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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [hate]

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hate

HATE, v.t. [L. odi, for hodi.]

1. To dislike greatly; to have a great aversion to. It expresses less than abhor, detest, and abominate, unless pronounced with a peculiar emphasis.

How long will fools hate knowledge? Prov.1.

Blessed are ye when men shall hate you. Luke 6.

The Roman tyrant was contented to be hated, if he was but feared.

2. In Scripture, it signifies to love less.

If any man come to me, and hate not father and mother, &c. Luke 14.

He that spareth the rod, hateth his son. Prov. 13.

HATE, n. Great dislike or aversion; hatred.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [hate]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

HATE, v.t. [L. odi, for hodi.]

1. To dislike greatly; to have a great aversion to. It expresses less than abhor, detest, and abominate, unless pronounced with a peculiar emphasis.

How long will fools hate knowledge? Prov.1.

Blessed are ye when men shall hate you. Luke 6.

The Roman tyrant was contented to be hated, if he was but feared.

2. In Scripture, it signifies to love less.

If any man come to me, and hate not father and mother, &c. Luke 14.

He that spareth the rod, hateth his son. Prov. 13.

HATE, n. Great dislike or aversion; hatred.


HATE, n.

Great dislike or aversion; hatred. Dryden.


HATE, v.t. [Sax. hatian, to hate, and to heat; Goth. hatyan; G. hassen; D. haaten; Sw. hata; Dan. hader; L. odi, for hodi. In all the languages except the Saxon, hate and heat are distinguished in orthography; but the elements of the word are the same, and probably they are radically one word denoting to stir, to irritate, to rouse.]

  1. To dislike greatly; to have a great aversion to. It expresses less than abhor, detest and abominate, unless pronounced with peculiar emphasis. How long will fools hate knowledge? Prov. i. Blessed are ye when men shall hate you. Luke vi. The Roman tyrant was contented to be hated, if he was but feared. Rambler.
  2. In Scripture, it signifies to love less. If any man come to me, and hate not father and mother, &c. Luke xiv. He that spareth the rod, hateth his son. Prov. xiii.

Hate
  1. To have a great aversion to, with a strong desire that evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; to dislike intensely; to detest; as, to hate one's enemies; to hate hypocrisy.

    Whosoever hateth his brother is a murderer. 1 John iii. 15.

  2. Strong aversion coupled with desire that evil should befall the person toward whom the feeling is directed; as exercised toward things, intense dislike; hatred; detestation; -- opposed to love.

    For in a wink the false love turns to hate. Tennyson.

  3. To be very unwilling; followed by an infinitive, or a substantive clause with that; as, to hate to get into debt; to hate that anything should be wasted.

    I hate that he should linger here. Tennyson.

  4. To love less, relatively.

    Luke xiv. 26.

    Syn. -- To Hate, Abhor, Detest, Abominate, Loathe. Hate is the generic word, and implies that one is inflamed with extreme dislike. We abhor what is deeply repugnant to our sensibilities or feelings. We detest what contradicts so utterly our principles and moral sentiments that we feel bound to lift up our voice against it. What we abominate does equal violence to our moral and religious sentiments. What we loathe is offensive to our own nature, and excites unmingled disgust. Our Savior is said to have hated the deeds of the Nicolaitanes; his language shows that he loathed the lukewarmness of the Laodiceans; he detested the hypocrisy of the scribes and Pharisees; he abhorred the suggestions of the tempter in the wilderness.

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Hate

HATE, verb transitive [Latin odi, for hodi.]

1. To dislike greatly; to have a great aversion to. It expresses less than abhor, detest, and abominate, unless pronounced with a peculiar emphasis.

How long will fools hate knowledge? Proverbs 1:22.

Blessed are ye when men shall hate you. Luke 6:22.

The Roman tyrant was contented to be hated, if he was but feared.

2. In Scripture, it signifies to love less.

If any man come to me, and hate not father and mother, etc. Luke 14:26.

He that spareth the rod, hateth his son. Proverbs 13:24.

HATE, noun Great dislike or aversion; hatred.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

condition

CONDITION, n. [L., to build or make, to ordain; properly, to set or fix, or to set together or in order; con and do, to give; properly, to send.]

1. State; a particular mode of being; applied to external circumstances, to the body, to the mind, and to things. We speak of a good condition or a bad condition, in reference to wealth and poverty; in reference to health and sickness; in reference to a cheerful or depressed disposition of mind; and with reference to a sound or broken, perishing state of things. The word signifies a setting or fixing, and has a very general and indefinite application, coinciding nearly with state, from sto, to stand, and denotes that particular frame, form, mode or disposition, in which a thing exists, at any given time. A man is in a good condition, when he is thriving. A nation, with an exhausted treasury and burthened with taxes, is not in a condition to make war. A poor man is in a humble condition. Religion affords consolation to man in every condition of life. Exhortations should be adapted to the condition of the mind.

Condition, circumstance, is not the thing; bliss is the same in subject or in king.

2. Quality; property; attribute.

It seemed to us a condition and property of divine powers and belongs to be hidden and unseen to others.

3. State of mind; temper; temperament; complexion. [See No. 1.]

4. Moral quality; virtue or vice.

[These senses however fall within the first definition.]

5. Rank, that is, state with respect to the orders or grades of society, or to property; as, persons of the best condition.

6. Terms of a contract or covenant; stipulation; that is, that which is set, fixed, established or proposed. What are the conditions of the treaty?

Make our conditions with yon captive king.

He sendeth and desireth conditions of peace. Luke 14.

7. A clause in a bond, or other contract containing terms or a stipulation that it is to be performed, and in case of failure, the penalty of the bond is to be incurred.

8. Terms given, or provided, as the ground of something else; that which is established, or to be done, or to happen, as requisite to another act; as, I will pay a sum of money, on condition you will engage to refund it.

A condition is a clause of contingency, on the happening of which the estate granted may be defeated.

CONDITION, v.i. To make terms; to stipulate.

It is one thing to condition for a good office, and another to execute it.

CONDITION, v.t. To contract; to stipulate.

It was conditioned between Saturn and Titan, that Saturn should put to death all his male children.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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