HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - March 19, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [hawk]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

hawk

HAWK, n. A genus of fowls, the Falco, of many species, having a crooked beak, furnished with a cere at the base, a cloven tongue, and the head thick set with feathers. Most of the species are rapacious, feeding on birds or other small animals. Hawks were formerly trained for sport or catching small birds.

HAWK, v.i. To catch or attempt to catch birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.

He that hawks at larks and sparrows.

A falc'ner Henry is, when Emma hawks.

1. To fly at; to attack on the wing; with at.

To hawk at flies.

HAWK, v.i. To make an effort to force up phlegm with noise; as, to hawk and spit.

To hawk up, transitively; as, to hawk up phlegm.

HAWK, n. An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.

HAWK, v.t. [L. auctio, auction, a sale by outcry.] To cry; to offer for sale by outcry in the street, or to sell by outcry; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [hawk]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

HAWK, n. A genus of fowls, the Falco, of many species, having a crooked beak, furnished with a cere at the base, a cloven tongue, and the head thick set with feathers. Most of the species are rapacious, feeding on birds or other small animals. Hawks were formerly trained for sport or catching small birds.

HAWK, v.i. To catch or attempt to catch birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.

He that hawks at larks and sparrows.

A falc'ner Henry is, when Emma hawks.

1. To fly at; to attack on the wing; with at.

To hawk at flies.

HAWK, v.i. To make an effort to force up phlegm with noise; as, to hawk and spit.

To hawk up, transitively; as, to hawk up phlegm.

HAWK, n. An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.

HAWK, v.t. [L. auctio, auction, a sale by outcry.] To cry; to offer for sale by outcry in the street, or to sell by outcry; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.


HAWK, n. [Sax. hafoc; D. havik; G. habicht; Sw. hök; Dan. hög, höög; W. hebog, named from heb, utterance.]

A genus of fowls, the Falco, of many species, having a crooked beak, furnished with a cere at the base, a cloven tongue, and the head thick set with feathers. Most of the species are rapacious, feeding on birds or other small animals. Hawks were formerly trained for sport or catching small birds.


HAWK, n.

An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.


HAWK, v.i.

  1. To catch or attempt to catch birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry. He that hawks at larks and sparrows. Locke. A falc'ner Henry is, when Emma hawks. Prior.
  2. To fly at; to attack on the wing; with at. To hawk at flies. Dryden.

HAWK, v.i. [W. hoçi; Scot. hawgh. Qu. Chal. כיח, and keck and cough. See Class Gk, No. 5, 29, 36.]

To make an effort to force up phlegm with noise; as, to hawk and spit. Shak. Harvey. To hawk up, transitively; as, to hawk up phlegm.


HAWK, v.t. [Qu. G. hocken, to take on the back; höcken, to higgle; höcker, a huckster; or the root of L. auctio, auction, a sale by outcry. The root of the latter probably signified to cry out.]

To cry; to offer for sale by outcry in the street, or to sell by outcry; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.


Hawk
  1. One of numerous species and genera of rapacious birds of the family Falconidæ. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch of the bill, and in having shorter and less pointed wings. Many are of large size and grade into the eagles. Some, as the goshawk, were formerly trained like falcons. In a more general sense the word is not infrequently applied, also, to true falcons, as the sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.

    * Among the common American species are the red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis); the red-shouldered (B. lineatus); the broad-winged (B. Pennsylvanicus); the rough-legged (Archibuteo lagopus); the sharp-shinned (Accipiter fuscus). See Fishhawk, Goshawk, Marsh hawk, under Marsh, Night hawk, under Night.

    Bee hawk (Zoöl.), the honey buzzard. -- Eagle hawk. See under Eagle. -- Hawk eagle (Zoöl.), an Asiatic bird of the genus Spizætus, or Limnætus, intermediate between the hawks and eagles. There are several species. -- Hawk fly (Zoöl.), a voracious fly of the family Asilidæ. See Hornet fly, under Hornet. -- Hawk moth. (Zoöl.) See Hawk moth, in the Vocabulary. -- Hawk owl. (Zoöl.) (a) A northern owl (Surnia ulula) of Europe and America. It flies by day, and in some respects resembles the hawks. (b) An owl of India (Ninox scutellatus). -- Hawk's bill (Horology), the pawl for the rack, in the striking mechanism of a clock.

  2. To catch, or attempt to catch, birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey] to practice falconry.

    A falconer Henry is, when Emma hawks. Prior.

  3. To clear the throat with an audible sound by forcing an expiratory current of air through the narrow passage between the depressed soft palate and the root of the tongue, thus aiding in the removal of foreign substances.
  4. To raise by hawking, as phlegm.
  5. An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.
  6. To offer for sale by outcry in the street; to carry (merchandise) about from place to place for sale; to peddle; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.

    His works were hawked in every street. Swift.

  7. A small board, with a handle on the under side, to hold mortar.

    Hawk boy, an attendant on a plasterer to supply him with mortar.

  8. To make an attack while on the wing; to soar and strike like a hawk; -- generally with at; as, to hawk at flies.

    Dryden.

    A falcon, towering in her pride of place,
    Was by a mousing owl hawked at and killed.
    Shak.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

84

606

66

657

96

649
Hawk

HAWK, noun A genus of fowls, the Falco, of many species, having a crooked beak, furnished with a cere at the base, a cloven tongue, and the head thick set with feathers. Most of the species are rapacious, feeding on birds or other small animals. Hawks were formerly trained for sport or catching small birds.

HAWK, verb intransitive To catch or attempt to catch birds by means of hawks trained for the purpose, and let loose on the prey; to practice falconry.

He that hawks at larks and sparrows.

A falc'ner Henry is, when Emma hawks.

1. To fly at; to attack on the wing; with at.

To hawk at flies.

HAWK, verb intransitive To make an effort to force up phlegm with noise; as, to hawk and spit.

To hawk up, transitively; as, to hawk up phlegm.

HAWK, noun An effort to force up phlegm from the throat, accompanied with noise.

HAWK, verb transitive [Latin auctio, auction, a sale by outcry.] To cry; to offer for sale by outcry in the street, or to sell by outcry; as, to hawk goods or pamphlets.

Why 1828?

0
3
 


I do a lot of reading of materials that were written in the late 19th century, helpful to know what the words meant at that time.

— Blythe

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

pec-cary

PEC-CARY, n. A quadruped of Mexico, in general appearance resembling a hog, but its body is less bulky, its legs shorter, and its bristles thicker and stronger, like the quills of the porcupine. Its color is black and white, and it has on the hind part of the back a protuberance like the navel of other animals, with an orifice form which issues a liquor of a very strong scent.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

169

324

Compact Edition

133

111

CD-ROM

105

86

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.326 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top