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Monday - September 26, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comBROWSING [W]

Please click on the word of the partial definition to see the complete definition

ID Word Definition

61206

w
W is the twenty third letter of the English Alphabet. It takes its written form and its name from ...

61207

wabble
WABBLE, v.i. To move from one side to the other; to vacillate; as a turning or whirling body. So it ...

61208

wacke
WACKE,

61209

wacky
WACKY,n. A rock nearly allied to basalt, of which it may be regarded as a more soft and earthy ...

61210

wad
WAD, n.1. A little mass of some soft or flexible material, such as hay, straw, tow, paper, or old ...

61211

wadd
WADD, n. In mineralogy, a black wadd is a species of ore of manganese, of which there are four ...

61212

wadded
WADDED, a. Formed into a wad or mass.

61213

wadding
WADDING, n. 1. A wad, or the materials for wads; any pliable substance of which wads may be made.2. ...

61214

waddle
WADDLE, v.i.1. To move one way and the other in walking; to deviate to one side and the other; to ...

61215

waddling
WADDLING, ppr. Moving from side to side in walking.

61216

waddlingly
WADDLINGLY, adv. With a vacillating gait.

61217

wade
WADE, v.i.1. To walk through any substance that yields to the feet; as, to wade through water; to ...

61218

wading
WADING, ppr. Walking through a substance that yields to the feet, as through water or sand.

61219

wadsett
WADSETT, n. An ancient tenure or lease of land in the highlands of Scotland, which seems to have ...

61220

wadsetter
WADSETTER, n. One who holds by wadsett.

61221

wafer
WAFER, n.1. A thin cake or leaf; as a wafer of bread given by the Romanists in the Eucharist.2. A ...

61222

waft
WAFT, v.t.1. To bear through a fluid or bouyant medium; to convey through water or air; as, a ...

61223

waftage
WAFTAGE, n. Conveyance or transportation through a bouyant medium, as air or water. [Not in use.]

61224

wafted
WAFTED, pp. Borne or conveyed through air or water.

61225

wafter
WAFTER, n. 1. He or that which wafts; a passage boat.2. The conductor of vessels at sea; an old ...

61226

wafting
WAFTING, ppr. Carrying through a bouyant medium.

61227

wafture
WAFTURE, n. The act of waving. [Not in use.]

61228

wag
WAG, v.t. To move one way and the other with quick turns; to move a little way, and then turn the ...

61229

wage
WAGE, v.t.1. To lay; to bet; to throw down as a pledge; to stake; to put at hazard on the event of ...

61230

waged
WAGED, pp. laid; deposited; as a pledge; made or gegun, as war.

61231

wagel
WAGEL, n. 1. A name given in Cornwall to the martinazzo, dunghunter, or dungbird, a species of ...

61232

wager
WAGER, n. 1. Something deposited, laid or hazarded on the event of a contest or some unsettled ...

61233

wagered
WAGERED, pp. Laid; pledged; as a bet.

61234

wagerer
WAGERER, n. One who wagers or lays a bet.

61235

wagering
WAGERING, ppr. Laying; betting.Wagering policy, in commerce, a policy of insurance, insuring a sum ...

61236

wages
WAGES, n. plural in termination, but singular in signification.1. Hire; reward; that which is paid ...

61237

waggel
WAGGEL,

61238

waggishly
WAGGISHLY, adv. In a waggish manner; in sport.

61239

waggishness
WAGGISHNESS, n. Mischievous sport; wanton merriment.

61240

waggle
WAGGLE, v.i. To waddle; to reel or move from side to side.Why do you go nodding and waggling ...

61241

wagon
WAGON, n.1. A vehicle moved on four wheels, and usually drawn by horses; used for the ...

61242

wagonage
WAGONAGE, n. Money paid for carriage in a wagon.

61243

wagoner
WAGONER, n. 1. One who conducts a wagon.2. A constellation, Charles wain.

61244

wagoning
WAGONING, ppr. Transporting in a wagon.WAGONING, n. The business of transporting in a wagon.

61245

wagtail
WAGTAIL, n. [wag and tail.] A small bird, a species of Motacilla.

61246

waid
WAID, a. Crushed. [Not in use.]

61247

waif
WAIF, n. Goods found, of which the owner is not known. These were originally such goods as a thief, ...

61248

wail
WAIL, v.t. To lament; to moan; to bewail.Or if no more her absent lord she wails--WAIL, v.i. To ...

61249

wailful
WAILFUL, a. Sorrowful; mournful.

61250

wailing
WAILING, ppr. Lamenting with audible cries.WAILING, n. Loud cries of sorrow; deep lamentation.There ...

61251

wailment
WAILMENT, n. Lamentation.

61252

wain
WAIN, n. [See Wagon.]1. A wagon; a carriage for the transportation of goods on wheels.2. A ...

61253

wain-bote
WAIN-BOTE, n. Timber for wagons for carts.

61254

wain-house
WAIN-HOUSE, n. A house or shed for wagons and carts. [Local.]

61255

wain-rope
WAIN-ROPE, n. A rope for binding a load on a wagon; a cart-rope.

61256

wainage
WAINAGE, n. A finding of carriages.

61257

wainscot
WAINSCOT, n. In building, timber-work serving to line the walls of a room, being made in ...

61258

wainscoted
WAINSCOTED, pp. Lined with boards or panels.

61259

wainscoting
WAINSCOTING, ppr. Lining with boards.

61260

wair
WAIR, n. A piece of timber two yards long, and a foot broad. [I know not where used.]

61261

waist
WAIST, n. 1. That part of the human body which is immediately below the ribs or thorax; or the ...

61262

waistband
WAISTBAND, n. The band or upper pat of breeches, trousers or pantaloons, which encompasses the ...

61263

waistcloths
WAISTCLOTHS, n. Coverings of canvas or tarpauling for the hammocks, stowed on the gangways, between ...

61264

waistcoat
WAISTCOAT, n. [waist and coat.] A short coat or garment for men, extending no lower than the hips, ...

61265

waister
WAISTER, n. In ships, waisters are men who are stationed in the waist in working the ship.

61266

wait
WAIT, v.i. [The sense is to stop, or to continue.]1. To stay or rest in expectation; to stop or ...

61267

waiter
WAITER, n. 1. One who waits; an attendant; a servant in attendance.The waiters stand in ranks; the ...

61268

waiting
WAITING, ppr. Staying in expectation.Waiting on, attending; accompanying; serving.Waiting for, ...

61269

waiting-maid
WAITING-MAID, WAITING-WOMAN, n. An upper servant who attends a lady. Waiting-gentlewoman is ...

61270

waiting-woman
WAITING-MAID, WAITING-WOMAN, n. An upper servant who attends a lady. Waiting-gentlewoman is ...

61271

waits
WAITS, n. 1. Itinerant nocturnal musicians. [Not in use.]2. Nocturnal musicians who attended great ...

61272

waive
WAIVE, n. A woman put out of the protection of the law.

61273

waiwode
WAIWODE, n. In the Turkish empire, the governor of a small province or town; a general.

61274

wake
WAKE, v.i. [G. The primary sense is to stir, to rouse, to excite.]1. To be awake; to continue ...

61275

wake-robin
WAKE-ROBIN, n. A plant of the genus Arum.

61276

wakeful
WAKEFUL, a. 1. Not sleeping; indisposed to sleep.Dissembling sleep, but wakeful with the fright--2. ...

61277

wakefully
WAKEFULLY, adv. With watching or sleeplessness.

61278

wakefulness
WAKEFULNESS, n. 1. Indisposition to sleep.2. Forbearance of sleep; want of sleep.

61279

waken
WAKEN, v.i. wakn. To wake; to cease to sleep; to be awakened.Early Turnus wakning with the ...

61280

wakened
WAKENED, pp. Roused from sleep; excited into action.

61281

wakener
WAKENER, n. One who rouses from sleep.

61282

wakening
WAKENING, ppr. Rousing form sleep or stupidity; calling into action.

61283

waker
WAKER, n. One who watches; one who rouses from sleep.

61284

waking
WAKING, ppr. 1. Being awake; not sleeping.2. Rousing from sleep; exciting into motion or ...

61285

wale
WALE, n. 1. In cloth, a ridge or streak rising above the rest. We say, cloth is wove with a wale.2. ...

61286

wale-knot
WALE-KNOT, WALL-KNOT, n. A single wale-knot is made by untwisting the ends of a rope, and making a ...

61287

walk
WALK, v.i. [G., to full, to felt hats; a fuller; to stir, to be agitated, to rove, to travel, to ...

61288

walk-mill
WALK-MILL, n. Wauk-mill. A fulling mill. [Local.]

61289

walkable
WALKABLE, a. Waukable. Fit to be walked on. [Not much used.]

61290

walker
WALKER, n. Wauker.1. One who walks.2. In our mother tongue, a fuller.3. In law, a forest officer ...

61291

walking
WALKING, ppr. Wauking. Moving on the legs with a slow pace; moving; conducting ones self.WALKING, ...

61292

walking-staff
WALKING-STAFF, WALKING-STICK, n. A staff or stick carried in the hand for support or amusement in ...

61293

walking-stick
WALKING-STAFF, WALKING-STICK, n. A staff or stick carried in the hand for support or amusement in ...

61294

wall
WALL, n. [L., stake, post, probably originally a fence of stakes, a palisade or stockade; the first ...

61295

wall-creeper
WALL-CREEPER, n. A small bird of the genus Certhia; the spider-catcher.

61296

wall-cress
WALL-CRESS, n. [wall and cress.] 1. A plant of the genus Arabis.2. A plant of the genus Turritis.

61297

wall-eye
WALL-EYE, n. [wall and eye.] 1. A disease in the crystaline humor of the eye; the glaucoma.2. In ...

61298

wall-eyed
WALL-EYED, a. Having white eyes.

61299

wall-flower
WALL-FLOWER, n. [wall and flower.] A plant of the genus Cheiranthus; a species of stock ...

61300

wall-fruit
WALL-FRUIT, n. [wall and fruit.] Fruit which, to be ripened, must be planted against a wall.

61301

wall-knot
WALE-KNOT, WALL-KNOT, n. A single wale-knot is made by untwisting the ends of a rope, and making a ...

61302

wall-louse
WALL-LOUSE, n. [wall and louse.] An insect or small bug. [L.]

61303

wall-moss
WALL-MOSS, n. A species of moss growing on walls.

61304

wall-pennywort
WALL-PENNYWORT, n. A plant of the genus Cotyledon.

61305

wall-pepper
WALL-PEPPER, n. A plant of the genus Sedum.

61306

wall-pie
WALL-PIE, n. A plant, a species of Asplenium.

61307

wall-sided
WALL-SIDED, a. Having sides nearly perpendicular, as a ship.

61308

wall-spring
WALL-SPRING, n. A spring of water issuing from stratified rocks.

61309

wall-wort
WALL-WORT, n. A plant, the dwarf elder or danewort; a species of Sambucus.

61310

walled
WALLED, pp. Inclosed or fortified with a wall.

61311

waller
WALLER, n. One who builds walls in the country.

61312

wallerite
WALLERITE, n. A mineral, or variety of clay, found in small compact masses of the size of a nut, ...

61313

wallet
WALLET, n. 1. A bag for carrying the necessaries for a journey or march; a knapsack.2. Any thing ...

61314

walling
WALLING, ppr. Inclosing or fortifying with a wall.WALLING, n. Walls in general; materials for ...

61315

wallop
WALLOP, v.i. [See Well.] To boil with a continued bubbling or heaving and rolling of the liquor, ...

61316

walloping
WALLOPING, ppr. Boiling with a heaving and noise.

61317

wallow
WALLOW, v.i. [L., G. This verb seems to be connected with well, walk, &c.]1. To roll ones body on ...

61318

wallower
WALLOWER, n. One that rolls in mire.

61319

wallowing
WALLOWING, ppr. Rolling the body on any thing.

61320

walnut
WALNUT, n. A tree and its fruit, of the genus Juglans. The black walnut, so called, grows in ...

61321

walrus
WALRUS, n. [G., a whale, a horse.] The morse or sea horse, an animal of the northern seas, of the ...

61322

waltron
WALTRON, n. Another name of the walrus.

61323

waltz
WALTZ, n. [G., to roll.] A modern dance and tune, the measure of whose music is triple; three ...

61324

wamble
WAMBLE, v.i. To be disturbed with nausea; as a wambling stomach. [Vulgar.]

61325

wamble-cropped
WAMBLE-CROPPED, a. Sick at the stomach. [Vulgar.]

61326

wampee
WAMPEE, n. A plant, a species of Arum.

61327

wampum
WAMPUM, n. Shells or strings of shells, used by the American Indians as money or a medium of ...

61328

wan
WAN, a. Pale; having a sickly hue; languid of look. Sad to view, his visage pale and wan.Why so ...

61329

wand
WAND, n. 1. A small stick; a rod. If a child runs away, a few strokes of a wand will bring him ...

61330

wander
WANDER, v.i. [G., to wander, to walk, to change, exchange or transform.]1. To rove; to ramble here ...

61331

wanderer
WANDERER, n. A rambler; one that roves; one that deviates from duty.

61332

wandering
WANDERING, ppr. Roving; rambling; deviating from duty.WANDERING, n. 1. Peregrination; a traveling ...

61333

wanderingly
WANDERINGLY, adv. In a wandering or unsteady manner.

61334

wanderoo
WANDEROO, n. A baboon of Ceylon and Malabar.

61335

wane
WANE, v.i. 1. To be diminished; to decrease; particularly applied to the illuminated part of the ...

61336

wang
WANG, n. 1. The jaw, jaw-bone or cheek bone. [Little used or vulgar.]2. The latchet of a shoe. [Not ...

61337

wang-tooth
WANG-TOOTH, n. A jaw-tooth.

61338

wanhope
WANHOPE, n. Want of hope. [Not used.]

61339

wanhorn
WANHORN, n. A plant of the genus Kaempferia.

61340

waning
WANING, ppr. Decreasing; failing; declining.

61341

wanly
WANLY, adv. In a pale manner; palely.

61342

wanned
WANNED, a. Made wan or pale.

61343

wanness
WANNESS, n. Paleness; a sallow, dead, pale color; as the wanness of the cheeks after a fever.

61344

wannish
WANNISH, a. Somewhat wan; of a pale hue.

61345

want
WANT, n. 1. Deficiency; defect; the absence of that which is necessary or useful; as a want of ...

61346

want-wit
WANT-WIT, n. [want and wit.] One destitute of wit or sense; a fool. [Not in much use.]

61347

wantage
WANTAGE, n. Deficiency; that which is wanting.

61348

wanted
WANTED, pp. Needed; desired.

61349

wanting
WANTING, ppr. 1. Needing; lacking; desiring.2. a. Absent; deficient. One of the twelve is wanting. ...

61350

wantless
WANTLESS, a. Having no want; abundant; fruitful.

61351

wanton
WANTON, a. 1. Wandering or roving in gaiety or sport; sportive; frolicsome; darting aside, or one ...

61352

wantoning
WANTONING, ppr. Roving; flying loosely; playing without restraint; indulging in licentiousness.

61353

wantonize
WANTONIZE, v.i. To behave wantonly. [Not in use.]

61354

wantonly
WANTONLY, adv. Loosely; without regularity or restraint; sportively; gayly; playfully; ...

61355

wantonness
WANTONNESS, n. 1. Sportiveness; gaiety; frolicsomeness; waggery.--As sad as night, only for ...

61356

wanty
WANTY, n. A broad strap of leather, used for binding a load upon the back of a beast. [Local.]

61357

wapacut
WAPACUT, n. The spotted owl of Hudsons bay.

61358

waped
WAPED, a. [L., to strike, and awhap, whap, which the common people in New England use, and ...

61359

wapentac
WAPENTAKE, WAPENTAC, n. [See Touch. This name had its origin in a custom of touching lances or ...

61360

wapentake
WAPENTAKE, WAPENTAC, n. [See Touch. This name had its origin in a custom of touching lances or ...

61361

wapp
WAPP, n. In a ship, the rope with which the shrouds are set taught in wale-knots.

61362

wappe
WAPPE, n. A species of cur, said to be so called from his voice. His only use is to alarm the ...

61363

wapper
WAPPER, n. A fish; a name given to the smaller species of the river gudgeon.

61364

war
WAR, n. [G., to perplex, embroil, disturb. The primary sense of the root is to strive, struggle, ...

61365

war-beat
WAR-BEAT, WAR-BEATEN, a. [war and beat.] Worn down in war.

61366

war-beaten
WAR-BEAT, WAR-BEATEN, a. [war and beat.] Worn down in war.

61367

war-office
WAR-OFFICE, n. An office in which the military affairs of a country are superintended and managed.

61368

war-worn
WAR-WORN, a. [war and worn.] Worn with military service; as a war-worn coat; a war-worn soldier.

61369

warble
WARBLE, v.t. [G., to turn, whirl, warble; a whirl, a vortex; a turning bone or joint, L.]1. To ...

61370

warbled
WARBLED, pp. Quavered; modulated; uttered musically.

61371

warbler
WARBLER, n. 1 . A singer; a songster; used of birds.In lulling strains the fetherd warblers woo.2. ...

61372

warbles
WARBLES, n. In farriery, small hard tumors on the backs of horses, occasioned by the heat of the ...

61373

warbling
WARBLING, ppr. 1. Quavering the voice; modulating notes; singing.2. a. Filled with musical notes; ...

61374

ward
WARD, in composition, as in toward, homeward, is the Saxon weard, from the root of L.WARD, v.t. 1. ...

61375

ward-room
WARD-ROOM, n. [ward and room.] In a ship, a room over the gun-room, where the lieutenants and other ...

61376

ward-staff
WARD-STAFF, n. A constables or watchmans staff.

61377

warded
WARDED, pp. Guarded. Warded off, prevented from attacking or injuring.

61378

warden
WARDEN, n. 1. A keeper; a guardian.2. An officer who keeps or guards; a keeper; as the warden of ...

61379

warder
WARDER, n. 1. A keeper; a guard.The warders of the gate.2. A trunchion by which an officer of arms ...

61380

wardmote
WARDMOTE, n. In law, a court held in each ward in London.

61381

wardrobe
WARDROBE, n. 1. A room or apartment where clothes or wearing apparel is kept.2. Wearing apparel in ...

61382

wardship
WARDSHIP, n. 1. Guardianship; care and protection of a ward.2. Right of guardianship.Wardship is ...

61383

ware
WARE, pret. of wear, obs. It is now written wore.

61384

wareful
WAREFUL, a. [from ware, wary.] Wary; watchful; cautious. [Not used.]

61385

warefulness
WAREFULNESS, n. Wariness; cautiousness.

61386

warehouse
WAREHOUSE, n. [ware and house.] A storehouse for goods.WAREHOUSE, v.t. s as z. To deposit or secure ...

61387

warehoused
WAREHOUSED, pp. Placed in a store for safe keeping.

61388

warehousing
WAREHOUSING, ppr. Repositing in a store for safe keeping.

61389

wareless
WARELESS, a. Unwary; incautious.2. Suffered unawares.

61390

warely
WARELY, adv. Cautiously. [See Warily.]

61391

warfare
WARFARE, n. [war and fare.] 1. Military service; military life; war.The Philistines gathered their ...

61392

warhable
WARHABLE, a. [war and L. habilis.] Fit for war. [Not in use.]

61393

warhoop
WARHOOP, n. [war and hoop.] The savage yell of war; a yell uttered on entering into battle.

61394

warily
WARILY, adv. [from wary.] Cautiously; with timorous prudence or wise foresight. Great enterprises ...

61395

warine
WARINE, n. A species of monkey of South America.

61396

wariness
WARINESS, n. Caution; prudent care to foresee and guard against evil. The road was so slippery, and ...

61397

wark
WARK, n. Work; a building. [It is obsolete, except in bulwark.]

61398

warlike
WARLIKE, a. [war and like.]1. Fit for war; disposed for war; as a warlike state.Old Siward with ten ...

61399

warlikeness
WARLIKENESS, n. A warlike disposition or character. [Little used.]

61400

warling
WARLING, n. One often quarreled with; a word coined perhaps to rhyme with darling. [Not in use.]

61401

warlock
WARLOCK, WARLUCK, n. A male witch; a wizard. [This word is not in use.]

61402

warluck
WARLOCK, WARLUCK, n. A male witch; a wizard. [This word is not in use.]

61403

warm
WARM, a. Waurm. [G. See Swarm.]1. Having heat in a moderate degree; not cold; as warm blood; warm ...

61404

warmed
WARMED, pp. Moderately heated; made ardent; excited.

61405

warming
WARMING, ppr. Making moderately hot; making ardent or zealous.

61406

warming-pan
WARMING-PAN, n. [warm and pan.] A covered pan with a long handle, for warming a bed with ignited ...

61407

warming-stone
WARMING-STONE, n. [warm and stone.] A stone dug in cornwall, which retains heat a great while, and ...

61408

warmly
WARMLY, adv. 1. With gentle heat.2. Eagerly; earnestly; ardently; as, to espouse warmly the cause ...

61409

warmness
WARMNESS, WARMTH, n. 1. Gentle heat; as the warmth of the blood.2. Zeal; ardor; fervor; as the ...

61410

warmth
WARMNESS, WARMTH, n. 1. Gentle heat; as the warmth of the blood.2. Zeal; ardor; fervor; as the ...

61411

warn
WARN, v.t. [G.]1. To give notice of approaching or probable danger or evil, that it may be avoided; ...

61412

warned
WARNED, pp. Cautioned against danger; admonished of approaching evil; notified.

61413

warner
WARNER, n. An admonisher.

61414

warning
WARNING, ppr. Cautioning against danger; admonishing; giving notice to; summoning to meet or ...

61415

warp
WARP, n. Waurp. [See the Verb.] 1. In manufactures, the threads, which are extended lengthwise in ...

61416

warped
WARPED, pp. Twisted by shrinking or seasoning; turned out of the true direction; perverted; moved ...

61417

warping
WARPING, ppr. Turning or twisting; causing to incline; perverting; moving with a warp; enriching by ...

61418

warping-bank
WARPING-BANK, n. A bank or mound of earth raised round a field for retaining the water let in from ...

61419

warping-clough
WARPING-CLOUGH, WARPING-HATCH, WARPING-SLUICE, n. A flood gate to let in tide water upon land. ...

61420

warping-cut
WARPING-CUT, WARPING-DRAIN, WARPING-GUTTER, n. An open passage or channel for discharging the water ...

61421

warping-drain
WARPING-CUT, WARPING-DRAIN, WARPING-GUTTER, n. An open passage or channel for discharging the water ...

61422

warping-gutter
WARPING-CUT, WARPING-DRAIN, WARPING-GUTTER, n. An open passage or channel for discharging the water ...

61423

warping-hatch
WARPING-CLOUGH, WARPING-HATCH, WARPING-SLUICE, n. A flood gate to let in tide water upon land. ...

61424

warping-hook
WARPING-HOOK, n. A hook used by rope-makers for hanging the yarn on, when warping into hauls for ...

61425

warping-post
WARPING-POST, n. A strong post used in warping rope yarn.

61426

warping-sluice
WARPING-CLOUGH, WARPING-HATCH, WARPING-SLUICE, n. A flood gate to let in tide water upon land. ...

61427

warproof
WARPROOF, n. [war and proof.] Valor tried by war.

61428

warrant
WARRANT, v.t. [The primary sense of the root is to stop or hold, or to repel, and thus guard by ...

61429

warrantable
WARRANTABLE, a. Authorized by commission, precept or right; justifiable; defensible. The seizure of ...

61430

warrantableness
WARRANTABLENESS, n. The quality of being justifiable.

61431

warrantably
WARRANTABLY, adv. In a manner that may be justified; justifiably.

61432

warranted
WARRANTED, pp. Authorized; justified; secured; assured by covenant or by implied obligation.

61433

warrantee
WARRANTEE, n. The person to whom land or other thing is warranted.

61434

warranter
WARRANTER, n. 1. One who gives authority or legally empowers.2. One who assures, or covenants to ...

61435

warranting
WARRANTING, ppr.1. Authorizing; empowering.2. Assuring; securing to another a right, or covenanting ...

61436

warrantise
WARRANTISE, n. Authority; security. [Not in use.]

61437

warrantor
WARRANTOR, n. One who warrants.

61438

warranty
WARRANTY, n. 1. In law, a promise or covenant by deed, made by the bargainer for himself and his ...

61439

warray
WARRAY, v.t. To make war upon.

61440

warre
WARRE, a. Worse.

61441

warren
WARREN, n. [See Guard, Warrant and Wary.]1. A piece of ground appropriated to the breeding and ...

61442

warrener
WARRENER, n. The keeper of a warren.

61443

warriangle
WARRIANGLE, n. A hawk.

61444

warrior
WARRIOR, n. 1. In a general sense, a soldier; a man engaged in military life.2. Emphatically, a ...

61445

warrioress
WARRIORESS, n. A female warrior.

61446

wart
WART, n. Waurt. [G.]1. A hard excrescence on the skin of animals, which is covered with the ...

61447

warted
WARTED, a. In botany, having little knobs on the surface; verrucose; as a warted capsule.

61448

wartwort
WARTWORT, n. A plant of the genus Euphorbia or spurge, which is studded with hard warty knobs; ...

61449

warty
WARTY, a. 1. Having warts; full of warts; overgrown with warts; as a warty leaf.2. Of the nature of ...

61450

wary
WARY, a. [See Ware and Warn.] Cautious of danger; carefully watching and guarding against ...

61451

was
WAS, s. as z.; the past tense of the substantive verb; L., to be, to exist, whence English is, in ...

61452

wash
WASH, v.t. [G.]1. To cleanse by ablution, or by rubbing in water; as, to wash the hands or the ...

61453

wash-ball
WASH-BALL, n. [wash and ball.] A ball of soap, to be used in washing the hands or face.

61454

wash-board
WASH-BOARD, n. [wash and board.] 1. A broad thin plank, fixed occasionally on the top of a boat or ...

61455

wash-pot
WASH-POT, n. A vessel in which any thing is washed.

61456

wash-tub
WASH-TUB, n. A tub in which clothes are washed.

61457

washed
WASHED, pp. 1. Cleansed in water; purified.2. Overflowed; dashed against with water.3. Covered over ...

61458

washer
WASHER, n. 1. One who washes.2. An iron ring between the nave of a wheel and the linch-pin.

61459

washer-woman
WASHER-WOMAN, n. A woman that washes clothes for others or for hire.

61460

washing
WASHING, ppr. Cleansing with water; purifying; overflowing; overspreading.WASHING, n. 1. The act of ...

61461

washy
WASHY, a. [from wash.]1. Watery; damp; soft; as the washy ooze.2. Weak; not solid.3. Weak; not firm ...

61462

wasp
WASP, n. [G., L.] In entomology, a genus of insects, Vespa, of the order of Hymenopters. The mouth ...

61463

wasp-fly
WASP-FLY, n. A species of fly resembling a wasp, but having no sting, and but two wings.

61464

waspish
WASPISH, a. Snappish; petulant; irritable; irascible; quick to resent any trifling affront.Much do ...

61465

waspishly
WASPISHLY, adv. Petulantly; in a snappish manner.

61466

waspishness
WASPISHNESS, n. Petulance; irascibility; snappishness.

61467

wassail
WASSAIL, n. 1. A liquor made of apples, sugar and ale, formerly much used by English good ...

61468

wassail-bowl
WASSAIL-BOWL, n. A bowl for holding wassail.

61469

wassail-cup
WASSAIL-CUP, n. A cup in which wassail was carried to the company.

61470

wassailer
WASSAILER, n. A toper; a drunkard.

61471

wast
WAST, past tense of the substantive verb, in the second person; as, thou wast.

61472

waste
WASTE, v.t. [G., L.] 1. To diminish by gradual dissipation or loss. Thus disease wastes the ...

61473

waste-gate
WASTE-GATE, n. A gate to let the water of a pond pass off when it is not wanted.

61474

waste-wier
WASTE-WIER, n. An overfall or wier for the superfluous water of a canal.

61475

wasted
WASTED, pp. 1. Expended without necessity or use; lost through negligence; squandered.2. ...

61476

wasteful
WASTEFUL, a. 1. Lavish; prodigal; expending property, or that which is valuable, without necessity ...

61477

wastefully
WASTEFULLY, adv. In a lavish manner; with prodigality; in useless expenses or consumption.Her ...

61478

wastefulness
WASTEFULNESS, n. Lavishness; prodigality; the act or practice of expending what is valuable without ...

61479

wastel
WASTEL, n. A particular sort of bread; fine bread or cake.

61480

wasteness
WASTENESS, n. A desolate state; solitude.That day is a day of wrath, a day of trouble and distress, ...

61481

waster
WASTER, n. 1. One who is prodigal; one who squanders property; one who consumes extravagantly or ...

61482

wastethrift
WASTETHRIFT, n. [waste and thrift.] A spendthrift.

61483

wasting
WASTING, ppr. 1. Lavishing prodigally; expending or consuming without use; diminishing by slow ...

61484

wastorel
WASTREL, WASTOREL, n. Waste substances; any thing cast away as bad. [Local.]

61485

wastrel
WASTREL, n. A state of waste or common. [Local.]

61486

watch
WATCH, n. [It is from the same root as wake, which see.]1. Forbearance of sleep.2. Attendance ...

61487

watch-glass
WATCH-GLASS, n. [watch and glass.]1. In ships, a half hour glass, used to measure the time of a ...

61488

watch-house
WATCH-HOUSE, n. [watch and house.] A house in which a watch or guard is placed.

61489

watch-light
WATCH-LIGHT, n. [watch and light.] A candle with a rush wick.

61490

watched
WATCHED, pp. Guarded; observed with steady vigilance.

61491

watcher
WATCHER, n. 1. One who sits up or continues awake; particularly, one who attends upon the sick ...

61492

watchet
WATCHET, a. Pale or light blue.Who stares in Germany at watchet eyes? [Not in use.]

61493

watchful
WATCHFUL, a. Vigilant; attentive; careful to observe; observant; cautious. It has of before the ...

61494

watchfully
WATCHFULLY, adv. Vigilantly; heedfully; with careful observation of the approach of evil, or ...

61495

watchfulness
WATCHFULNESS, n. 1. Vigilance; heedfulness; heed; suspicious attention; careful and diligent ...

61496

watching
WATCHING, ppr. Being awake; guarding; attending the sick; carefully observing.WATCHING, n. ...

61497

watchmaker
WATCHMAKER, n. [watch and maker.] One whose occupation is to make and repair watches.

61498

watchman
WATCHMAN, n. [watch and man.] A sentinel; a guard.

61499

watchtower
WATCHTOWER, n. [watch and tower.] A tower on which a sentinel is placed to watch for enemies or the ...

61500

watchword
WATCHWORD, n. [watch and word.] The word given to sentinels, and to such as have occasion to visit ...

61501

water
WATER, n. Wauter. [G., Gr.]1. A fluid, the most abundant and most necessary for living beings of ...

61502

water-bearer
WATER-BEARER, n. [water and bearer.] In astronomy, a sign of the zodiac, called also Aquarius, from ...

61503

water-bellows
WATER-BELLOWS, n. [water and bellows.] A machine for blowing air into a furnace, by means of a ...

61504

water-borne
WATER-BORNE, n. Borne by the water; floated; having water sufficient to float; as ships water-borne ...

61505

water-calamint
WATER-CALAMINT, n. [water and calamint.] A species of mint or Mentha.

61506

water-carriage
WATER-CARRIAGE, n. [water and carriage.]1. Transportation or conveyance by water; or the means of ...

61507

water-cart
WATER-CART, n. [water and cart.] A cart earing a large cask of water which is conveyed into a ...

61508

water-clock
WATER-CLOCK, n. [water and clock.] The clepsydra; an instrument or machine serving to measure time ...

61509

water-color
WATER-COLOR, n. [water and color.] Water-colors, in painting or limning, are colors diluted and ...

61510

water-course
WATER-COURSE, n. [water and course.]1. A stream of water; a river or brook. Isaiah 44.2. A channel ...

61511

water-cress
WATER-CRESS, n. [water and cress.] A small creeping plant or weed growing in watery places.A plant, ...

61512

water-crowfoot
WATER-CROWFOOT, n. [water and crowfoot.] A plant on which cows are said to be fond of feeding.

61513

water-drop
WATER-DROP, n. [water and drop.[ A drop of water.

61514

water-dropwort
WATER-DROPWORT, n. A plant of the genus Oenanthe.

61515

water-elephant
WATER-ELEPHANT, n. A name given to the hippopotamus.

61516

water-engine
WATER-ENGINE, n. [water and engine.] An engine to raise water; or an engine moved by water.

61517

water-flag
WATER-FLAG, n. [water and flag.] Water and flower de luce, a species of Tris.

61518

water-flood
WATER-FLOOD, n. [water and flood.] A flood of water; an inundation.

61519

water-fly
WATER-FLY, n. [water and fly.] An insect that is seen on the water.

61520

water-fowl
WATER-FOWL, n. [water and fowl.] A fowl that frequents the water, or lives about rivers, lakes, or ...

61521

water-fox
WATER-FOX, n. [water and fox.] A name given to the carp, on account of its cunning.

61522

water-furrow
WATER-FURROW, n. [water and furrow.] In agriculture, a deep furrow made for conducting water fro ...

61523

water-gage
WATER-GAGE, WATER-GUAGE, n. [water and gage.] An instrument for measuring or ascertaining the depth ...

61524

water-gall
WATER-GALL, n. 1. A cavity made in the earth by a torrent of water.2. An appearance in the rainbow.

61525

water-germander
WATER-GERMANDER, n. A plant of the genus Teucrium.

61526

water-god
WATER-GOD, n. [water and god.] A deity that presides over the water.

61527

water-gruel
WATER-GRUEL, n. [water and gruel.] A liquid food, composed of water and a small portion of meal or ...

61528

water-guage
WATER-GAGE, WATER-GUAGE, n. [water and gage.] An instrument for measuring or ascertaining the depth ...

61529

water-hair-grass
WATER-HAIR-GRASS, n. A species of grass, the Aira aquatica.

61530

water-hammer
WATER-HAMMER, n. A column of water in a vacuum, which not being supported as in the air, falls ...

61531

water-hemp-agrimon
WATER-HEMP-AGRIMONY, n. A plant of the genus Bidens.

61532

water-hen
WATER-HEN, n. [water and hen.] A water fowl of the genus Fulica, the gallinula or moorhen; also, a ...

61533

water-hog
WATER-HOG, n. [water and hog.] A quadruped of South America, the Cavia capybara.

61534

water-laurel
WATER-LAUREL, n. [water and laurel.] A plant.

61535

water-leaf
WATER-LEAF, n. [water and leaf.] A plant of the genus Hydrophyllum.

61536

water-level
WATER-LEVEL, n. [water and level.] The level formed by the surface of still water.

61537

water-lily
WATER-LILY, n. [water and lily.] A plant of the genus Nymphaea.

61538

water-line
WATER-LINE, n. [water and line.] A horizontal line supposed to be drawn about a ships bottom at ...

61539

water-logged
WATER-LOGGED, a. [water and log.] Lying like a log on the water. A ship is said to be water-logged, ...

61540

water-mark
WATER-MARK, n. [water and mark.] The mark or limit of the rise of a flood.

61541

water-melon
WATER-MELON, n. [water and melon.] A plant and its fruit, of the genus Cucurbita. This plant ...

61542

water-mill
WATER-MILL, n. [water and mill.] A mill whose machinery is moved by water, and thus distinguished ...

61543

water-mint
WATER-MINT. [See Water-calamint.]

61544

water-newt
WATER-NEWT, n. [water and newt.] An animal of the lizared tribe, [Lacerta aquatica.]

61545

water-ordeal
WATER-ORDEAL, n. [water and ordeal.] A judicial trial of persons accused of crimes, by means of ...

61546

water-ouzel
WATER-OUZEL, n. [water and ouzel.] A fowl of the genus Sturnus.The water ouzel is the Turdus ...

61547

water-parsnep
WATER-PARSNEP, n. [water and parsnep.[ A plant of the genus Sium.

61548

water-poa
WATER-POA, n. A species of grass, the Poa aquatica.

61549

water-poise
WATER-POISE, n. s as z. [water and poise.] An instrument for examining the purity of water.

61550

water-pot
WATER-POT, n. [water and pot.] A vessel for holding or conveying water, or for sprinkling water on ...

61551

water-proof
WATER-PROOF, a. [water and proof.] Impervious to water; so firm and compact as not to admit water; ...

61552

water-radish
WATER-RADISH, n. [water and radish.] A species of water-cresses. Water-cress, a species of ...

61553

water-rail
WATER-RAIL, n. [water and rail.] A fowl of the genus Rallus.

61554

water-rat
WATER-RAT, n. [water and rat.] An animal of the genus Mus, which lives in the banks of streams or ...

61555

water-rocket
WATER-ROCKET, n. [water and rocket.]1. A species of water-cresses.2. A kind of fire-work to be ...

61556

water-rot
WATER-ROT, v.t. [water and rot.] To rot by steeping in water; as, to water-rot hemp or flax.

61557

water-rotted
WATER-ROTTED, pp. Rotted by being steeped in water.

61558

water-rotting
WATER-ROTTING, ppr. Rotting in water.

61559

water-sail
WATER-SAIL, n. [water and sail.] A small sail used under a studding sail or driver boom.

61560

water-sapphire
WATER-SAPPHIRE, n. [water and sapphire.] A kind of blue precious stone.

61561

water-shoot
WATER-SHOOT, n. [water and shoot.[ A sprig or shoot from the root or stock of a tree. [Local.]

61562

water-snake
WATER-SNAKE, n. [water and snake.] A snake that frequents the water.

61563

water-soak
WATER-SOAK, v.t. [water and soak.] To soak or fill the interstices with water.

61564

water-soaked
WATER-SOAKED, pp. Soaked or having its interstices filled with water; as water-soaked wood; a water ...

61565

water-soldier
WATER-SOLDIER, n. A plant of the genus Stratiotes.

61566

water-spaniel
WATER-SPANIEL, n. [water and spaniel.] A dog so called.

61567

water-spout
WATER-SPOUT, n. [water and spout.] At sea, a vertical column of water, raised from the surface of ...

61568

water-table
WATER-TABLE, n. [water and table.] In architecture, a ledge in the wall of a building, about ...

61569

water-tath
WATER-TATH, n. In England, a species of coarse grass growing in wet grounds, and supposed to be ...

61570

water-thermometer
WATER-THERMOMETER, n. An instrument for ascertaining the precise degree of cold at which water ...

61571

water-tight
WATER-TIGHT, a. [water and tight.] So tight as not to admit water.

61572

water-trefoil
WATER-TREFOIL, n. A plant.

61573

water-violet
WATER-VIOLET, n. [water and violet.] A plant of the genus Hottonia.

61574

water-way
WATER-WAY, n. [water and way.] In a ships deck, a piece of timber, forming a channel for conducting ...

61575

water-wheel
WATER-WHEEL, n. [water and wheel.] 1. A wheel moved by water.2. An engine for raising water from a ...

61576

water-willow
WATER-WILLOW, n. [water and willow.] A plant. [L.]

61577

water-with
WATER-WITH, n. [water and with.] A plant.

61578

water-work
WATER-WORK, n. [water and work.] Water-works are hydraulic machines or engines, particularly such ...

61579

water-wort
WATER-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Elatine.

61580

waterage
WATERAGE, n. Money paid for transportation by water.

61581

watered
WATERED, pp. Overspread or sprinkled with water; made wet; supplied with water; made lustrous by ...

61582

waterer
WATERER, n. One who waters.

61583

waterfall
WATERFALL, n. [water and fall.] A fall or perpendicular descent of the water of a river or stream, ...

61584

wateriness
WATERINESS, n. [from watery.] Moisture; humidity; a state of abounding with water.

61585

watering
WATERING, ppr. Overflowing; sprinkling or wetting with water; supplying with water; giving water ...

61586

watering-place
WATERING-PLACE, n. A place to which people resort for mineral water, or for the use of water in ...

61587

watering-trough
WATERING-TROUGH, n. A trough in which cattle and horses drink.

61588

waterish
WATERISH, a. 1. Resembling water; thin, as a liquor.2. Moist; somewhat watery; as waterish land.

61589

waterishness
WATERISHNESS, n. Thinness, as of a liquor; resemblance to water.Waterishness, which is like the ...

61590

waterless
WATERLESS, a. Destitute of water.

61591

waterman
WATERMAN, n. [water and man.] A boatman; a ferryman; a man who manages water-craft.

61592

watery
WATERY, a. 1. Resembling water; thin or transparent, as a liquid; as watery humors.The oily and ...

61593

wattle
WATTLE, n. [L., a shoot.]1. Properly, a twig or flexible rod; and hence, a hurdle.2. The fleshy ...

61594

wattled
WATTLED, pp. Bound or interwoven with twigs.

61595

wattling
WATTLING, ppr. Interweaving with twigs.

61596

waul
WAUL, v.i. To cry, as a cat.

61597

wauling
WAULING, ppr. Crying, as a cat.

61598

wave
WAVE, n. [G.]1. A moving swell or volume of water; usually, a swell raised and driven by wind. A ...

61599

wave-loaf
WAVE-LOAF, n. [wave and loaf.] A loaf for a wave-offering.

61600

wave-offering
WAVE-OFFERING, n. An offering made with waving towards the four cardinal points. Numbers 18.

61601

wave-subjected
WAVE-SUBJECTED, a. Subject to be overflowed.

61602

wave-worn
WAVE-WORN, a. [wave and worn.] Worn by the waves.The shore that oer his wave-worn basis bowd.

61603

waved
WAVED, pp. 1. Moved one way and the other; brandished.2. Put off; omitted.3. a. In heraldry, ...

61604

waveless
WAVELESS, a. Free from waves; undisturbed; unagitated; as the waveless sea.

61605

wavellite
WAVELLITE, n. A mineral, a phosphate or sub-phosphate of alumin; commonly found in crystals, which ...

61606

waver
WAVER, v.i. 1. To play or move to and fro; to move one way and the other.2. To fluctuate; to be ...

61607

waverer
WAVERER, n. One who wavers; one who is unsettled in doctrine, faith or opinion.

61608

wavering
WAVERING, ppr. or a. Fluctuating; being in doubt; undetermined.

61609

waveringness
WAVERINGNESS, n. State or quality of being wavering.

61610

waving
WAVING, ppr. Moving as a wave; playing to and fro; brandishing.

61611

wavy
WAVY, a. [from wave.[1. Rising or swelling in waves; full of waves; as the wavy sea.2. Playing to ...

61612

wax
WAX, n. [G., L.]1. A thick, viscid, tenacious substance, collected by bees, or excreted from their ...

61613

wax-bill
WAX-BILL, n. A bird, a species of Loxia.

61614

wax-candle
WAX-CANDLE, n. [wax and candle.] A candle made of wax.

61615

wax-chandler
WAX-CHANDLER, n. [wax and chandler.] A maker of wax candles.

61616

wax-myrtle
WAX-MYRTLE, n. The bayberry, or Myrica cerifera, a shrub of North America, the berries of which are ...

61617

wax-palm
WAX-PALM, n. A species of palm, the Ceroxylon andicola, a native of the Andes, the stem of which is ...

61618

wax-work
WAX-WORK, n. Figures formed of wax, in imitation of real beings.

61619

waxed
WAXED, pp. Smeared or rubbed with wax.

61620

waxen
WAXEN, a. Made of wax; as waxen cells.

61621

waxing
WAXING, ppr. Growing; increasing; becoming; smearing with wax.WAXING, n. In chemistry, the ...

61622

waxy
WAXY, a. Soft like wax; resembling wax; viscid; adhesive.

61623

way
WAY, n. [G., L.]1. Literally, a passing; hence, a passage; the place of passing; hence, a road of ...

61624

way-bread
WAY-BREAD, n. A name given to the herb plantain(plantago.) [Local.]

61625

way-leave
WAY-LEAVE, n. A provincial term for the ground purchased for a wagon-way between coal-pits and a ...

61626

way-maker
WAY-MAKER, n. One who makes a way; a precursor.

61627

way-mark
WAY-MARK, n. [way and mark.] A mark to guide in traveling. Jeremiah 31.

61628

way-pane
WAY-PANE, n. A slip left for cartage in watered land. [Local.]

61629

way-thistle
WAY-THISTLE, n. A troublesome plant or perennial weed.

61630

way-warden
WAY-WARDEN, n. In local usage, the surveyor of a road.

61631

way-wiser
WAY-WISER, n. An instrument for measuring the distance which one has traveled on the road; called ...

61632

wayfarer
WAYFARER, n. A traveler; a passenger.

61633

wayfaring
WAYFARING, a. [supra.] Traveling; passing; being on a journey. Judges 19.

61634

wayfaring-tree
WAYFARING-TREE, n. A shrub, a species of Viburnum.

61635

waylaid
WAYLAID, pp. Watched int he way. [See Waylay.]

61636

waylay
WAYLAY, v.t. [way and lay.] To watch insidiously in the way, with a view to seize, rob or slay; to ...

61637

waylayer
WAYLAYER, n. One who waits for another in ambush, with a view to seize, rob or slay him.

61638

wayless
WAYLESS, a. Having no road or path; pathless; trackless.

61639

wayment
WAYMENT, v.i. To lament. [Not in use.]

61640

wayward
WAYWARD, a. [way and ward.] Froward; peevish; perverse; liking his own way.Wayward beauty doth not ...

61641

waywardly
WAYWARDLY, adv. Frowardly; perversely.

61642

waywardness
WAYWARDNESS, n. Forwardness; perverseness.

61643

waywode
WAYWODE, WAIWODE, n. 1. In the Ottoman empire, the governor of a small town or province, which not ...

61644

waywodeship
WAYWODESHIP, n. The province or jurisdiction of a waywode.

61645

we
WE, pron. plu. of I; or rather a different word, denoting the person speaking and another or others ...

61646

weak
WEAK, a. [G. The primary sense of the root is to yield, fail, give way, recede, or to be soft.]1. ...

61647

weak-hearted
WEAK-HEARTED, a. Having little courage; dispirited.

61648

weaken
WEAKEN, v.t. 1. To lessen the strength of, or to deprive of strength; to debilitate; to enfeeble; ...

61649

weakened
WEAKENED, pp. Debilitated; enfeebled; reduced in strength.

61650

weakener
WEAKENER, n. He or that which weakens.

61651

weakening
WEAKENING, ppr. Debilitating; enfeebling; reducing the strength or vigor of any thing.

61652

weakling
WEAKLING, n. A feeble creature.

61653

weakly
WEAKLY, adv. 1. Feebly; with little physical strength; faintly; not forcible; as a fortress weakly ...

61654

weakness
WEAKNESS, n. 1. Want of physical strength; want of force or vigor; feebleness; as the weakness of a ...

61655

weakside
WEAKSIDE, n. [weak and side.] Foible; deficience; failing; infirmity.

61656

weal
WEAL, n. [G., L., to be strong, to avail, to prevail. The primary sense of weal is strength, ...

61657

wealsman
WEALSMAN, n. [weal and man.] A name given sneeringly to a politician.

61658

wealth
WEALTH, n. 1. Prosperity; external happiness.2. Riches; large possessions of money, goods or land; ...

61659

wealthily
WEALTHILY, adv. Richly.

61660

wealthiness
WEALTHINESS, n. State of being wealthy; richness.

61661

wealthy
WEALTHY, a. Rich; having large possessions in lands, goods, money or securities, or larger than the ...

61662

wean
WEAN, v.t. [G. See Wont.]1. To accustom and reconcile, as a child or other young animal, to a want ...

61663

weaned
WEANED, pp. Accustomed or reconciled to the want of the breast or other object of desire.

61664

weanel
WEANEL, WEANLING, n. A child or other animal newly weaned.

61665

weaning
WEANING, ppr. Accustoming or reconciling, as a young child or other animal, to a want of the ...

61666

weanling
WEANEL, WEANLING, n. A child or other animal newly weaned.

61667

weapon
WEAPON, n. [G., L.]1. Any instrument of offense; any thing used or designed to be used in ...

61668

weapon-salve
WEAPON-SALVE, n. [weapon and salve.] A salve which was supposed to cure the wound, by being applied ...

61669

weaponed
WEAPONED, a. Wepnd. Armed; furnished with weapons or arms; equipped.

61670

weaponless
WEAPONLESS, a. Unarmed; having no weapon.

61671

wear
WEAR, v.t. pret. wore; pp. worn.1. To waste or impair by rubbing or attrition; to lessen or ...

61672

wearable
WEARABLE, a. That can be worn.

61673

weard
WEARD, Sax. A warden, in names, denotes watchfulness or care, but it must not be confounded with ...

61674

wearer
WEARER, n. [from wear.]1. One who wears or carries as appendant to the body; as the wearer of a ...

61675

weariness
WEARINESS, n. [from weary.] 1. The state of being weary or tired; that lassitude or exhaustion of ...

61676

wearing
WEARING, ppr. 1. Bearing on or appendant to the person; diminishing by friction; consuming.2. a. ...

61677

wearish
WEARISH, a. 1. Boggy; watery. [Not in use.]2. Weak; washy. [Not in use.]

61678

wearisome
WEARISOME, a. [from weary.] Causing weariness; tiresome; tedious; fatiguing; as a wearisome march; ...

61679

wearisomely
WEARISOMELY, adv. Tediously; so as to cause weariness.

61680

wearisomeness
WEARISOMENESS, n. The quality of exhausting strength or patience; tiresomeness; tediousness; as the ...

61681

weary
WEARY, a. 1. Having the strength much exhausted by toil or violent exertion; tired; fatigued. [It ...

61682

weasand
WEASAND, WESAND, n. s as z. The windpipe or trachea; the canal through which air passes to and from ...

61683

weasel
WEASEL, WEESEL, n. s as z. A small animal of the genus Mustela, which lives under the roots of ...

61684

weasel-coot
WEASEL-COOT, n. The red headed smew or Mergus minutus.

61685

weather
WEATHER, n. Wether. [G., The primary sense of this word is air, wind or atmosphere; probably the ...

61686

weather-beaten
WEATHER-BEATEN, a. [weather and beaten.] Beaten or harassed by the weather.

61687

weather-bit
WEATHER-BIT, n. A turn of the cable about the end of the windlass, without the knight-heads.

61688

weather-board
WEATHER-BOARD, n. That side of a ship which is towards the wind; the windward side. So in other ...

61689

weather-boarding
WEATHER-BOARDING, n. The act of nailing up boards against a wall; or the boards themselves.

61690

weather-boards
WEATHER-BOARDS, n. Pieces of plank placed in the ports of a ship, when laid up in ordinary.

61691

weather-cloths
WEATHER-CLOTHS, n. Long pieces of canvas or tarpaulin used to preserve the hammocks from injury by ...

61692

weather-cock
WEATHER-COCK, n. [weather and cock.]1. Something in the shape of a cock placed on the stop of a ...

61693

weather-driven
WEATHER-DRIVEN, a. [weather and driven.] Driven by winds or storms; forced by stress of weather.

61694

weather-fend
WEATHER-FEND, v.t. [weather and fend.] To shelter.

61695

weather-gage
WEATHER-GAGE, n. [weather and gage.] Something that shows the weather. A ship is said to have the ...

61696

weather-glass
WEATHER-GLASS, n. [weather and glass.] An instrument to indicate the state of the atmosphere. This ...

61697

weather-helm
WEATHER-HELM, n. [weather and helm.] A ship is said to carry a weather-helm, when she is inclined ...

61698

weather-proof
WEATHER-PROOF, a. [weather and proof.] Proof against rough weather.

61699

weather-roll
WEATHER-ROLL, n. [weather and roll.] The roll of a ship to the windward; opposed to lee-lurch.

61700

weather-spy
WEATHER-SPY, n. [weather and spy.] A star-gazer; one that foretells the weather. [Little used.]

61701

weather-tide
WEATHER-TIDE, n. [weather and tide.] The tide which sets against the lee side of a ship, impelling ...

61702

weather-wise
WEATHER-WISE, a. [weather and wise.] Skillful in foreseeing the changes or state of the weather.

61703

weather-wiser
WEATHER-WISER, n. Something that foreshows the weather. [Not used.]

61704

weathered
WEATHERED, pp. Passed to the windward; passed with difficulty.

61705

weathering
WEATHERING, ppr. Passing or sailing to the windward; passing with difficulty.

61706

weathermost
WEATHERMOST, a. [weather and most.] Being farthest to the windward.

61707

weave
WEAVE, v.t. pret. wove; pp. woven, wove. The regular form, weaved, is rarely or never used. [G., ...

61708

weaver
WEAVER, n. 1. One who weaves; one whose occupation is to weave.2. The common name of the genus ...

61709

weaver-fish
WEAVER-FISH, n. A kind of fish, [L.] [See Weever.]

61710

weaving
WEAVING, ppr. Forming cloth by intertexture of threads.WEAVING, n. 1. The act or art of forming ...

61711

web
WEB, n. [See Weave.]1. Texture of threads; plexus; any thing woven. Penelope devised a web to ...

61712

web-footed
WEB-FOOTED, a. [web and foot.] Having webbed feet; palmiped. A goose, or duck, is a web-footed ...

61713

webbed
WEBBED, a. [from web.] Having the toes united by a membrane, or web; as the webbed feet of aquatic ...

61714

wed
WED, v.t. [L., to give bail; a league; probably both are of one family.]1. To marry; to take for a ...

61715

wedded
WEDDED, pp. Married; closely attached.

61716

wedding
WEDDING, ppr. Marrying; uniting with in matrimony.WEDDING, n. Marriage; nuptials; nuptial ceremony; ...

61717

wedding-clothes
WEDDING-CLOTHES, n. [wedding and clothes.] Garments for a bride or a bridegroom, to be worn at ...

61718

wedding-day
WEDDING-DAY, n. [wedding and day.] The day of marriage.

61719

wedding-feast
WEDDING-FEAST, n. [wedding and feast.] A feast or entertainment prepared for the guests at a ...

61720

wedge
WEDGE, n. [This word signifies a mass, a lump.]1. A mass of metal; as a wedge of gold or silver. ...

61721

wedge-shaped
WEDGE-SHAPED, a. [wedge and shape.] Having the shape of a wedge; cuneiform. A wedge-shaped leaf is ...

61722

wedged
WEDGED, pp. Split with a wedge; fastened with a wedge; closely compressed.

61723

wedging
WEDGING, ppr. Cleaving with a wedge; fastening with wedges; compressing closely.

61724

wedlock
WEDLOCK, n. Marriage; matrimony.WEDLOCK, v.t. To marry. [Little used.]

61725

wedlocked
WEDLOCKED, pp. United in marriage. [Little used.]

61726

wednesday
WEDNESDAY, n. Wenzday. The fourth day of the week; the next day after Tuesday.

61727

wee
WEE, a. [G.] Small; little. [Not in use.]

61728

weechelm
WEECHELM, WITCH-ELM, n. A species of elm.

61729

weed
WEED, n. 1. The general name of any plant that is useless or noxious. The word therefore has no ...

61730

weed-hook
WEED-HOOK, WEEDING-HOOK, n. [weed and hook.] A hook used for cutting away or extirpating weeds.

61731

weeded
WEEDED, pp. Freed from weeds or whatever is noxious.

61732

weeder
WEEDER, n. One that weeds or frees from any thing noxious.

61733

weeding
WEEDING, ppr. Freeing from weeds or whatever is noxious to growth.WEEDING, n. The operation of ...

61734

weeding-chisel
WEEDING-CHISEL, n. S as z. A tool with a divided chisel point, for cutting the roots of large weeds ...

61735

weeding-forceps
WEEDING-FORCEPS, WEEDING-TONGS, n. An instrument for taking up some sorts of plants in weeding.

61736

weeding-fork
WEEDING-FORK, n. A strong three-pronged fork, used in cleaning ground of weeds.

61737

weeding-hook
WEED-HOOK, WEEDING-HOOK, n. [weed and hook.] A hook used for cutting away or extirpating weeds.

61738

weeding-rhim
WEEDING-RHIM, n. An implement somewhat like the frame of a wheel-barrow, used for tearing up weeds ...

61739

weeding-tongs
WEEDING-FORCEPS, WEEDING-TONGS, n. An instrument for taking up some sorts of plants in weeding.

61740

weedless
WEEDLESS, a. Free from weeds or noxious matter.

61741

weedy
WEEDY, a. 1. Consisting of weeds; as weedy trophies.2. Abounding with weeds; as weedy grounds; a ...

61742

week
WEEK, n. [G.]1. The space of seven days.I fast twice in the week. Luke 18. 2. In Scripture, a ...

61743

week-day
WEEK-DAY, n. [weed and day.] Any day of the week except the Sabbath.

61744

weekly
WEEKLY, a. Coming, happening or done once a week; hebdomadary; as a weekly payment of bills; a ...

61745

weel
WEEL, n. [See Well.] A whirlpool. [Not in use.]

61746

weely
WEEL, WEELY, n. A kind of twiggin trap or snare for fish.

61747

ween
WEEN, v.i. [G., to imagine. The sense is to set, fix or hold in the mind.] To think; to imagine; to ...

61748

weening
WEENING, ppr. Thinking; imagining.

61749

weep
WEEP, v.i. pret. and pp. wept. Weeped, I believe is never used. [See Whoop. The primary sense is ...

61750

weeper
WEEPER, n. 1. One who weeps; one who sheds tears.2. A white border on the sleeve of a mourning ...

61751

weeping
WEEPING, ppr. Lamenting; shedding tears.WEEPING, n. Lamentation.

61752

weeping-rock
WEEPING-ROCK, n. [weep and rock.] A porous rock from which water gradually issues.

61753

weeping-spring
WEEPING-SPRING, n. A spring that slowly discharges water.

61754

weeping-willow
WEEPING-WILLOW, n. A species of willow, whose branches grow very long and slender, and hang down ...

61755

weerish
WEERISH, a. Insipid; weak; washy; surly. [Not in use.]

61756

weesel
WEESEL, the more proper spelling of weasel.

61757

weet
WEET, v.t. pret. wot. [L., Gr.] To know.

61758

weetless
WEETLESS, a. Unknowing.

61759

weever
WEEVER, n. A fish, called also sea-dragon. [L.] A fish of the genus Trachinus, the spines of whose ...

61760

weevil
WEEVIL, n. [G.] A small insect that does great damage to wheat or other corn, by eating into the ...

61761

weft
WEFT, old pret. of wave.WEFT, n. [from weave.] 1. To woof of cloth; the threads that cross the ...

61762

weftage
WEFTAGE, n. Texture. [Not used.]

61763

weigh
WEIGH, v.t. wa. [L., G. See Wag.]1. To examine by the balance; to ascertain the weight, that is, ...

61764

weighable
WEIGHABLE, a. That may be weighed.

61765

weighed
WEIGHED, pp. 1. Examined by the scales; having the weight ascertained.2. Considered.3. a. ...

61766

weigher
WEIGHER, n. 1. One who weighs.2. An officer whose duty is to weigh commodities.

61767

weighing
WEIGHING, ppr. Examining by scales; considering.WEIGHING, n. 1. The act of ascertaining weight.2. ...

61768

weighing-cage
WEIGHING-CAGE, n. A cage in which small living animals may be conveniently weighed.

61769

weighing-house
WEIGHING-HOUSE, n. A building furnished with a dock and other conveniences fro weighing commodities ...

61770

weighing-machine
WEIGHING-MACHINE, n. 1. A machine for weighing heavy bodies, and particularly wheel carriages, at ...

61771

weight
WEIGHT, n. Wate. [See Weigh.]1. The quantity of a body, ascertained by the balance; in a ...

61772

weightily
WEIGHTILY, adv. 1. Heavily; ponderously.2. With force or impressiveness; with moral power.

61773

weightiness
WEIGHTINESS, n. 1. Ponderousness; gravity; heaviness.2. Solidity; force; impressiveness; power of ...

61774

weightless
WEIGHTLESS, a. Having no weight; light.

61775

weighty
WEIGHTY, a. 1. Having great weight; heavy; ponderous; as a weighty body.2. Important; forcible; ...

61776

weird
WEIRD, a. Skilled in witchcraft. [Not in use.]

61777

weive
WEIVE, for waive. [Not in use.]

61778

welaway
WELAWAY, an exclamation expressive of grief or sorrow, equivalent to alas. It is a compound of Sax. ...

61779

welcome
WELCOME, a. 1. Received with gladness; admitted willingly to the house, entertainment and company; ...

61780

welcomed
WELCOMED, pp. Received with gladness and kindness.

61781

welcomely
WELCOMELY, adv. In a welcome manner.

61782

welcomeness
WELCOMENESS, n. Gratefulness; agreeableness; kind reception.

61783

welcomer
WELCOMER, n. One who salutes or receives kindly a new comer.

61784

welcoming
WELCOMING, ppr. Saluting or receiving with kindness a new comer or guest.

61785

weld
WELD, WOLD, n. A plant of the genus Reseda, used by dyers to give a yellow color, and sometimes ...

61786

welded
WELDED, pp. Forged or beat into union in an intense heat.

61787

welder
WELDER, n. 1. One who welds iron.2. A manager; an actual occupant. [Not in use.]

61788

welding
WELDING, ppr. Uniting in an intense heat.

61789

welding-heat
WELDING-HEAT, n. The heat necessary for welding iron bars, which is said to be 60 degrees by ...

61790

welfare
WELFARE, n. [well and fare, a good faring; G.]1. Exemption from misfortune, sickness, calamity or ...

61791

welk
WELK, v.i. [G., to wither, to fade, to decay; primarily to shrink or contract, as things in drying, ...

61792

welked
WELKED, pp. or a. Contracted into wrinkles or ridges.--Horns welkd and wavd like the enridged sea.

61793

welkin
WELKIN, n. [G., a cloud.] The visible regions of the air; the vault of heaven. [This is obsolete, ...

61794

welking
WELKING, ppr. Fading; declining; contracting.

61795

well
WELL, n. [G., a spring; to spring, to issue forth, to gush, to well, to swell. G., a wave. On this ...

61796

well-beloved
WELL-BELOVED, a. Greatly beloved. Mark 12.

61797

well-born
WELL-BORN, a. [well and born.] Born of a noble or respectable family; not of mean birth.

61798

well-bred
WELL-BRED, a. [well and bred.] Educated to polished manners; polite.

61799

well-done
WELL-DONE, exclam. [well and done.] A word of praise; bravely; nobly; in a right manner.

61800

well-drain
WELL-DRAIN, n. [well and drain.] A drain or vent for water, somewhat like a well or pit, serving to ...

61801

well-favored
WELL-FAVORED, a. Handsome; well formed; beautiful; pleasing to the eye. Genesis 29.

61802

well-grounded
WELL-GROUNDED, a. [well and ground.] Well founded; having a solid foundation.

61803

well-head
WELL-HEAD, n. [well and head.] A source, spring or fountain.

61804

well-hole
WELL-HOLE, WELL, n. In architecture, the hole or space left in a floor for the stairs.

61805

well-intentioned
WELL-INTENTIONED, a. Having upright intentions or purpose.

61806

well-mannered
WELL-MANNERED, a. [well and manner.] Polite; well-bred; complaisant.

61807

well-meaner
WELL-MEANER, n. [well and mean.] One whose intention is good.

61808

well-meaning
WELL-MEANING, a. Having a good intention.

61809

well-met
WELL-MET, exclam. A term of salutation denoting joy at meeting.

61810

well-minded
WELL-MINDED, a. [well and mind.] Well disposed; having a good mind.

61811

well-moralized
WELL-MORALIZED, a. Regulated by good morals.

61812

well-natured
WELL-NATURED, a. [well and natured.] Good natured; kind.

61813

well-nigh
WELL-NIGH, adv. [well and nigh.] Almost; nearly.

61814

well-room
WELL-ROOM, n. [well and room.] In a boat, a place in the bottom where the water is collected, and ...

61815

well-spent
WELL-SPENT, a. [well and spent.] Spent or passed in virtue; as a well-spent life; well-spent days.

61816

well-spoken
WELL-SPOKEN, a. [well and speak.]1. Speaking well; speaking with fitness or grace; or speaking ...

61817

well-spring
WELL-SPRING, n. [well and spring.] A source of continual supply. Proverbs 16.

61818

well-water
WELL-WATER, n. [well and water.] The water that flows into a well from subterraneous springs; water ...

61819

well-willer
WELL-WILLER, n. [well and will.] One who means kindly.

61820

well-wish
WELL-WISH, n. [well and wish.] A wish of happiness.

61821

well-wisher
WELL-WISHER, n. [supra.] One who wishes the good of another.

61822

welladay
WELLADAY, alas, Johnson supposes to be a corruption of welaway, which see.

61823

wellbeing
WELLBEING, n. [well and being.] Welfare; happiness; prosperity; as, virtue is essential to the well ...

61824

wellfare
WELLFARE, is now written welfare.

61825

welsh
WELSH, a. [G., foreign, strange, Celtic.] Pertaining to the Welsh nation.WELSH, n. 1. The language ...

61826

welt
WELT, n. [See Wall.] A border; a kind of hem or edging, as on a garment or piece of cloth, or on a ...

61827

welter
WELTER, v.t. [G., L.] To roll, as the body of an animal; but usually, to roll or wallow in some ...

61828

weltering
WELTERING, ppr. Rolling; wallowing; as in mire, blood, or other filthy matter.

61829

wem
WEM, n. A spot; a scar.WEM, v.t To corrupt.

61830

wen
WEN, n. An encysted swelling or tumor; also, a fleshy excrescence growing on animals, sometimes to ...

61831

wench
WENCH, n. 1. A young woman. [Little used.]2. A young woman of ill fame. 3. In America, a black or ...

61832

wencher
WENCHER, n. A lewd man.

61833

wenching
WENCHING, ppr. Frequenting women of ill fame.

61834

wend
WEND, v.i. 1. To go; to pass to or from. [Obsolete, except in poetry; but its preterit, went, is in ...

61835

wennel
WENNEL, n. A weanel. [See Weanel.]

61836

wennish
WENNISH, WENNY, a. [from wen.] Having the nature of a wen.

61837

wenny
WENNISH, WENNY, a. [from wen.] Having the nature of a wen.

61838

went
WENT, pret. of the obsolete verb wend. We now arrange went in grammar as the preterit of go, but in ...

61839

wept
WEPT, pret. and pp. of weep.When he had come near, he beheld the city and wept over it. Luke 19.

61840

were
WERE, pron. er, which when prolonged, becomes ware. This is used as the imperfect tense plural of ...

61841

weregild
WEREGILD, n. Formerly, the price of a mans head; a compensation paid for a man killed, partly to ...

61842

wernerian
WERNERIAN, a. Pertaining to Werner, the German mineralogist, who arranged minerals in classes, &c. ...

61843

wernerite
WERNERITE, n. A mineral, regarded by Werener as a subspecies of scapolite; called foliated ...

61844

wert
WERT, the second person singular of the subjunctive imperfect tense of be. [See Were.]Werth, worth, ...

61845

wesand
WEASAND, WESAND, n. s as z. The windpipe or trachea; the canal through which air passes to and from ...

61846

wesil
WESIL, for weasand. [Not in use.]

61847

west
WEST, n. [L., a decline or fall, departure. In elements, it coincides with waste.]1. In strictness, ...

61848

westering
WESTERING, a. Passing to the west. [I believe not now used.]

61849

westerly
WESTERLY, a. 1. Being towards the west; situated in the western region; as the westerly parts of ...

61850

western
WESTERN, a. 1. Being in the west, or int he region nearly in the direction of west; being in that ...

61851

westing
WESTING, n. Space or distance westward; or departure; as the westing and southing of a ship.

61852

westward
WESTWARD, adv. [L.] Towards the west; as, to ride or sail westward.

61853

westwardly
WESTWARDLY, adv. In a direction towards the west; as, to pass westwardly.

61854

wet
WET, a. [Gr., L.]1. Containing water, as wet land, or a wet cloth; or having water or other liquid ...

61855

wether
WETHER, n. A ram castrated.

61856

wetness
WETNESS, n. 1. The state of being wet, either by being soaked or filled with liquor, or by having a ...

61857

wettish
WETTISH, a. Somewhat wet; moist; humid.

61858

wex
WEX, v.t. or I. To grow; to wax. [Not to be used.] [See Wax.]

61859

wezand
WEZAND, for weasand. [See the latter.] [Note--In words beginning with wh, the letter h, or ...

61860

whack
WHACK, v.t. To strike. This is probably the primary word on which is formed thwack. [See Twit.] ...

61861

whale
WHALE, n. [G., to stir, agitate or rove.] The general name of an order of animals inhabiting the ...

61862

whale-fishery
WHALE-FISHERY, n. The fishery or occupation of taking whales.

61863

whalebone
WHALEBONE, n. [whale and bone.] A firm elastic substance taken from the upper jaw of the whale, ...

61864

whaly
WHALY, a. Marked with streaks; properly wealy.

61865

whame
WHAME, n. A species of fly, tabanus, the burrel fly, that annoys horses.

61866

whang
WHANG, n. A lether thong. [Not in use.]WHANG, v.t. To beat. [Not in use or local.]

61867

whap
WHAP, n. A blow. [Vulgar.] [See Awhap.]

61868

whapper
WHAPPER, n. Something uncommonly large of the kind. So thumper is connected with thump, to strike ...

61869

wharf
WHARF, n. A perpendicular bank or mound or timber or stone and earth, raised on the shore of a ...

61870

wharfage
WHARFAGE, n. The fee or duty paid for the privilege of using a wharf for loading or unloading ...

61871

wharfing
WHARFING, n. Wharfs in general.

61872

wharfinger
WHARFINGER, n. A man who has the care of a wharf, or the proprietor of a wharf.

61873

what
WHAT, pronoun relative or substitute. [G., L. See Wight.]1. That which. Say what you will, is the ...

61874

whatever
WHATEVER, pron. [what and ever.] 1. Being this or that; being of one nature or another; being one ...

61875

whatsoever
WHATSOEVER, a compound of what, so, and ever, has the sense of whatever, and is less used than the ...

61876

wheal
WHEAL, n. A pustule. [See Weal.]

61877

wheat
WHEAT, n. [G.] A plant of the genus Triticum, and the seed of the plant, which furnishes a white ...

61878

wheat-bird
WHEAT-BIRD, n. A bird that feeds on wheat.

61879

wheat-ear
WHEAT-EAR, n. The English name of the Motacilla aenanthe; called also white-tail and fallow-finch.

61880

wheat-plum
WHEAT-PLUM, n. A sort of plum.

61881

wheaten
WHEATEN, a. Hweetn. Made of wheat; as wheaten bread.

61882

wheedle
WHEEDLE, v.t. [Gr.] To flatter; to entice by soft words.To learn th unlucky art of wheeling ...

61883

wheedled
WHEEDLED, pp. Flattered; enticed; coaxed.

61884

wheedling
WHEEDLING, ppr. Flattering; enticing by soft words.WHEEDLING, n. The act of flattering or enticing.

61885

wheel
WHEEL, n. 1. A circular frame of wood, iron or other metal, consisting of a nave or hub, into which ...

61886

wheel-animal
WHEEL-ANIMAL, n. A genus of animalcules, with arms for taking their prey, resembling wheels.

61887

wheel-barrow
WHEEL-BARROW, n. [wheel and barrow.] A barrow moved on a single wheel.

61888

wheel-boat
WHEEL-BOAT, n. [wheel and boat.] A boat with wheels, to be used either on water or upon inclined ...

61889

wheel-carriage
WHEEL-CARRIAGE, n. [wheel and carriage.] A carriage moved on wheels.

61890

wheel-fire
WHEEL-FIRE, n. [wheel and fire.] In chemistry, a fire which encompasses the crucible without ...

61891

wheel-shaped
WHEEL-SHAPED, a. [wheel and shape.] In botany, rotate; monopetalous, expanding into a flat border ...

61892

wheel-wright
WHEEL-WRIGHT, n. [wheel and wright.] A man whose occupation is to make wheels and wheel-carriages, ...

61893

wheeled
WHEELED, pp. Conveyed on wheels; turned; rolled round.

61894

wheeler
WHEELER, n. A maker of wheels.

61895

wheeling
WHEELING, ppr. Conveying on wheels or in a wheel-carriage; turning.WHEELING, n. 1. The act of ...

61896

wheely
WHEELY, a. Circular; suitable to rotation.

61897

wheeze
WHEEZE, v.i. [L.] To breathe hard and with an audible sound, as persons affected with asthma.

61898

wheezing
WHEEZING, ppr. Breathing with difficulty and noise.

61899

whelk
WHELK, n. 1. A wrinkle; inequality on the surface; protuberance; a pustule. [See Welk and Weal.]2. ...

61900

whelky
WHELKY, a. Protuberant; embossed; rounded.

61901

whelm
WHELM, v.t. 1. To cover with water or other fluid; to cover by immersion in something that envelops ...

61902

whelmed
WHELMED, pp. Covered, as by being plunged or immersed.

61903

whelming
WHELMING, ppr. Covering, as by immersion.

61904

whelp
WHELP, n. [L.]1. The young of the canine species, and of several other beasts of prey; a puppy; a ...

61905

when
WHEN, adv. [G., L.]1. At the time. We were present when General LaFayette embarked at Havre for New ...

61906

whence
WHENCE, adv. 1. From what place.Whence and what art thou?2. From what source. Whence shall we ...

61907

whencesoever
WHENCESOEVER, adv. [whence, so, and ever.] From what place soever; from what cause or source ...

61908

whencever
WHENCEVER. [See Whensoever.]

61909

whenever
WHENEVER, adv. [when and ever.] At whatever time. Whenever you come, you will be kindly received.

61910

whensoever
WHENSOEVER, adv. [when, so, and ever.] At what time soever; at whatever time.

61911

where
WHERE, adv. 1. At which place or places.She visited the place where first she was so happy--In all ...

61912

whereabout
WHEREABOUT, adv. [where and about.] 1. Near what place. Whereabout did you meet your friend?2. Near ...

61913

whereas
WHEREAS, adv. s as z. [where and as.]1. When in fact or truth, implying opposition to something ...

61914

whereat
WHEREAT, adv. [where and at.]1. At which.Whereat he was no less angry and ashamed, than desirous to ...

61915

whereby
WHEREBY, adv. [where and by.] 1. By which. You take my life, when you do take the means whereby I ...

61916

whereever
WHEREEVER, adv. [where and ever.] At whatever place.He cannot but love virtue, wherever it is.

61917

wherefore
WHEREFORE, adv. [where and for.]1. For which reason.Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them. ...

61918

wherein
WHEREIN, adv. [where and in.] 1. In which; in which thing, time, respect, book, &c. This is the ...

61919

whereinto
WHEREINTO, adv. [where and into.] Into which.

61920

whereness
WHERENESS, n. Ubiety; imperfect locality.A point hath no dimensions, but only a whereness, and is ...

61921

whereof
WHEREOF, adv. [where and of.] 1. Of which. We are not guilty of the crime whereof we are accused.2. ...

61922

whereon
WHEREON, adv. [where and on.]1. On which; as the ground whereon we tread.2. On what. Whereon do we ...

61923

whereso
WHERESO, adv. [See Wheresoever.]

61924

wheresoever
WHERESOEVER, adv. [where, so, and ever.] In what place soever; in whatever place, or in any place ...

61925

wherethrough
WHERETHROUGH, through which, is not in use.

61926

whereto
WHERETO, adv. [where and to.] 1. To which.Whereto we have already attained-- Philippians 3.2. To ...

61927

whereunto
WHEREUNTO, adv. [where and unto.] The same as whereto. [Little used.]

61928

whereupon
WHEREUPON, adv. Upon which.The townsmen mutinied and sent to Essex, whereupon he came thither.

61929

wherewith
WHEREWITH, adv. [where an with.] 1. With which.The love wherewith thou hast loved me. John 17.2. ...

61930

wherewithal
WHEREWITHAL, adv. [See Withal.] [where, with, and all.] The same as wherewith.

61931

wherret
WHERRET, v.t. [G.] To hurry; to trouble; to tease; to give a box on the ear. [Low and not used in ...

61932

wherry
WHERRY, n. [a different orthography of ferry, formed with a strong breathing; like whistle, from ...

61933

whet
WHET, v.t. pret. and pp. whetted or whet. [G.]1. To rub for the purpose of sharpening, as an edge ...

61934

whet-slate
WHETSTONE-SLATE, WHET-SLATE, n. Novaculite or coticular shist, a variety of slate used for ...

61935

whether
WHETHER, pronoun or substitute. [L. The sense seems to be what, or which of two, referring either ...

61936

whetstone
WHETSTONE, n. [whet and stone.] A stone used for sharpening edged instruments by friction.

61937

whetstone-slate
WHETSTONE-SLATE, WHET-SLATE, n. Novaculite or coticular shist, a variety of slate used for ...

61938

whetted
WHETTED, pp. Rubbed for sharpening; sharpened; provoked; stimulated.

61939

whetter
WHETTER, n. He or that which whets or sharpens.

61940

whetting
WHETTING, ppr. Rubbing for the purpose of making sharp; sharpening; provoking; inciting; ...

61941

whewer
WHEWER, n. Another name of the widgeon. [Local.]

61942

whey
WHEY, n. The serum or watery part of milk, separated from the more thick or coagulable part, ...

61943

whey-tub
WHEY-TUB, n. A tub in which whey stands for yielding cream, &c.

61944

wheyey
WHEYEY, a. Partaking of whey; resembling whey.

61945

wheyish
WHEYISH, a. Having the qualities of whey.

61946

which
WHICH, pron. relative or substitute. [I have not found this word in any other language. I think it ...

61947

whichever
WHICHEVER, WHICHSOEVER, pron. Whether one or the other. Whichever road you take, it will conduct ...

61948

whichsoever
WHICHEVER, WHICHSOEVER, pron. Whether one or the other. Whichever road you take, it will conduct ...

61949

whiff
WHIFF, n. 1. A sudden expulsion of air from the mouth; a puff; as the whiff of a smoker.And seasons ...

61950

whiffle
WHIFFLE, v.i. [G., to doubt, to rove or wander, which seems to be allied to sweep.] To start, shift ...

61951

whiffler
WHIFFLER, n. 1. One who whiffles or frequently changes his opinion or course; one who uses sifts ...

61952

whiffling
WHIFFLING, ppr. Shifting and turning; prevaricating; shuffling.WHIFFLING, n. Prevarication.

61953

whig
WHIG, n. [See Whey.] Acidulated whey, sometimes mixed with butter milk and sweet herbs; used as a ...

61954

whiggarchy
WHIGGARCHY, n. Government by whigs. [Cant.]

61955

whiggish
WHIGGISH, a. Pertaining to whigs; partaking of the principles of whigs.

61956

whiggism
WHIGGISM, n. The principles of a whig.

61957

while
WHILE, n. [G. See the Verb.] Time; space of time, or continued duration. He was some while in this ...

61958

whilere
WHILERE, adv. [while and ere.] A little while ago.

61959

whiling
WHILING, ppr. Loitering; passing time agreeably, without impatience or tediousness.

61960

whilk
WHILK, n. A shell. [See Whelk.]

61961

whilom
WHILOM, adv. Formerly; once; of old.

61962

whilst
WHILST, adv. The same as while, which see. Whiles is not used.

61963

whim
WHIM, n. 1. Properly, a sudden turn or start of the mind; a freak; a fancy; a capricious notion. We ...

61964

whimbrel
WHINBREL, WHIMBREL, n. A bird resembling the curlew.

61965

whimper
WHIMPER, v.i. [G.] To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; as, a child whimpers.

61966

whimpering
WHIMPERING, ppr. Crying with a low broken voice.WHIMPERING, n. [supra.] A low muttering cry.

61967

whimpled
WHIMPLED, a word used by Shakespeare, is perhaps a mistake for whimpered. There is no such word in ...

61968

whimsey
WHIMSEY, n. s as z. [from whim.] A whim; a freak; a capricious notion; as the whimseys of ...

61969

whimsical
WHIMSICAL, a. Full of whims; freakish; having odd fancies; capricious.My neighbors call me ...

61970

whimsically
WHIMSICALLY, adv. [supra.] In a whimsical manner; freakishly.

61971

whimsicalness
WHIMSICALNESS, n. [supra.] Freakishness; whimsical disposition; odd temper.

61972

whin
WHIN, n. [L.] Gorse; furze; a plant of the genus Ulex.

61973

whin-ax
WHIN-AX, n. [whin and ax.] An instrument used for extirpating whin from land.

61974

whin-chat
WHIN-CHAT, n. A bird, a species of warbler, the Motacilla rubetra, Linn.

61975

whin-stone
WHIN-STONE, n. [whin and stone.] Whin-stone or whin is a provincial name given to basaltic rocks, ...

61976

whin-yard
WHIN-YARD, n. A sword; in contempt.

61977

whinbrel
WHINBREL, WHIMBREL, n. A bird resembling the curlew.

61978

whine
WHINE, v.t. [L.] TO express murmurs by a plaintive cry; to moan with a puerile noise; to murmur ...

61979

whiner
WHINER, n. One who whines.

61980

whining
WHINING, ppr. Expressing murmurs by a mean plaintive tone or cant.

61981

whinny
WHINNY, v.i. [L.; from the root of whine.] To utter the sound of a horse; to neigh.

61982

whinoc
WHINOC, n. [G., small.] The small pig of a litter.

61983

whip
WHIP, v.t. [L., a sweeping throw or thrust.]1. To strike with a lash or sweeping cord; as, to whip ...

61984

whip-cord
WHIP-CORD, n. [whip and cord.] Cord of which lashes are made.

61985

whip-graft
WHIP-GRAFT, v.t. [whip and graft.] To graft by cutting the cion and stock in a sloping direction, ...

61986

whip-grafting
WHIP-GRAFTING, n. The at or practice of grafting by cutting the cion and stock with a slope, to fit ...

61987

whip-hand
WHIP-HAND, n. [whip and hand.] Advantage over; as, he has the whip-hand of her.

61988

whip-lash
WHIP-LASH, n. [whip and lash.] The lash of a whip.

61989

whip-saw
WHIP-SAW, n. [whip and saw.] A saw to be used by two persons.

61990

whip-staff
WHIP-STAFF, n. [whip and staff.] In ships, a bar by which the rudder is turned. In small vessels ...

61991

whip-stitch
WHIP-STITCH, v.t. [whip and stitch.] In agriculture, to half-plow or to rafter land. This word, I ...

61992

whip-stock
WHIP-STOCK, n. [whip and stock.] The rod or staff to which the lash of a whip is fastened.

61993

whipped
WHIPPED, pp. Struck with a whip; punished; enwrapped; sewed slightly.

61994

whipper
WHIPPER, n. One who whips; particularly, an officer who inflicts the penalty of legal whipping.

61995

whipping
WHIPPING, ppr. Striking with a whip; punishing with a whip; enwrapping.WHIPPING, n. The act of ...

61996

whipping-post
WHIPPING-POST, n. [whipping and post.] A post to which offenders are tied when whipped.

61997

whipple-tree
WHIPPLE-TREE, n. [whip and tree; but qu. Is it no whiffle-tree?] The bar to which the traces or ...

61998

whippowil
WHIPPOWIL, n. The popular name of an American bird, so called from its note, or the sounds of its ...

61999

whipster
WHIPSTER, n. A nimble fellow.

62000

whipt
WHIPT, pp. of whip; sometimes used for whipped.

62001

whir
WHIR, v.i. hwur. To whirl round with noise; to fly with noise.WHIR, v.t. To hurry.

62002

whirl
WHIRL, v.t. hwurl. [G., to whirl, to warble. L.] TO turn round rapidly; to turn with velocity. He ...

62003

whirl-bat
WHIRL-BAT, n. [whirl and bat.] Any thing moved with a whirl as preparatory for a blow, or to ...

62004

whirl-blast
WHIRL-BLAST, n. [whirl and blast.] A whirling blast of wind.

62005

whirl-bone
WHIRL-BONE, n. [whirl and bone.] The patella; the cap of the knee; the knee-pan.

62006

whirl-pit
WHIRL-PIT, n. A whirlpool. [Not used.]

62007

whirled
WHIRLED, pp. 1. Turned round with velocity.2. In botany, growing in whirls; bearing whirls; ...

62008

whirligig
WHIRLIGIG, n. [whirl and gig.]1. A toy which children spin or whirl round.2. In military ...

62009

whirling
WHIRLING, ppr. Turning or moving round with velocity.

62010

whirling-table
WHIRLING-TABLE, n. A machine contrived to exhibit and demonstrate the principal laws of gravitation ...

62011

whirlpool
WHIRLPOOL, n. [whirl and pool.] An eddy of water; a vortex or gulf where the water moves round in a ...

62012

whirlwind
WHIRLWIND, n. [whirl and wind.] A violent wind moving in a circle, or rather in a spiral form, as ...

62013

whirraw
WHIRRAW. [See Horra.]

62014

whirring
WHIRRING, n. The sound of a partridges or pheasants wings. [Note.--Whir is used by the common ...

62015

whisk
WHISK, n. 1. A small bunch of grass, straw, hair or the like, used for a brush; hence, a brush or ...

62016

whisker
WHISKER, n. [from whisk.[ Long hair growing on the human cheek.

62017

whiskered
WHISKERED, a. Formed into whiskers; furnished with whiskers.

62018

whisket
WHISKET, n. A basket. [Local.]

62019

whisking
WHISKING, ppr. Brushing; sweeping along; moving with velocity along the surface.

62020

whisky
WHISKY, n. A spirit distilled from grain. In the north of England, the name is given to the spirit ...

62021

whisper
WHISPER, v.i. [L. The word seems by its sound to be an onomatopy, as it expresses a sibilant sound ...

62022

whispered
WHISPERED, pp. Uttered in a low voice; uttered with suspicion or caution.

62023

whisperer
WHISPERER, n. 1. One who whispers.2. A tattler; one who tells secrets; a conveyer of intelligence ...

62024

whispering
WHISPERING, ppr. Speaking in a low voice; telling secretly; backbiting.

62025

whisperingly
WHISPERINGLY, adv. In a low voice.

62026

whist
WHIST, a. Silent; mute; still; not speaking; not making a noise.The winds with wonder whist, ...

62027

whistle
WHISTLE, v.i. hwisl. [L., a whistle; allied to whisper.]1. To utter a kind of musical sound, by ...

62028

whistle-fish
WHISTLE-FISH, n. A local name of a species of Gadus, with only tow fins on the back; the Mustela ...

62029

whistled
WHISTLED, pp. Sounded with a pipe; uttered in a whistle.

62030

whistler
WHISTLER, n. One who whistles.

62031

whistling
WHISTLING, ppr. Uttering a musical sound through a small orifice of the lips; sounding with a pipe; ...

62032

whistly
WHISTLY, adv. Silently.

62033

whit
WHIT, n. [L.] A point; a jot; the smallest part or particle imaginable. It is used without a ...

62034

white
WHITE, a. [G.]1. Being in the color of pure snow; snowy; not dark; as white paper; a white skin.2. ...

62035

white-bait
WHITE-BAIT, n. [white and bait.] A very small delicate fish, of the genus Clupea.

62036

white-beam
WHITE-BEAM, n. The white-leaf tree, a species of Crataegus.

62037

white-bear
WHITE-BEAR, n. [white and bear.] The bear that inhabits the polar regions.

62038

white-blaze
WHITE-FACE, WHITE-BLAZE, n. A white mark in the forehead of a horse, descending almost to the nose.

62039

white-brant
WHITE-BRANT, n. [white and brant.] A species of the duck kind, the Anas hyperborea.

62040

white-bug
WHITE-BUG , n. [white and bug.] An insect of the bug kind, which injures vines and some other ...

62041

white-campion
WHITE-CAMPION, n. [white and campion.] A pernicious perennial weed, growing in corn land, pastures ...

62042

white-caterpillar
WHITE-CATERPILLAR, n. An insect of a small size, called sometimes the borer, that injures the ...

62043

white-centaury
WHITE-CENTAURY, n. AN annual weed in woods and other places. It is said to form the basis of the ...

62044

white-clover
WHITE-CLOVER, n. A small species of perennial clover, bearing white flowers. It furnishes excellent ...

62045

white-crop
WHITE-CROP, n. White crops, in agriculture, are such as lose their green color or become white in ...

62046

white-darnel
WHITE-DARNEL, n. A prolific and troublesome weed, growing among corm.

62047

white-ear
WHITE-EAR, WHITE-TAIL, n. A bird, the fallow finch.

62048

white-face
WHITE-FACE, WHITE-BLAZE, n. A white mark in the forehead of a horse, descending almost to the nose.

62049

white-film
WHITE-FILM, n. A white film growing over the eyes of sheep and causing blindness.

62050

white-foot
WHITE-FOOT, n. A white mark on the foot of a horse, between the fetlock and the coffin.

62051

white-honeysuckle
WHITE-HONEYSUCKLE, n. A name sometimes given to the white clover.

62052

white-horse-fish
WHITE-HORSE-FISH, n. In ichthyology, the Raia aspera nostras of Willoughby, and the Raia fullonica ...

62053

white-land
WHITE-LAND, n. A name which the English give to a tough clayey soil, of a whitish hue when dry, but ...

62054

white-lead
WHITE-LEAD, n. A carbonate of lead, much used in painting. It is prepared by exposing sheets of ...

62055

white-limed
WHITE-LIMED, a. Whitewashed, or plastered with lime.

62056

white-line
WHITE-LINE, n. Among printers, a void space, broader than usual, left between lines.

62057

white-livered
WHITE-LIVERED, a. [white and liver.]1. Having a pale look; feeble; cowardly.2. Envious; malicious.

62058

white-manganese
WHITE-MANGANESE, n. An ore of manganese; carbonated oxydized manganese.

62059

white-meat
WHITE-MEAT, n. [white and meat.] Meats made of milk, butter, cheese, eggs and the like.

62060

white-poplar
WHITE-POPLAR, n. A tree of the poplar kind, sometimes called the abele tree.

62061

white-poppy
WHITE-POPPY, n. A species of poppy, sometimes cultivated fro the opium which is obtained from its ...

62062

white-pot
WHITE-POT, n. [white and pot.] A kind of food made of milk, cream, eggs, sugar, &c. baked in a pot.

62063

white-precipitate
WHITE-PRECIPITATE, n. Carbonate of mercury.

62064

white-pyrite
WHITE-PYRITE, WHITE-PYRITES, n. [white and pyrite.] An ore of a tin-white color, passing into a ...

62065

white-pyrites
WHITE-PYRITE, WHITE-PYRITES, n. [white and pyrite.] An ore of a tin-white color, passing into a ...

62066

white-rent
WHITE-RENT, n. [white and rent.] In Devon and Cornwall, a rent or duty of eight pence, payable ...

62067

white-salt
WHITE-SALT, n. Salt dried and calcined; decrepitated salt.

62068

white-swelling
WHITE-SWELLING, n. [white and swelling.] A swelling or chronic enlargement of the joints, ...

62069

white-tail
WHITE-TAIL, n. A bird, the wheat-ear, a species of Motacilla.

62070

white-thorn
WHITE-THORN, n. A species of thorn, called also haw-thorn, of the genus Crataegus.

62071

white-throat
WHITE-THROAT, n. A small bird that frequents gardens and hedges, the Motacila sylvia.

62072

white-vitriol
WHITE-VITRIOL, n. In mineralogy, sulphate of zink, a natural salt.

62073

white-washer
WHITE-WASHER, n. One who whitewashes the walls or plastering of apartments.

62074

white-water
WHITE-WATER, n. A disease of sheep, of the dangerous stomachic kind.

62075

white-wax
WHITE-WAX, n. Bleached wax.

62076

white-wine
WHITE-WINE, n. Any wine of a clear transparent color, bordering on white, as Madeira, Sherry, ...

62077

whited
WHITED, pp. Made white; whitened.

62078

whitely
WHITELY, adv. Coming near to white. [Not used.]

62079

whiten
WHITEN, v.t. hwitn. To make white; to bleach; to blanch; as, to whiten cloth.WHITEN, v.i. To grow ...

62080

whitened
WHITENED, pp. Made white; bleached.

62081

whitener
WHITENER, n. One who bleaches or makes white.

62082

whiteness
WHITENESS, n. 1. The state of being white; white color, or freedom from any darkness or obscurity ...

62083

whites
WHITES, n. The fluor albus, a disease of females.

62084

whitester
WHITESTER, n. A bleacher. [Local.]

62085

whitestone
WHITESTONE, n. IN geology, the weiss stein of Werner, and the eurite of some geologists; a species ...

62086

whitewash
WHITEWASH, n. [white and wash.] 1. A wash or liquid composition for whitening something; a wash for ...

62087

whitewashed
WHITEWASHED, pp. Covered or overspread with a white liquid composition.

62088

whitewashing
WHITEWASHING, ppr. Overspreading or washing with a white liquid composition.

62089

whitewood
WHITEWOOD, n. A species of timber tree growing in North America, the Liriodendron, or tulip tree. ...

62090

whither
WHITHER, adv. 1. To what place, interrogatively. Whither goest thou?Whither away so fast?2. To what ...

62091

whithersoever
WHITHERSOEVER, adv. [whither and soever.] To whatever place. I will go whithersoever you lead.

62092

whiting
WHITING, n. [from white.]1. A small sea fish, the Asellus mollis or albus, a species of Gadus.2. ...

62093

whitish
WHITISH, a. [from white.] Somewhat white; white in a moderate degree.

62094

whitishness
WHITISHNESS, n. [supra.] The quality of being somewhat white.

62095

whitleather
WHITLEATHER, WHITLETHER, n. [white and leather.] Lether dressed with alum, remarkable for its ...

62096

whitlether
WHITLEATHER, WHITLETHER, n. [white and leather.] Lether dressed with alum, remarkable for its ...

62097

whitlow
WHITLOW, n. 1. In surgery, paronychia, a swelling or inflammation about the nails or ends of the ...

62098

whitlow-grass
WHITLOW-GRASS, n. 1. Mountain knotgrass, a species of Illecebrium.

62099

whitsour
WHITSOUR, n. A sort of apple.

62100

whitster
WHITSTER, n. A whitener; a bleacher.

62101

whitsul
WHITSUL, n. A provincial name of milk, sour milk, cheese curds and butter.

62102

whitsuntide
WHITSUNTIDE, n. [white, Sunday, and tide.] The feast or season of Pentecost; so called it is said, ...

62103

whitten-tree
WHITTEN-TREE, n. A sort of tree.

62104

whittle
WHITTLE, n. 1. A small pocket knife. [In this sense, I believe the word is not used in America.]2. ...

62105

whity-brown
WHITY-BROWN, a. Of a color between white and brown. [Local in England.]

62106

whiz
WHIZ, v.t. [It seems to be allied to hiss.] To make a humming or hissing sound, like an arrow or ...

62107

whizzing
WHIZZING, ppr. Making a humming or hissing sound.

62108

who
WHO, pron. relative. pron. hoo. [L. Who is undoubtedly a contracted word in English as in Latin. ...

62109

whoever
WHOEVER, pron. [who and ever.] Any on without exception; any person whatever. The person who ...

62110

whole
WHOLE, a. Hole. [G., Gr. This seems to be connected with heal, hale. Of this the derivative ...

62111

wholesale
WHOLESALE, n. [whole and sale.]1. Sale of goods by the piece or large quantity; as distinguished ...

62112

wholesome
WHOLESOME, a. [G.]1. Tending to promote health; favoring health; salubrious; as wholesome air or ...

62113

wholesomely
WHOLESOMELY, adv. In a wholesome or salutary manner; salubriously.

62114

wholesomeness
WHOLESOMENESS, n. 1. The quality of contributing to health; salubrith; as the wholesomeness of air ...

62115

wholly
WHOLLY, adv. 1. Entirely; completely; perfectly.Nor wholly overcome, nor wholly yield.2. Totally; ...

62116

whom
WHOM, pron. hoom. The objective of who, coinciding with the L. quem and quam.

62117

whomsoever
WHOMSOEVER, pron. [whom and soever.] Any person without exception.With whomsoever thou findest thy ...

62118

whoobub
WHOOBUB, for hubbub. [Not in use.]

62119

whoop
WHOOP, n. Hoop. [ This is the same as hoop, but aspirated. The sense is to drive out the voice.]1. ...

62120

whoot
WHOOT, v.i. hoot. [See Hoot.]

62121

whop
WHOP, n. [the vulgar pronunciation of whap, or awhap.] A sudden fall, or the suddenness of striking ...

62122

whore
WHORE, n. Hore. [G. The correct orthography is hore.] A harlot; a courtesan; a concubine; a ...

62123

whoredom
WHOREDOM, n. Horedom.1. Lewdness; fornication; practice of unlawful commerce with the other sex. It ...

62124

whoremaster
WHOREMASTER, n. [supra.] One who practices lewdness.

62125

whoremonger
WHOREMONGER, n. The same as whoremaster.

62126

whoreson
WHORESON, n. A bastard; a word used generally in contempt.

62127

whorish
WHORISH, a. Lewd; unchaste; addicted to unlawful sexual pleasures; incontinent.

62128

whorishly
WHORISHLY, adv. In a lewd manner.

62129

whorishness
WHORISHNESS, n. The practice of lewdness; the character of a lewd woman.

62130

whorl
WHORL, WHORLE. [See Whirl.]

62131

whorle
WHORL, WHORLE. [See Whirl.]

62132

whort
WHORT, n. The fruit of the whortleberry; or the shrub.

62133

whortleberry
WHORTLEBERRY, n. A plant or shrub and its fruit, of the genus Vaccinium.

62134

whose
WHOSE, hooz. The possessive or genitive case of who or which; applied to persons or things. We say, ...

62135

whosesoever
WHOSESOEVER, pron. [whose and soever.] Of any person whatever. John 20.

62136

whoso
WHOSO, pron. Hooso. Any person whatever.

62137

whosoever
WHOSOEVER, pron. [who, so, and ever.] Any one; any person whatever.Whosoever will, let him take of ...

62138

whur
WHUR, v.i. To pronounce the letter r with too much force.WHUR, n. The sound of a body moving ...

62139

whurt
WHURT, n. A whortleberry or bilberry. [See Whort.]

62140

why
WHY, adv. [L., for what. The original phrase is for what, for why.]1. For what cause or reason, ...

62141

wi
WI, from the Gothic weiha, signifies holy. It is found in some names, as in Wibert, holy-bright, or ...

62142

wic
WIC, WICK, a termination, denotes jurisdiction, as in bailiwick. Its primary sense is a village or ...

62143

wick
WICK, n. A number of threads of cotton or some similar substance, loosely twisted into a string, ...

62144

wicked
WICKED, a. [The primary sense is to wind and turn, or to depart, to fall away.]1. Evil in principle ...

62145

wickedly
WICKEDLY, adv. IN a manner or with motives and designs contrary to the divine law; viciously; ...

62146

wickedness
WICKEDNESS, n. Departure from the rules of the divine law; evil disposition or practices; ...

62147

wicken
WICKEN, WICKEN-TREE, n. The Sorbus aucuparia, mountain ash, or roan-tree.

62148

wicken-tree
WICKEN, WICKEN-TREE, n. The Sorbus aucuparia, mountain ash, or roan-tree.

62149

wicker
WICKER, a. [L., to grow. The word signifies a shoot.] Made of twigs or oziers; as a wicker basket; ...

62150

wicket
WICKET, n. A small gate. The wicket, often opend, knew the key.

62151

wickliffite
WICKLIFFITE, n. A follower of Wickliffe, the English reformer.

62152

wide
WIDE, a. 1. Broad; having a great or considerable distance or extent between the sides; opposed to ...

62153

widely
WIDELY, adv. 1. With great extent each way. The gospel was widely disseminated by the apostles.2. ...

62154

widen
WIDEN, v.t. To make wide or wider; to extend in breadth; as, to widen a field; to widen a breach. ...

62155

widened
WIDENED, pp. Made wide or wider; extended in breadth.

62156

wideness
WIDENESS, n. 1. Breadth; width; great extent between the sides; as the wideness of a room.2. Large ...

62157

widening
WIDENING, ppr. Extending the distance between the sides; enlarging in all directions.

62158

widgeon
WIDGEON, n. A fowl of the duck kind, or genus Anas, having a black bill, the head and upper part of ...

62159

widow
WIDOW, n. [L. See Wide.] A woman who has lost her husband by death. Luke 2.Widows chamber, in ...

62160

widow-bench
WIDOW-BENCH, n. [widow and bench.] In Sussex, that share which a widow is allowed of her husbands ...

62161

widow-hunter
WIDOW-HUNTER, n. [widow and hunter.] One who seeks or courts widows for a jointure or fortune.

62162

widow-maker
WIDOW-MAKER, n. [widow and maker.] One who make widows by destroying lives.

62163

widow-wail
WIDOW-WAIL, n. In botany, a plant of the genus Cneorum.

62164

widowed
WIDOWED, pp. 1. Bereaved of a husband by death.2. Deprived of some good; stripped.Trees of their ...

62165

widower
WIDOWER, n. A man who has lost his wife by death.

62166

widowhood
WIDOWHOOD, n. 1. The state of being a widow.2. Estate settled on a widow. [Not in use.]

62167

widowing
WIDOWING, ppr. Bereaving of a husband; depriving; stripping.

62168

width
WIDTH, n. [from wide.] Breadth; wideness; the extent of a thing from side to side; as the width of ...

62169

wield
WIELD, v.t. [L. The primary sense of power and strength is to stretch or strain.]1. To use with ...

62170

wielded
WIELDED, pp. Used with command; managed.

62171

wielding
WIELDING, ppr. Using with power; managing.

62172

wieldless
WIELDLESS, a. Unmanageable.

62173

wieldy
WIELDY, a. That may be wielded; manageable.

62174

wiery
WIERY, a. [from wire.] 1. Made of wire; having the properties of wire. It would be better written ...

62175

wife
WIFE, n. plu. Wives. [G., a woman.]1. The lawful consort of man; a woman who is united to man in ...

62176

wig
WIG, in Saxon, signifies war. It is found in some names.WIG, n. [G., roll butter. It would seem ...

62177

wigeon
WIGEON. [See Widgeon.]

62178

wight
WIGHT, n. [g., a living being. L., to live.] A being; a person. It is obsolete, except in irony or ...

62179

wightly
WIGHTLY, adv. Swiftly; nimbly.

62180

wigwam
WIGWAM, n. An Indian cabin or hut, so called in America. It is sometimes written weekwam.

62181

wild
WILD, a. [G.]1. Roving; wandering; inhabiting the forest or open field; hence, not tamed or ...

62182

wild-fowl
WILD-FOWL, n. [wild and fowl.] Fowls of the forest, or untamed.

62183

wild-goose
WILD-GOOSE, n. [wild and goose.] An aquatic fowl of the genus Anas, the Anas anser, a fowl of ...

62184

wild-honey
WILD-HONEY, n. [wild and honey.] Honey that is found int he forest, in hollow trees or among rocks.

62185

wild-land
WILD-LAND, n. [wild and land.]1. Land not cultivated, or in a state that renders it unfit for ...

62186

wild-service
WILD-SERVICE, n. A plant. The wilder myrtle-leaved service is a tree of the genus Crataegus, [C. ...

62187

wilder
WILDER, v.t. To lose or cause to lose the way or track; to puzzle with mazes or difficulties; to ...

62188

wildered
WILDERED, pp. Lost in a pathless tract; puzzled.

62189

wildering
WILDERING, ppr. Puzzling.

62190

wilderness
WILDERNESS, n. [from wild.]1. A desert; a tract of land or region uncultivated and uninhabited by ...

62191

wildfire
WILDFIRE, n. [wild and fire.] 1. A composition of inflammable materials.Brimstone, pitch, wildfire, ...

62192

wilding
WILDING, n. A wild sour apple.

62193

wildly
WILDLY, adv. 1. Without cultivation.2. Without tameness.3. With disorder; with perturbation or ...

62194

wildness
WILDNESS, n. 1. Rudeness; rough uncultivated state; as the wildness of a forest or heath.2. ...

62195

wilds
WILDS, n. Among farmers, the part of a plow by which it is drawn.

62196

wile
WILE, n. A trick or stratagem practiced for ensnaring or deception; a sly, insidious artifice.That ...

62197

wilily
WILILY, adv. [from wily.] By stratagem; with insidious art. Joshua 9.

62198

wiliness
WILINESS, n. [from wily.] Cunning; guile.

62199

wilk
WILK, WHILK, n. [G., to wither, or cause to wither.] A species of shell. [See Welk.]

62200

will
WILL, n. [See the Verb.]1. That faculty of the mind by which we determine either to do or forbear ...

62201

willed
WILLED, pp. 1. Determined; resolved; desired.2. Disposed of by will or testament.

62202

willer
WILLER, n. One who wills.

62203

willful
WILLFUL, a. [will and full.]1. Governed by the will without yielding to reason; obstinate; ...

62204

willfully
WILLFULLY, adv. 1. Obstinately; stubbornly.2. By design; with set purpose.If we sin willfully after ...

62205

willfulness
WILLFULNESS, n. Obstinacy; stubbornness; perverseness.Sins of presumption are such as proceed from ...

62206

willing
WILLING, ppr. 1. Determining; resolving; desiring.2. Disposing of by will.WILLING, a. 1. Free to do ...

62207

willing-hearted
WILLING-HEARTED, a. Well disposed; having a free heart. Exodus 35.

62208

willingly
WILLINGLY, adv. 1. With free will; without reluctance; cheerfully.2. By ones own choice.The ...

62209

willingness
WILLINGNESS, n. Free choice or consent of the will; freedom from reluctance; readiness of the mind ...

62210

willow
WILLOW, n. [L.] A tree of the genus Salix. There are several species of willow, the white, the ...

62211

willow-gall
WILLOW-GALL, n. A protuberance on the leaves of willows.

62212

willow-herb
WILLOW-HERB, n. The purple loose strife, a plant of the genus Lythrum; also, the yellow loose ...

62213

willow-tufted
WILLOW-TUFTED, a. Tufted with willows.

62214

willow-weed
WILLOW-WEED, n. A name sometimes given to the smartweed or persicaria.

62215

willow-wort
WILLOW-WORT, n. A plant.

62216

willowed
WILLOWED, a. Abounding with willows.

62217

willowish
WILLOWISH, a. Like the color of the willow.

62218

willowy
WILLOWY, a. Abounding with willows.

62219

wilt
WILT, v.i. [G., to fade; that is, to shrink or withdraw.] To begin to wither; to lose freshness and ...

62220

wilted
WILTED, pp. Having become flaccid and lost its freshness, as a plant.

62221

wilting
WILTING, ppr. Beginning to fade or wither.

62222

wily
WILY, a. [from wile.] Cunning; sly; using craft or stratagem to accomplish a purpose; subtle; as a ...

62223

wimble
WIMBLE, n. [See Whim.] An instrument for boring holes, turned by a handle.WIMBLE, a. Active; ...

62224

wimbrel
WIMBREL, n. A bird of the curlew kind, a species of Soclopax.

62225

wimple
WIMPLE, n. [G., a pendant.] A hood or vail. Isaiah 3.WIMPLE, v.t. To draw down, as a vail.

62226

win
WIN, v.t. pret. and pp. won. [G.]1. To gain by success in competition or contest; as, to win the ...

62227

wince
WINCE, v.i. 1. To shrink, as from a blow or from pain; to start back.I will not stir nor wince.2. ...

62228

wincer
WINCER, n. One that winces, shrinks or kicks.

62229

winch
WINCH, n. A windlass; or an instrument with which to turn or strain something forcibly; as a winch ...

62230

winching
WINCHING, WINCING, ppr. Flinching; shrinking; kicking.

62231

wincing
WINCHING, WINCING, ppr. Flinching; shrinking; kicking.

62232

wincopipe
WINCOPIPE, n. The vulgar name of a little flower, that, when it opens in the morning, bodes a fair ...

62233

wind
WIND, n. [L., G. The primary sense is to move, flow, rush or drive along.]1. Air in motion with any ...

62234

wind-dropsy
WIND-DROPSY, n. [wind and dropsy.] A swelling of the belly from wind in the intestines; tympauites.

62235

wind-egg
WIND-EGG, n. [wind and egg.] An addle egg.

62236

wind-fallen
WIND-FALLEN, a. Blown down by the wind.

62237

wind-flower
WIND-FLOWER, n. [wind and flower.] A plant, the anemone.

62238

wind-furnace
WIND-FURNACE, n. [wind and furnace.] A furnace in which the air is supplied by an artificial ...

62239

wind-gage
WIND-GAGE, n. [wind and gage.] A soft tumor on the fetlock joints of a horse.

62240

wind-gun
WIND-GUN, n. An air gun; a gun discharged by the force of compressed air.

62241

wind-hatch
WIND-HATCH, n. [wind and hatch.] In mining, the opening or place where the ore is taken out of the ...

62242

wind-hover
WIND-HOVER, n. [wind and hover.] A species of hawk; called also the stannel, but more usually the ...

62243

wind-instrument
WIND-INSTRUMENT, n. An instrument of music, played by wind, chiefly by the breath; as a flute, a ...

62244

wind-mill
WIND-MILL, n. [wind and mill.] A mill turned by the wind.

62245

wind-pump
WIND-PUMP, n. [wind and pump.] A pump moved by wind, useful in draining lands.

62246

wind-rode
WIND-RODE, n. A term used by seamen to signify a ship when riding with wind and tide opposed to ...

62247

wind-sail
WIND-SAIL, n. [wind and sail.] A wide tube or funnel of canvas, used to convey a stream of air into ...

62248

wind-shock
WIND-SHOCK, n. [wind and shock.] A sort of bruise or shiver in a tree.

62249

wind-tight
WIND-TIGHT, a. [wind and tight.] So tight as to prevent the passing of wind.

62250

windage
WINDAGE, n. The difference between the diameter of a piece and that of a ball or shell.

62251

windbound
WINDBOUND, a. [wind and bound.] Prevented from sailing by a contrary wind.]

62252

winder
WINDER, v.t. To fan; to clean grain with a fan. [Local.]

62253

winder-meb
WINDER-MEB, n. A bird of the genus Larus, or gull-kind.

62254

windfall
WINDFALL, n. [wind and fall.]1. Fruit blown off the tree by wind.2. An unexpected legacy.

62255

windged-pea
WINDGED-PEA, n. A plant.

62256

windiness
WINDINESS, n. [from windey.] 1. The state of being windy or tempestuous; as the windiness of the ...

62257

winding
WINDING, ppr. 1. Turning; binding about; bending.2. a. Bending; twisting from a direct line or an ...

62258

winding-engine
WINDING-ENGINE, n. An engine employed in mining, to draw up buckets from a deep pit.

62259

winding-sheet
WINDING-SHEET, n. [winding and sheet.] A sheet in which a corpse is wrapped.

62260

winding-tackle
WINDING-TACKLE, n. [winding and tackle.] A tackle consisting of one fixed triple block, and one ...

62261

windlas
WINDLAS, WINDLASS, n. [wind and lace.] 1. A machine for raising great weights, consisting of a ...

62262

windlass
WINDLAS, WINDLASS, n. [wind and lace.] 1. A machine for raising great weights, consisting of a ...

62263

windle
WINDLE, n. A spindle; a kind of reel.

62264

window
WINDOW, n. [ G. The vulgar pronunciation is windor, as if from the Welsh gwyntdor, wind-door.]1. An ...

62265

window-blind
WINDOW-BLIND, n. [window and blind.] A blind to intercept the light of a window. Venetian ...

62266

window-frame
WINDOW-FRAME, n. [window and frame.] The frame of a window which receives and holds the sashes.

62267

window-glass
WINDOW-GLASS, n. [window and glass.] Panes of glass for windows.

62268

window-sash
WINDOW-SASH, n. [window and sash.] The sash or light frame in which panes of glass are set for ...

62269

windowy
WINDOWY, a. Having little crossings like the sashes of a window.

62270

windpipe
WINDPIPE, n. [wind and pipe.] The passage for the breath to and from the lungs; the trachea.

62271

windrow
WINDROW, n. [wind and row.] 1. A row or line of hay, raked together for the purpose of being rolled ...

62272

windseed
WINDSEED, n. A plant of the genus Arctolis.

62273

windward
WINDWARD, n. [wind and ward.] The point from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the ...

62274

windy
WINDY, a. 1. Consisting of wind; as a windy tempest.2. Next the wind; as the windy side.3. ...

62275

wine
WINE, n. [Gr.]1. The fermented juice of grapes; as the wine of the Madeira grape; the wine of ...

62276

wine-bibber
WINE-BIBBER, n. One who drinks much wine; a great drinker. Proverbs 23.

62277

wine-cask
WINE-CASK, n. [wine and cask.] A cask in which wine is or has been kept.

62278

wine-fly
WINE-FLY, n. A small fly found in empty wine casks.

62279

wine-glass
WINE-GLASS, n. [wine and glass.] A small glass in which wine is drank.

62280

wine-measure
WINE-MEASURE, n. [See Measure.] The measure by which wines and other spirits are sold, smaller than ...

62281

wine-merchant
WINE-MERCHANT, n. A merchant who deals in wines.

62282

wine-press
WINE-PRESS, n. [wine and press.] A place where grapes are pressed.

62283

wineless
WINELESS, a. Destitute of wine; as wineless life.

62284

wing
WING, n. 1. The limb of a fowl by which it flies. In a few species of fowls, the wings do not ...

62285

wing-footed
WING-FOOTED, a. [wing and foot.] Swift; moving with rapidity; fleet.

62286

wing-shell
WING-SHELL, n. [wing and shell.] The shell that covers the wing of insects.

62287

winged
WINGED, pp. 1. Furnished with wings; transported by flying.2. a. Having wings; as a winged fowl. ...

62288

wingless
WINGLESS, a. Having no wings; not able to ascend or fly.

62289

wingy
WINGY, a. Having wings; rapid; as wingy speed.

62290

wink
WINK, v.i. [G. Wink and wince are radically one word.]1. To shut the eyes; to close the ...

62291

winker
WINKER, n. One who winks.

62292

winking
WINKING, ppr. Shutting the eyes; shutting and opening the eyelids; hinting by closing the eye; ...

62293

winkingly
WINKINGLY, adv. With the eye almost closed.

62294

winner
WINNER, n. [from win.] One who gains by success in competition or contest.

62295

winning
WINNING, ppr. [from win.]1. Gaining success in competition or contest.2. a. Attracting; adapted to ...

62296

winnow
WINNOW, v.t. [L., a fan.]1. To separate and drive off the chaff from grain by means of wind. Grain ...

62297

winnowed
WINNOWED, pp. Separated from the chaff by wind; sifted; examined.

62298

winnower
WINNOWER, n. One who winnows.

62299

winnowing
WINNOWING, ppr. Separating from the chaff by wind; examining.

62300

winter
WINTER, n. 1. The cold season of the year. Astronomically considered, winter commences in northern ...

62301

winter-apple
WINTER-APPLE, n. [winter and apple.] An apple that keeps well in winter.

62302

winter-barley
WINTER-BARLEY, n. [winter and barley.] A kind of barley which is sowed in autumn.

62303

winter-beaten
WINTER-BEATEN, a. [winter and beat.] Harassed by the severe weather of winter.

62304

winter-berry
WINTER-BERRY, n. [winter and berry.] A plant of the genus Prinos.

62305

winter-bloom
WINTER-BLOOM, n. [winter and bloom.] A plant of the genus Azalea.

62306

winter-cherry
WINTER-CHERRY, n. [winter and cherry.] A plant of the genus Physalis, and its fruit, which is of ...

62307

winter-citron
WINTER-CITRON, n. [winter and citron.] A sort of pear.

62308

winter-cress
WINTER-CRESS, n. [winter and cress.] A plant of the genus Erysimum.

62309

winter-crop
WINTER-CROP, n. [winter and crop.] A crop which will bear the winter, or which may be converted ...

62310

winter-fallow
WINTER-FALLOW, n. [winter and fallow.] Ground that is fallowed in winter.

62311

winter-garden
WINTER-GARDEN, n. [winter and garden.] An ornamental garden for winter.

62312

winter-green
WINTER-GREEN, n. [winter and green.] A plant of the genus Pyrola, useful as a vulnerary.

62313

winter-kill
WINTER-KILL, v.t. [winter and kill.] To kill by means of the weather in winter; as, to winter-kill ...

62314

winter-killed
WINTER-KILLED, pp. Killed by the winter, as grain.

62315

winter-killing
WINTER-KILLING, ppr. Killing by the weather in winter.

62316

winter-lodge
WINTER-LODGE, WINTER-LODGMENT, n. [winter and lodge.] In botany, the hybernacle of a plant, which ...

62317

winter-lodgment
WINTER-LODGE, WINTER-LODGMENT, n. [winter and lodge.] In botany, the hybernacle of a plant, which ...

62318

winter-pear
WINTER-PEAR, n. [winter and pear.] Any pear that keeps well in winter.

62319

winter-quarters
WINTER-QUARTERS, n. [winter and quarters.] The quarters of an army during the winter; a winter ...

62320

winter-rig
WINTER-RIG, v.t. [winter and rig.] To fallow or till in winter. [Local.]

62321

winter-solstice
WINTER-SOLSTICE, n. [winter and solstice.] The solstice of the winter, which takes place when the ...

62322

wintered
WINTERED, pp. Kept through the winter.

62323

wintering
WINTERING, ppr. Passing the winter; keeping in winter.

62324

winterly
WINTERLY, a. Such as is suitable to winter. [Little used.]

62325

wintery
WINTERY, a. Suitable to winter; brumal; hyemal; cold; stormy.

62326

winy
WINY, a. [from wine.] Having the taste or qualities of wine.

62327

wipe
WIPE, v.t. 1. To rub something soft for cleaning; to clean by rubbing; as, to wipe the hands or ...

62328

wiped
WIPED, pp. Rubbed for cleaning; cleaned by rubbing; cleared away; effaced.

62329

wiper
WIPER, n. 1. One who wipes.2. The instrument used for wiping.

62330

wiping
WIPING, ppr. Rubbing with a cloth or other soft thing for cleaning; clearing away; effacing.

62331

wire
WIRE, n. A thread of metal; any metallic substance drawn to an even thread.WIRE, v.t. To bind with ...

62332

wire-grate
WIRE-GRATE, n. [wire and grate.] A grate or contrivance of fine wire work to keep insects out of ...

62333

wire-heel
WIRE-HEEL, n. [wire and heel.] A defect and disease in the feet of a horse or other beast.

62334

wire-worm
WIRE-WORM, n. [wire and worm.] A mischievous worm that sometimes injures grain.

62335

wiredraw
WIREDRAW, v.t. [wire and draw.]1. To draw a metal into wire, which is done by drawing it through a ...

62336

wiredrawer
WIREDRAWER, n. One who draw metal into wire.

62337

wiredrawing
WIREDRAWING, ppr. 1. Drawing a metal into wire.2. Drawing to a great length or fineness.

62338

wiredrawn
WIREDRAWN, pp. Drawn into wire; drawn out to great length or fineness.

62339

wiry
WIRY, a. Made of wire; like wire.

62340

wis
WIS, v.t. pret. wist. To think; to suppose; to imagine.

62341

wisdom
WISDOM, n. s as z. [G. See Wise.]1. The right use or exercise of knowledge; the choice of laudable ...

62342

wise
WISE, a. s as z. [G., to know., L.]1. Properly, having knowledge; hence, having the power of ...

62343

wise-hearted
WISE-HEARTED, a. [wise and heart.] Wise; knowing; skillful. Exodus 28.

62344

wiseacre
WISEACRE, n. More correctly wisesager. [G., a sayer, a predictor or foreteller.] One who makes ...

62345

wiseling
WISELING, n. One who pretends to be wise.

62346

wisely
WISELY, adv. 1. Prudently; judiciously; discretely; with wisdom. Proverbs 16. 21.2. Craftily; with ...

62347

wiseness
WISENESS, n. Wisdom.

62348

wish
WISH, v.i. [G.]1. To have a desire, or strong desire, either for what is or is not supposed to be ...

62349

wished
WISHED, pp. Desired; or ardently desired.

62350

wisher
WISHER, n. One who desires; one who expresses a wish.

62351

wishful
WISHFUL, a. 1. Having desire, or ardent desire.2. Showing desire; as wishful eyes.3. Desirable; ...

62352

wishfully
WISHFULLY, adv. 1. With desire or ardent desire.2. With the show of desiring.

62353

wishing
WISHING, ppr. Desiring.

62354

wisket
WISKET, n. A basket.

62355

wisp
WISP, n. [G.] A small bundle of straw or other like substance; as a wisp of straw; a wisp of hay; a ...

62356

wist
WIST, pret. of wis.

62357

wistful
WISTFUL, a. [from wist. The sense is stretching or reaching towards.] Full of thoughts; earnest; ...

62358

wistfully
WISTFULLY, adv. Attentively; earnestly.

62359

wistit
WISTIT, n. The striated monkey; a small species of monkey from South America, with an annulated ...

62360

wistly
WISTLY, adv. Earnestly.

62361

wit
WIT, v.i. [G., to know. See Wise.] To know. This verb is used only in the infinitive, to wit, ...

62362

wit-cracker
WIT-CRACKER, n. [wit and cracker.] One who breaks jests; a joker. [Not in use.]

62363

wit-craft
WIT-CRAFT, n. [wit and craft.] Contrivance; invention.

62364

wit-fish
WIT-FISH, n. [white fish.] An East Indian fish of the size of a whiting; also, another East Indian ...

62365

wit-snapper
WIT-SNAPPER, n. [wit and snap.] One who affects repartee. [Not in use.]

62366

wit-starved
WIT-STARVED, a. Barren of wit; destitute of genius.

62367

wit-worm
WIT-WORM, n. [wit and worm.] One that feeds on wit. [Not in use.]

62368

witch
WITCH, n. 1. A woman who by compact with the devil, practices sorcery or enchantment.2. A woman who ...

62369

witch-elm
WITCH-ELM, n. A kind of elm.

62370

witch-hazel
WITCH-HAZEL, n. 1. A species of elm, (Ulmus montana.)2. The hop-hornbeam, (carpinus ostrya.)The ...

62371

witchcraft
WITCHCRAFT, [witch and craft.]1. The practices of witches; sorcery; enchantments; intercourse with ...

62372

witchery
WITCHERY, n. 1. Sorcery; enchantment.2. Fascination.

62373

wite
WITE, v.t. To reproach; to blame.WITE, n. Blame; reproach.

62374

witeless
WITELESS, a. Blameless.

62375

with
WITH, prep. [G.]1. By, noting cause, instrument or means. We are distressed with pain; we are ...

62376

with-vine
WITH-VINE, WITH-WINE, n. A local name for the couch-grass.

62377

with-wine
WITH-VINE, WITH-WINE, n. A local name for the couch-grass.

62378

withal
WITHAL, adv. Withaul. [with and all.] 1. With the rest; together with; likewise; at the same ...

62379

withdraw
WITHDRAW, v.t. [with and draw.] 1. To take back; to take from.It is impossible that God should ...

62380

withdrawing
WITHDRAWING, ppr. Taking back; recalling; retiring.

62381

withdrawing-room
WITHDRAWING-ROOM, n. A room behind another room for retirement; a drawing room.

62382

withdrawment
WITHDRAWMENT, n. The act of withdrawing or taking back; a recalling.Their withdrawment from the ...

62383

withdrawn
WITHDRAWN, pp. of withdraw. Recalled; taken back.

62384

withe
WITH, WITHE, n. [L., probably a shoot.]1. A willow twig.2. A band consisting of a twig, or twigs ...

62385

wither
WITHER, v.i. 1. To fade; to lose its native freshness; to become sapless; to dry.It shall wither in ...

62386

wither-band
WITHER-BAND, n. [withers and band.] A piece of iron laid under a saddle near a horses withers, to ...

62387

wither-wrung
WITHER-WRUNG, a. Injured or hurt in the withers, as a horse.

62388

withered
WITHERED, pp. Faded; dried; shrunk.

62389

witheredness
WITHEREDNESS, n. The state of being withered.

62390

withering
WITHERING, ppr. Fading; becoming dry.

62391

witherite
WITHERITE, n. In mineralogy, a carbonate of baryte, first discovered by Dr. Withering; rhomboidal ...

62392

withernam
WITHERNAM, n. In withernam, in law, a second or reciprocal distress, in lieu of a first distress ...

62393

withers
WITHERS, n. [This seems to signify a joining, from the root of with.] The juncture of the shoulder ...

62394

withheld
WITHHELD, pret. and pp. of withhold.

62395

withhold
WITHHOLD, v.t. pret. and pp. withheld. [with and hold.]1. TO hold back; to restrain; to keep from ...

62396

withholden
WITHHOLDEN, pp. The old participle of withhold; now obsolete. We use withheld.

62397

withholder
WITHHOLDER, n. One that withholds.

62398

withholding
WITHHOLDING, ppr. Holding back; restraining; retaining; not granting.

62399

within
WITHIN, prep.1. In the inner part; as the space within the walls of a house; a man contented and ...

62400

withinside
WITHINSIDE, adv. [within and side.] In the inner parts. [Bad.]

62401

without
WITHOUT, prep.1. Not with; as without success.2. In a state of destitution or absence from.There is ...

62402

withouten
WITHOUTEN, for withoutan, the Saxon word, is obsolete.

62403

withstand
WITHSTAND, v.t. [with and stand. See Stand.] To oppose; to resist, either with physical or moral ...

62404

withstander
WITHSTANDER, n. One that opposes; an opponent; a resisting power.

62405

withstanding
WITHSTANDING, ppr. Opposing; making resistance.

62406

withwind
WITHWIND, n. A plant. [L.]

62407

withy
WITHY, n. A large species of willow.

62408

witless
WITLESS, a. [wit and less.] 1. Destitute of wit or understanding; inconsiderate; wanting thought; ...

62409

witlessly
WITLESSLY, adv. Without the exercise of judgment.

62410

witling
WITLING, n. [dim. From with.] A person who has little wit or understanding; a pretender to wit or ...

62411

witness
WITNESS, n. 1. Testimony; attestation of a fact or event.If I bear witness of myself, my witness is ...

62412

witnessed
WITNESSED, pp. Seen in person; testified; subscribed by persons present; as a deed witnessed by two ...

62413

witnessing
WITNESSING, ppr. Seeing in persons; bearing testimony; giving evidence.

62414

witted
WITTED, a. Having wit or understanding; as a quick witted boy.

62415

witticism
WITTICISM, n. [from wit.] A sentence or phrase which is affectedly witty; a low kind of wit.--He is ...

62416

wittily
WITTILY, adv. [from wit.]1. With wit; with a delicate turn or phrase, or with an ingenious ...

62417

wittiness
WITTINESS, n. [from witty.] The quality of being witty.

62418

wittingly
WITTINGLY, adv. [See Wit.] Knowingly; with knowledge; by design.He knowingly and wittingly brought ...

62419

wittol
WITTOL, n. A man who knows his wifes infidelity and submits to it; a tame cuckold.

62420

wittolly
WITTOLLY, adv. Like a tame cuckold.

62421

witty
WITTY, a. [from wit.] 1. Possessed of wit; full of wit; as a witty poet.2. Judicious; ingenious; ...

62422

witwall
WITWALL, n. A bird, the great spotted woodpecker.

62423

wive
WIVE, v.i. [from wife.] to marry. [Not in use.]WIVE, v.t. 1. To match to a wife.2. To take for a ...

62424

wivehood
WIVEHOOD, n. Behavior becoming a wife. [It should be wifehood.]

62425

wiveless
WIVELESS, a. Not having a wife. [It should be wifeless.]

62426

wively
WIVELY, a. Pertaining to a wife. [It should be wifely.]

62427

wiver
WIVER, WIVERIN, n. A kind of heraldric dragon.

62428

wiverin
WIVER, WIVERIN, n. A kind of heraldric dragon.

62429

wives
WIVES, plu. of wife.

62430

wizard
WIZARD, n. [from wise.] A conjurer; an enchanter; a sorcerer. Leviticus 20.The wily wizard must be ...

62431

wizen
WIZEN, v.i. To wither; to dry. [Local.]

62432

wo
WO, n. [G.]1. Grief; sorrow; misery; a heavy calamity.One who is past; and behold, there come two ...

62433

woad
WOAD, n. [G.] A plant of the genus Isatis, cultivated for the use of dyers. The woad blue is a very ...

62434

woad-mill
WOAD-MILL, n. A mill for bruising and preparing woad.

62435

wobegone
WOBEGONE, a. [wo, be, and gone.] Overwhelmed with wo; immersed in grief and sorrow.So wobegone was ...

62436

wodanium
WODANIUM, n. A metal recently discovered in a species of pyrite, found in Hungary, which had been ...

62437

woesome
WOESOME, a. Wosum. Woful. [Not in use.]

62438

woft
WOFT, for waft. [Not in use.]

62439

woful
WOFUL, a. 1. Sorrowful; distressed with grief or calamity; afflicted.How many woful widows left to ...

62440

wofully
WOFULLY, adv. 1. Sorrowfully; mournfully; in a distressing manner.2. Wretchedly; extremely; as, he ...

62441

wofulness
WOFULNESS, n. Misery; calamity.

62442

wold
WOLD, in Saxon, is the same as wald and weald, a wood, sometimes perhaps a lawn or plain. Wald ...

62443

wolf
WOLF, n. WULF. [G., Gr.]1. An animal of the genus Canis, a beast of prey that kills sheep and other ...

62444

wolf-dog
WOLF-DOG, n. 1. A dog of a large breed, kept to guard sheep.2. A dog supposed to be bred between a ...

62445

wolf-fish
WOLF-FISH, n. A fish, the lupus marinus, (the Anarrhichas lupus of Linne;) a fierce voracious fish ...

62446

wolf-net
WOLF-NET, n. A kind of net used in fishing, which takes great numbers.

62447

wolfish
WOLFISH, a. Like a wolf; having the qualities or form of a wolf; as a wolfish visage; wolfish ...

62448

wolfram
WOLFRAM, n. In mineralogy, an ore of tungsten. Its color is generally a brownish of grayish black; ...

62449

wolfs-bane
WOLFS-BANE, n. 1. A poisonous plant of the genus Aconitum; aconite.2. The winter aconite, or ...

62450

wolfs-claw
WOLFS-CLAW, n. A plant of the genus Lycopodium.

62451

wolfs-milk
WOLFS-MILK, n. An herb.

62452

wolfs-peach
WOLFS-PEACH, n. A plant of the genus Solanum, (S. Lycopersicum)

62453

wolverene
WOLVERIN, WOLVERENE, n. The glutton, a carnivorous animal of voracious appetite. The name wolverene ...

62454

wolverin
WOLVERIN, WOLVERENE, n. The glutton, a carnivorous animal of voracious appetite. The name wolverene ...

62455

wolvish
WOLVISH, a. More properly wolfish, which see.

62456

woman
WOMAN, n. plu. women. [a compound of womb and man.]1. The female of the human race, grown to adult ...

62457

woman-hater
WOMAN-HATER, n. [woman and hater.] One who has an aversion to the female sex.

62458

womaned
WOMANED, a. Accompanied or united with a woman. [Not used.]

62459

womanhood
WOMANHOOD, n. [woman and hood.] the state, character or collective qualities of a woman.

62460

womanise
WOMANISE, v.t. To make effeminate. [Not used.]

62461

womanish
WOMANISH, a. Suitable to a woman; having the qualities of a woman; feminine; as womanish habits; ...

62462

womankind
WOMANKIND, n. [woman and kind.] The female sex; the race of females of the human kind.

62463

womanly
WOMANLY, a. Becoming a woman; feminine; as womanly behavior.A blushing womanly discovering ...

62464

womb
WOMB, n. Woom. [G.]1. The uterus or matrix of a female; that part where the young of an animal is ...

62465

wombat
WOMBAT, n. An animal of New Holland, of the opossum family.

62466

womby
WOMBY, a. Wommy. Capacious. [Not in use.]

62467

women
WOMEN, n. plu. of woman. pron. wimen. But it is supposed the word we pronounce is from Sax. wifman, ...

62468

won
WON, pret. and pp. of win; as victories won.

62469

wonder
WONDER, n. [G., Gr., to show; and hence a sight; a panic.]1. That emotion which is excited by ...

62470

wonder-working
WONDER-WORKING, a. Doing wonders or surprising things.

62471

wonderer
WONDERER, n. One who wonders.

62472

wonderful
WONDERFUL, a. Adapted to excite wonder or admiration; exciting surprise; strange; astonishing. Job ...

62473

wonderfully
WONDERFULLY, adv. In a manner to excite wonder or surprise.I will praise thee, for I am fearfully ...

62474

wonderfulness
WONDERFULNESS, n. The state or quality of being wonderful.

62475

wondering
WONDERING, ppr. Indulging or feeling wonder. Genesis 24. Luke 24.

62476

wonderment
WONDERMENT, n. Surprise; astonishment; a wonderful appearance. [Vulgar.]

62477

wonderstruck
WONDERSTRUCK, a. [wonder and struck.] Struck with wonder, admiration and surprise.

62478

wondrous
WONDROUS, a. Admirable; marvelous; such as may excite surprise and astonishment; strange.That I may ...

62479

wondrously
WONDROUSLY, adv. In a strange or wonderful manner or degree.Chloe complains, and wondrouslys ...

62480

wone
WON, WONE, v.i. [G.] To dwell; to abide. Obsolete. Its participle is retained in wont, that is, ...

62481

wont
WONT, a contraction of woll not, that is, will not.WONT, a. [wont is strictly the participle ...

62482

wonted
WONTED, pp. 1. Accustomed; used.Again his wonted weapon provd.2. Accustomed; made familiar by ...

62483

wontedness
WONTEDNESS, n. The state of being accustomed.

62484

wontless
WONTLESS, a. Unaccustomed; unused.

62485

woo
WOO, v.t. 1. To court; to solicit in love.My proud rival wooes another partner to his throne and ...

62486

woo-house
WOO-HOUSE, n. [wood and house.] A house or shed in which wood is deposited and sheltered from the ...

62487

wood
WOOD, a. Mad; furious.WOOD, n. 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest.Light thickens, ...

62488

wood-anemone
WOOD-ANEMONE, n. A plant. [See Anemone.]

62489

wood-ashes
WOOD-ASHES, n. [wood and ashes.] The remains of burnt wood or plants. [This word is used in England ...

62490

wood-bind
WOOD-BIND, WOOD-BINE, n. A name given to the honeysuckle, a species of Lonicera.

62491

wood-bine
WOOD-BIND, WOOD-BINE, n. A name given to the honeysuckle, a species of Lonicera.

62492

wood-bound
WOOD-BOUND, a. [wood and bound.] Encumbered with tall woody hedgerows.

62493

wood-chat
WOOD-CHAT, n. A species of butcher bird.

62494

wood-coal
WOOD-COAL, n. [wood and coal.] Charcoal.

62495

wood-cock
WOOD-COCK, n. [wood and cock.] A fowl of the genus Scolopax, inhabiting the northern parts of the ...

62496

wood-cockshell
WOOD-COCKSHELL, n. A name given by English naturalists to a peculiar kind of the purpura, called by ...

62497

wood-drink
WOOD-DRINK, n. [wood and drink.] A decoction or infusion of medicinal woods.

62498

wood-engraving
WOOD-ENGRAVING, n. Xylography; the art of engraving on wood, or of cutting figures of natural ...

62499

wood-fretter
WOOD-FRETTER, n. [wood and fret.] An insect or worm that eats wood.

62500

wood-hole
WOOD-HOLE, n. [wood and hole.] A place where wood is laid up.

62501

wood-land
WOOD-LAND, n. [wood and land.] 1. Land covered with wood, or land on which trees are suffered to ...

62502

wood-lark
WOOD-LARK, n. [wood and lark.] A bird, a species of lark.

62503

wood-layer
WOOD-LAYER, n. [wood and layer.] A young oak or other timber plant, laid down in a hedge among the ...

62504

wood-lock
WOOD-LOCK, n. [wood and lock.] In shipbuilding, a piece of elm, close fitted and sheathed with ...

62505

wood-louse
WOOD-LOUSE, n. [wood and louse.] An insect, the millepede.

62506

wood-meil
WOOD-MEIL, n. A coarse hairy stuff made of Iceland wool, used to line the ports of ships of war.

62507

wood-mite
WOOD-MITE, [wood and mite.] A small insect found in old wood.

62508

wood-monger
WOOD-MONGER, n. [wood and monger.] A wood seller.

62509

wood-mote
WOOD-MOTE, n. [wood and mote.] In England, the ancient name of the forest court; now the court of ...

62510

wood-nightshade
WOOD-NIGHTSHADE, n. A plant.

62511

wood-note
WOOD-NOTE, n. [wood and note.] Wild music.--Or sweetest Shakespeare, fancys child, warble his ...

62512

wood-nymph
WOOD-NYMPH, n. [wood and nymph.] A fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad.The wood-nymphs deckd with ...

62513

wood-offering
WOOD-OFFERING, n. Wood burnt on the altar. Nehemiah 10.

62514

wood-pigeon
WOOD-PIGEON, n. [wood and pigeon.] The ring-dove, (Columba palumbus.)

62515

wood-puceron
WOOD-PUCERON, n. [wood and puceron.] A small insect of the puceron kind, of a grayish color, having ...

62516

wood-roof
WOOD-ROOF, WOOD-RUFF, n. [wood and roof or ruff.] A plant of the genus Asperula.

62517

wood-sage
WOOD-SAGE, n. [wood and sage.] A plant of the genus Teucrium.

62518

wood-sare
WOOD-SARE, n. A kind of froth seen on herbs.

62519

wood-seere
WOOD-SEERE, n. The time when there is no sap in a tree.

62520

wood-shock
WOOD-SHOCK, n. The fisher or wejack, a quadruped of the weasel kind in North America.

62521

wood-soot
WOOD-SOOT, n. [wood and soot.] Soot from burnt wood, which has been found useful as a manure.

62522

wood-sorrel
WOOD-SORREL, n. [wood and sorrel.] A plant of the genus Oxalis.

62523

wood-spite
WOOD-SPITE, n. [wood and spite.] A name given in some parts of England to the green woodpecker.

62524

wood-stone
WOOD-STONE, n. [wood and stone.] A blackish gray silicious stone, a subspecies of horn-stone.

62525

wood-ward
WOOD-WARD, n. [wood and ward.] An officer of the forest, whose duty is to guard the woods.

62526

wood-wash
WOOD-WASH, n. A name sometimes applied to dyers broom.

62527

wood-worm
WOOD-WORM, n. [wood and worm.] A worm that is bread in wood.

62528

woodchuk
WOODCHUK, n. [wood and chuk, a hog.] [See Chuk.] The popular name in New England of a species of ...

62529

wooded
WOODED, a. Supplied or covered with wood; as land wooded and watered.

62530

wooden
WOODEN, a. [from wood.] 1. Made of wood; consisting of wood; as a wooden box; a wooden leg; a ...

62531

wooding
WOODING, ppr. Getting or supplying with wood.

62532

woodless
WOODLESS, a. Destitute of wood.

62533

woodman
WOODMAN, n. [wood and man.]1. A forest officer, appointed to take care of the kings wood.2. A ...

62534

woodness
WOODNESS, n. Anger; madness; rage.

62535

woodpecker
WOODPECKER, n. [wood and peck.] A bird of the genus Picus, that pecks holes in trees, or that picks ...

62536

woodreve
WOODREVE, n. [wood and reve.] In England, the steward or overseer of a wood.

62537

woodwaxen
WOODWAXEN, n. A plant of the genus Genista; dyers broom.

62538

woody
WOODY, a. [from wood.] 1. Abounding with wood; as woody land; a woody region.--Secret shades of ...

62539

wooer
WOOER, n. [from woo.] One who courts, or solicits in love.

62540

woof
WOOF, n. [Gr.]1. The threads that cross the warp in weaving; the weft.2. Texture; cloth; as a pall ...

62541

wooing
WOOING, ppr. [from woo.] Courting; soliciting in love.

62542

wooingly
WOOINGLY, adv. Enticingly; with persuasiveness; so as to invite to stay.

62543

wool
WOOL, n. [G., Gr., soft; down; L., to pull off.]1. That species of hair which grows on sheep and ...

62544

wool-ball
WOOL-BALL, n. A ball or mass of wool found in the stomach of sheep.

62545

wool-comber
WOOL-COMBER, n. One whose occupation is to comb wool.

62546

wool-driver
WOOL-DRIVER, n. [wool and driver.] One who buys wool and carries it to market.

62547

wool-staple
WOOL-STAPLE, n. [wool and staple.] A city or town where wool used to be brought to the kings staple ...

62548

wool-stapler
WOOL-STAPLER, n. One who deals in wool.

62549

wool-trade
WOOL-TRADE, n. [wool and trade.] The trade in wool.

62550

wool-winder
WOOL-WINDER, n. [wool and wind.] A person employed to wind or make up wool into bundles to be ...

62551

woold
WOOLD, v.t. [G.] To wind, particularly to wind a rope round a mast or yard, when made of two or ...

62552

woolded
WOOLDED, pp. Bound fast with ropes; wound round.

62553

woolder
WOOLDER, n. A stick used in woolding.

62554

woolding
WOOLDING, ppr. Binding fast with ropes; winding round.WOOLDING, n. 1. The act of winding, as a rope ...

62555

woolen
WOOLEN, a. 1. Made of wool; consisting of wool; as woolen cloth.2. Pertaining to wool; as woolen ...

62556

woolen-draper
WOOLEN-DRAPER, n. One who deals in woolen goods.

62557

woolfel
WOOLFEL, n. [wool and fel., L.] A skin with the wool; a skin from which the wool has not been ...

62558

wooliness
WOOLINESS, n. [from woolly.] The state of being woolly.

62559

woolly
WOOLLY, a. 1. Consisting of wool; as a woolly covering; a woolly fleece.2. Resembling wool; as ...

62560

woolly-pastinum
WOOLLY-PASTINUM, n. A name given in the East Indies to a species of red orpiment or arsenic.

62561

woolpack
WOOLPACK, n. [wool and pack.]1. A pack or bag of wool.2. Any thing bulky without weight.

62562

woolsack
WOOLSACK, n. [wool and sack.]1. A sack or bag of wool.2. The seat of the lord chancellor and of the ...

62563

woolward
WOOLWARD, adv. In wool. [Not in use.]

62564

woop
WOOP, n. A bird. [L.]

62565

woos
WOOS, n. A plant; sea weed.

62566

woots
WOOTS, n. Indian steel, a metallic substance imported form the East Indies; valued as the material ...

62567

word
WORD, n. [G., L., to speak. A word is that which is uttered or thrown out.]1. An articulate or ...

62568

word-catcher
WORD-CATCHER, n. One who cavils at words.

62569

worded
WORDED, pp. Expressed in words.

62570

worder
WORDER, n. A speaker. [Not in use.]

62571

wordiness
WORDINESS, n. [from wordy.] The state or quality of abounding with words.

62572

wording
WORDING, n. 1. The act of expressing in words.2. The manner of expressing in words. The wording of ...

62573

wordish
WORDISH, a. Respecting words. [Not used.]

62574

wordishness
WORDISHNESS, n. Manner of wording. [Not used.]

62575

wordless
WORDLESS, a. Not using words; not speaking; silent.

62576

wordy
WORDY, a. 1. Using many words; verbose; as a wordy speaker; a wordy orator.2. Containing many ...

62577

wore
WORE, pret. of wear. He wore gloves.WORE, pret. of ware. They wore ship.

62578

work
WORK, v.i. [G., Gr.]1. In a general sense, to move, or to move one way and the other; to perform; ...

62579

work-fellow
WORK-FELLOW, n. One engaged in the same work with another. Romans 16.

62580

work-folk
WORK-FOLK, n. Persons that labor.

62581

worked
WORKED, pp. Moved; labored; performed; managed; fermented.

62582

worker
WORKER, n. One that works; one that performs.

62583

workhouse
WORKHOUSE, WORKING-HOUSE, n. 1. A house where any manufacture is carried on.2. Generally, a house ...

62584

working
WORKING, ppr. Moving; operating; laboring; fermenting.WORKING, n. 1. Motion; the act of laboring.2. ...

62585

working-house
WORKHOUSE, WORKING-HOUSE, n. 1. A house where any manufacture is carried on.2. Generally, a house ...

62586

workman
WORKMAN n. [work and man.] 1. Any man employed in labor, whether in tillage or manufactures.2. By ...

62587

workmanlike
WORKMANLIKE, a. Skillful; well performed.

62588

workmanly
WORKMANLY, a. Skillful; well performed.WORKMANLY, adv. In a skillful manner; in a manner becoming a ...

62589

workmanship
WORKMANSHIP, n. 1. Manufacture; something made, particularly by manual labor. Exodus 31.2. That ...

62590

workmaster
WORKMASTER, n. [work and master.] The performer of any work.

62591

workshop
WORKSHOP, n. [work and shop.] A shop where any manufacture is carried on.

62592

workwoman
WORKWOMAN, n. A woman who performs any work; or one skilled in needle work.

62593

world
WORLD, n. [This seems to be a compound word, and probably is named from roundness, the vault; but ...

62594

worldliness
WORLDLINESS, n. [from world.] A predominant passion for obtaining the good things of this life; ...

62595

worldling
WORLDLING, n. A person whose soul is set upon gaining temporal possessions; one devoted to this ...

62596

worldly
WORLDLY, a. 1. Secular; temporal; pertaining to this world or life, in contradistinction to the ...

62597

worldly-minded
WORLDLY-MINDED, a. Devoted to the acquisition of property and to temporal enjoyments.

62598

worldly-mindedness
WORLDLY-MINDEDNESS, n. A predominating love and pursuit of this worlds goods, to the exclusion of ...

62599

worm
WORM, n. [G. This word is probably named form a winding motion, and the root of swarm.]1. In common ...

62600

worm-eaten
WORM-EATEN, a. [worm and eat.] 1. Gnawed by worms; as worm-eaten boards, planks or timber.2. Old; ...

62601

worm-grass
WORM-GRASS, n. A plant of the genus Spigalia.

62602

worm-powder
WORM-POWDER, n. A powder used for expelling worms from the stomach and intestines.

62603

worm-seed
WORM-SEED, n. 1. A seed which has the property of expelling worms from the stomach, bowels, and ...

62604

worm-tincture
WORM-TINCTURE, n. A tincture prepared from earth-worms dried, pulverized and mixed with oil of ...

62605

wormed
WORMED, pp. Cleared by a worm or screw.

62606

worming
WORMING, ppr. Entering by insinuation; drawing, as a cartridge; clearing, as a gun.

62607

wormlike
WORMLIKE, a. Resembling a worm; spiral; vermicular.

62608

wormwood
WORMWOOD, n. [G.] A plant, the artemisia. It has a bitter nauseous taste; but it is stomachic and ...

62609

wormwood-fly
WORMWOOD-FLY, n. A small black fly, found on the stalks of wormwood.

62610

wormy
WORMY, a. 1. Containing a worm; abounding with worms.2. Earthy; groveling.

62611

worn
WORN, pp. of wear; as a garment long worn.Worn out, consumed or rendered useless by wearing.

62612

wornil
WORNIL, n. A maggot that infests the backs of cows.

62613

worral
WORRAL, n. An animal of the lizard kind, about four feet long and eight inches broad, with a forked ...

62614

worried
WORRIED, pp. [from worry.] Harassed; fatigued.

62615

worrier
WORRIER, n. [from worry.] One that worries or harasses.

62616

worry
WORRY, v.t. 1. To tease; to trouble; to harass with importunity, or with care and anxiety. Persons ...

62617

worrying
WORRYING, ppr. Teasing; troubling; harassing; fatiguing; tearing.

62618

worse
WORSE, a. [This adjective has the signification of the comparative degree, and as bad has no ...

62619

worsen
WORSEN, v.t. To worse. [Not in use.]

62620

worser
WORSER, is a vulgar word, and not used in good writing or speaking.

62621

worship
WORSHIP, n. [See Worth.]1. Excellence of character; dignity; worth; worthiness.--Elfin born of ...

62622

worshiped
WORSHIPED, pp. Adored; treated with divine honors; treated with civil respect.

62623

worshiper
WORSHIPER, n. One who worships; one who pays divine honors to any being; one who adores.

62624

worshipful
WORSHIPFUL, a. 1. Claiming respect; worthy of honor from its character or dignity. This is ...

62625

worshipfully
WORSHIPFULLY, adv. Respectfully.

62626

worshiping
WORSHIPING, ppr. Adoring; paying divine honors to; treating with supreme reverence; treating with ...

62627

worst
WORST, a. [superl. of worse, which see.]1. Most bad; most evil; in a moral sense; as the worst man; ...

62628

worsted
WORSTED, pp. Defeated; overthrown.WORSTED, n. WUSTED. [The origin of this word is uncertain. It is ...

62629

wort
WORT, n. [G., L., to grow; green.]1. A plant; an herb; now used chiefly or wholly in compounds; as ...

62630

worth
WORTH, a. Termination, signifies a farm or court; as in Wordsworth.WORTH, v.i. This verb is now ...

62631

worthily
WORTHILY, adv. 1. In a manner suited to; as, to walk worthily of our extraction. [Bad.]2. ...

62632

worthiness
WORTHINESS, n. 1. Desert; merit.The prayers which our Savior made, were for his own worthiness ...

62633

worthless
WORTHLESS, a. 1. Having no value; as a worthless garment; a worthless ship.2. Having no value of ...

62634

worthlessness
WORTHLESSNESS, n. 1. Want of value; want of useful qualities; as the worthlessness of an old ...

62635

worthy
WORTHY, a. [G.]1. Deserving; such as merits; having worth or excellence; equivalent; with of, ...

62636

wot
WOT, v.i. To know; to be aware.

62637

would
WOULD, WUD, pret. of will, G., L. Would is used as an auxiliary verb in conditional forms of ...

62638

woulding
WOULDING, n. Motion of desire. [Not in use.]

62639

wound
WOUND, n. [G.]1. A breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or of the bark and wood of a tree, or ...

62640

wounded
WOUNDED, pp. Hurt; injured.

62641

wounder
WOUNDER, n. One that wounds.

62642

wounding
WOUNDING, ppr. Hurting; injuring.

62643

woundless
WOUNDLESS, a. Free from hurt or injury.

62644

woundwort
WOUNDWORT, n. The name of several plants; one, a species of Achillea; another, a species of ...

62645

woundy
WOUNDY, a. Excessive. [Not English.]

62646

woungster
WOUNGSTER, n. Yungster. A young person; a lad; a colloquial word.

62647

wove
WOVE, pret. of weave, sometimes the participle.

62648

wox
WOX, WOXEN, for waxed. [Not in use.] Note. W before r is always silent.

62649

woxen
WOX, WOXEN, for waxed. [Not in use.] Note. W before r is always silent.

62650

wrack
WRACK, WRECK, n. [See Wreck.] A name given to a marine plant which is of great utility as a manure. ...

62651

wrain-bolt
WRAIN-BOLT. [See Wring-bolt.]

62652

wrangle
WRANGLE, v.i. [from the root of wring.] To dispute angrily; to quarrel peevishly and noisily; to ...

62653

wrangler
WRANGLER, n. An angry disputant; one who disputes with heat or peevishness; as a noisy contentious ...

62654

wranglesome
WRANGLESOME, a. Contentious; quarrelsome.

62655

wrangling
WRANGLING, ppr. Disputing or contending angrily.WRANGLING, n. The act of disputing angrily.

62656

wrap
WRAP, v.t. pret. and pp. wrapped or wrapt.1. To wind or fold together. John 20.2. To involve; to ...

62657

wrap-rascal
WRAP-RASCAL, n. An upper coat.

62658

wrapped
WRAPPED, WRAPT, pp. Wound; folded; inclosed.

62659

wrapper
WRAPPER, n. 1. One that wraps.2. That in which any thing is wrapped or inclosed.

62660

wrapping
WRAPPING, ppr. 1. Winding; folding; involving; inclosing.2. a. Used or designed for wrapping or ...

62661

wrapt
WRAPPED, WRAPT, pp. Wound; folded; inclosed.

62662

wrass
WRASS, WRASSE, n. A fish, the Labrus tinca of Linne, called by authors, turdus vulgaris, or tinca ...

62663

wrasse
WRASS, WRASSE, n. A fish, the Labrus tinca of Linne, called by authors, turdus vulgaris, or tinca ...

62664

wrath
WRATH, n. [L.]1. Violent anger; vehement exasperation; indignation; as the wrath of Achilles.When ...

62665

wrathful
WRATHFUL, a. 1. Very angry; greatly incensed. The king was very wrathful.2. Springing from wrath, ...

62666

wrathfully
WRATHFULLY, adv. With violent anger.

62667

wrathfulness
WRATHFULNESS, n. Vehement anger.

62668

wrathless
WRATHLESS, a. Free from anger.

62669

wrathy
WRATHY, a. Very angry; a colloquial word.

62670

wrawl
WRAWL, v.i. To cry, as a cat. [Not in use.]

62671

wreak
WREAK, v.t. [G. The sense is to drive or throw, to dash with violence.]1. To execute; to inflict; ...

62672

wreakful
WREAKFUL, a. Revengeful; angry.

62673

wreakless
WREAKLESS, a. Unrevengeful; weak.

62674

wreath
WREATH, n. [See Writhe.]1. To twist; to convolve; to wind one about another; as, to wreath a ...

62675

wreathed
WREATHED, pp. Twisted; entwined; interwoven.

62676

wreathing
WREATHING, ppr. Twisting; entwining; encircling.

62677

wreathy
WREATHY, a. Twisted; curled; spiral; as a wreathy spire.

62678

wreck
WRECK, n. 1. Destruction; properly, the destruction of a ship or vessel on the shore. Hence,2. The ...

62679

wrecked
WRECKED, pp. Dashed against the shore or on rocks; stranded and ruined.

62680

wreckful
WRECKFUL, a. Causing wreck.

62681

wrecking
WRECKING, ppr. Stranding; running on rocks or on shore; ruining.

62682

wren
WREN, n. A small bird of the genus Motacilla.

62683

wrench
WRENCH, v.t. [See Wring.]1. To pull with a twist; to wrest, twist or force by violence; as, to ...

62684

wrest
WREST, v.t. [G., to wrest, to snatch or pull, to burst, to tear.]1. To twist or extort by violence; ...

62685

wrested
WRESTED, pp. Pulled with twisting; distorted; perverted.

62686

wrester
WRESTER, n. One who wrests or perverts.

62687

wresting
WRESTING, ppr. Pulling with a twist; distorting; perverting.

62688

wrestle
WRESTLE, v.i. resl.1. To strive with arms extended, as two men, who seize each other by the collar ...

62689

wrestler
WRESTLER, n. One who wrestles; or one who is skillful in wrestling.

62690

wrestling
WRESTLING, pp. Striving to throw; contending.WRESTLING, n. Strife; struggle; contention.

62691

wretch
WRETCH, n. 1. A miserable person; one sunk in the deepest distress; as a forlorn wretch.2. A ...

62692

wretched
WRETCHED, a. 1. Very miserable; sunk into deep affliction or distress, either from want, anxiety or ...

62693

wretchedly
WRETCHEDLY, adv. 1. Most miserably; very poorly. The prisoners were wretchedly lodged.2. Unhappily; ...

62694

wretchedness
WRETCHEDNESS, n. 1. Extreme misery or unhappiness, either from want or sorrow; as the wretchedness ...

62695

wretchless
WRETCHLESS, for reckless, is improper.

62696

wretchlessness
WRETCHLESSNESS, for recklessness, is improper.

62697

wrig
WRIG, for wriggle. [Not in use.]

62698

wriggle
WRIGGLE, v.i. To move the body to and fro with short motions.Both he and his successors would often ...

62699

wriggler
WRIGGLER, n. One who wriggles.

62700

wriggling
WRIGGLING, ppr. Moving the body one way and the other with quick turns.

62701

wright
WRIGHT, n. An artificer; one whose occupation is some kind of mechanical business; a workman; a ...

62702

wring
WRING, v.t. pret. and pp. wringed and wrung. The latter is chiefly used.1. To twist; to turn and ...

62703

wring-bolt
WRING-BOLT, n. [wring and bolt.] A bolt used by shipwrights, to bend and secure the planks against ...

62704

wring-staves
WRING-STAVES, n. Strong bars of wood used in applying wring-bolts.

62705

wringed
WRINGED, pp. Twisted; pressed; distressed; extorted.

62706

wringer
WRINGER, n. One who wrings; one that forces water out of any thing by wringing.

62707

wringing
WRINGING, ppr. Twisting; writhing; extorting.

62708

wrinkle
WRINKLE, n. [G.]1. A small ridge or prominence, or a furrow, formed by the shrinking or contraction ...

62709

wrinkled
WRINKLED, pp. Contracted into ridges and furrows.

62710

wrinkling
WRINKLING, ppr. Shrinking; contracting into furrows and ridges.

62711

wrist
WRIST, n. 1. The joint by which the hand is united to the arm.2. In the manege, the bridle wrist is ...

62712

wristband
WRISTBAND, n. [wrist and band.] That band or part of a shirt sleeve which covers the wrist.

62713

writ
WRIT, n. [from write.] 1. That which is written. In this sense, writ is particularly applied to the ...

62714

write
WRITE, v.t. pret. wrote.; pp. writ, written. [L.]1. To form by a pen on paper or other material, or ...

62715

writer
WRITER, n. 1. One who writes or has written.2. An author.3. A clerk or amanuensis.Writer of the ...

62716

writhe
WRITHE, v.t. 1. To twist; to distort.Her mouth she writhd.2. To twist with violence; as, to writhe ...

62717

writhed
WRITHED, pp. Twisted; distorted.

62718

writhing
WRITHING, ppr. Twisting; distorting.

62719

writhle
WRITHLE, v.t. [from writhe.] To wrinkle. [Not in use.]

62720

writing
WRITING, ppr. 1. Forming, as characters, with a pen, style or graver.2. a. Used or intended for ...

62721

writing-master
WRITING-MASTER, n. One who teaches the art of penmanship.

62722

written
WRITTEN, pp. Expressed in letters.Written laws, statutes; laws enacted by the supreme power and ...

62723

wrizzled
WRIZZLED, for writhled. [Not in use.]

62724

wroken
WROKEN, for wreaked. [Not in use.]

62725

wrong
WRONG, a. Literally wrung, twisted or turned from a straight line or even surface. Hence,1. Not ...

62726

wrong-doer
WRONG-DOER, n. One who injures another, or does wrong.

62727

wrong-doing
WRONG-DOING, n. Evil or wicked act or action.

62728

wronged
WRONGED, pp. Treated unjustly; injured.

62729

wronger
WRONGER, n. One who injures another.

62730

wrongful
WRONGFUL, a. Injurious unjust; as a wrongful taking of property; wrongful dealing.

62731

wrongfully
WRONGFULLY, adv. Unjustly; in a manner contrary to the moral law or to justice; as, to accuse one ...

62732

wronghead
WRONGHEAD, WRONGHEADED, a. [wrong and head.] Wrong in opinion or principle; having a perverse ...

62733

wrongheaded
WRONGHEAD, WRONGHEADED, a. [wrong and head.] Wrong in opinion or principle; having a perverse ...

62734

wrongheadedness
WRONGHEADEDNESS, n. Perverseness; erroneousness.

62735

wronglessly
WRONGLESSLY, adv. Without injury to any one. [Not used.]

62736

wrongly
WRONGLY, adv. In a wrong manner; unjustly; amiss. He judges wrongly of my motives.

62737

wrongness
WRONGNESS, n. Wrong disposition; error.

62738

wrote
WROTE, pret. of write. He wrote a letter yesterday. Herodotus wrote his history more than two ...

62739

wroth
WROTH, a. Rauth. [See Wrath.] Very angry; much exasperated.Cain was very wroth, and his countenance ...

62740

wrought
WROUGHT, pret. and pp. of work. raut.1. Worked; formed by work or labor; as wrought iron.2. ...

62741

wrung
WRUNG, pre. and pp. of wring.

62742

wry
WRY, a. 1. Twisted; turned to one side; distorted; as a wry neck; a wry mouth.2. Deviating from the ...

62743

wryneck
WRYNECK, n. [wry and neck.]1. A twisted or distorted neck; a deformity in which the neck is drawn ...

62744

wrynecked
WRYNECKED, a. Having a distorted neck.

62745

wryness
WRYNESS, a. The state of being wry or distorted.

62746

wych-elm
WYCH-ELM, n. A variety of the elm, or a peculiar species, (Ulmus glabra.)

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Word of the Day

likely

LI'KELY, a. [that is, like-like.]

1. Probable; that may be rationally though or believed to have taken place in time past, or to be true now or hereafter; such as is more reasonable than the contrary. A likely story, is one which evidence, or the circumstances of the case render probable, and therefore credible.

2. Such as may be liked; pleasing; as a likely man or woman.

[This use of likely is not obsolete, as Johnson affirms, nor is it vulgar. But the English and their descendants in America differ in the application. The English apply the word to external appearance, and with them, likely is equivalent to handsome, well formed; as a likely man, a likely horse. In America, the word is usually applied to the endowments of the mind, or to pleasing accomplishments. With us, a likely man, is a man of good character and talents, or of good dispositions or accomplishments, that render him pleasing or respectable.]

LI'KELY, adv. Probably.

While man was innocent, he was likely ignorant of nothing important for him to know.

Random Word

unbesought

UNBESOUGHT, a. unbesaut'. Not besought; not sought by petition or entreaty.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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