirm ...

27300

hospitality
HOSPITAL'ITY, n. [L. hospitalitas.] The act or practice of receiving and entertaining strangers or ...

27301

hospitaller
HOS'PITALLER, n. [from hospital.] Properly, one residing in a hospital for the purpose of ...

27302

hospitate
HOS'PITATE, v.i. [L. hospitor.] To reside or lodge under the roof of another. [Not ...

27303

host
HOST, n. [L.hostis, a stranger, an enemy, probably of the same family. See Hospitable.]1. One who ...

27304

hostage
HOS'TAGE, n. A person delivered to an enemy or hostile power, as a pledge to secure the ...

27305

hostel
HOSTEL, HOSTELLER. [See Hotel.]

27306

hosteller
HOSTEL, HOSTELLER. [See Hotel.]

27307

hostess
HOSTESS, n. A female host; a woman who entertains guests at her house.1. A woman who keeps an ...

27308

hostess-ship
HOSTESS-SHIP, n. The character or business of a hostess.

27309

hostile
HOS'TILE, a. [L. hostilis, from hostis, an enemy, that is, a foreigner.]1. Belonging to a public ...

27310

hostilely
HOS'TILELY, adv. In a hostile manner.

27311

hostility
HOSTIL'ITY, n. [L. hostilitas, from hostis, an enemy.]1. The state of war between nations or ...

27312

hostilize
HOS'TILIZE, v.t. To make an enemy. [Little used.]

27313

hosting
HOSTING, n. [from host, an army.] An encounter; a battle. [Little used.]1. A muster or review.

27314

hostler
HOS'TLER, n. hos'ler. The person who has the care of horses at an inn.

27315

hostless
HOSTLESS, a. Inhospitable. [Not in use.]

27316

hostry
HOSTRY, a. A stable for horses.1. A lodging house.

27317

hot
HOT, a.1. Having sensible heat; opposed to cold; as a hot stove or fire; a hot cloth; hot liquors. ...

27318

hotbed
HOT'BED, n. In gardening, a bed of earth and horsedung or tanner's bark, covered with glass to ...

27319

hotbrained
HOT'BRAINED, a. Ardent in temper; violent; rash; precipitate; as hotbrained youth.

27320

hotch-potch
HOTCH-POTCH, n. A mixed mass; a medley of ingredients. [Vulgar.] [See Hotchpot.]

27321

hotchpot
HOTCH'POT, n.1. Properly, a mingled mass; a mixture of ingredients.2. In law, a mixing of lands. ...

27322

hotcockles
HOT'COCKLES, n. plu. A play in which one covers his eyes, and guesses who strikes him, or his hand ...

27323

hote
HOT, HOTE, HOTEN, pp. Called; named.

27324

hotel
HOTEL', n.1. A palace.2. An inn; a house for entertaining strangers or travelers. It was ...

27325

hoten
HOT, HOTE, HOTEN, pp. Called; named.

27326

hotheaded
HOT'HEADED, a. Of ardent passions; vehement; violent; rash.

27327

hothouse
HOT'HOUSE, n. A house kept warm to shelter tender plants and shrubs from the cold air; a place in ...

27328

hotly
HOT'LY, adv. [from hot.] With heat.1. Ardently; vehemently; violently; as a stag hotly pursued.2. ...

27329

hotmouthed
HOT'MOUTHED, a. Headstrong; ungovernable. That hotmouthed beast that bears against the curb.

27330

hotness
HOT'NESS, n. Sensible heat beyond a moderate degree or warmth.1. Violence; vehemence; fury.

27331

hotspur
HOT'SPUR, n. [hot and spur.] A man violent, passionate, heady, rash or precipitate.1. A kind of ...

27332

hotspurred
HOT'SPURRED, a. Vehement; rash; heady; headstrong.

27333

hottentot
HOT'TENTOT, n. A native of the southern extremity of Africa.1. A savage brutal man.

27334

hottentot-cherry
HOTTENTOT-CHERRY, n. A plant. [See Cherry.]

27335

hough
HOUGH, n. hok.1. The lower part of the thigh; the ham; the joint of the hind leg of a beast that ...

27336

houlet
HOUL'ET, n. An owl. [See Howlet.]

27337

hoult
HOULT, n. [See Holt.]

27338

hound
HOUND, n. [L. canis.] A generic name of the dog; but in English it is confined to a particular ...

27339

houndfish
HOUND'FISH, n. A fish, called also Galeus laevis, with a long round body, and ash-colored sides ...

27340

hounds
HOUNDS, n. In seamen's language, the projecting parts of the head of a mast.

27341

houndtree
HOUND'TREE, n. A kind of tree.

27342

houp
HOUP. [See Hoopoo.]

27343

hour
HOUR, n. our. [L. hora; also L. tempestivus, from tempus. See Time. But hour, hora, afterward ...

27344

hourglass
HOUR'GLASS, n. our'glass. A chronometer that measures the flux of time by the running of sand from ...

27345

hourhand
HOUR'HAND, n. The hand or pointed pin which shows the hour on a chronometer.

27346

houri
HOU'RI, n. Among Mohammedans, a nymph of paradise.

27347

hourly
HOUR'LY, a. our'ly. Happening or done every hour; occurring hour by hour; frequent; often ...

27348

hourplate
HOUR'PLATE, n. our'plate. The plate of a clock or other time-piece on which the hours are marked; ...

27349

housage
HOUS'AGE, n. [from house.] A fee for keeping goods in a house.

27350

house
HOUSE, n. hous. [L. casa; Heb. to put on, to cover.]1. In a general sense, a building or shed ...

27351

house-breaker
HOUSE-BREAK'ER, n. house'-breaker. One who breaks, opens and enters a house by day with a felonious ...

27352

house-breaking
HOUSE-BREAKING, n. hous'-breaking. The breaking, or opening and entering of a house by daylight, ...

27353

house-wright
HOUSE-WRIGHT, n. hous'wright. An architect who builds houses.

27354

houseboat
HOUSEBOAT, n. hous'boat. A covered boat.

27355

housebote
HOUSEBOTE, n. hous'bote. 1. In law, a sufficient allowance of wood to repair the house and ...

27356

housed
HOUS'ED, pp. s as z. Put under cover; sheltered.

27357

housedog
HOUSEDOG, n. hous'dog. A dog kept to guard the house.

27358

household
HOUSEHOLD, n. hous'hold. Those who dwell under the same roof and compose a family; those who ...

27359

household-stuff
HOUSEHOLD-STUFF, n. hous'hold-stuff. The furniture of a house; the vessels, utensils and goods of ...

27360

householder
HOUSEHOLDER, n. hous'holder. The master or chief of a family; one who keeps house with his family. ...

27361

housekeeper
HOUSEKEEPER, n. hous'keeper. One who occupies a house with his family; a man or woman who maintains ...

27362

housekeeping
HOUSEKEEPING, a. hous'keeping. Domestic; used in a family; as housekeeping commodities. [Little ...

27363

housel
HOUS'EL, n. houz'l. The eucharist; the sacred bread.HOUS'EL, v.t. To give or receive the ...

27364

houselamb
HOUSELAMB, n. hous'lamb. A lamb kept in a house for fatting.

27365

houseleek
HOUSELEEK, n. hous'leek. [See Leek.] A plant of the genus Sempervivum, which is found on the tops ...

27366

houseless
HOUSELESS, n. hous'less. Destitute of a house or habitation; as the houseless child of want.1. ...

27367

houseline
HOUSELINE

27368

housemaid
HOUSEMAID, n. hous'maid. A female servant employed to keep a house clean, &c.

27369

housepigeon
HOUSEPIGEON, n. A tame pigeon.

27370

houseraiser
HOUSERAISER, n. One who erects a house.

27371

houseroom
HOUSEROOM, n. hous'room. Room or place in a house.

27372

housesnail
HOUSESNAIL, n. A particular kind of snail.

27373

housewarming
HOUSEWARMING, n. hous'warming. A feast or merry making at the time a family enters a new house.

27374

housewife
HOUSEWIFE, n. hous'wife. [house and wife; contracted into huswife,hussy.] The mistress of a ...

27375

housewifely
HOUSEWIFELY, a. hous'wifely. Pertaining to the mistress of a family.1. Taken from housewifery, or ...

27376

housewifery
HOUSEWIFERY, n. hous'wifery. The business of the mistress of a family; female business in the ...

27377

housing
HOUS'ING , n. Among seamen, a small line formed of three strands, smaller than rope-yard, used for ...

27378

housling
HOUS'LING, a. [See Housel.] Sacramental; as housling fire, used in the sacrament of marriage.

27379

houss
HOUSS, a covering. [See Housing.]

27380

hove
HOVE, pret. of heave.

27381

hovel
HOV'EL, n. A shed; a cottage; a mean house.HOV'EL, v.t. To put in a hovel; to shelter.

27382

hoven
HOVEN, pp. of heave.

27383

hover
HOV'ER, v.i.1. To flap the wings, as a fowl; to hang over or about, fluttering or flapping the ...

27384

hover-ground
HOV'ER-GROUND, n. Light ground.

27385

hovering
HOV'ERING, ppr. Flapping the wings; hanging over or around; moving with short irregular flights.

27386

how
HOW, adv. In what manner. I know not how to answer. How can a man be born when he is old? How can ...

27387

howbeit
HOWBE'IT, adv. [how, be, and it.] Be it as it may; nevertheless; notwithstanding; yet; but; ...

27388

howdy
HOW'DY, n. A midwife. [Local.]

27389

however
HOWEV'ER, adv. [how and ever.] In whatever manner or degree; as, however good or bad style may ...

27390

howitz
HOW'ITZ

27391

howitzer
HOW'ITZER, n. A kind of mortar or short gun, mounted on a field carriage, and used for throwing ...

27392

howker
HOW'KER, n. A Dutch vessel with two masts, a main and a mizen-mast; also, a fishing boat with one ...

27393

howl
HOWL, v.i. [L. ululo.]1. To cry as a dog or wolf; to utter a particular kind of loud, protracted ...

27394

howlet
HOWL'ET, n. A fowl of the owl kind, which utters a mournful cry. It is as large as a pullet.

27395

howling
HOWL'ING, ppr. Uttering the cry of a dog or wolf; uttering a loud cry of distress.HOWL'ING, a. ...

27396

howsoever
HOWSOEV'ER, adv. [how, so, and ever.]1. In what manner soever.2. Although.[For this word, however ...

27397

hox
HOX, v.t. To hough; to hamstring. [Not used. See Hough.]

27398

hoy
HOY, n. A small vessel, usually rigged as a sloop, and employed in conveying passengers and goods ...

27399

hub
HUB, n. The nave of a wheel; a solid piece of timber in which the spokes are inserted.

27400

hubbub
HUB'BUB, n. A great noise of many confused voices; a tumult; uproar; riot.

27401

huck
HUCK, v.i. To haggle in trading. [Not in use.]HUCK, n. The name of a German river-trout.

27402

huckaback
HUCK'ABACK, n. A kind of linen with raised figures on it.

27403

huckle
HUCK'LE, n. [infra.] The hip, that is, a bunch.

27404

hucklebacked
HUCK'LEBACKED, a. Having round shoulders.

27405

hucklebone
HUCK'LEBONE, n. The hip bone.

27406

huckster
HUCK'STER, n. 1. A retailer of small articles, of provisions, nuts, &c.2. A mean trickish ...

27407

hucksteress
HUCK'STERESS, n. A female peddlar.

27408