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Wednesday - January 16, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [hedge]

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hedge

HEDGE, n. hej. [Eng. haw] Properly, a thicket of thorn-bushes or other shrubs or small trees; but appropriately, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden.

Hedge, prefixed to another word, or in composition, denotes something mean, as a hedge-priest, a hedge-press, a hedge-vicar, that is, born in or belonging to the hedges or woods, low, outlandish. [Not used in American.]

HEDGE, v.t. hej. To inclose with a hedge; to fence with a thicket of shrubs or small trees; to separate by a hedge; as, to hedge a field or garden.

1. To obstruct with a hedge, or to obstruct in any manner.

I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hos.2.

2. To surround for defense; to fortify.

England hedged in with the main.

3. To inclose for preventing escape.

That is a law to hedge in the cuckow.

Dryden, Swift and Shakespeare have written hedge, for edge, to edge in, but improperly.

HEDGE, v.i. hej. To hide, as in a hedge; to hide; to skulk.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [hedge]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

HEDGE, n. hej. [Eng. haw] Properly, a thicket of thorn-bushes or other shrubs or small trees; but appropriately, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden.

Hedge, prefixed to another word, or in composition, denotes something mean, as a hedge-priest, a hedge-press, a hedge-vicar, that is, born in or belonging to the hedges or woods, low, outlandish. [Not used in American.]

HEDGE, v.t. hej. To inclose with a hedge; to fence with a thicket of shrubs or small trees; to separate by a hedge; as, to hedge a field or garden.

1. To obstruct with a hedge, or to obstruct in any manner.

I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hos.2.

2. To surround for defense; to fortify.

England hedged in with the main.

3. To inclose for preventing escape.

That is a law to hedge in the cuckow.

Dryden, Swift and Shakespeare have written hedge, for edge, to edge in, but improperly.

HEDGE, v.i. hej. To hide, as in a hedge; to hide; to skulk.


HEDGE, n. [hej; Sax. hege, heag, hæg, hegge; G. heck; D. heg, haag; Dan. hekke or hek; Sw. hägn, hedge, protection; Fr. haie; W. cae. Hence Eng. haw, and Hague in Holland. Ar. حَاجٌ haugan, a species of thorny plant.]

Properly, a thicket of thorn-bushes or other shrubs or small trees; but appropriately, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden. Hedge, prefixed to another word, or in composition, denotes something mean, as a hedge-priest, a hedge-press, a hedge-vicar, that is, born in or belonging to the hedges or woods, low, outlandish. [Not used in America.]


HEDGE, v.i. [hej.]

To hide, as in a hedge; to hide; to skulk. Shak.


HEDGE, v.t. [hej.]

  1. To inclose with a hedge; to fence with a thicket of shrubs or small trees; to separate by a hedge; as, to hedge a field or garden.
  2. To obstruct with a hedge, or to obstruct in any manner. I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hos. ii.
  3. To surround for defense; to fortify. England hedged in with the main. Shak.
  4. To inclose for preventing escape. That is a law to hedge in the cuckow. Locke. Dryden, Swift and Shakspeare have written hedge for edge, to edge in, but improperly.

Hedge
  1. A thicket of bushes, usually thorn bushes; especially, such a thicket planted as a fence between any two portions of land; and also any sort of shrubbery, as evergreens, planted in a line or as a fence; particularly, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows to separate the parts of a garden.

    The roughest berry on the rudest hedge. Shak.

    Through the verdant maze
    Of sweetbrier hedges I pursue my walk.
    Thomson.

    * Hedge, when used adjectively or in composition, often means rustic, outlandish, illiterate, poor, or mean; as, hedge priest; hedgeborn, etc.

    Hedge bells, Hedge bindweed (Bot.), a climbing plant related to the morning-glory (Convolvulus sepium). -- Hedge bill, a long-handled billhook. -- Hedge garlic (Bot.), a plant of the genus Alliaria. See Garlic mustard, under Garlic. -- Hedge hyssop (Bot.), a bitter herb of the genus Gratiola, the leaves of which are emetic and purgative. - - Hedge marriage, a secret or clandestine marriage, especially one performed by a hedge priest. [Eng.] -- Hedge mustard (Bot.), a plant of the genus Sisymbrium, belonging to the Mustard family. -- Hedge nettle (Bot.), an herb, or under shrub, of the genus Stachys, belonging to the Mint family. It has a nettlelike appearance, though quite harmless. -- Hedge note. (a) The note of a hedge bird. (b) Low, contemptible writing. [Obs.] Dryden. -- Hedge priest, a poor, illiterate priest. Shak. -- Hedge school, an open-air school in the shelter of a hedge, in Ireland; a school for rustics. -- Hedge sparrow (Zoöl.), a European warbler (Accentor modularis) which frequents hedges. Its color is reddish brown, and ash; the wing coverts are tipped with white. Called also chanter, hedge warbler, dunnock, and doney. -- Hedge writer, an insignificant writer, or a writer of low, scurrilous stuff. [Obs.] Swift. -- To breast up a hedge. See under Breast. -- To hang in the hedge, to be at a standstill. "While the business of money hangs in the hedge." Pepys.

  2. To inclose or separate with a hedge] to fence with a thickly set line or thicket of shrubs or small trees; as, to hedge a field or garden.
  3. To shelter one's self from danger, risk, duty, responsibility, etc., as if by hiding in or behind a hedge; to skulk; to slink; to shirk obligations.

    I myself sometimes, leaving the fear of God on the left hand and hiding mine honor in my necessity, am fain to shuffle, to hedge and to lurch. Shak.

  4. To obstruct, as a road, with a barrier; to hinder from progress or success; -- sometimes with up and out.

    I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hos. ii. 6.

    Lollius Urbius . . . drew another wall . . . to hedge out incursions from the north. Milton.

  5. To reduce the risk of a wager by making a bet against the side or chance one has bet on.
  6. To surround for defense; to guard; to protect; to hem (in).

    "England, hedged in with the main." Shak.
  7. To use reservations and qualifications in one's speech so as to avoid committing one's self to anything definite.

    The Heroic Stanzas read much more like an elaborate attempt to hedge between the parties than . . . to gain favor from the Roundheads. Saintsbury.

  8. To surround so as to prevent escape.

    That is a law to hedge in the cuckoo. Locke.

    To hedge a bet, to bet upon both sides; that is, after having bet on one side, to bet also on the other, thus guarding against loss.

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Hedge

HEDGE, noun hej. [Eng. haw] Properly, a thicket of thorn-bushes or other shrubs or small trees; but appropriately, such a thicket planted round a field to fence it, or in rows, to separate the parts of a garden.

HEDGE, prefixed to another word, or in composition, denotes something mean, as a hedge-priest, a hedge-press, a hedge-vicar, that is, born in or belonging to the hedges or woods, low, outlandish. [Not used in American.]

HEDGE, verb transitive hej. To inclose with a hedge; to fence with a thicket of shrubs or small trees; to separate by a hedge; as, to hedge a field or garden.

1. To obstruct with a hedge or to obstruct in any manner.

I will hedge up thy way with thorns. Hosea 2.

2. To surround for defense; to fortify.

England hedged in with the main.

3. To inclose for preventing escape.

That is a law to hedge in the cuckow.

Dryden, Swift and Shakespeare have written hedge for edge, to edge in, but improperly.

HEDGE, verb intransitive hej. To hide, as in a hedge; to hide; to skulk.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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cat

CAT, n.

1. A name applied to certain species of carnivorous quadrupeds, of the genus Felis. The domestic cat needs no description. It is a deceitful animal, and when enraged, extremely spiteful. It is kept in houses, chiefly for the purpose of catching rats and mice. The wild cat is much larger than the domestic cat. It is a strong, ferocious animal, living in the forest, and very destructive to poultry and lambs.

The wild cat of Europe is of the same species with the domestic cat; the catamount, of N. America, is much larger and a distinct species.

2. A ship formed on the Norwegian model, having a narrow stern, projecting quarters, and a deep waist. It is strong built, from four to six hundred tons burthen, and employed in the coal trade.

3. A strong tackle or combination of pulleys, to hook and draw an anchor perpendicularly up to the cat-head of a ship.

4. A double tripod having six feet.

Cat of nine tails, an instrument of punishment, consisting of nine pieces of line or cord fastened to a piece of thick rope, and having three knots at intervals, used to flog offenders on board of ships.

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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