HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Wednesday - December 7, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comBROWSING [I]

Please click on the word of the partial definition to see the complete definition

ID Word Definition

27794

i
I is the ninth letter,and the third vowel of the English Alphabet. We receive it through the Latin ...

27795

iambic
IAM'BIC, n. [L. imabicus;] Pertaining to the iambus, a poetic foot consisting of two syllables, a ...

27796

iambics
IAM'BICS, n. plu. Verses composed of short and long syllables alternately. Anciently, certain ...

27797

iambus
IAM'BUS, n. [L. iambus.] In poetry, a foot consisting of two syllables,the first short and the ...

27798

ibex
IBEX, n. [L.] The wild goat of the genus Capra,which is said to be the stock of the tame goat. It ...

27799

ibis
IBIS, n. [Gr. and L.] A fowl of the genus Tantalus,and grallic order, a native of Egypt. The bill ...

27800

ic
OL'IGIST,'IC, a. [Gr. least.] Oligist iron, so called, is a crystallized tritoxyd of iron.

27801

icarian
ICA'RIAN, a. [from Icarus, the son of Daedalus, who fled on wings to escape the resentment of ...

27802

ice
ICE, n. 1. Water or other fluid congealed, or in a solid state; a solid, transparent, brittle ...

27803

iceberg
ICEBERG, n. [ice and a hill.] A hill or mountain of ice, or a vast body of ice accumulated in ...

27804

iceblink
ICEBLINK, n. A name given by seamen to a bright appearance near the horizon, occasioned by the ...

27805

iceboat
ICEBOAT, n. A boat constructed for moving on ice.

27806

icebound
ICEBOUND, a. In seaman's language, totally surrounded with ice, so as to be incapable of advancing.

27807

icebuilt
ICEBUILT, a. Composed of ice.1. Loaded with ice.

27808

icehouse
ICEHOUSE, n. [ice and house.] A repository for the preservation of ice during warm weather; a pit ...

27809

iceisle
ICEISLE, n. iceile. [ice and isle.] A vast body of floating ice,such as is often seen in the ...

27810

icelander
ICELANDER, n. A native of Iceland.

27811

icelandic
ICELAND'IC, a. Pertaining to Iceland; and as a noun, the language of the Icelanders.Iceland spar, ...

27812

iceplant
ICEPLANT, n. A plant of the genus Mesembryanthemem, sprinkled with pellucid, glittering, icy ...

27813

icespar
ICESPAR, n. A variety of feldspar,the crystals of which resemble ice.

27814

ichneumon
ICHNEU'MON, n. [L. from the Gr. to follow the steps, a footstep; a follower of the crocodile.]An ...

27815

ichnographic
ICHNOGRAPH'IC

27816

ichnographical
ICHNOGRAPH'ICAL, a. [See Ichnography.] Pertaining to ichnography; describing a ground- plot.

27817

ichnography
ICHNOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a footstep, and to describe.] In perspective, the view of any thing cut off ...

27818

ichor
I'CHOR, n. [Gr.] A thin watery humor, like serum or whey.1. Sanious matter flowing from an ulcer.

27819

ichorous
I'CHOROUS, a. Like ichor; thin; water; serous.1. Sanious.

27820

ichthyocol
ICH'THYOCOL

27821

ichthyocolla
ICHTHYOCOL'LA, n. [Gr. a fish, and glue.] Fish-glue; isinglass; a glue prepared from the sounds of ...

27822

ichthyolite
ICH'THYOLITE, n. [Gr. a fish, and a stone.] Fossil fish; or the figure or impression of a fish in ...

27823

ichthyological
ICHTHYOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to ichthyology.

27824

ichthyologist
ICHTHYOL'OGIST, n. [See Ichthyology.] One versed in ichthyology.

27825

ichthyology
ICHTHYOL'OGY, n. [Gr. a fish, and discourse.] The science of fishes, or that part of zoology which ...

27826

ichthyophagous
ICHTHYOPH'AGOUS, a. [Gr. fish, and to eat.] Eating or subsisting on fish.

27827

ichthyophagy
ICHTHYOPH'AGY, n. [supra.] The practice of eating fish.

27828

ichthyophthalmite
ICHTHYOPHTHAL'MITE, n. [Gr. a fish, and an eye.] Fish-eyestone. [See Apophyllite.]

27829

icicle
I'CICLE, n. A pendent conical mass of ice, formed by the freezing of water or other fluid as it ...

27830

iciness
I'CINESS, n. The state of being icy, or of being very cold.1. The state of generating ice.

27831

icing
I'CING, ppr. Covering with concreted sugar.

27832

icon
I'CON, n. [Gr. an image, to resemble.] An image or representation. [Not in use.]

27833

iconoclast
ICON'OCLAST, n. [Gr. an image, and a breaker, to break.] A breaker or destroyer of images; a name ...

27834

iconoclastic
ICONOCLAS'TIC, a. Breaking images.

27835

iconography
ICONOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. an image, to describe.] The description of images or ancient statues, busts, ...

27836

iconolater
ICONOL'ATER, n. [Gr. an image, and a servant.] One that worships images; a name given to ...

27837

iconology
ICONOL'OGY, n. [Gr. an image, and a discourse.] The doctrine of images or representations.

27838

icosahedral
ICOSAHE'DRAL, a. [Gr. twenty, and seat, basis.] Having twenty equal sides.

27839

icosahedron
ICOSAHE'DRON, n. [supra.] A solid of twenty equal sides.In geometry, a regular solid, consisting ...

27840

icosander
ICOSAN'DER, n. [Gr. twenty, and a male.] In botany, a plant having twenty or more stamens inserted ...

27841

icosandrian
ICOSAN'DRIAN, n. Pertaining to the class of plants, Icosandria, having twenty or more stamens ...

27842

icteric
IC'TERIC

27843

icterical
ICTER'ICAL, a. [L. ictericus, from icterus, jaundice.] Affected with the jaundice.1. Good in the ...

27844

icteritious
ICTERI'TIOUS, a. [L. icterus,jaundice.] Yellow; having the color of the skin when it is affected ...

27845

icy
I'CY, a. [from ice.] Abounding with ice; as the icy regions of the north.1. Cold; frosty; as icy ...

27846

icy-pearled
I'CY-PEARLED, a. Studded with spangles of ice.I'd, contracted from I would, or I had.

27847

idea
IDE'A, n. [L. idea; Gr. to see, L. video.]1. Literally, that which is seen; hence, form, image, ...

27848

ideal
IDE'AL, a. Existing in idea; intellectual; mental; as ideal knowledge. There will always be a wide ...

27849

idealism
IDE'ALISM, n. The system or theory that makes every thing to consist in ideas, and denies the ...

27850

idealize
IDE'ALIZE, v.i. To form ideas.

27851

ideally
IDE'ALLY, adv. Intellectually; mentally; in idea.

27852

ideate
IDE'ATE, v.t. To form in idea; to fancy. [Not in use.]

27853

identic
IDEN'TIC

27854

identical
IDEN'TICAL, a. [L. idem, the same.] The same; not different; as the identical person; the ...

27855

identification
IDENTIFICA'TION, n. The act of making or proving to be the same.

27856

identified
IDEN'TIFIED, pp. Ascertained or made to be the same.

27857

identify
IDEN'TIFY, v.t. [L. idem, the same, and facio, to make.]1. To ascertain or prove to be the same. ...

27858

identifying
IDEN'TIFYING, ppr. Ascertaining or proving to be the same.1. Making the same in interest, ...

27859

identity
IDEN'TITY, n. Sameness, as distinguished from similitude and diversity. We speak of the identity ...

27860

ides
IDES, n. plu. [L. idus.] In the ancient Roman calendar, eight days in each month; the first day of ...

27861

idio-repulisve
IDIO-REPUL'ISVE, a. Repulsive by itself; as the idio-repulsive power of heat.

27862

idiocrasy
IDIOC'RASY, n. [Gr. proper, peculiar to one's self, and mixture, temperament, to mix.]Peculiarity ...

27863

idiocratic
IDIOCRAT'IC

27864

idiocratical
IDIOCRAT'ICAL, a. Peculiar in constitution.

27865

idiocy
ID'IOCY, n. [Gr. See Idiot.] A defect of understanding; properly, a natural defect. Idiocy and ...

27866

idioelectric
IDIOELEC'TRIC, a. [Gr. separate from others, peculiar to one's self,and electric.]Electric per se, ...

27867

idiom
ID'IOM, n. [L. idioma, from Gr. proper, or peculiar to one's self; Eng. widow, wide.]1. A mode of ...

27868

idiomatic
IDIOMAT'IC

27869

idiomatical
IDIOMAT'ICAL, a. Peculiar to a language; pertaining to the particular genius or modes of ...

27870

idiomatically
IDIOMAT'ICALLY, adv. According to the idiom of a language.

27871

idiopathic
IDIOPATH'IC, a. [See Idiopathy.] Pertaining to idiopathy; indicating a disease peculiar to a ...

27872

idiopathically
IDIOPATH'ICALLY, adv. By means of its own disease or affections; not sympathetically.

27873

idiopathy
IDIOP'ATHY, n. [Gr. proper, peculiar, and suffering, disease, to suffer.]1. An original disease in ...

27874

idiosyncrasy
IDIOSYN'CRASY, n. [Gr. proper, with, and temperament.] A peculiar temperament or organization of a ...

27875

idiot
ID'IOT, n.[L. idiota; Gr. private,vulgar,unskilled, peculiar, that is, separate, simple. See ...

27876

idiotic
IDIOT'IC, a. Like an idiot; foolish; sottish.

27877

idiotish
ID'IOTISH, a. Like an idiot; partaking of idiocy; foolish.

27878

idiotism
ID'IOTISM, n. [Gr. a form of speech taken from the vulgar.]1. An idiom; a peculiarity of ...

27879

idiotize
ID'IOTIZE, v.i. To become stupid.

27880

idle
I'DLE, a.1. Not employed; unoccupied with business; inactive; doing nothing. Why stand ye here all ...

27881

idleheaded
I'DLEHEADED, a. [idle and head.] Foolish; unreasonable.1. Delirious; infatuated. [Little used.]

27882

idleness
I'DLENESS, n. Abstinence from labor or employment; the state of a person who is unemployed in ...

27883

idlepated
I'DLEPATED, a. Idleheaded; stupid.

27884

idler
I'DLER, n. One who does nothing; one who spends his time in inaction, or without being engaged in ...

27885

idlesby
I'DLESBY, n. An idle or lazy person. [Not used.]

27886

idly
I'DLY, adv. In an idle manner; without employment.1. Lazily; sluggishly.2. Foolishly; uselessly; ...

27887

idocrase
ID'OCRASE, n. [Gr. form, and mixture; a mixed figure.]A mineral, the vesuvian of Werner, sometimes ...

27888

idol
I'DOL, n. [L. idolum; Gr. form or to see.]1. An image, form or representation, usually of a man or ...

27889

idolater
IDOL'ATER, n. [L. idololatra. See Idolatry.]1. A worshiper of idols; one who pays divine honors ...

27890

idolatress
IDOL'ATRESS, n. A female worshiper of idols.

27891

idolatrize
IDOL'ATRIZE, v.i. To worship idols.IDOL'ATRIZE, v.t. To adore; to worship.

27892

idolatrous
IDOL'ATROUS, a. Pertaining to idolatry; partaking of the nature of idolatry, or of the worship of ...

27893

idolatrously
IDOL'ATROUSLY, adv. In an idolatrous manner; with excessive reverence.

27894

idolatry
IDOL'ATRY, n. [L. idololatria. Gr. idol, and to worship or serve.]1. The worship of idols, images, ...

27895

idolish
I'DOLISH, a. Idolatrous.

27896

idolism
I'DOLISM, n. The worship of idols. [Little used.]

27897

idolist
I'DOLIST, n. A worship of images; a poetical word.

27898

idolize
I'DOLIZE, v.t. To love to excess; to love or reverence to adoration; as, to idolize gold or ...

27899

idolized
I'DOLIZED, pp. Loved or reverenced to adoration.

27900

idolizer
I'DOLIZER, n. One who idolizes, or loves to reverence.

27901

idolizing
I'DOLIZING, ppr. Loving or revering to an excess bordering on adoration.

27902

idoneous
IDO'NEOUS, a. [L. idoneus; probably from the root of Gr. to be strong, able or sufficient.]Fit; ...

27903

idyl
IDYL, n. [L. idyllium; Gr. supposed to be from form.]A short poem; properly, a short pastoral poem; ...

27904

ieland
I'ELAND, n. i'land. [L. aqua,and land. This is the genuine English word, always used in discourse, ...

27905

if
IF, v.t. It is used as the sign of a condition, or it introduces a conditional sentence. It is a ...

27906

igated
IGATED, pp. Steered or managed in passing on the water; passed over in sailing.

27907

igneous
IG'NEOUS, a. [L.igneus, from ignis, fire.]1. Consisting of fire; as igneous particles emitted from ...

27908

ignescent
IGNES'CENT, a. [L. ignescens, ignesco, from ignis, fire.]Emitting sparks of fire when struck with ...

27909

ignifluous
IGNIF'LUOUS, a. [L.ignifluus.] Flowing with fire.

27910

ignify
IG'NIFY, v.t. [L. ignis and facio.] To form into fire.

27911

ignipotent
IGNIP'OTENT, a. [L. ignis, fire, and potens, powerful.]Presiding over fire. Vulcan is called the ...

27912

ignite
IGNI'TE, v.t. [L. ignis, fire.] To kindle, or set on fire.1. More generally, to communicate fire ...

27913

ignited
IGNI'TED, pp. Set on fire.1. Rendered red or luminous by heat or fire.

27914

ignitible
IGNI'TIBLE, a. Capable of being ignited.

27915

igniting
IGNI'TING, ppr. Setting on fire; becoming red with heat.1. Communicating fire to; heating to ...

27916

ignition
IGNI'TION, n. The act of kindling, or setting on fire.1. The act or operation of communicating ...

27917

ignivomous
IGNIV'OMOUS, a. [L. ignivomus; ignis, fire, and vomo, to vomit.]Vomiting fire; as an ignivomous ...

27918

ignobility
IGNOBIL'ITY, n. Ignobleness. [Not in use.]

27919

ignoble
IGNO'BLE, a. [L. ignobilis; in and nobilis. See Noble.]1. Of low birth or family; not noble; not ...

27920

ignobleness
IGNO'BLENESS, n. Want of dignity; meanness.

27921

ignobly
IGNO'BLY, adv. Of low family or birth; as ignobly born.1. Meanly; dishonorably; reproachfully; ...

27922

ignominious
IGNOMIN'IOUS, a. [L. ignominiosus. See Ignominy.]1. Incurring disgrace; cowardly; of mean ...

27923

ignominiously
IGNOMIN'IOUSLY, adv. Meanly; disgracefully; shamefully.

27924

ignominy
IG'NOMINY, n. [L. ignominia; in and nomen, against name or reputation.] Public disgrace; shame; ...

27925

ignoramus
IGNORA'MUS, n. [L. we are ignorant; from ignoro.]1. The indorsement which a grand jury make on a ...

27926

ignorance
IG'NORANCE, n. [L. ignorantia; ignoro,not to know; ignarus, ignorant; in and gnarus, knowing.]1. ...

27927

ignorant
IG'NORANT, a. [L. ignorans.] Destitute of knowledge; uninstructed or uninformed; untaught; ...

27928

ignorantly
IG'NORANTLY, adv. Without knowledge, instruction or information. Whom therefore ye ignorantly ...

27929

ignore
IGNO'RE, v.t. To be ignorant. [Not in use.]

27930

ignoscible
IGNOS'CIBLE, a. [L. ignoscibilis.] Pardonable. [Not used.]

27931

ignote
IGNO'TE, a. [L. ignotus.] Unknown. [Not used.]

27932

iguana
IGU`ANA, n. A species of lizard, of the genus Lacerta.

27933

il
Il, prefixed to words beginning with l, stands for in, as used in the Latin language, and usually ...

27934

ile
ILE, so written by Pope for aile, a walk or alley in a church or public building. [Not in use.]1. ...

27935

ilex
I'LEX, n. [L.] In botany, the generic name of the Holly-tree.Also, the Quercus ilex, or great ...

27936

iliac
IL'IAC, a. [L. iliacus, from ilia, the flank, or small intestines; Gr. to wind.] Pertaining to the ...

27937

iliad
IL'IAD, n. [from Ilium, Ilion, Troy.] An epic poem, composed by Homer, in twenty four books. The ...

27938

ilk
ILK, a. The same; each. This is retained in Scottish, from the Saxon elc, each.

27939

ill
ILL, n. 1. Bad or evil, in a general sense; contrary to good, physical or moral; applied to ...

27940

ill-bred
ILL-BRED, a. Not well bred; unpolite.

27941

ill-breeding
ILL-BREE'DING, n. Want of good breeding; unpoliteness.

27942

ill-conditioned
ILL-CONDI'TIONED, a. [See Condition.] Being in bad order or state.

27943

ill-favored
ILL-FA'VORED, a. [ill and favored.] Ugly; ill-looking; wanting beauty; deformed. Ill-favored and ...

27944

ill-favoredly
ILL-FA'VOREDLY, adv. With deformity.1. Roughly; rudely.

27945

ill-favoredness
ILL-FA'VOREDNESS, n. Ugliness; deformity.

27946

ill-lived
ILL-LI'VED, a. Leading a wicked life. [Little used.]

27947

ill-nature
ILL-NA'TURE, n. [ill and nature.] Crossness; crabbedness; habitual bad temper, or want of ...

27948

ill-natured
ILL-NA'TURED, a. Cross, crabbed; surly; intractable; of habitual bad temper; peevish; fractious. ...

27949

ill-naturedly
ILL-NA'TUREDLY, adv. In a peevish or forward manner; crossly; unkindly.

27950

ill-naturedness
ILL-NA'TUREDNESS, n. Crossness; want of a kind disposition.

27951

ill-will
ILL-WILL' n. Enmity; malevolence.

27952

ill-willer
ILL-WILL'ER, n. One who wishes ill to another.

27953

illabile
ILLAB'ILE, a. [See Labile.] Not liable to fall or err; infallible. [Not used.]

27954

illability
ILLABIL'ITY, n. The quality of not being liable to err, fall or apostatize. [Not used.]

27955

illacerable
ILLAC'ERABLE, a. [See Lacerate.] That cannot be torn or rent.

27956

illapse
ILLAPSE, n. illaps'. [See Lapse.] A sliding in; an immission or entrance of one thing into ...

27957

illaqueate
ILLAQ'UEATE, v.t. [L. illaqueo; in and laqueo, to ensnare; laquens, a snare.] To ensnare; to ...

27958

illaqueated
ILLAQ'UEATED, pp. Ensnared.

27959

illaqueation
ILLAQUEA'TION, n. The act of ensnaring; a catching or entrapping. [Little used.]1. A snare.

27960

illataive
IL'LATAIVE, a. [See Illation.] Relating to illation; that may be inferred; as an illative ...

27961

illation
ILLA'TION, n. [L. illatio; in and latio, a bearing; latus, from fero.] An inference from premises; ...

27962

illaudable
ILLAUD'ABLE, a. [See Laudable.] Not laudable; not worthy of approbation or commendation; as an ...

27963

illaudably
ILLAUD'ABLY, adv. In a manner unworthy of praise; without deserving praise.

27964

illecebrous
ILLE'CEBROUS, a. [L.illecebrosus.] Alluring; full of allurement.

27965

illegal
ILLE'GAL, a. [See Legal.] Not legal; unlawful; contrary to law; illicit; as an illegal act; ...

27966

illegality
ILLEGAL'ITY, n. Contrariety to law; unlawfulness; as the illegality of trespass,or of false ...

27967

illegalize
ILLE'GALIZE, v.t. To render unlawful.

27968

illegally
ILLE'GALLY, adv. In a manner contrary to law; unlawfully; as a man illegally imprisoned.

27969

illegibility
ILLEGIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being illegible.

27970

illegible
ILLEG'IBLE, a. [See Legible.] That cannot be read; obscure or defaced so that the words cannot be ...

27971

illegibly
ILLEG'IBLY, adv. In a manner not to be read; as a letter written illegibly.

27972

illegitimacy
ILLEGIT'IMACY, n. [See Legitimate.]1. The state of being born out of wedlock; the state of ...

27973

illegitimate
ILLEGIT'IMATE, a. [See Legitimate.]1. Unlawfully begotten; born out of wedlock; spurious; as an ...

27974

illegitimately
ILLEGIT'IMATELY, adv. Not in wedlock; without authority.

27975

illelgitimation
ILLELGITIMA'TION, n. The state of one not born in wedlock.1. Want of genuineness.

27976

illeviable
ILLEV'IABLE, a. That cannot be levied or collected.

27977

illiberal
ILLIB'ERAL, a. [See Liberal.] Not liberal; not free or generous.1. Not noble; not ingenuous; not ...

27978

illiberality
ILLIBERAL'ITY, n. Narrowness of mind; contractedness; meanness; want of catholic opinions.1. ...

27979

illiberally
ILLIB'ERALLY, adv. Ungenerously; uncandidly; uncharitably; disingenuously.1. Parsimoniously.

27980

illicit
ILLIC'IT, a. [L. illicitus; in and licitus, from liceo, to permit.]Not permitted or allowed; ...

27981

illicitly
ILLIC'ITLY, adv. Unlawfully.

27982

illicitness
ILLIC'ITNESS, n. Unlawfulness.

27983

illicitous
ILLIC'ITOUS, a. Unlawful.

27984

illighten
ILLI'GHTEN, v.t. [See Light, Lighten.] To enlighten. [Not in use.]

27985

illimitable
ILLIM'ITABLE, a. [in,not, and limit,or L. limes.]That cannot be limited or bounded; as the ...

27986

illimitably
ILLIM'ITABLY, adv. Without possibility of being bounded.1. Without limits.

27987

illimited
ILLIM'ITED, a. [L. limes, a limit.] Unbounded; not limited; interminable.

27988

illimitedness
ILLIM'ITEDNESS, n. Boundlessness; the state of being without limits or restriction. The ...

27989

illinition
ILLINI'TION, n. [L.illinitus, illinio, to anoint; in and lino, to besmear.] A thin crust of some ...

27990

illiteracy
ILLIT'ERACY, n. [from illiterate.] The state of being untaught or unlearned; want of a knowledge ...

27991

illiterate
ILLIT'ERATE, a. [L. illiteratus; in and literatus; from litera, a letter.] Unlettered; ignorant ...

27992

illiterateness
ILLIT'ERATENESS, n. Want of learning; ignorance of letters, books or science.

27993

illiterature
ILLIT'ERATURE, n. Want of learning. [Little used.]

27994

illness
ILL'NESS, n. [from ill.] Badness; unfavorableness; as the illness of the weather. [Not used.]1. ...

27995

illogical
ILLOG'ICAL, a. [See Logical.] Ignorant or negligent of the rules of logic or correct reasoning; as ...

27996

illogically
ILLOG'ICALLY, adv. In a manner contrary to the rules of correct reasoning.

27997

illogicalness
ILLOG'ICALNESS, n. Contrariety to sound reasoning.

27998

illstarred
ILL'STARRED, a. [ill and star.] Fated to be unfortunate.

27999

illude
ILLU'DE, v.t. [L. illudo; in and ludo, to play. See Ludicrous.]To play upon by artifice; to ...

28000

illuded
ILLU'DED, pp. Deceived; mocked.

28001

illuding
ILLU'DING, ppr. Playing on by artifice; deceiving.

28002

illume
ILLU'ME

28003

illuminant
ILLU'MINANT, n. That which illuminates or affords light.

28004

illuminate
ILLU'MINATE, v.t. [See Illume.] To enlighten; to throw light on; to supply with light. [This word ...

28005

illuminated
ILLU'MINATED, pp. Enlightened; rendered light or luminous; illustrated; adorned with pictures, as ...

28006

illuminati
ILLUMINA'TI, n. A church term anciently applied to persons who had received baptism; in which ...

28007

illuminating
ILLU'MINATING, ppr. Enlightening; rendering luminous or bright; illustrating; adorning with ...

28008

illumination
ILLUMINA'TION, n. The act of illuminating or rendering luminous; the act of supplying with ...

28009

illuminative
ILLU'MINATIVE, a. Having the power of giving light.

28010

illuminator
ILLU'MINATOR, n. He or that which illuminates or gives light.1. One whose occupation is to ...

28011

illumine
ILLU'MINE, v.t. [L. illumino; in and lumino, to enlighten, from lumen, light. See Luminous.]1. To ...

28012

illuminee
ILLUMINEE'

28013

illuminism
ILLU'MINISM, n. The principles of the Illuminati.

28014

illuminize
ILLU'MINIZE, v.t. To initiate into the doctrines or principles of the Illuminati.

28015

illusion
ILLU'SION, n. s as z. [L. illusio, from illudo, to illude.] Deceptive appearance; false show, by ...

28016

illusive
ILLU'SIVE, a. Deceiving by false show; deceitful; false. While the fond soul, Wrapt in gay visions ...

28017

illusively
ILLU'SIVELY, adv. By means of a false show.

28018

illusiveness
ILLU'SIVENESS, n. Deception; false show.

28019

illusory
ILLU'SORY, a. [L. illusus,illudo.] Deceiving or tending to deceive by false appearances; ...

28020

illustrate
ILLUS'TRATE, v.t. [L. illustro; in and lustro, to illuminate. See Luster.]1. To make clear, bright ...

28021

illustrated
ILLUS'TRATED, pp. Made bright or glorious.1. Explained; elucidated; made clear to the ...

28022

illustrating
ILLUS'TRATING, ppr. Making bright or glorious; rendering distinguished; elucidating.

28023

illustration
ILLUSTRA'TION, n. The act of rendering bright or glorious.1. Explanation; elucidation; a ...

28024

illustrative
ILLUS'TRATIVE, a. Having the quality of elucidating and making clear what is obscure; as an ...

28025

illustratively
ILLUS'TRATIVELY, adv. By way of illustration or elucidation.

28026

illustrator
ILLUS'TRATOR, n. One who illustrates or makes clear.

28027

illustrious
ILLUS'TRIOUS, a. [L. illustris.]1. Conspicuous; distinguished by the reputation of greatness; ...

28028

illustriously
ILLUS'TRIOUSLY, adv. Conspicuously; nobly; eminently; with dignity or distinction.1. Gloriously; ...

28029

illustriousness
ILLUS'TRIOUSNESS, n. Eminence of character; greatness; grandeur; glory.

28030

illuxurious
ILLUXU'RIOUS, a. Not luxurious.

28031

im
I'M, contracted from I am.

28032

image
IM'AGE, n. [L. imago.]1. A representation or similitude of any person or thing, formed of a ...

28033

image-worship
IM'AGE-WORSHIP, n. The worship of images; idolatry.

28034

imagery
IM'AGERY, n. im'ajry. Sensible representations, pictures, statues. Rich carvings, portraitures and ...

28035

imaginable
IMAG'INABLE, a. That may be imagined or conceived. This point is proved with all imaginable ...

28036

imaginant
IMAG'INANT, a. Imagining; conceiving. [Not used.]

28037

imaginary
IMAG'INARY, a. Existing only in imagination or fancy; visionary; fancied; not real. Imaginary ills ...

28038

imagination
IMAGINA'TION, n. [L. imaginatio.] The power or faculty of the mind by which it conceives and forms ...

28039

imaginative
IMAG'INATIVE, a. That forms imaginations.1. Full of imaginations; fantastic.

28040

imagine
IMAG'INE, v.t. [L. imaginor, from imago, image.]1. To form a notion or idea in the mind; to fancy. ...

28041

imagined
IMAG'INED, pp. Formed in the mind; fancied; contrived.

28042

imaginer
IMAG'INER, n. One who forms ideas; one who contrives.

28043

imagining
IMAG'INING, ppr. Forming ideas in the mind; devising.

28044

imam
IM'AM

28045

iman
IM'AN, n. A minister or priest among the Mohammedans.Imbalm, Imbargo, Imbark, Imbase. See Embalm, ...

28046

imban
IMBAN', v.t. [in and ban.] To excommunicate, in a civil sense; to cut off from the rights of man, ...

28047

imband
IMBAND', v.t. [in and band.] To form into a band or bands. Beneath full sails imbanded nations ...

28048

imbanded
IMBAND'ED, pp. Formed into a band or bands.

28049

imbank
IMBANK, v.t. [in and bank.] To inclose with a bank; to defend by banks, mounds or dikes.

28050

imbanked
IMBANK'ED, pp. Inclosed or defended with a bank.

28051

imbanking
IMBANK'ING, ppr. Inclosing or surrounding with a bank.

28052

imbankment
IMBANK'MENT, n. The act of surrounding or defending with a bank.1. Inclosure by a bank; the banks ...

28053

imbarn
IMB`ARN, v.t. To deposit in a barn. [Not used.]

28054

imbastardize
IMB`ASTARDIZE, v.t. To bastardize, which see.

28055

imbead
IMBE'AD, v.t. [in and bead.] To fasten with a bead. The strong bright bayonet imbeaded fast.

28056

imbeaded
IMBE'ADED, pp. Fastened with a bead.

28057

imbecile
IM'BECILE, a. im'becil. [L. imbecillis.] Weak; feeble; destitute of strength, either of body or of ...

28058

imbecility
IMBECIL'ITY, n. [L. imbecillitas.]1. Want of strength; weakness; feebleness of body or of mind. ...

28059

imbed
IMBED', v.t. [in and bed.] To sink or lay in a bed; to place in a mass of earth, sand or other ...

28060

imbedded
IMBED'DED, pp. Laid or inclosed, as in a bed or mass of surrounding matter.

28061

imbedding
IMBED'DING, ppr. Laying, as in a bed.

28062

imbellic
IMBEL'LIC, a. [L. in and bellicus.] Not warlike or martial. [Little used.]

28063

imbenching
IMBENCH'ING, n. [in and bench.] A raised work like a bench.

28064

imbibe
IMBI'BE, v.t. [L. imbibo; in and bibo, to drink.]1. To drink in; to absorb; as, a dry or porous ...

28065

imbibed
IMBI'BED, pp. Drank in, as a fluid; absorbed; received into the mind and retained.

28066

imbiber
IMBI'BER, n. He or that which imbibes.

28067

imbibing
IMBI'BING, ppr. Drinking in; absorbing; receiving and retaining.

28068

imbibition
IMBIBI'TION, n. The act of imbibing.

28069

imbitter
IMBIT'TER, v.t. [in and bitter.] To make bitter.1. To make unhappy or grievous; to render ...

28070

imbittered
IMBIT'TERED, pp. Made unhappy or painful; exasperated.

28071

imbittering
IMBIT'TERING, ppr. Rendering unhappy or distressing; exasperating.

28072

imbodied
IMBOD'IED, pp. [See Imbody.] Formed into a body.

28073

imbody
IMBOD'Y, v.t. [in and body.] To form into a body; to invest with matter; to make corporeal; as, to ...

28074

imbodying
IMBOD'YING, ppr. Forming into a body; investing with a corporeal body.1. Collecting and uniting ...

28075

imboil
IMBOIL', v.i. To effervesce.

28076

imbolden
IMBOLDEN, v.t. imboldn. [in and bold.] To encourage; to give confidence to. Nothing imboldens sin ...

28077

imboldening
IMBOLDENING, ppr. Encouraging; giving confidence.

28078

imborder
IMBORD'ER, v.t. [in and border.] To furnish or inclose with a border; to adorn with a border.1. To ...

28079

imbordered
IMBORD'ERED, pp. Furnished, inclosed or adorned with a border; bounded.

28080

imbordering
IMBORD'ERING, ppr. Furnishing, inclosing or adorning with a border; bounding.

28081

imbosk
IMBOSK', v.t. To conceal,as in bushes; to hide.

28082

imbosom
IMBO'SOM, v.t. s as z. [in and bosom.] To hold in the bosom; to cover fondly with the folds of ...

28083

imbosomed
IMBO'SOMED, pp. Held in the bosom or to the breast; caressed; surrounded in the midst; inclosed; ...

28084

imbosoming
IMBO'SOMING, ppr. Holding in the bosom; caressing; holding to the breast; inclosing or covering in ...

28085

imbound
IMBOUND', v.t. [in and bound.] To inclose in limits; to shut in. [Little used.]

28086

imbow
IMBOW, v.t. [in and bow.] To arch; to vault; as an imbowed roof.1. To make of a circular form; as ...

28087

imbowed
IMBOWED, pp. Arched; vaulted; made of a circular form.

28088

imbower
IMBOW'ER, v.t. [in and bower.] To cover with a bower; to shelter with trees.

28089

imbowered
IMBOW'ERED, pp. Covered with a bower; sheltered with trees.

28090

imbowering
IMBOW'ERING, ppr. Covering with a bower or with trees.

28091

imbowing
IMBOWING, ppr. Arching; vaulting; making of a circular form.

28092

imbowment
IMBOWMENT, n. An arch; a vault.

28093

imbox
IMBOX', v.t. To inclose in a box.

28094

imbrangle
IMBRAN'GLE, v.t. To entangle.

28095

imbreed
IMBREE'D, v.t. To generate within.

28096

imbricate
IM'BRICATE

28097

imbricated
IM'BRICATED, a. [L. imbricatus, imbrico, from imbrex, a tile.]1. Bent and hollowed like a roof or ...

28098

imbrication
IMBRICA'TION, n. A concave indenture, like that of tiles; tiling.

28099

imbrown
IMBROWN', v.t. [in and brown.] To make brown; to darken; to obscure. The umpierc'd shade Imbrown'd ...

28100

imbrowned
IMBROWN'ED, pp. Made brown; darkened; tanned.

28101

imbrowning
IMBROWN'ING, ppr. Rendering brown; darkening; tanning.

28102

imbrue
IMBRUE, v.t. imbru'. [Gr. to moisten.]1. To wet or moisten; to soak; to drench in a fluid, chiefly ...

28103

imbrued
IMBRU'ED, pp. Wet; moistened; drenched.

28104

imbruing
IMBRU'ING, ppr. Wetting; moistening; drenching.

28105

imbrute
IMBRU'TE, v.t. [in and brute.] To degrade to the state of a brute; to reduce to brutality. --And ...

28106

imbruted
IMBRU'TED, pp. Degraded to brutism.

28107

imbruting
IMBRU'TING, ppr. Reducing to brutishness.

28108

imbue
IMBUE,v.t. imbu'. [L. imbuo; in and the root of Eng. buck, to buck cloth, that is, to dip, drench ...

28109

imbued
IMBU'ED, pp. tinged; dyed; tinctured.

28110

imbuing
IMBU'ING, ppr. Tinging; dyeing; tincturing deeply.

28111

imitability
IMITABIL'ITY, n. [See Imitable, Imitate.] The quality of being imitable.

28112

imitable
IM'ITABLE, a. [L. imitabilis. See Imitate.]1. That may be imitated or copied. Let us follow our ...

28113

imitate
IMI'TATE, v.t. [L. imitor; allied perhaps to Gr. similar, equal.]1. To follow in manners; to copy ...

28114

imitated
IM'ITATED, pp. Followed; copied.

28115

imitating
IM'ITATING, ppr. Following in manner; copying.

28116

imitation
IMITA'TION, n. [L. imitatio; imitor, to imitate.]1. The act of following in manner, or of copying ...

28117

imitative
IM'ITATIVE, a. Inclined to follow in manner; as, man is an imitative being.1. Aiming at ...

28118

imitator
IM'ITATOR, n. One that follows in manners or deportment.1. One that copies, or attempts to make ...

28119

imitatorship
IMITA'TORSHIP, n. The office or state of an imitator.

28120

immaculate
IMMAC'ULATE, n. [L.immaculatus; in and macula, a spot.]1. Spotless; pure; unstained; undefiled; ...

28121

immaculately
IMMAC'ULATELY, adv. With spotless purity.

28122

immaculateness
IMMAC'ULATENESS, n. Spotless purity.

28123

immailed
IMMA'ILED, a. Wearing mail or armor.

28124

immalleable
IMMAL'LEABLE, a. [in and malleable.] Not malleable; that cannot be extended by hammering.

28125

immanacle
IMMAN'ACLE, v.t. [in and manacle.] To put manacles on; to fetter or confine; to restrain from free ...

28126

immanacled
IMMAN'ACLED, pp. Fettered; confined.

28127

immanacling
IMMAN'ACLING, ppr. Fettering; confining.

28128

immane
IMMA'NE, a. [L. immanis.] Vast; huge; very great. [Little used.]

28129

immanely
IMMA'NELY, adv. Monstrously; cruelly.

28130

immanency
IM'MANENCY, n. Internal dwelling.

28131

immanent
IM'MANENT, a. [L. in and manens, maneo, to abide.] Inherent; intrinsic; internal.

28132

immanity
IMMAN'ITY, n. [L. immanitas.] Barbarity; savageness.

28133

immarcessible
IMMARCES'SIBLE, a. [L. in and marcesco, to fade.] Unfading.

28134

immartial
IMM`ARTIAL, a. [in and martial.] Not martial; not warlike.

28135

immask
IMM`ASK, v.t. [in and mask.] To cover, as with a mask; to disguise.

28136

immasked
IMM`ASKED, pp. Covered; masked.

28137

immasking
IMM`ASKING, ppr. Covering; disguising.

28138

immatchable
IMMATCH'ABLE, a. That cannot be matched; peerless.

28139

immaterial
IMMATE'RIAL, a.1. Incorporeal; not material; not consisting of matter; as immaterial spirits. The ...

28140

immaterialism
IMMATE'RIALISM, n. The doctrine of the existence or state of immaterial substances or spiritual ...

28141

immaterialist
IMMATE'RIALIST, n. One who professes immateriality.

28142

immateriality
IMMATERIAL'ITY, n. The quality of being immaterial, or not consisting of matter; destitution of ...

28143

immaterialized
IMMATE'RIALIZED, a. Rendered or made immaterial.

28144

immaterially
IMMATE'RIALLY, adv. In a manner not depending on matter.1. In a manner unimportant.

28145

immaterialness
IMMATE'RIALNESS, n. The state of being immaterial; immateriality.

28146

immateriate
IMMATE'RIATE, a. Not consisting of matter; incorporeal; immaterial. [Little used.]

28147

immature
IMMATU'RE, a. [L. immaturus; in and maturus.]1. Not mature or ripe; unripe; that has not arrived ...

28148

immaturely
IMMATU'RELY, adv. Too soon; before ripeness or completion; before the natural time.

28149

immatureness
IMMATU'RENESS

28150

immaturity
IMMATU'RITY, n. Unripeness; incompleteness; the state of a thing which has not arrived to ...

28151

immeability
IMMEABIL'ITY, n. [L. in and meo, to pass.] Want of power to pass.The proper sense is, the quality ...

28152

immeasurable
IMMEAS'URABLE, a. immezh'urable. [in and measure.]That cannot be measured; immense; indefinitely ...

28153

immeasurably
IMMEAS'URABLY, adv. To an extent not to be measured; immensely; beyond all measure.

28154

immeasured
IMMEAS'URED, a. Exceeding common measure.

28155

immechanical
IMMECHAN'ICAL, a. [in and mechanical.] Not consonant to the laws of mechanics.

28156

immediacy
IMME'DIACY, n. [from immediate.] Power of acting without dependence.

28157

immediate
IMME'DIATE, a. [L. in and medius, middle.]1. Proximate; acting without a medium, or without the ...

28158

immediately
IMME'DIATELY, adv. Without the intervention of any other cause or event; opposed to mediately. The ...

28159

immediateness
IMME'DIATENESS, n. Presence with regard to time.1. Exemption from second or intervening causes.

28160

immedicable
IMMED'ICABLE, a. [L. immedicabilis; in and medicabilis, from medico,to heal.] Not to be healed; ...

28161

immelodious
IMMELO'DIOUS, a. Not melodious.

28162

immemorable
IMMEM'ORABLE, a. [L. immemorabilis; in and memorabilis. See Memory.]Not to be remembered; not worth ...

28163

immemorial
IMMEMO'RIAL, a. [L. in and memor, memoria.]Beyond memory; an epithet given to time or duration, ...

28164

immemorially
IMMEMO'RIALLY, adv. Beyond memory.

28165

immense
IMMENSE, a. immens'. [L. immensus; in and mensus,metior, to measure.]1. Unlimited; unbounded; ...

28166

immensely
IMMENSELY, adv. immens'ly. Infinitely; without limits or measure.1. Vastly; very greatly.

28167

immensity
IMMENS'ITY, n. Unlimited extension; an extent not to be measured; infinity. By the power we find ...

28168

immensurability
IMMENSURABIL'ITY, n. [from immensurable.] The quality of not being capable of measure; ...

28169

immensurable
IMMEN'SURABLE, a. [L. in and mensurabilis, from mensura, measure; mensus, metior.] Not to be ...

28170

immensurate
IMMEN'SURATE, a. Unmeasured.

28171

immerge
IMMERGE, v.t. immerj'. [L. immergo; in and mergo, to plunge.]1. To plunge into or under a fluid. ...

28172

immerit
IMMER'IT, n. Want of worth. [Not used.]

28173

immerited
IMMER'ITED, a. Unmerited. [Not used.]

28174

immeritous
IMMER'ITOUS, a. Undeserving. [Not used.]

28175

immerse
IMMERSE, v.t. immers'. [L. immersus, from immergo; in and mergo, to plunge.]1. To put under water ...

28176

immersed
IMMERS'ED, pp. Put into a fluid; plunged; deeply engaged; enveloped in the light of the sun, as a ...

28177

immersing
IMMERS'ING, ppr. Plunging into a fluid; dipping; overwhelming; deeply engaging.

28178

immersion
IMMER'SION, n. The act of putting into a fluid below the surface; the act of plunging into a fluid ...

28179

immesh
IMMESH', v.t. [in and mesh.] To entangle in the meshes of a net, or in a web. Observe whether the ...

28180

immeshed
IMMESH'ED, pp. Entangled in meshes or webs.

28181

immeshing
IMMESH'ING, ppr. Entangling in meshes or webs.

28182

immethodical
IMMETHOD'ICAL, a. [in and methodical. See Method.]Having no method; without systematic ...

28183

immethodically
IMMETHOD'ICALLY, adv. Without order or regularity; irregularly.

28184

immethodicalness
IMMETHOD'ICALNESS, n. Want of method; confusion.

28185

immigrant
IM'MIGRANT, n. A person that removes into a country for the purpose of permanent residence.

28186

immigrate
IM'MIGRATE, v.i. [L. immigro; in and migro, to migrate.]To remove into a country for the purpose of ...

28187

immigration
IMMIGRA'TION, n. The passing or removing into a country for the purpose of permanent residence.

28188

imminence
IM'MINENCE, n. [L. imminentia, immineo, to hang over.]Properly, a hanging over, but used by ...

28189

imminent
IM'MINENT, a. [L. imminens, from immineo, to hang over; in and minor, to threaten. See ...

28190

immingle
IMMIN'GLE, v.t. [in and mingle.] To mingle; to mix; to unite with numbers.

28191

immingled
IMMIN'GLED, pp. Mixed; mingled.

28192

immingling
IMMIN'GLING, ppr. Mixing; mingling.

28193

imminution
IMMINU'TION, n. [L. imminutio, imminuo; in and minuo, to lessen.] A lessening; diminution; ...

28194

immiscibility
IMMISCIBIL'ITY, n. [L. immisceo; in and misceo, to mix.] Incapacity of being mixed.

28195

immiscible
IMMIS'CIBLE, a. [in and miscible.] Not capable of being mixed.

28196

immission
IMMIS'SION, n. [L. immissio, immitto; in and mitto,to send.]The act of sending or thrusting in; ...

28197

immit
IMMIT', v.t. [L. immitto; in and mitto, to send.] To send in; to inject.

28198

immitigable
IMMIT'IGABLE, a. [in and mitigate.] That cannot be mitigated or appeased.

28199

immix
IMMIX', v.t. [in and mix.] To mix; to mingle.

28200

immixable
IMMIX'ABLE, a. Not capable of being mixed.

28201

immixed
IMMIX'ED

28202

immixt
IMMIXT', a. Unmixed.

28203

immobility
IMMOBIL'ITY, n. [L. immobilitas, from immobilis; in and mobilis, from moveo, to move.] ...

28204

immoderacy
IMMOD'ERACY, n. Excess.

28205

immoderate
IMMOD'ERATE, a. [L. immoderatus; in and moderatus. See Moderate.]Exceeding just or usual bounds; ...

28206

immoderately
IMMOD'ERATELY, adv. Excessively; to an undue degree; unreasonably; as, to weep immoderately.

28207

immoderateness
IMMOD'ERATENESS, n. Excess; extravagance.

28208

immoderation
IMMOD'ERATION, n. Excess; want of moderation.

28209

immodest
IMMOD'EST, a. [L. immodestus; in and modestus, modest. See the latter.]1. Literally, not limited ...

28210

immodestly
IMMOD'ESTLY, adv. Without due reserve; indecently; unchastely; obscenely.

28211

immodesty
IMMOD'ESTY, n. [L. immodestia.] Want of modesty; indecency; unchastity.1. Want of delicacy or ...

28212

immolate
IM'MOLATE, v.t. [L. immolo, to sacrifice; in and mola,meal sprinkled with salt, which was thrown on ...

28213

immolated
IM'MOLATED, pp. Sacrificed; offered in sacrifice. From the same altar on which the small states ...

28214

immolating
IM'MOLATING, ppr. Sacrificing; offering, as a victim.

28215

immolation
IMMOLA'TION, n. The act of sacrificing.1. A sacrifice offered.

28216

immolator
IM'MOLATOR, n. One who offers in sacrifice.

28217

immoment
IMMO'MENT, a. Trifling.

28218

immomentous
IMMOMENT'OUS, a. Unimportant.

28219

immoral
IMMOR'AL, a. [in and moral.] Inconsistent with moral rectitude; contrary to the moral or divine ...

28220

immorality
IMMORAL'ITY, n. Any act or practice which contravenes the divine commands or the social duties. ...

28221

immorally
IMMOR'ALLY, adv. Wickedly; viciously; in violation of law or duty.

28222

immorigerous
IMMORIG'EROUS, a. [Low L. immoriger.] Rude; uncivil.

28223

immorigerousness
IMMORIG'EROUSNESS, n. Rudeness; disobedience.

28224

immortal
IMMOR'TAL, a. [L. immortalis. See Mortal.]1. Having no principle of alteration or corruption; ...

28225

immortality
IMMORTAL'ITY, n. The quality of never ceasing to live or exist; exemption from death and ...

28226

immortalization
IMMORTALIZA'TION, n. The act of immortalizing.

28227

immortalize
IMMOR'TALIZE, v.t. 1. To render immortal; to make perpetual; to cause to live or exist while the ...

28228

immortalized
IMMOR'TALIZED, pp. Rendered immortal or perpetual.

28229

immortalizing
IMMOR'TALIZING, ppr. Making immortal or perpetual.

28230

immortally
IMMOR'TALLY, adv. With endless existence; with exemption from death.

28231

immortification
IMMORTIFICA'TION, n. [in and mortification.] Want of subjection of the passions.

28232

immovability
IMMOVABIL'ITY, n. Steadfastness that cannot be moved or shaken.

28233

immovable
IMMOV'ABLE, a. [in and movable.] That cannot be moved from its place; as an immovable ...

28234

immovableness
IMMOV'ABLENESS, n. The quality of being immovable.

28235

immovably
IMMOV'ABLY, adv. In a manner not to be moved from its place or purpose; or in a manner not to be ...

28236

immund
IMMUND', a. [L. immundus.] Unclean.

28237

immundicity
IMMUNDIC'ITY, n. Uncleanness.

28238

immunity
IMMU'NITY, n. [L. immuinitas, from immunis, free, exempt; in and munus,charge, office, duty.]1. ...

28239

immure
IMMU'RE, v.t. [L. in and murus, a wall.]1. To inclose within walls; to shut up; to confine; as, to ...

28240

immured
IMMU'RED, pp. Confined within walls.

28241

immusical
IMMU'SICAL, a. [in and musical.] Not musical; inharmonious; not accordant; harsh.

28242

immutability
IMMUTABIL'ITY, n. [L. immutabilitas; in and mutabilis, mutable, from muto, to ...

28243

immutable
IMMU'TABLE, a. [L.immutabilis; in and mutabilis.]invariable; unalterable; not capable or ...

28244

immutableness
IMMU'TABLENESS, n. Unchangeableness; immutability.

28245

immutably
IMMU'TABLY, adv. Unchangeably; unalterably; invariably; in a manner that admits of no change.

28246

immutate
IMMU'TATE, a. [L. immutatus.] Unchanged.

28247

immutation
IMMUTA'TION, n. [L. immutatio.] Change; alteration.

28248

imp
IMP, n.1. A son; offspring; progeny. The tender imp was weaned. A lad of life, an imp of fame.2. ...

28249

impacable
IMPA'CABLE, a. [L. in and paco, to appease.]Not to be appeased or quieted.

28250

impact
IMPACT', v.t. [L. impactus, from impingo; in and pango, to drive.]To drive close; to press or drive ...

28251

impacted
IMPACT'ED, pp. Driven hard; made close by driving.

28252

impaint
IMPA'INT, v.t. To paint; to adorn with colors.

28253

impair
IMPA'IR, v.t. [L. pejor.]1. To make worse; to diminish in quantity, value or excellence. An ...

28254

impaired
IMPA'IRED, pp. Diminished; injured; weakened.

28255

impairer
IMPA'IRER, n. He or that which impairs.

28256

impairing
IMPA'IRING, ppr. Making worse;lessening; injuring; enfeebling.

28257

impairment
IMPA'IRMENT, n. Diminution; decrease; injury. [Not used.]

28258

impalatable
IMPAL'ATABLE, a. Unpalatable. [Little used.]

28259

impale
IMPA'LE, v.t. [L. in and palus, a pole, a stake.]1. To fix on a stake; to put to death by fixing ...

28260

impallid
IMPAL'LID, v.t. To make pallid or pale. [Not in use.]

28261

impalm
IMP`ALM, v.t. imp`am. [L. in and palma, the hand.]To grasp; to take in the hand.

28262

impalpability
IMPALPABIL'ITY, n. The quality of not being palpable, or perceptible by the touch.

28263

impalpable
IMPAL'PABLE, a. [L. in and palpo, to feel. [See Palpable.]Not to be felt; that cannot be perceived ...

28264

impalsy
IMPAL'SY, v.t. s as z. [in and palsy.] To strike with palsy; to paralyze; to deaden.

28265

impanate
IM'PANATE, a. [L. in and panis, bread.] Embodied in bread.IM'PANATE, v.t. To embody with bread.

28266

impanation
IMPANA'TION, n. The supposed substantial presence of the body and blood of Christ, with the ...

28267

impannel
IMPAN'NEL, v.t. [in and pannel.] To write or enter the names of a jury in a list or on a piece of ...

28268

impanneled
IMPAN'NELED, pp. Having the names entered in a pannel; formed, as a jury.

28269

impanneling
IMPAN'NELING, ppr. Writing the names of a pannel; forming, as a jury.

28270

imparadise
IMPAR'ADISE, v.t. To put in a place of felicity; to make happy.

28271

imparadised
IMPAR'ADISED, pp. Placed in a condition resembling that of paradise; made happy.

28272

imparadising
IMPAR'ADISING, ppr. Making very happy.

28273

imparalleled
IMPAR'ALLELED, a. Unparalleled. [Not used.]

28274

imparasyllabic
IMPARASYLLAB'IC, a. [L. in, par, and syllaba.]Not consisting of an equal number of syllables. An ...

28275

impardonable
IMP`ARDONABLE, a. Unpardonable.

28276

imparity
IMPAR'ITY, n. [in and parity; L. par, equal.]1. Inequality; disproportion.2. Oddness; ...

28277

impark
IMP`ARK, v.t. [in and park.] To inclose for a park; to make a park by inclosure; to sever from a ...

28278

imparl
IMP`ARL, v.i. To hold mutual discourse; appropriately, in law, to have license to settle a lawsuit ...

28279

imparlance
IMP`ARLANCE, n. Properly, leave for mutual discourse; appropriately, in law, the license or ...

28280

imparsonee
IMPARSONEE', a. A parson imparsonee, is a parson presented, instituted and inducted into a ...

28281

impart
IMP`ART, v.t. [L. impertior; in and partio, to divide; from pars, a part.]1. To give, grant or ...

28282

impartance
IMP`ARTANCE, n. Communication of a share; grant.

28283

impartation
IMPARTA'TION, n. The act of imparting or conferring. [Not much used.]

28284

imparted
IMP`ARTED, pp. Communicated; granted; conferred.

28285

impartial
IMP`ARTIAL, a. [in and partial, from part, L. pars.]1. Not partial; not biased in favor of one ...

28286

impartialist
IMP`ARTIALIST, n. One who is impartial. [Little used.]

28287

impartiality
IMPARTIAL'ITY, n. imparshal'ity. Indifference of opinion or judgment; freedom from bias in favor ...

28288

impartially
IMP`ARTIALLY, adv. Without bias of judgment; without prejudice; without inclination to favor one ...

28289

impartibility
IMPARTIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of not being subject to partition.1. The quality of being capable ...

28290

impartible
IMP`ARTIBLE, a. 1. Not partible or subject to partition; as an impartible estate.2. [from ...

28291

imparting
IMP`ARTING, ppr. Communicating; granting; bestowing.

28292

impartment
IMP`ARTMENT, n. The act of imparting; the communication of knowledge; disclosure.

28293

impassable
IMP`ASSABLE, a. [in and passable. See Pass.]That cannot be passed; not admitting a passage; as an ...

28294

impassableness
IMP`ASSABLENESS, n. The state of being impassable.

28295

impassably
IMP`ASSABLY, adv. In a manner or degree that prevents passing, or the power of passing.

28296

impassibility
IMPASSIBIL'ITY

28297

impassible
IMPAS'SIBLE, a. [L. impassibilis, from passus, patior, to suffer.]Incapable of pain, passion or ...

28298

impassibleness
IMPAS'SIBLENESS, n. [from impassible.]Exemption from pain or suffering; insusceptibility of injury ...

28299

impassion
IMPAS'SION, v.t. [in and passion.] To move or affect strongly with passion.

28300

impassionate
IMPAS'SIONATE, v.t. To affect powerfully.IMPAS'SIONATE, a. Strongly affected.1. Without passion ...

28301

impassioned
IMPAS'SIONED, a. Actuated or agitated by passion. The tempter all impassioned, thus began.1. ...

28302

impassive
IMPAS'SIVE, a. [L. in and passus, patior,to suffer.]Not susceptible of pain or suffering; as the ...

28303

impassively
IMPAS'SIVELY, adv. Without sensibility to pain or suffering.

28304

impassiveness
IMPAS'SIVENESS, n. The state of being insusceptible of pain.

28305

impassivity
IMPASSIV'ITY, n. The quality of being insusceptible of feeling, pain or suffering.

28306

impastation
IMPASTA'TION, n. [in and paste.] The mixtion of various materials of different colors and ...

28307

impaste
IMPA'STE, v.t.1. To knead; to make into paste.2. In painting, to lay on colors thick and bold.

28308

impasted
IMPA'STED, a. Concreted, as into paste.1. Pasted over; covered with paste, or with thick paint.

28309

impatible
IMPAT'IBLE, a. [L. impatibilis.] Intolerable; that cannot be borne.

28310

impatience
IMPA'TIENCE, n. [L. impatientia, from impatiens; in and patior, to suffer.] Uneasiness under pain ...

28311

impatient
IMPA'TIENT, a. [L. impatiens.] Uneasy or fretful under suffering; not bearing pain with composure; ...

28312

impatiently
IMPA'TIENTLY, adv. With uneasiness or restlessness; as, to bear disappointment impatiently.1. ...

28313

impatronization
IMPATRONIZA'TION, n. Absolute seignory or possession.

28314

impatronize
IMPAT'RONIZE, v.t. To gain to one's self the power of any seignory.

28315

impawn
IMPAWN', v.t. [in and pawn.] To pawn; to pledge; to deposit as security.

28316

impeach
IMPE'ACH, v.t. [L. pango, pactus.]1. To hinder; to impede. This sense is found in our early ...

28317

impeachable
IMPE'ACHABLE, a. Liable to accusation; chargeable with a crime; accusable; censurable.1. Liable ...

28318

impeached
IMPE'ACHED, pp. Hindered.1. Accused; charged with a crime, misdemeanor or wrong; censured. The ...

28319

impeacher
IMPE'ACHER, n. An accuser by authority; one who calls in question.

28320

impeaching
IMPE'ACHING, ppr. Hindering.1. Accusing by authority; calling in question the purity or rectitude ...

28321

impeachment
IMPE'ACHMENT, n. Hinderance; impediment; stop; obstruction.1. An accusation or charge brought ...

28322

impearl
IMPEARL, v.t. imperl'. [in and pearl.] To form in the resemblance of pearls. --Dew-drops which the ...

28323

impeccability
IMPECCABIL'ITY

28324

impeccable
IMPEC'CABLE, a. [L. pecco, to err, to sin.] Not liable to sin; not subject to sin; exempt from the ...

28325

impeccancy
IMPEC'CANCY, n. [See Impeccable.] The quality of not being liable to sin; exemption from sin, ...

28326

impede
IMPE'DE, v.t. [L. impedio; supposed to be compounded of in and pedes, feet, to catch or entangle ...

28327

impeded
IMPE'DED, pp. Hindered; stopped; obstructed.

28328

impediment
IMPED'IMENT, n. [L. impedimentum.] That which hinders progress or motion; hinderance; obstruction; ...

28329

impedimental
IMPEDIMENT'AL, a. Hindering; obstructing.

28330

impeding
IMPE'DING, ppr. Hindering; stopping; obstructing.

28331

impedite
IM'PEDITE, v.t. To impede. [Not in use.]

28332

impeditive
IMPED'ITIVE, a. Causing hinderance.

28333

impel
IMPEL', v.t. [L. impello; in and pello, to drive.]To drive or urge forward; to press on; to excite ...

28334

impelled
IMPEL'LED, pp. Driven forward; urged on; moved by any force or power, physical or moral.

28335

impellent
IMPEL'LENT, n. A power or force that drives forward; impulsive power.

28336

impeller
IMPEL'LER, n. He or that which impels.

28337

impelling
IMPEL'LING, ppr. Driving forward; urging; pressing.

28338

impen
IMPEN', v.t. [in and pen.] To pen; to shut or inclose in a narrow place.

28339

impend
IMPEND', v.i. [L. impendeo; in and pendeo, to hang.]1. To hang over; to be suspended above; to ...

28340

impendence
IMPEND'ENCE

28341

impendency
IMPEND'ENCY, n. The state of hanging over; near approach; a menacing attitude.

28342

impendent
IMPEND'ENT, a. Hanging over; imminent; threatening; pressing closely; as an impendent evil.

28343

impending
IMPEND'ING, ppr. Hanging over; approaching near; threatening.

28344

impenetrability
IMPENETRABIL'ITY, n. [from impenetrable.]1. The quality of being impenetrable.2. In philosophy, ...

28345

impenetrable
IMPEN'ETRABLE, a. [L. impenetrabilis; in and penetrabilis, from penetro, to penetrate.]1. That ...

28346

impenetrableness
IMPEN'ETRABLENESS, n. Impenetrability, which see.

28347

impenetrably
IMPEN'ETRABLY, adv. With solidity that admits not of being penetrated.1. With hardness that ...

28348

impenitence
IMPEN'ITENCE

28349

impenitency
IMPEN'ITENCY, n. [L. in and poenitens, from poeniteo, to repent, poena, pain.] Want of penitence ...

28350

impenitent
IMPEN'ITENT, a. Not penitent; not repenting of sin; not contrite; obdurate; of a hard heart. They ...

28351

impenitently
IMPEN'ITENTLY, adv. Without repentance or contrition for sin; obdurately.

28352

impennous
IMPEN'NOUS, a. [in and pennous.] Wanting wings.

28353

impeople
IMPE'OPLE, v.t. To form into a community. [See People.]

28354

imperate
IM'PERATE, a. [L. imperatus, impero, to command.]Done by impulse or direction of the mind. [Not ...

28355

imperative
IMPER'ATIVE, a. [L. imperativus, from impero, to command. See Empire.]1. Commanding; expressive of ...

28356

imperatively
IMPER'ATIVELY, adv. With command; authoritatively.

28357

imperatorial
IMPERATO'RIAL, a. Commanding. [Not in use.]

28358

imperceptible
IMPERCEP'TIBLE, a.1. Not to be perceived; not to be known or discovered by the senses. We say a ...

28359

imperceptibleness
IMPERCEP'TIBLENESS, n. The quality of being imperceptible.

28360

imperceptibly
IMPERCEP'TIBLY, adv. In a manner not to be perceived.

28361

impercipient
IMPERCIP'IENT, a. Not perceiving or having power to perceive.

28362

imperdible
IMPER'DIBLE, a. Not destructible. [Not a legitimate word.]

28363

imperfect
IMPER'FECT, a. [L. imperfectus; in and perfectus, finished, perfect; perficio, to perfect; per and ...

28364

imperfection
IMPERFEC'TION, n. [L. imperfectio, supra.]Defect; fault; the want of a part or of something ...

28365

imperfectly
IMPER'FECTLY, adv. In an imperfect manner or degree; not fully; not entirely; not completely; not ...

28366

imperfectness
IMPER'FECTNESS, n. The state of being imperfect.

28367

imperforate
IMPER'FORATE, a. [L. in and perforatus, perforo.]Not perforated or pierced; having no opening.

28368

imperforated
IMPER'FORATED, a. Not perforated.1. Having no pores.

28369

imperforation
IMPERFORA'TION, n. The state of being not perforated, or without any aperture.

28370

imperforble
IMPER'FORBLE, a. [infra.] That cannot be perforated or bored through.

28371

imperial
IMPE'RIAL, a. [L.imperialis, from impero, to command. See Emperor.]1. Pertaining to an empire, or ...

28372

imperialist
IMPE'RIALIST, n. One who belongs to an emperor; a subject or soldier of an emperor. The ...

28373

imperiality
IMPERIAL'ITY, n. Imperial power.1. The right of an emperor to a share of the produce of mines, &c. ...

28374

imperially
IMPE'RIALLY, adv. In a royal manner.

28375

imperil
IMPER'IL, v.t. [in and peril.] To bring into danger.

28376

imperious
IMPE'RIOUS, a. [L. imperiosus.]1. Commanding; dictatorial; haughty; arrogant; overbearing; ...

28377

imperiously
IMPE'RIOUSLY, adv. With arrogance of command; with a haughty air of authority; in a domineering ...

28378

imperiousness
IMPE'RIOUSNESS, n. Authority; air of command.1. Arrogance of command; haughtiness. Imperiousness ...

28379

imperishable
IMPER'ISHABLE, a. Not subject to decay; not liable to perish; indestructible; enduring ...

28380

imperishableness
IMPER'ISHABLENESS, n. The quality of being imperishable.

28381

impermanence
IMPER'MANENCE, n. Want of permanence or continued duration.

28382

impermanent
IMPER'MANENT, a. [in and permanent.] Not permanent; not enduring.

28383

impermeability
IMPERMEABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being impermeable by a fluid.

28384

impermeable
IMPER'MEABLE, a. [L. in and permeo; per and meo, to pass.]Not to be passed through the pores by a ...

28385

impersonal
IMPER'SONAL, a. [L. impersonalis; in and personalis, from persona. See Person.]In grammar, an ...

28386

impersonality
IMPERSONAL'ITY, n. Indistinction of personality.

28387

impersonally
IMPER'SONALLY, adv. In the manner of an impersonal verb.

28388

impersonate
IMPER'SONATE, v.t. To personify.

28389

impersonated
IMPER'SONATED, a. Made persons of. [See Personated.]

28390

imperspicuity
IMPERSPICU'ITY, n. Want of perspicuity, or clearness to the mind.

28391

imperspicuous
IMPERSPIC'UOUS, a. [in and perspicuous.] Not perspicuous; not clear; obscure.

28392

impersuasible
IMPERSUA'SIBLE, a. [L. in and persuasibilis. See Persuade.]Not to be moved by persuasion; not ...

28393

impertinence
IMPER'TINENCE

28394

impertinency
IMPER'TINENCY, n. [L. impertinens; in and pertinens, pertineo, to pertain; per and teneo, to ...

28395

impertinent
IMPER'TINENT, a. [L. impertinens, supra.]1. Not pertaining to the matter in hand; of no weight; ...

28396

impertinently
IMPER'TINENTLY, adv. Without relation to the matter in hand.1. Officiously; intrusively; rudely.

28397

impertransibility
IMPERTRANSIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of not being capable of being passed through.

28398

impertransible
IMPERTRAN'SIBLE, a. [L. in and pertranseo; per and transeo, to pass over or through; trans and eo, ...

28399

imperturbable
IMPERTURB'ABLE, a. [L.in and perturbo, to disturb; per and turbo.]That cannot be disturbed or ...

28400

imperturbation
IMPERTURBA'TION, n. Freedom from agitation of mind; calmness.

28401

imperturbed
IMPERTURB'ED, a. Undisturbed. [Not in use.]

28402

imperviosly
IMPER'VIOSLY, adv. In a manner to prevent passage or penetration.

28403

impervious
IMPER'VIOUS, a. [L. impervius; in and pervius, passable; per and via, way.]1. Not to be penetrated ...

28404

imperviousness
IMPER'VIOUSNESS, n. The state of not admitting a passage.

28405

impetiginous
IMPETIG'INOUS, a. [L.impetigo, a ringworm.]Resembling the ring-worm or tetters; covered with scaled ...

28406

impetrable
IM'PETRABLE, a. [See Impetrate.] That may be obtained by petition.

28407

impetrate
IM'PETRATE, v.t. [L. impetro.] To obtain by request or entreaty.

28408

impetration
IMPETRA'TION, n. The act of obtaining by prayer or petition.1. In law, the preobtaining of ...

28409

impetrative
IM'PETRATIVE, a. Obtaining; tending to obtain by entreaty.

28410

impetratory
IM'PETRATORY, a. Beseeching; containing entreaty.

28411

impetuosity
IMPETUOS'ITY, n. [See Impetuous.] A rushing with violence and great force; fury; violence.1. ...

28412

impetuous
IMPET'UOUS, a. [L. impetuosus, from impetus,impeto; in and peto, to urge, to rush. See Bid.]1. ...

28413

impetuously
IMPET'UOUSLY, adv. Violently; fiercely; forcibly; with haste and force.

28414

impetuousness
IMPET'UOUSNESS, n. A driving or rushing with haste and violence; furiousness; fury; violence.1. ...

28415

impetus
IM'PETUS, n. [L. supra.] Force of motion; the force with which any body is driven or impelled.1. ...

28416

impictured
IMPIC'TURED, a. Painted; impressed.

28417

impier
IMPIER. [See Umpire.]

28418

impierceable
IMPIERCEABLE, a. impers'able. [in and pierce.]Not to be pierced or penetrated.

28419

impiety
IMPI'ETY, n. [L. impietas;in and pietas, pius.]1. Ungodliness; irreverence towards the Supreme ...

28420

impignorate
IMPIG'NORATE, v.t. To pledge or pawn. [Not in use.]

28421

impignoration
IMPIGNORA'TION, n. The act of pawning. [Not in use.]

28422

impinge
IMPINGE, v.i. impinj'. [L. impingo; in and pango, to strike. See Pack.] To fall against; to ...

28423

impinging
IMPING'ING, ppr. Striking against.

28424

impinguate
IMPIN'GUATE, v.t. [L. in and pinguis, fat.]To fatten; to make fat. [Not in use.]

28425

impious
IM'PIOUS, a. [L. impius; in and pius, pious.]1. Irreverent towards the Supreme Being; wanting in ...

28426

impiously
IM'PIOUSLY, adv. With irreverence for God, or contempt for his authority; profanely; wickedly.

28427

impiousness
IM'PIOUSNESS, n. Impiety; contempt of God and his laws.

28428

implacability
IMPLACABIL'ITY

28429

implacable
IMPLA'CABLE, a. [L. implacabilis; in and placabilis, from placo, to appease.]1. Not to be ...

28430

implacableness
IMPLACABLENESS, n. [from implacable.] The quality of not being appeasable; inexorableness; ...

28431

implacably
IMPLA'CABLY, adv. With enmity not to be pacified or subdued; inexorably; as, to hate a person ...

28432

implant
IMPLANT', v.t. [in and plant, L. planto.]To set, plant or infix for the purpose of growth; as, to ...

28433

implantation
IMPLANTA'TION, n. The act of setting or infixing in the mind or heart, as principles or first ...

28434

implanted
IMPLANT'ED, pp. Set, infixed in the mind, as principles or rudiments.

28435

implanting
IMPLANT'ING, ppr. Setting or infixing in the mind, as principles.

28436

implausibility
IMPLAUSIBIL'ITY, n. [from implausible.]The quality of not being plausible or specious.

28437

implausible
IMPLAUS'IBLE, a. s as z. [in and plausible.]Not specious; not wearing the appearance of truth or ...

28438

implausibly
IMPLAUS'IBLY, adv. Without an appearance of probability.

28439

impleach
IMPLE'ACH, v.t. [in and pleach.] To interweave. [Not in use.]

28440

implead
IMPLE'AD, v.t. [in and plead.] To institute and prosecute a suit against one in court; to sue at ...

28441

impleaded
IMPLE'ADED, pp. Prosecuted; sued; subject to answer to a suit in court.

28442

impleader
IMPLE'ADER, n. One who prosecutes another.

28443

impleading
IMPLE'ADING, ppr. Prosecuting a suit.

28444

impleasing
IMPLE'ASING, a. Unpleasing. [Not in use.]

28445

impledge
IMPLEDGE, v.t. To pawn. [Not used.]

28446

implement
IM'PLEMENT,n. [Low L.implementum, from impleo, to fill; in and pleo.]may supply wants; ...

28447

impletion
IMPLE'TION, n. [L. impleo, to fill; in and pleo.]The act of filling; the state of being full.The ...

28448

implex
IM'PLEX, a. [L. implexus. See Implicate.]Infolded; intricate; entangled; complicated.Every poem is ...

28449

implexion
IMPLEX'ION, n. [See Implicate.] The act of infolding or involving; the state of being involved; ...

28450

implicate
IM'PLICATE, v.t. [L. implico, implicatus; in and plico, to fold.]1. To infold; to involve; to ...

28451

implicated
IM'PLICATED, pp. Infolded; involved.1. Involved; connected; concerned; proved to be concerned or ...

28452

implicating
IM'PLICATING, ppr. Involving; proving to be concerned.

28453

implication
IMPLICA'TION, n. [L. implicatio, supra.]1. The act of infolding or involving.2. Involution; ...

28454

implicative
IM'PLICATIVE, a. Having implication.

28455

implicatively
IM'PLICATIVELY, adv. By implication.

28456

implicit
IMPLIC'IT, a. [L. implicitus, from implico, supra.]1. Infolded; entangled; complicated. In his ...

28457

implicitly
IMPLIC'ITLY, adv. By inference deducible, but not expressed in words; virtually; in reality, but ...

28458

implicitness
IMPLIC'ITNESS, n. The state of being implicit; the state of trusting without reserve.

28459

implied
IMPLI'ED, pp. [See Imply.] Involved; contained virtually, though not expressed; as an implied ...

28460

impliedly
IMPLI'EDLY, adv. By implication.

28461

imploration
IMPLORA'TION, n. Earnest supplication.

28462

implore
IMPLO'RE, v.t. [L. imploro; in and ploro, to cry out.]1. To call upon or for,in supplication; to ...

28463

implored
IMPLO'RED, pp. Earnestly supplicated; besought.

28464

implorer
IMPLO'RER, n. One who prays earnestly.

28465

imploring
IMPLO'RING, ppr. Beseeching; entreating; praying earnestly.

28466

implumed
IMPLU'MED

28467

implumous
IMPLU'MOUS, a. Having no plumes or feathers.

28468

implunge
IMPLUNGE, v.t. implunj'. To plunge; to immerse.

28469

imply
IMPLY', v.t. [L. implico; in and plico, to fold. See Implicate.]1. Literally, to infold or ...

28470

implying
IMPLY'ING, ppr. Involving; containing in substance, or by fair inference, or by construction of ...

28471

impocket
IMPOCK'ET, v.t. To pocket. [Not used.]

28472

impoison
IMPOIS'ON, v.t. s as z. [See Poison.]1. To poison; to impregnate with poison; to corrupt with ...

28473

impoisoned
IMPOIS'ONED, pp. Poisoned; corrupted; embittered.

28474

impoisoning
IMPOIS'ONING, ppr. Poisoning; corrupting; embittering.

28475

impoisonment
IMPOIS'ONMENT, n. The act of poisoning.

28476

impolarly
IM'POLARLY, adv. Not according to the direction of the poles. [Not used.]

28477

impolicy
IMPOL'ICY, n. [in and policy.] Inexpedience; unsuitableness to the end proposed; bad policy; ...

28478

impolite
IMPOLI'TE, a. [in and polite.] Not of polished manners; unpolite; uncivil; rude in manners.

28479

impolitely
IMPOLI'TELY, adv. Uncivilly.

28480

impoliteness
IMPOLI'TENESS, n. Incivility; want of good manners.

28481

impolitical
IMPOLIT'ICAL, for impolitic,is obsolete.

28482

impoliticly
IMPOL'ITICLY, adv. Not wisely; not with due forecast and prudence; in a manner to injure public or ...

28483

imponderability
IMPONDERABIL'ITY, n. Absolute levity; destitution of sensible weight.

28484

imponderable
IMPON'DERABLE

28485

imponderous
IMPON'DEROUS, a. [in and ponderable, ponderous.]Not having sensible weight.

28486

impoor
IMPOOR', v.t. [in and poor.] To impoverish. [Not in use.]

28487

imporosity
IMPOROS'ITY, n. [in and porosity.] Want of porosity; closeness of texture; compactness that ...

28488

imporous
IMPO'ROUS, a. Destitute of pores; very close or compact in texture; solid.

28489

import
IMPO'RT, v.t. [L.importo; in and porto,to bar. See Bear.]1. To bring from a foreign country or ...

28490

importable
IMPO'RTABLE, a. That may be imported.1. Insupportable; not to be endured.

28491

importance
IMPORT'ANCE, n.1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by ...

28492

important
IMPORT'ANT, a. Literally, bearing on or to. Hence, weighty; momentous; of great consequence; ...

28493

importantly
IMPORT'ANTLY, adv. Weightily; forcibly.

28494

importation
IMPORTA'TION, n.1. The act or practice of importing, or of bringing from another country or state; ...

28495

imported
IMPO'RTED, pp. Brought from another country or state.

28496

importer
IMPO'RTER, n. He that imports; the merchant who,by himself or his agent, brings goods from another ...

28497

importing
IMPO'RTING, ppr. Bringing into one's own country or state from a foreign or distant state.1. ...

28498

importless
IMPO'RTLESS, a. Of no weight or consequence. [Not used.]

28499

importunacy
IMPORT'UNACY, n. The act of importuning; importunateness.

28500

importunate
IMPORT'UNATE, a. [L. importunus. See Importune.]1. Bearing on; pressing or urging in request or ...

28501

importunately
IMPORT'UNATELY, adv. With urgent request; with pressing solicitation.

28502

importunateness
IMPORT'UNATENESS, n. Urgent and pressing solicitation.

28503

importunator
IMPORT'UNATOR, n. One that importunes. [Not in use.]

28504

importune
IMPORTU'NE, v.t. [L. importunus; in and porto, to bear on.]To request with urgency; to press with ...

28505

importunely
IMPORTU'NELY, adv. With urgent solicitation; incessantly; continually; troublesomely.1. ...

28506

importunity
IMPORTU'NITY, n. [L. importunitas.]Pressing solicitation; urgent request; application for a claim ...

28507

importuous
IMPO'RTUOUS, a. [L. importuosus; in and portus.]Without a port,haven or harbor.

28508

imposable
IMPOSABLE, a. That may be imposed or laid on.

28509

impose
IMPO'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. impositum, from impono; in and pono, to put. Pono, as written, belongs ...

28510

imposed
IMPO'SED, pp. Laid on, as a tax,burden, duty or penalty; enjoined.Imposes on, deceived.

28511

imposer
IMPO'SER, n. One who lays on; one who enjoins. --The imposers of these oaths might repent.

28512

imposing
IMPO'SING, ppr. Laying on; enjoining; deceiving.1. Commanding; adapted to impress forcibly; as an ...

28513

imposing-stone
IMPO'SING-STONE, n. Among printers, the stone on which the pages or columns of types are imposed ...

28514

imposition
IMPOSI'TION, n. s as z. [L. impositio. See Impose.]1. In a general sense, the act of laying ...

28515

impossibility
IMPOSSIBIL'ITY, n. [from impossible.]1. That which cannot be; the state of being not possible to ...

28516

impossible
IMPOSS'IBLE, a. [L. impossibilis; in and possibilis, from possum, to be able.]1. That cannot be. ...

28517

impost
IM'POST, n. [L. impositum, impono.]1. Any tax or tribute imposed by authority; particularly, a ...

28518

imposthumate
IMPOS'THUMATE, v.i. impos'tumate. [See Imposthume.]To form an abscess; to gather; to collect pus ...

28519

imposthumated
IMPOS'THUMATED, pp. Affected with an imposthume.

28520

imposthumation
IMPOSTHUMA'TION, n. The act of forming an abscess; also, an abscess; an imposthume.

28521

imposthume
IMPOS'THUME, n. impos'tume. [This word is a corruption of apostem, L. apostema; Gr. to separate, ...

28522

impostor
IMPOS'TOR, n. [Low L. impostor, from impono. See Impose.]One who imposes on others; a person who ...

28523

imposturage
IMPOS'TURAGE, n. Imposition. [Not in use.]

28524

imposture
IMPOS'TURE, n. [L. impostura. See Impose.]Deception practiced under a false or assumed character; ...

28525

impostured
IMPOS'TURED, a. Having the nature of imposture.

28526

imposturous
IMPOS'TUROUS, a. Deceitful. [Not used.]

28527

impotence
IM'POTENCE,

28528

impotency
IM'POTENCY, n. [L. impotentia; in and potentia, from possum. See Power.]1. Want of strength or ...

28529

impotent
IM'POTENT, a. [L. impotens.]1. Weak; feeble; wanting strength or power; unable by nature, or ...

28530

impotently
IM'POTENTLY, adv. Weakly; without power over the passions.

28531

impound
IMPOUND', v.t. [in and pound. See Pound.]1. To put, shut or confine in a pound or close pen; as, ...

28532

impounded
IMPOUND'ED, pp. Confined in a pound.

28533

impounder
IMPOUND'ER, n. One who impounds the beasts of another.

28534

impounding
IMPOUND'ING, ppr. Confining in a pound; restraining.

28535

impoverish
IMPOV'ERISH, v.t.1. To make poor; to reduce to poverty or indigence. Idleness and vice are sure ...

28536

impoverished
IMPOV'ERISHED, pp. Reduced to poverty; exhausted.

28537

impoverisher
IMPOV'ERISHER, n. One who makes others poor.1. That which impairs fertility.

28538

impoverishing
IMPOV'ERISHING, ppr. Making poor; exhausting.

28539

impoverishment
IMPOV'ERISHMENT, n. Depauperation; a reducing to indigence; exhaustion; drain of wealth, richness ...

28540

impower
IMPOWER. [See Empower.]

28541

impracticability
IMPRACTICABIL'ITY

28542

impracticable
IMPRAC'TICABLE, a. [in and practicable. See Practice.]1. That cannot be done or performed; ...

28543

impracticableness
IMPRAC'TICABLENESS, n. [See Impracticable.]1. The state or quality of being beyond human power, ...

28544

impracticably
IMPRAC'TICABLY, adv. In a manner or degree that hinders practice. --Morality not impracticably ...

28545

imprecate
IM'PRECATE, v.t. [L. imprecor; in and precor, to pray. See Pray.]To invoke, as an evil on any one; ...

28546

imprecated
IM'PRECATED, pp. Invoked on one, as some evil.

28547

imprecating
IM'PRECATING, ppr. Calling for evil on one's self or another.

28548

imprecation
IMPRECA'TION, n. [L. imprecatio.] The act of imprecating, or invoking evil on any one; a prayer ...

28549

imprecatory
IM'PRECATORY, a. Containing a prayer for evil to befall a person.

28550

imprecision
IMPRECIS'ION, n. s as z. [in and precision.]Want of precision or exactness; defect of accuracy.

28551

impregn
IMPRE'GN, v.t. impre'ne. [L. in and proegnans. See Pregnant.]To impregnate; to infuse the seed of ...

28552

impregnable
IMPREG'NABLE, a.1. Not to be stormed, or taken by assault; that cannot be reduced by force; able ...

28553

impregnably
IMPREG'NABLY, adv. In a manner to resist penetration or assault; in a manner to defy force; as a ...

28554

impregnate
IMPREG'NATE, v.t. [See Pregnant.]1. To infuse the principle of conception; to make pregnant, as a ...

28555

impregnated
IMPREG'NATED, a. Made pregnant or prolific; fecundated; filled with something by mixture, &c.

28556

impregnating
IMPREG'NATING, ppr. Infusing seed or pollen; rendering pregnant; fructifying; fecundating; filling ...

28557

impregnation
IMPREGNA'TION, n. The act of fecundating and rendering fruitful; applied to animals or plants.1. ...

28558

imprejudicate
IMPREJU'DICATE, a. [L. in, proe, and judico.]Not prejudged; unprejudiced; not prepossessed; ...

28559

impreparation
IMPREPARA'TION, n. [in and preparation.] Want of preparation; unpreparedness; unreadiness. [Little ...

28560

imprescriptibility
IMPRESCRIPTIBIL'ITY, n. The state of being independent of prescription; the state which renders a ...

28561

imprescriptible
IMPRESCRIP'TIBLE, a. [L. proescribo; proe and scribo, to write.]That cannot be lost or impaired by ...

28562

impress
IMPRESS', v.t. [L. impressum, from imprimo; in and premo, to press.]1. To imprint; to stamp; to ...

28563

impressed
IMPRESS'ED, pp. Imprinted; stamped; marked by pressure; compelled to enter public service; seized ...

28564

impressibility
IMPRESSIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being impressible.

28565

impressible
IMPRESS'IBLE, a. That may be impressed; that yields to pressure; that may receive impressions. ...

28566

impressing
IMPRESS'ING, ppr. Imprinting; stamping; fixing in the mind; compelling into service.

28567

impression
IMPRES'SION, n. [L. impressio.] The act of impressing, as one body on another; as a figure made by ...

28568

impressive
IMPRESS'IVE, a. Making or tending to make an impression; having the power of affecting, or of ...

28569

impressively
IMPRESS'IVELY, adv. In a manner to touch sensibility, or to awaken conscience; in a manner to ...

28570

impressiveness
IMPRESS'IVENESS, n. The quality of being impressive.

28571

impressment
IMPRESS'MENT, n. The act of impressing men into public service; as the impressment of seamen.1. ...

28572

impressure
IMPRESS'URE, n. The mark made by pressure; indentation; dent; impression.

28573

imprest
IM'PREST, n. A kind of earnest-money; loan; money advanced.

28574

imprevalence
IMPREV'ALENCE, n. Incapability of prevailing.

28575

imprimatur
IMPRIMA'TUR, n. [L. let it be printed.]A license to print a book, &c.

28576

imprimery
IMPRIM'ERY, n. A print; impression; a printing-house; art of printing. [Not in use.]

28577

imprimis
IM'PRIMIS, adv. [L. imprimis, for in primis.]In the first place; first in order.

28578

imprint
IMPRINT', v.t. [L. imprimo; in and premo, to press. See Print.]1. To impress; to make by ...

28579

imprinted
IMPRINT'ED, pp. Marked by pressure; printed; fixed in the mind or memory.

28580

imprinting
IMPRINT'ING, ppr. Marking by pressure; printing; fixing on the mind or memory.

28581

imprison
IMPRIS'ON, v.t. impriz'n.1. To put into a prison; to confine in a prison or jail, or to arrest and ...

28582

imprisoned
IMPRIS'ONED, pp. Confined in a prison or jail; restrained from escape or from going at large.

28583

imprisoning
IMPRIS'ONING, ppr. Shutting up in prison; confining in a place.

28584

imprisonment
IMPRIS'ONMENT, n. The act of putting and confining in prison;the act of arresting and detaining in ...

28585

improbability
IMPROBABIL'ITY, n. [See Improbable.] The quality of being improbable, or not likely to be true; ...

28586

improbable
IMPROB'ABLE, a. [L. improbabilis; in and probabilis, from probo, to prove.] Not likely to be true; ...

28587

improbably
IMPROB'ABLY, adv. In a manner not likely to be true.1. In a manner not to be approved.

28588

improbate
IM'PROBATE, v.t. [L. improbo.] To disallow; not to approve. [Not used.]

28589

improbation
IMPROBA'TION, n. The act of disapproving. [Not in use.]

28590

improbity
IMPROB'ITY, n. [L. improbitas; in and probitas, from probo, to approve.] That which is disapproved ...

28591

improduced
IMPRODU'CED, a. Not produced. [Not in use.]

28592

improficiency
IMPROFI'CIENCY, n. Want of proficiency.

28593

improfitable
IMPROF'ITABLE, a. Unprofitable. [Not in use.]

28594

impromptu
IMPROMP'TU, adv. [L. in promptu, in readiness, from promptus, ready, quick.] Off hand; without ...

28595

improper
IMPROP'ER, a. [L. improprius; in and proprius, proper.]1. Not proper; not suitable; not adapted to ...

28596

improperly
IMPROP'ERLY, adv. Not fitly; in a manner not suited to the end; in a manner not suited to the ...

28597

impropitious
IMPROPI'TIOUS, a. Not propitious; unpropitious.[The latter is the word in use.]

28598

improportionable
IMPROPO'RTIONABLE, a. Not proportionable. [Little used.]

28599

improportionate
IMPROPO'RTIONATE, a. Not proportionate; not adjusted. [Little used.]

28600

impropriate
IMPRO'PRIATE, v.t. [L. in and proprius, proper.]1. To appropriate to private use; to take to one's ...

28601

impropriated
IMPRO'PRIATED, pp. Appropriated to one's self. [See Appropriated.]1. Put in possession of a ...

28602

impropriating
IMPRO'PRIATING, ppr. Appropriating to one's self.1. Annexing to a lay proprietor.

28603

impropriation
IMPROPRIA'TION, n. The act of putting an ecclesiastical benefice into the hands of a layman.1. ...

28604

impropriator
IMPRO'PRIATOR, n. A layman who has possession of the lands of the church or an ecclesiastical ...

28605

impropriety
IMPROPRI'ETY, n. [L. improprius. See Improper.]1. Unfitness; unsuitableness to character, time, ...

28606

improsperity
IMPROSPER'ITY, n. Unprosperity; want of success.

28607

improsperous
IMPROS'PEROUS, a. [in and prosperous.] Not prosperous; not successful; unfortunate; not yielding ...

28608

improsperously
IMPROS'PEROUSLY, adv. Unsuccessfully; unprosperously; unfortunately.

28609

improsperousness
IMPROS'PEROUSNESS, n. Ill success; want of prosperity.

28610

improvability
IMPROVABIL'ITY, n. [See Improvable.] The state or quality of being capable of improvement; ...

28611

improvable
IMPROV'ABLE, a. [See Improve.] Susceptible of improvement; capable of growing or being made ...

28612

improvableness
IMPROV'ABLENESS, n. Susceptibility of improvement; capableness of being made better, or of being ...

28613

improve
IMPROVE, v.t. improov'. [L. in and probo, to prove, or the adjective probus.]1. To make better; to ...

28614

improved
IMPROV'ED, pp. Made better, wiser or more excellent; advanced immoral worth, knowledge or ...

28615

improvement
IMPROVEMENT, n. improov'ment. Advancement in moral worth, learning, wisdom, skill or other ...

28616

improver
IMPROV'ER, n. One who improves; one who makes himself or any thing else better; as an improver of ...

28617

improvided
IMPROVI'DED, a. [L. improvisus; in and provideo, to foresee or provide.] Unforeseen; unexpected; ...

28618

improvidence
IMPROV'IDENCE, n. [L. in and providens, providentia, from pro, before, and video, to see.]Want of ...

28619

improvident
IMPROV'IDENT, a. [L. in and providens; pro and video, supra.]Wanting forecast; not foreseeing what ...

28620

improvidently
IMPROV'IDENTLY, adv. Without foresight or forecast; without care to provide against future wants.

28621

improving
IMPROV'ING, ppr. Making better; growing better; using to advantage.

28622

improvision
IMPROVIS'ION, n. s as z. [in and provision.] Want of forecast; improvidence. [Little used.]

28623

imprudence
IMPRU'DENCE, n. [L. imprudentia; in and prudentia, prudence.]Want of prudence; indiscretion; want ...

28624

imprudent
IMPRU'DENT, a. [L. imprudens; in and prudens, prudent.]Wanting prudence or discretion; indiscrete; ...

28625

imprudently
IMPRU'DENTLY, adv. Without the exercise of prudence; indiscreetly.

28626

impudence
IM'PUDENCE, n. [L. impudens; in and pudens, from pudeo, to be ashamed.] Shamelessness; want of ...

28627

impudent
IM'PUDENT, a. [L. impudens.] Shameless; wanting modesty; bold with contempt of others; saucy. When ...

28628

impudently
IM'PUDENTLY, adv. Shamelessly; with indecent assurance. At once assail With open mouths, and ...

28629

impudicity
IMPUDIC'ITY, n. [L. impudicitia.] Immodesty.

28630

impugn
IMPU'GN, v.t. impu'ne. [L. impugno; in and pugno, to fight or resist.] To oppose; to attack by ...

28631

impugnation
IMPUGNA'TION, n. Opposition. [Little used.]

28632

impugned
IMPU'GNED, pp. Opposed; contradicted; disputed.

28633

impugner
IMPU'GNER, n. One who opposes or contradicts.

28634

impugning
IMPU'GNING, ppr. Opposing; attacking; contradicting.

28635

impuissance
IMPUIS'SANCE, n. Impotence; weakness.

28636

impulse
IM'PULSE, n. im'puls. [L. impulsus, from impello. See Impel.]1. Force communicated; the effect ...

28637

impulsion
IMPUL'SION, n. [L. impulsio. See Impel.]1. The act of driving against or impelling; the agency of ...

28638

impulsive
IMPULS'IVE, a. Having the power of driving or impelling; moving; impellent. Poor men! poor papers! ...

28639

impulsively
IMPULS'IVELY, adv. With force; by impulse.

28640

impunity
IMPU'NITY, n. [L. impunitas; in and punio, to punish.]1. Exemption from punishment or penalty. No ...

28641

impure
IMPU'RE, a. [L. impurus; in and purus, pure.]1. Not pure; foul; feculent; tinctured; mixed or ...

28642

impurely
IMPU'RELY, adv. In an impure manner; with impurity.

28643

impureness
IMPU'RENESS

28644

impurity
IMPU'RITY, n. [L. impuritas, supra.]1. Want of purity; foulness; feculence; the admixture of a ...

28645

impurple
IMPUR'PLE, v.t. [in and purple;] To color or tinge with purple; to make red or reddish; as a field ...

28646

impurpling
IMPUR'PLING, ppr. Tinging or coloring with purple.

28647

imputable
IMPU'TABLE, a. [See Impute.] That may be imputed or charged to a person; chargeable. Thus we say, ...

28648

imputableness
IMPU'TABLENESS, n. The quality of being imputable.

28649

imputation
IMPUTA'TION, n. The act of imputing or charging; attribution; generally in an ill sense; as the ...

28650

imputative
IMPU'TATIVE, a. That may be imputed.

28651

imputatively
IMPU'TATIVELY, adv. By imputation.

28652

impute
IMPU'TE, v.t. [L. imputo; in and puto, to think, to reckon; properly, to set, to put, to throw to ...

28653

imputed
IMPU'TED, pp. Charged to the account of; attributed; ascribed.

28654

imputer
IMPU'TER, n. One that imputes or attributes.

28655

imputing
IMPU'TING, ppr. Charging to the account of; attributing; ascribing.

28656

imputrescible
IMPUTRES'CIBLE, a. [in and L. putresco, to putrefy.]Not subject to putrefaction or corruption.

28657

in
IN, a prefix, L. in, is used in composition as a particle of negation, like the English un, of ...

28658

inability
INABIL'ITY, n. [L. inhabilis; in and habilis.]1. Want of sufficient physical power or strength; as ...

28659

inablement
INA'BLEMENT, n. [See Enable.] Ability. [Not in use.]

28660

inabstinence
INAB'STINENCE, n. [in and abstinence.] A not abstaining; a partaking; indulgence of appetite; as ...

28661

inabusively
INABU'SIVELY, adv. Without abuse.

28662

inaccessibility
INACCESSIBIL'ITY

28663

inaccessible
INACCESS'IBLE, a. [in and accessible.]1. Not to be reached; as an inaccessible highth or rock. The ...

28664

inaccessibleness
INACCESS'IBLENESS, n. [from inaccessible.]The quality or state of being inaccessible, or not to be ...

28665

inaccessibly
INACCESS'IBLY, adv. So as not to be approached.

28666

inaccuracy
INAC'CURACY, n. [from inaccurate.] Want of accuracy or exactness; mistake; fault; defect; error; ...

28667

inaccurate
INAC'CURATE, a. [in and accurate.] Not accurate; not exact or correct; not according to truth; ...

28668

inaccurately
INAC'CURATELY, adv. Not according to truth; incorrectly; erroneously. The accounts are ...

28669

inaction
INAC'TION, n. Want of action; forbearance of labor; idleness; rest.

28670

inactive
INAC'TIVE, a. [in and active.] Not active; inert; having no power to move. Matter is, per se, ...

28671

inactively
INAC'TIVELY, adv. Idly; sluggishly; without motion, labor or employment.

28672

inactivity
INACTIV'ITY, n. [in and activity.] Inertness; as the inactivity of matter.1. Idleness, or ...

28673

inactuate
INAC'TUATE, v.t. To put in action. [Not used.]

28674

inactuation
INACTUA'TION, n. Operation. [Not used.]

28675

inadequacy
INAD'EQUACY, n. [from inadequate.] The quality of being unequal or insufficient for a purpose. The ...

28676

inadequate
INAD'EQUATE, a. [in and adequate. L. adoequatus, from adoequo, to equal.]1. Not equal to the ...

28677

inadequately
INAD'EQUATELY, adv. Not fully or sufficiently; not completely.

28678

inadequateness
INAD'EQUATENESS, n. The quality of being inadequate; inadequacy; inequality; incompleteness.

28679

inadequation
INADEQUA'TION, n. Want of exact correspondence.

28680

inadhesion
INADHE'SION, n. s as z. [in and adhesion.] Want of adhesion; a not adhering. Porcelain clay is ...

28681

inadmissibility
INADMISSIBIL'ITY, n. [from inadmissible.] The quality of being inadmissible, or not proper to be ...

28682

inadmissible
INADMIS'SIBLE, a. Not admissible; not proper to be admitted, allowed or received; as inadmissible ...

28683

inadvertence
INADVERT'ENCE

28684

inadvertency
INADVERT'ENCY, n. [L. in and advertens, adverto. See Advert.]1. A not turning the mind to; ...

28685

inadvertent
INADVERT'ENT, a. [L. in and advertens.] Not turning the mind to; heedless; careless; negligent.

28686

inadvertently
INADVERT'ENTLY, adv. Heedlessly; carelessly; from want of attention; inconsiderately.

28687

inaffability
INAFFABIL'ITY, n. Reservedness in conversation.

28688

inaffable
INAF'FABLE, a. Not affable; reserved.

28689

inaffectation
INAFFECTA'TION,n. Destitution of affected manner.

28690

inaffected
INAFFECT'ED, a. Unaffected. [Not used.]

28691

inaidabale
INA'IDABALE, a. That cannot be assisted.

28692

inalienable
INA'LIENABLE, a. [L. alieno, alienus.]Unalienable; that cannot be legally or justly alienated or ...

28693

inalienableness
INA'LIENABLENESS, n. The state of being inalienable.

28694

inalienably
INA'LIENABLY, adv. In a manner that forbids alienation; as rights inalienably vested.

28695

inalimental
INALIMENT'AL, a. [in and aliment.] Affording no nourishment.

28696

inalterability
INALTERABIL'ITY, n. [from inalterable.] The quality of not being alterable or changeable.

28697

inalterable
INAL'TERABLE, a. [in and alterable.] That cannot or may not be altered or changed; unalterable.

28698

inamiable
INA'MIABLE, a. Unamiable. [Not in use.]

28699

inamiableness
INA'MIABLENESS, n. Unamiableness. [Not in use.]

28700

inamissible
INAMIS'SIBLE, a. [L. in and amitto, to lose.] Not to be lost.[Little used.]

28701

inamissibleness
INAMIS'SIBLENESS, n. The state of not being liable to be lost.

28702

inamorato
INAMORA'TO, n. [L. in and amor, love.] A lover.

28703

inane
INA'NE, a. [L. inanis, empty.] Empty; void; sometimes used as a noun, to express a void space.

28704

inangular
INAN'GULAR, a. Not angular. [Little used.]

28705

inanimate
INAN'IMATE, v.t. [infra.] To animate. [Little used.]INAN'IMATE, a. [L. inanimatus; in and animo, ...

28706

inanimated
INAN'IMATED, a. Destitute of animal life.1. Not animated; not sprightly. [See Unanimated.]

28707

inanition
INANI'TION, n. [ L. inanis, empty.]Emptiness; want of fullness; as inanition of body or of the ...

28708

inanity
INAN'ITY, n. [L. inanitas, from inanis, void.]Emptiness; void space; vacuity.

28709

inappetence
INAP'PETENCE

28710

inappetency
INAP'PETENCY, n. [in and appetence, L. appetentia.]Want of appetence, or of a disposition to seek, ...

28711

inapplicability
INAPPLICABIL'ITY, n. [from inapplicable.]The quality of not being applicable; unfitness.

28712

inapplicable
INAP'PLICABLE, a. [in and applicable.] Not applicable; that cannot be applied; not suited or ...

28713

inapplication
INAPPLICA'TION, n. Want of application; want of attention or assiduity; negligence; indolence; ...

28714

inapposite
INAP'POSITE, a. s as z. [in and apposite.] Not apposite; not fit or suitable; not pertinent; as an ...

28715

inappreciable
INAPPRE'CIABLE, a. [in and appreciable, from appreciate.]1. Not to be appreciated; that cannot be ...

28716

inapprehensible
INAPPREHENS'IBLE, a. Not intelligible.

28717

inapprehensive
INAPPREHENS'IVE, a. Not apprehensive; regardless.

28718

inapproachable
INAPPROACHABLE, a. [in and approachable.]Not to be approached; inaccessible.

28719

inappropriate
INAPPRO'PRIATE, a. [in and appropriate.]Not appropriate; unsuited; not proper.1. Not appropriate; ...

28720

inaptitude
INAPT'ITUDE, n. [in and aptitude.] Want of aptitude; unfitness; unsuitableness.

28721

inaquate
INA'QUATE, a. [L. in and aquatus.] Embodied in water.

28722

inaquation
INAQUA'TION, n. The state of being inaquate.

28723

inarable
INAR'ABLE, v. [in and arable.]Not arable; not capable of being plowed or tilled.

28724

inaraching
IN`ARACHING, ppr. Grafting by approach.

28725

inarch
IN`ARCH, v.t. [in and arch.] To graft by approach; to graft by uniting a cion to a stock without ...

28726

inarched
IN`ARCHED, pp. Grafted by approach.

28727

inarching
IN`ARCHING, n. A method of ingrafting, by which a cion, without being separated from its parent ...

28728

inarticulate
INARTIC'ULATE, a. [in and articulate.] Not uttered with articulation or junction of the organs of ...

28729

inarticulately
INARTIC'ULATELY, adv. Not with distinct syllables; indistinctly.

28730

inarticulateness
INARTIC'ULATENESS, n. Indistinctness of utterance by animal voices; want of distinct articulation.

28731

inarticulation
INARTICULA'TION, n. Indistinctness of sounds in speaking.

28732

inartificial
INARTIFI'CIAL, a. [In and artificial.]1. Not done by art; not made or performed by the rules of ...

28733

inartificially
INARTIFI'CIALLY, adv. Without art; in an artless manner; contrary to the rules of art.

28734

inattention
INATTEN'TION, n. [in and attention.] The want of attention, or of fixing the mind steadily on an ...

28735

inattentive
INATTENT'IVE, a. [in and attentive.] Not fixing the mind on an object; heedless; careless; ...

28736

inattentively
INATTENT'IVELY, adv. Without attention; carelessly; heedlessly.

28737

inaudible
INAUD'IBLE, a. [in and audible.] That cannot be heard; as an inaudible voice or sound.1. Making ...

28738

inaudibly
INAUD'IBLY, adv. In a manner not to be heard.

28739

inaugural
INAUG'URAL, a. [L. inauguro; in and augur.]1. Pertaining to inauguration; as inaugural ...

28740

inaugurate
INAUG'URATE, v.t. [supra.] To introduce or induct into an office with solemnity or suitable ...

28741

inaugurated
INAUG'URATED, pp. Inducted into office with appropriate ceremonies.

28742

inaugurating
INAUG'URATING, ppr. Inducting into office with solemnities.

28743

inauguration
INAUGURA'TION, n. The act of inducting into office with solemnity; investiture with office by ...

28744

inauguratory
INAUG'URATORY, a. Suited to induction into office; pertaining to inauguration; as inauguratory ...

28745

inauration
INAURA'TION, n. [L. inauro, inauratus; in and aurum, gold.]The act or process of gilding, or ...

28746

inauspicate
INAUS'PICATE, a. Ill omened.

28747

inauspicious
INAUSPI'CIOUS, a. [in and auspicious.] Ill omened; unfortunate; unlucky; evil; unfavorable. The ...

28748

inauspiciously
INAUSPI'CIOUSLY, adv. With ill omens; unfortunately; unfavorably.

28749

inauspiciousness
INAUSPI'CIOUSNESS, n. Unluckiness; unfavorableness.

28750

inbeing
IN'BEING, n. [in and being.] Inherence; inherent existence; inseparableness.

28751

inborn
IN'BORN, a. [in and born.] Innate; implanted by nature; as inborn passions; inborn worth.

28752

inbreathed
IN'BREATHED, a. [in and breathe.] Infused by inspiration.

28753

inbred
IN'BRED, a. [in and bred, breed.] Bred within; innate; natural; as inbred worth; inbred affection.

28754

inbreed
INBREE'D, v.t. To produce or generate within.

28755

inca
IN'CA, n. The name or title given by the natives of Peru to their kings and to the princes of the ...

28756

incage
INCA'GE, v.t. [in and cage.] To confine in a cage; to coop us; to confine to any narrow limits.

28757

incaged
INCA'GED, pp. Cooped up; confined to a cage or to narrow limits.

28758

incagement
INCA'GEMENT, n. Confinement in a cage.

28759

incaging
INCA'GING, ppr. Confining to a cage or to narrow limits.

28760

incalculable
INCAL'CULABLE, a. That cannot be calculated; beyond calculation.

28761

incalculably
INCAL'CULABLY, adv. In a degree beyond calculation.

28762

incalescence
INCALES'CENCE

28763

incalescency
INCALES'CENCY, n. [L. incalescens,incalesco; in and calesco,caleo,to be hot.]A growing warm; ...

28764

incalescent
INCALES'CENT, a. Growing warm; increasing in heat.

28765

incameration
INCAMERA'TION, n. [in and camera, a chamber, or arched roof.]The act or process of uniting lands, ...

28766

incandescence
INCANDES'CENCE, n. [L. incandescens, incandesco; in and candesco; candeo, caneo, to be white, to ...

28767

incandescent
INCANDES'CENT, a. White or glowing with heat.

28768

incantation
INCANTA'TION, n. [L. incantatio, incanto; in and canto, to sing.]The act of enchanting; ...

28769

incantatory
INCANT'ATORY, a. Dealing by enchantment; magical.

28770

incanting
INCANT'ING, a. Enchanting. [Not used.]

28771

incanton
INCAN'TON, v.t. [in and canton.] To unite to a canton or separate community.

28772

incapability
INCAPABIL'ITY

28773

incapable
INCA'PABLE, a.1. Wanting capacity sufficient; not having room sufficient to contain or hold; ...

28774

incapableness
INCA'PABLENESS, n. [from incapable.] The quality of being incapable; natural incapacity or want of ...

28775

incapacious
INCAPA'CIOUS, a. [in and capacious.] Not capacious; not large or spacious; narrow; of small ...

28776

incapaciousness
INCAPA'CIOUSNESS, n. Narrowness; want of containing space.

28777

incapacitate
INCAPAC'ITATE, v.t. [in and capacitate.]1. To deprive of capacity or natural power of learning, ...

28778

incapacitation
INCAPACITA'TION, n. Want of capacity; disqualification.

28779

incapacity
INCAPAC'ITY, n. [in and capacity.] Want of capacity, intellectual power, or the power of ...

28780

incarcerate
INC`ARCERATE, v.t. [L. incarcero; in and carcer, a prison; Eng. cark, care; showing the primary ...

28781

incarceration
INCARCERA'TION, n. The act of imprisoning or confining; imprisonment.

28782

incarn
INC`ARN, v.t. [L. incarno; in and caro, carnis, flesh.]To cover with flesh; to invest with ...

28783

incarnadine
INC`ARNADINE, a. [L. in and caro,flesh.]Flesh-colored; of a carnation color; pale ...

28784

incarnate
INC`ARNATE, v.t. [L. incarno; in and caro, flesh.]To clothe with flesh; to embody in ...

28785

incarnation
INCARNA'TION, n. The act of clothing with flesh.1. The act of assuming flesh, or of taking a ...

28786

incarnative
INC`ARNATIVE, v. Causing new flesh to grow; healing.INC`ARNATIVE, n. A medicine that tends to ...

28787

incase
INCA'SE, v.t. [in and case.] To inclose in a case.1. To inclose; to cover or surround with ...

28788

incased
INCA'SED, pp. Inclosed as in a case, sheath or box.

28789

incasing
INCA'SING, ppr. Inclosing as in a case.

28790

incask
INC`ASK, v.t. To put into a cask.

28791

incastellated
INCAS'TELLATED, a. Confined or inclosed in a castle.

28792

incatenation
INCATENA'TION, n. [L. catena, a chain.]The act of linking together.

28793

incautious
INCAU'TIOUS, a. [in and cautious.] Not cautious; unwary; not circumspect; heedless; not attending ...

28794

incautiously
INCAU'TIOUSLY, adv. Unwarily; heedlessly; without due circumspection.

28795

incautiousness
INCAU'TIOUSNESS, n. Want of caution; unwariness; want of foresight.

28796

incavated
IN'CAVATED, a. [L. in and cavo, to make hollow.] Made hollow; bent round or in.

28797

incavation
INCAVA'TION, n. The act of making hollow.1. A hollow made.

28798

incend
INCEND', v.t. [L. incendo.] To inflame; to excite. [Little used.]

28799

incendiary
INCEND'IARY, n. [L. incendiarius, from incendo, to burn; in and candeo, to shine, or be on fire.]1. ...

28800

incense
IN'CENSE, n. in'cens. [L. incensum, burnt, from incendo, to burn.]1. Perfume exhaled by fire; the ...

28801

incensed
INCENS'ED, pp. Inflamed to violent anger; exasperated.

28802

incensement
INCENSEMENT, n. incens'ment. Violent irritation of the passions; heat; exasperation. It expresses ...

28803

incensing
INCENS'ING, ppr. Inflaming to anger; irritating; exasperation.

28804

incension
INCEN'SION, n. [L. incensio, from incendo, to burn.]The act of kindling; the state of being on ...

28805

incensive
INCENS'IVE, a. Tending to excite or provoke.

28806

incensor
INCENS'OR, n. [L.] A kindler of anger; an inflamer of the angry passions.

28807

incensory
INCENS'ORY, n. The vessel in which incense is burnt and offered. [We generally use censer.]

28808

incentive
INCEN'TIVE, a. [Low L. incentivus, from incendo, to burn.]Inciting; encouraging or moving. ...

28809

inception
INCEP'TION, n. [L. inceptio, from incipio, to begin; in and capio, to take.] Beginning. I hope ...

28810

inceptive
INCEP'TIVE, a. [L. inceptivus, from incipio, to begin.]Beginning; noting beginning; as an inceptive ...

28811

inceptor
INCEP'TOR, n. A beginner; one in the rudiments

28812

inceration
INCERA'TION, n. [L. incero, from cera.] The act of covering with wax.

28813

incertain
INCER'TAIN, a. [in and certain.] Uncertain; doubtful; unsteady.

28814

incertainly
INCER'TAINLY, adv. Doubtfully.

28815

incertainty
INCER'TAINTY, n. Uncertainty; doubt.

28816

incertitude
INCER'TITUDE, n. [L. incertitudo, from incertus; in and certus, certain.] Uncertainty; ...

28817

incessable
INCES'SABLE, a. Unceasing; continual. [little used.]

28818

incessancy
INCES'SANCY, n. [from incessant.] Unintermitted continuance; unceasingness.

28819

incessant
INCES'SANT, a. [L. in and cessans, from cesso, to cease.]Unceasing; unintermitted; uninterrupted; ...

28820

incessantly
INCES'SANTLY, adv. Without ceasing; continually.

28821

incest
IN'CEST, n. [L. incestum; in and castus, chaste.]The crime of cohabitation or sexual commerce ...

28822

incestuous
INCEST'UOUS, a. Guilty of incest; as an incestuous person.1. Involving the crime of incest; as an ...

28823

incestuously
INCEST'UOUSLY, adv. In an incestuous manner; in a manner to involve the crime of incest.

28824

incestuousness
INCEST'UOUSNESS, n. The state or quality of being incestuous.

28825

inch
INCH, n. [L. uncia, the twelfth part.]1. A lineal measure in Great Britain and the United States, ...

28826

incharitable
INCHAR'ITABLE, a. Uncharitable. [The latter is the word used.]

28827

inchastity
INCHAS'TITY, n. [in and chastity.] Lewdness; impurity; unchastity.

28828

inchest
INCHEST', v.t. To put into a chest.

28829

inchoate
IN'CHOATE, v.t. [L. inchoo.] To begin. [Little used.]IN'CHOATE, a. Begun; commenced. It is ...

28830

inchoately
IN'CHOATELY, adv. In an incipient degree.

28831

inchoation
INCHOA'TION, n. The act of beginning; commencement; inception. The setting on foot some of those ...

28832

inchoative
INCHO'ATIVE, a. Noting beginning; inceptive; as an inchoative verb, otherwise called inceptive.

28833

incide
INCI'DE, v.t. [L. incido; in and coedo, to strike.]To cut; to separate; as medicines.

28834

incidence
IN'CIDENCE, n. [L. incidens; incido, to fall on; in and cado, to fall.]1. Literally, a falling on; ...

28835

incident
IN'CIDENT, a. Falling; casual; fortuitous; coming or happening occasionally, or not in the usual ...

28836

incidental
INCIDENT'AL, a. Happening; coming without design; casual; accidental; as an incidental ...

28837

incidentally
INCIDENT'ALLY, adv. Casually; without intention; accidentally. I was incidentally present when ...

28838

incidently
IN'CIDENTLY, adv. Occasionally; by the way. [Not used.]

28839

incinerate
INCIN'ERATE, v.t. [L. in and cinis, cineris, ashes]To burn to ashes.

28840

incinerated
INCIN'ERATED, pp. Burnt to ashes.

28841

incinerating
INCIN'ERATING, ppr. Reducing to ashes by combustion.

28842

incineration
INCINERA'TION, n. The act of reducing to ashes by combustion.

28843

incipiency
INCIP'IENCY, n. Beginning; commencement.

28844

incipient
INCIP'IENT, a. [L. incipiens,incipio; in and capio, to take.]Beginning; commencing; as the ...

28845

incirclet
INCIR'CLET, n. A small circle.

28846

incircumscriptible
INCIRCUMSCRIP'TIBLE, a. That cannot be circumscribed or limited.

28847

incircumspection
INCIRCUMSPEC'TION, n. [in and circumspection.] Want of circumspection; heedlessness.

28848

incise
INCI'SE, v.t. s as z. To cut in; to carve.

28849

incised
INCI'SED, a. [L. incisus, from incido, to cut.]Cut; made by cutting; as an incised wound; incised ...

28850

incisely
INCI'SELY, adv. In the manner of incisions or notches.

28851

incision
INCIS'ION, n. s as z. [L. incisio, from incido, to cut.]1. A cutting; the act of cutting into a ...

28852

incisive
INCI'SIVE, a. Having the quality of cutting or separating the superficial part of any ...

28853

incisor
INCI'SOR, n. [L.] A cutter; a fore tooth, which cuts, bites or separates.

28854

incisory
INCI'SORY, a. Having the quality of cutting.

28855

incisure
INCIS'URE, n. [L. incisura.] A cut; a place opened by cutting; an incision.

28856

incitant
INCI'TANT, n. [from incite.] That which excites action in an animal body.

28857

incitation
INCITA'TION, n. [L. incitatio. See Incite.]1. The act of inciting or moving to action; ...

28858

incite
INCI'TE, v.t. [L. incito; in and cito, to call, to stir up.]1. To move the mind to action by ...

28859

incited
INCI'TED, pp. Moved to action; stirred up; spurred on.

28860

incitement
INCI'TEMENT, n. That which incites the mind or moves to action; motive; incentive; impulse. From ...

28861

inciter
INCI'TER, n. He or that which incites or moves to action.

28862

inciting
INCI'TING, ppr. Exciting to action; stirring up.In general, incite denotes to operate on the mind ...

28863

incivil
INCIV'IL, a. [in and civil.] Uncivil; rude; unpolite. [But uncivil is generally used.]

28864

incivility
INCIVIL'ITY, n. Want of courtesy; rudeness of manners towards others; impoliteness.1. Any act of ...

28865

incivilly
INCIV'ILLY, adv. Uncivilly; rudely.

28866

incivism
INCIV'ISM, n. [in and civism.] Want of civism; want of love to one's country or of patriotism; ...

28867

inclasp
INCL`ASP, v.t. To clasp; to hold fast.

28868

inclavated
IN'CLAVATED, a. Set; fast fixed.

28869

incle
IN'CLE, n. A kind of tape made of linen yarn.

28870

inclemency
INCLEM'ENCY, n. [L. inclementia. See Clemency.]1. Want of clemency; want of mildness of temper; ...

28871

inclement
INCLEM'ENT, a. Destitute of a mild and kind temper; void of tenderness; unmerciful; severe; ...

28872

inclinable
INCLI'NABLE, a. [L. inclinabilis. See Incline.]1. Leaning; tending; as a tower inclinable to ...

28873

inclination
INCLINA'TION, n. [L. inclinatio. See Incline.]1. A leaning; any deviation of a body or line from ...

28874

inclinatorily
INCLI'NATORILY, adv. Obliquely; with inclination.

28875

inclinatory
INCLI'NATORY, a. Having the quality of leaning or inclining.

28876

incline
INCLI'NE, v.t. [L. inclino; in and clino; Eng. to lean.]1. To lean; to deviate from an erect or ...

28877

inclined
INCLI'NED, pp. Having a leaning or tendency; disposed.Inclined plane, in mechanics, is a plane ...

28878

incliner
INCLI'NER, n. An inclined dial.

28879

inclining
INCLI'NING, ppr. Leaning; causing to lean.INCLI'NING, a. Leaning.

28880

inclip
INCLIP', v.t. [in and clip.] To grasp; to inclose; to surround.

28881

incloister
INCLOIS'TER, v.t. [in and cloister.] To shut up or confine in a cloister. [But cloister is ...

28882

inclose
INCLO'SE, v.t. s as z. [L. inclusus, includo; in and claudo, or cludo.]1. To surround; to shut in; ...

28883

inclosed
INCLO'SED, pp. Surrounded; encompassed; confined on all sides; covered and sealed; fenced.

28884

incloser
INCLO'SER, n. He or that which incloses; one who separates land from common grounds by a fence.

28885

inclosing
INCLO'SING, ppr. Surrounding; encompassing; shutting in; covering and confining.

28886

inclosure
INCLO'SURE, n. The act of inclosing.1. The separation of land from common ground into distinct ...

28887

incloud
INCLOUD', v.t. [in and cloud.] To darken; to obscure.

28888

inclouded
INCLOUD'ED, pp. Involved in obscurity.

28889

inclouding
INCLOUD'ING, ppr. Darkening; obscuring.

28890

include
INCLU'DE,v.t. [L. includo; in and cludo, to shut up.]1. To confine within; to hold; to contain; ...

28891

included
INCLU'DED, pp. Contained; comprehended.

28892

including
INCLU'DING, ppr. Containing; comprising.

28893

inclusion
INCLU'SION, n. s as z. [L. inclusio.] The act of including.

28894

inclusive
INCLU'SIVE, a. Inclosing; encircling.1. Comprehended in the number or sum; as form Monday to ...

28895

inclusively
INCLU'SIVELY, adv. Comprehending the thing mentioned; as from Monday to Saturday inclusively.

28896

incoagulable
INCOAG'ULABLE, a. [in and coagulable.] That cannot be coagulated or concreted.

28897

incoercible
INCOER'CIBLE, a. [in and coercible, from coerce.]Not to be coerced or compelled; that cannot be ...

28898

incoexistence
INCOEXIST'ENCE, n. [in and coexistence.] A not existing together. [Not common.]

28899

incog
INCOG', adv. [contracted from incognito.]In concealment; in disguise; in a manner not to be known.

28900

incogitancy
INCOG'ITANCY, n. [L. incogitantia; in and cogito, to think.]Want of thought, or want of the power ...

28901

incogitant
INCOG'ITANT, a. Not thinking; thoughtless.

28902

incogitantly
INCOG'ITANTLY, adv. Without consideration.

28903

incogitative
INCOG'ITATIVE, a. [in and cogitative.] Not thinking; wanting the power of thought; as, a vegetable ...

28904

incognito
INCOG'NITO, adv. [L. incognitus; in and cognitus, known.] In concealment; in a disguise of the ...

28905

incognizable
INCOGN'IZABLE, a. incon'izable. [in and cognizable.]That cannot be recognized, known or ...

28906

incoherence
INCOHE'RENCE

28907

incoherency
INCOHE'RENCY, n. [in and coherence.]1. Want of coherence; want of cohesion or adherence; looseness ...

28908

incoherent
INCOHE'RENT, a. [in and coherent.]1. Wanting cohesion; loose; unconnected; not fixed to each ...

28909

incoherently
INCOHE'RENTLY, adv. Inconsistently; without coherence of parts; as, to talk incoherently.

28910

incoincidence
INCOIN'CIDENCE, n. [in and coincidence.] Want of coincidence or agreement.

28911

incoincident
INCOIN'CIDENT, a. [in and coincident.]Not coincident; not agreeing in time, place or principle.

28912

incolumity
INCOLU'MITY, n. [L. incolumitas.] Safety; security.

28913

incombine
INCOMBI'NE, v.i. To differ.

28914

incombustibility
INCOMBUSTIBIL'ITY, n. [from incombustible.]The quality of being incapable of being burnt or ...

28915

incombustible
INCOMBUST'IBLE, a. [in and combustible.] Not to be burnt, decomposed or consumed by fire. Amianth ...

28916

incombustibleness
INCOMBUST'IBLENESS, n. Incombustibility.

28917

income
IN'COME, n. in'cum. [in and come.] That gain which proceeds from labor, business or property of ...

28918

incoming
IN'COMING, a. Coming in.IN'COMING, n. [in and come.] Income; gain. Many incomings are subject to ...

28919

incommensurability
INCOMMENSURABIL'ITY, n. [from incommensurable.] The quality or state of a thing, when it has no ...

28920

incommensurable
INCOMMEN'SURABLE, a. [in and commensurable.]Having no common measure. Two lines are ...

28921

incommensurate
INCOMMEN'SURATE, a. [in and commensurate.]1. Not admitting of a common measure.2. Not of equal ...

28922

incommensurately
INCOMMEN'SURATELY, adv. Not in equal or due measure or proportion.

28923

incommiscible
INCOMMIS'CIBLE, a. [in and commix.]That cannot be commixed or mutually mixed.

28924

incommixture
INCOMMIX'TURE, n. A state of being unmixed.

28925

incommode
INCOMMO'DE, v.t. [L. incommodo; in and commodo, con and modus.]To give inconvenience to; to give ...

28926

incommoded
INCOMMO'DED, pp. Put to inconvenience; molested.

28927

incommoding
INCOMMO'DING, ppr. Subjecting to trouble or inconvenience.

28928

incommodious
INCOMMO'DIOUS, a. [L. incommodus.] Inconvenient; not affording ease or advantage; unsuitable; ...

28929

incommodiously
INCOMMO'DIOUSLY, adv. In a manner to create inconvenience; inconveniently; unsuitably.

28930

incommodiousness
INCOMMO'DIOUSNESS, n. Inconvenience; unsuitableness.

28931

incommodity
INCOMMOD'ITY, n. [L. incommoditas.] Inconvenience; trouble. [Now little used.]

28932

incommunicability
INCOMMUNICABIL'ITY

28933

incommunicable
INCOMMU'NICABLE, a. [in and communicable.]1. That cannot be communicated or imparted to others.2. ...

28934

incommunicableness
INCOMMU'NICABLENESS, n. [from incommunicable.]The quality of not being communicable, or capable of ...

28935

incommunicably
INCOMMU'NICABLY, adv. In a manner not to be imparted or communicated.

28936

incommunicated
INCOMMU'NICATED, a. Not imparted.

28937

incommunicating
INCOMMU'NICATING, a. Having no communion or intercourse with each other; as an administration in ...

28938

incommunicative
INCOMMU'NICATIVE, a. Not communicative; not free or apt to impart to others in conversation.1. Not ...

28939

incommutability
INCOMMUTABIL'ITY

28940

incommutable
INCOMMU'TABLE, a. [in and commutable.]Not to be exchanged or commuted with another.

28941

incommutableness
INCOMMU'TABLENESS, n. The quality of being incommutable.

28942

incommutably
INCOMMU'TABLY, adv. Without reciprocal change.

28943

incompact
INCOMPACT'

28944

incompacted
INCOMPACT'ED, a. [in and compact.]Not compact; not having the parts firmly united; not solid.

28945

incomparable
INCOM'PARABLE, a. [in and comparable.] That admits of no comparison with others; usually in a good ...

28946

incomparableness
INCOM'PARABLENESS, n. Excellence beyond comparison.

28947

incomparably
INCOM'PARABLY, adv. Beyond comparison; without competition. Newton was incomparably the greatest ...

28948

incompared
INCOMPA'RED, a. Not matched; peerless.

28949

incompassionate
INCOMPAS'SIONATE, a. [in and compassionate.]Void of compassion or pity; destitute of tenderness.

28950

incompassionately
INCOMPAS'SIONATELY, adv. Without pity or tenderness.

28951

incompassionatenes
INCOMPAS'SIONATENESS, n. Want of pity.

28952

incompatibility
INCOMPATIBIL'ITY, n. [from incompatible.]1. Inconsistency; that quality or state of a thing which ...

28953

incompatible
INCOMPAT'IBLE, a. [L. in and competo, to suit, to be proper or convenient; con and peto, to press ...

28954

incompatibly
INCOMPAT'IBLY, adv. Inconsistently; incongruously.

28955

incompetence
INCOM'PETENCE

28956

incompetency
INCOM'PETENCY, n. 1. Inability; want of sufficient intellectual powers or talents; as the ...

28957

incompetent
INCOM'PETENT, a. [L. in and competens, competo. See Incompatible.]1. Wanting adequate powers of ...

28958

incompetently
INCOM'PETENTLY, adv. Insufficiently; inadequately; not suitably.

28959

incomplete
INCOMPLE'TE, a. [in and complete.]Not finished. The building is incomplete.1. Imperfect; ...

28960

incompletely
INCOMPLE'TELY, adv. Imperfectly.

28961

incompleteness
INCOMPLE'TENESS, n. An unfinished state; imperfectness; defectiveness.

28962

incomplex
INCOMPLEX', a. [in and complex.] Not complex; uncompounded; simple.

28963

incompliance
INCOMPLI'ANCE, n. [in and compliance.]1. Defect of compliance; refusal to comply with ...

28964

incompliant
INCOMPLI'ANT, a. [in and compliant.] Unyielding to request or solicitation; not disposed to ...

28965

incomposed
INCOMPO'SED, a. [in and composed.] Disordered; disturbed. [But this word is little used. Instead ...

28966

incomposite
INCOM'POSITE, a. incom'pozit. [in and composite.]Uncompounded; simple.

28967

incompossibility
INCOMPOSSIBIL'ITY, n. [in and composible.]The quality of not being possible but by the negation or ...

28968

incompossible
INCOMPOS'SIBLE, a. [in, con, and possible.] Not possible to be or subsist with something else. ...

28969

incomprehensibilit
INCOMPREHENSIBIL'ITY, n. [See the next word.]The quality of being incomprehensible, or beyond the ...

28970

incomprehensible
INCOMPREHENS'IBLE, a.1. That cannot be comprehended or understood; That is beyond the reach of ...

28971

incomprehensiblene
INCOMPREHENS'IBLENESS, n. Incomprehensibility, which see.

28972

incomprehensibly
INCOMPREHENS'IBLY, adv. In a manner which the human mind cannot comprehend or understand; ...

28973

incomprehension
INCOMPREHEN'SION, n. Want of comprehension or understanding.

28974

incomprehensive
INCOMPREHENS'IVE, a. Not comprehensive; not extensive.

28975

incompressibility
INCOMPRESSIBIL'ITY, n. [See Incompressible.] The quality of resisting compression, or of being ...

28976

incompressible
INCOMPRESS'IBLE, a. [in and compressible.] Not to be compressed; not capable of being reduced by ...

28977

inconcealable
INCONCE'ALABLE, a. [in and concealable]Not concealable; not to be hid or kept secret.

28978

inconceivable
INCONCE'IVABLE, a. [in and conceivable.]1. That cannot be conceived by the mind; incomprehensible. ...

28979

inconceivableness
INCONCE'IVABLENESS, n. The quality of being inconceivable; incomprehensibility.

28980

inconceivably
INCONCE'IVABLY, adv. In a manner beyond comprehension, or beyond the reach of human intellect.

28981

inconceptible
INCONCEP'TIBLE, a. Inconceivable. [Little used.]

28982

inconcinnity
INCONCIN'NITY, n. [L. inconcinnitas.] Unsuitableness; want of proportion.

28983

inconcludent
INCONCLU'DENT, a. [L. in and concludens, concludo, to conclude.]Not inferring a conclusion or ...

28984

inconcluding
INCONCLU'DING, a. Inferring no consequence.

28985

inconclusive
INCONCLU'SIVE, a. [in and conclusive.] Not producing a conclusion; not closing, concluding or ...

28986

inconclusively
INCONCLU'SIVELY, adv. Without such evidence as to determine the understanding in regard to truth ...

28987

inconclusiveness
INCONCLU'SIVENESS, n. Want of such evidence as to satisfy the mind of truth or falsehood,and put an ...

28988

inconcoct
INCONCOCT', a. Inconcocted.

28989

inconcocted
INCONCOCT'ED, a. [in and concoct.] Not fully digested; not matured; unripened.

28990

inconcoction
INCONCOC'TION, n. [in and concoction.] The state of being indigested; unripeness; immaturity.

28991

inconcurring
INCONCUR'RING, a. [in and concurring, from concur.]Not concurring; not agreeing.

28992

inconcussible
INCONCUS'SIBLE, a. That cannot be shaken.

28993

incondensability
INCONDENSABIL'ITY, n. [See Incondensable.]The quality of being not condensable.

28994

incondensable
INCONDENS'ABLE, a. [in and condensable.]1. Not capable of condensation; that cannot be made more ...

28995

incondite
INCON'DITE, a. [L. inconditus; in and condo, to build.]Rude; unpolished; irregular. [Little used.]

28996

inconditional
INCONDI'TIONAL, a. [in and conditional.] Without any condition, exception or limitation; absolute. ...

28997

inconditonate
INCONDI'TONATE, a. [in and condition.]Not limited or restrained by conditions; absolute. [Not now ...

28998

inconfirmed
INCONFIRMED, for unconfirmed,is not in use.

28999

inconformity
INCONFORM'ITY, n. [in and conformity.] Want of conformity; incompliance with the practice of ...

29000

inconfused
INCONFU'SED, a. s as z. Not confused; distinct.

29001

inconfusion
INCONFU'SION, n. Distinctness.

29002

incongenial
INCONGE'NIAL, a. [in and congenial.]Not congenial; not of a like nature; unsuitable.

29003

incongeniality
INCONGENIAL'ITY, n. Unlikeness of nature; unsuitableness.

29004

incongruence
INCON'GRUENCE, n. [in and congruence.] Want of congruence, adaptation or agreement; ...

29005

incongruent
INCON'GRUENT, a. Unsuitable; inconsistent.

29006

incongruity
INCONGRU'ITY, n. [in and congruity.]1. Want of congruity; impropriety; inconsistency; absurdity; ...

29007

incongruous
INCON'GRUOUS, a. [L incongruus.] Not congruous; unsuitable; not fitting; inconsistent; improper. ...

29008

incongruously
INCON'GRUOUSLY, adv. Unsuitably; unfitly; improperly.

29009

inconnection
INCONNEC'TION, n. [in and connection.]Want of connection; loose, disjointed state.

29010

inconscionable
INCON'SCIONABLE, a. Having no sense of good and evil.

29011

inconsequence
INCON'SEQUENCE, n. [L. inconsequentia.]Want of just inference; inconclusiveness.

29012

inconsequent
INCON'SEQUENT, a. Not following from the premises; without regular inference;as an inconsequent ...

29013

inconsequential
INCONSEQUEN'TIAL, a. Not regularly following from the premises.1. Not of consequence; not of ...

29014

inconsiderable
INCONSID'ERABLE, a. [in and considerable.] Not worthy of consideration or notice; unimportant; ...

29015

inconsiderableness
INCONSID'ERABLENESS, n. Small importance.

29016

inconsiderably
INCONSID'ERABLY, adv. In a small degree; to a small amount; very little.

29017

inconsideracy
INCONSID'ERACY, n. Thoughtlessness; want of consideration. [Unusual.]

29018

inconsiderate
INCONSID'ERATE, a. [L. inconsideratus. See Consider.]1. Not considerate; not attending to the ...

29019

inconsiderately
INCONSID'ERATELY, adv. Without due consideration or regard to consequences; heedlessly; ...

29020

inconsiderateness
INCONSID'ERATENESS, n. Want of due regard to consequences; carelessness; thoughtlessness; ...

29021

inconsideration
INCONSIDERA'TION, n. Want of due consideration; want of thought; inattention to consequences.

29022

inconsistence
INCONSIST'ENCE

29023

inconsistency
INCONSIST'ENCY, n. [in and consistence.]1. Such opposition or disagreement as that one proposition ...

29024

inconsistent
INCONSIST'ENT, a. Incompatible; incongruous; not suitable. Loud laughter in grave company is ...

29025

inconsistently
INCONSIST'ENTLY, adv. With absurdity; incongruously; with self-contradiction; without steadiness ...

29026

inconsistentness
INCONSIST'ENTNESS,n. Inconsistency. [Not in use.]

29027

inconsisting
INCONSIST'ING, a. Inconsistent. [Not used.]

29028

inconsolable
INCONSO'LABLE, a. [in and consolable.] Not to be consoled; grieved beyond susceptibility of ...

29029

inconsolably
INCONSO'LABLY, adv. In a matter or degree that does not admit of consolation.

29030

inconsonance
INCON'SONANCE, n. Disagreement of sounds; discordance.

29031

inconsonancy
INCON'SONANCY, n. [in and consonancy.] Disagreement; inconsistency. In music, disagreement of ...

29032

inconsonant
INCON'SONANT, a. Not agreeing; inconsistent; discordant.

29033

inconspicuous
INCONSPIC'UOUS, a. [in and conspicuous.]1. Not discernible; not to be perceived by the sight.2. ...

29034

inconstancy
INCON'STANCY, n. [L. inconstantia. See Constancy.]1. Mutability or instability of temper or ...

29035

inconstant
INCON'STANT, a. [L. inconstans.]1. Mutable; subject to change of opinion, inclination or purpose; ...

29036

inconstantly
INCON'STANTLY, adv. In an inconstant manner; not steadily.

29037

inconsumable
INCONSU'MABLE, a. [in and consumable.] Not to be consumed; that cannot be wasted.

29038

inconsummate
INCONSUM'MATE, a. [in and consummate.]Not consummate; not finished; not complete.

29039

inconsummateness
INCONSUM'MATENESS, n. State of being incomplete.

29040

inconsumptible
INCONSUMP'TIBLE, a. [L. in and consumptus.]1. Not to be spent, wasted or destroyed by fire. [Not ...

29041

incontestable
INCONTEST'ABLE, a. Not contestable; not to be disputed; not admitting debate; too clear to be ...

29042

incontestably
INCONTEST'ABLY, adv. In a manner to preclude debate; indisputably; incontrovertibly; indubitably.

29043

incontiguous
INCONTIG'UOUS, a. [in and contiguous.] Not contiguous; not adjoining; not touching; separate.

29044

incontinence
INCON'TINENCE

29045

incontinency
INCON'TINENCY, n. [L. incontinentia. See Continence.]1. Want of restraint of the passions or ...

29046

incontinent
INCON'TINENT, a. [L. incontinens.] Not restraining the passions or appetites, particularly the ...

29047

incontinently
INCON'TINENTLY, adv. Without due restraint of the passions or appetites; unchastely.1. ...

29048

incontracted
INCONTRACT'ED, a. Not contracted; not shortened.

29049

incontrollable
INCONTROLLABLE, a. [in and controllable.]Not to be controlled; that cannot be restrained or ...

29050

incontrollably
INCONTROLLABLY, adv. In a manner that admits of no control.

29051

incontrovertible
INCONTROVERT'IBLE, a. [in and controvertible.]Indisputable; too clear or certain to admit of ...

29052

incontrovertibly
INCONTROVERT'IBLY, adv. In a manner or to a degree that precludes debate or controversy.

29053

inconvenience
INCONVE'NIENCE

29054

inconveniency
INCONVE'NIENCY, n. [L.inconveniens; in and convenio, conveniens.]1. Unfitness; unsuitableness; ...

29055

inconvenient
INCONVE'NIENT, a. [L. supra.]1. Incommodious; unsuitable; disadvantageous; giving trouble or ...

29056

inconveniently
INCONVE'NIENTLY, adv. Unsuitably; incommodiously; in a manner to give trouble; unseasonably.

29057

inconversable
INCONVERS'ABLE, a. [in and conversable.] Not inclined to free conversation; incommunicative; ...

29058

inconversant
INCON'VERSANT, a. Not conversant; not familiar; not versed.

29059

inconvertibility
INCONVERTIBIL'ITY, n. [from inconvertible.] The quality of not being changeable or convertible ...

29060

inconvertible
INCONVERT'IBLE, a. [in and convertible.] Not convertible; that cannot be transmuted or changed ...

29061

inconvincible
INCONVIN'CIBLE, a. [in and convincible.] Not convincible; that cannot be convinced; not capable of ...

29062

inconvincibly
INCONVIN'CIBLY, adv. In a manner not admitting of conviction.

29063

incony
INCO'NY, a. or n. Unlearned; artless; an accomplished person, in contempt.

29064

incorporal
INCOR'PORAL, a. [in and corporal. Not consisting of matter or body; immaterial. [Incorporeal is ...

29065

incorporality
INCORPORAL'ITY, n. The quality of not consisting of matter; immateriality.

29066

incorporally
INCOR'PORALLY, adv. Without matter or a body; immaterially.

29067

incorporate
INCOR'PORATE, a. [in and corporate.]1. Not consisting of matter; not having a material body. ...

29068

incorporated
INCOR'PORATED, pp. Mixed or united in one body; associated in the same political body; united in a ...

29069

incorporating
INCOR'PORATING, ppr. Mixing or uniting in one body or mass; associating in the same political ...

29070

incorporation
INCORPORA'TION, n. The act of incorporating.1. Union of different ingredients in one mass.2. ...

29071

incorporeal
INCORPO'REAL, a. [L. incorporalis, incorporeus.]Not consisting of matter; not having a material ...

29072

incorporeally
INCORPO'REALLY, adv. Without body; immaterially.

29073

incorporeity
INCORPORE'ITY, n. The quality of being not material; immateriality.

29074

incorpse
INCORPSE, v.t. incorps'. To incorporate.

29075

incorrect
INCORRECT', a. [in and correct.] Not correct; not exact; not according to a copy or model, or to ...

29076

incorrection
INCORREC'TION, n. Want of correction.

29077

incorrectly
INCORRECT'LY, adv. Not in accordance with truth or other standard; inaccurately; not exactly; as a ...

29078

incorrectness
INCORRECT'NESS, n. Want of conformity to truth or to a standard; inaccuracy. Incorrectness may ...

29079

incorrigibility
INCORRIGIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being bad, erroneous or depraved beyond correction; hopeless ...

29080

incorrigible
INCOR'RIGIBLE, a. [L. corrigo; con and rego.]1. That cannot be corrected or amended; bad beyond ...

29081

incorrigibleness
INCOR'RIGIBL'ENESS

29082

incorrigibly
INCOR'RIGIBLY, adv. To a degree of depravity beyond all means of amendment.

29083

incorrupt
INCORRUPT'

29084

incorrupted
INCORRUPT'ED, a. [L. incorruptus; in and corrumpo, corruptus; con and rumpo, to break.] Not ...

29085

incorruptibility
INCORRUPTIBIL'ITY, n.[from incorruptible.]The quality of being incapable of decay or corruption.

29086

incorruptible
INCORRUPT'IBLE, a.1. That cannot corrupt or decay; not admitting of corruption. Thus gold, glass, ...

29087

incorruptibleness
INCORRUPT'IBLENESS, n. The quality of being incorruptible, or not liable to decay.

29088

incorruption
INCORRUP'TION, n. [in and corruption.] Incapacity of being corrupted. It is sown in corruption; it ...

29089

incorruptive
INCORRUPT'IVE, a. Not liable to corruption or decay.

29090

incorruptness
INCORRUPT'NESS, n. Exemption from decay or corruption.1. Purity of mind or manners; probity; ...

29091

incrassate
INCRAS'SATE, v.t. [L. incrasso, incrassatus; in and crassus, thick.]1. To make thick or thicker; ...

29092

incrassated
INCRAS'SATED, a. In botany, thickened or becoming thicker towards the flower, as a peduncle.1. ...

29093

incrassating
INCRAS'SATING, ppr. Rendering thick or thicker; growing thicker.

29094

incrassation
INCRASSA'TION, n. The act of thickening, or state of becoming thick or thicker.

29095

incrassative
INCRAS'SATIVE, a. Having the quality of thickening.INCRAS'SATIVE, n. That which has the power to ...

29096

increasable
INCRE'ASABLE, a. That may be increased.

29097

increase
INCRE'ASE, v.i. [L. incresco; in and cresco, to grow.]1. To become greater in bulk or quantity; to ...

29098

increased
INCRE'ASED, pp. Augmented; made or grown larger.

29099

increaseful
INCRE'ASEFUL, a. Abundant of produce.

29100

increaser
INCRE'ASER, n. He or that which increases.

29101

increasing
INCRE'ASING, ppr. Growing; becoming larger; advancing in any quality, good or bad.

29102

increate
INCREA'TE

29103

increated
INCREA'TED, a. Uncreated, which see. [The latter is the word mostly used.]

29104

incredibility
INCREDIBIL'ITY, n. [See Incredible.] The quality of surpassing belief, or of being too ...

29105

incredible
INCRED'IBLE, a. [L. incredibilis; in and credibilis, credible.]That cannot be believed; not to be ...

29106

incredibleness
INCRED'IBLENESS, n. Incredibility, which see.

29107

incredibly
INCRED'IBLY, adv. In a manner to preclude belief.

29108

incredulity
INCREDU'LITY, n. The quality of not believing; indisposition to believe; a withholding or refusal ...

29109

incredulous
INCRED'ULOUS, a. [L. incredulus; in and credulus; credo, to believe.] Not believing; indisposed to ...

29110

incredulousness
INCRED'ULOUSNESS, n. Incredulity, which see.

29111

incremable
INCREM'ABLE, a. [L. in and cremo.] That cannot be burnt. [not used.]

29112

increment
IN'CREMENT, n. [L. incrementum, from incresco. See Increase.]1. Increase; a growing in bulk, ...

29113

increpate
IN'CREPATE, v.t. [L. increpo.] To chide; to rebuke. [Not in use.]

29114

increpation
INCREPA'TION, n. A chiding or rebuking; rebuke; reprehension.

29115

increscent
INCRES'CENT, a. [L. increscens. See Increase.]growing; augmenting; swelling.

29116

incriminate
INCRIM'INATE, v.t. [L. in and criminor, to accuse. See Crime.]To accuse; to charge with a crime or ...

29117

incruental
INCRUENT'AL, a. [L. incruentus.] Unbloody; not attended with blood. [Not in use.]

29118

incrust
INCRUST', v.t. [L. incrusto; in and crusto, to crust.To cover with a crust or with a hard coat; to ...

29119

incrustate
INCRUST'ATE, v.t. To incrust. [Less frequently used.]

29120

incrustation
INCRUSTA'TION, n. [L. incrustatio.]1. A crust or rough coat of any thing on the surface of a ...

29121

incrystalizable
INCRYS'TALIZABLE, a. [in and crystalizable.]That will not crystalize; that cannot be formed into ...

29122

incubate
IN'CUBATE, v.i. [L. incubo; in and cubo, to lie down.] To sit, as on eggs for hatching.

29123

incubation
INCUBA'TION, n. [L. incubatio.] The act of sitting on eggs for the purpose of hatching young.

29124

incubature
INCU'BATURE, n. Incubation. [Not used.]

29125

incubus
IN'CUBUS, n. [L. incubo, to lie on.]1. The nightmare; an oppression of the breast in sleep, or ...

29126

inculcate
INCULC'ATE, v.t. [L. inculco, to drive or force on; in and calco, to tread,calx,the heel.] To ...

29127

inculcated
INCULC'ATED, pp. Impressed or enforced by frequent admonitions.

29128

inculcating
INCULC'ATING, ppr. Impressing or enforcing by repeated instruction.

29129

inculcation
INCULCA'TION, n. The action of impressing by repeated admonitions.

29130

inculpable
INCULP'ABLE, a. [L. in and culpabilis, from culpa, a fault.]Without fault; unblamable; that cannot ...

29131

inculpableness
INCULP'ABLENESS, n. Unblamableness.

29132

inculpably
INCULP'ABLY, a. Unblamably; without blame.

29133

incult
INCULT', a. [L. incultus; in and cultus, from colo.]Untilled; uncultivated.

29134

incultivated
INCUL'TIVATED, a. Not cultivated; uncultivated.

29135

incultivation
INCULTIVA'TION, n. Neglect or want of cultivation.

29136

inculture
INCUL'TURE, n. Want or neglect of cultivation.

29137

incumbency
INCUM'BENCY, n. [from incumbent.] A lying or resting on something.1. The state of holding or ...

29138

incumbent
INCUM'BENT, a. [L. incumbens, incumbo; in and cumbo, to lie down.]1. Lying or resting on. And when ...

29139

incumber
INCUM'BER, v.t. To burden with a load; to embarrass. [See Encumber, and its derivatives.]

29140

incumbrance
INCUM'BRANCE, n. A burdensome and troublesome load; any thing that impedes motion or action, or ...

29141

incumbrancer
INCUM'BRANCER, n. One who has an incumbrance, or some legal claim on an estate.

29142

incumbrous
INCUM'BROUS, a. Cumbersome; troublesome.

29143

incur
INCUR', v.t. [L. incurro, to run against; in and curro, to run.]1. Literally, to run against; ...

29144

incurability
INCURABIL'ITY, n. The state of being incurable; impossibility of cure; insusceptibility of cure or ...

29145

incurable
INCU'RABLE, a.1. That cannot be cured; not admitting of cure; beyond the power of skill or ...

29146

incurableness
INCU'RABLENESS, n. The state of not admitting cure or remedy.

29147

incurably
INCU'RABLY, adv. In a manner or degree that renders cure impracticable.

29148

incuriosity
INCURIOS'ITY, n. Want of curiosity; inattentiveness; indifference.

29149

incurious
INCU'RIOUS, a. [in and curious.] Destitute of curiosity; not curious or inquisitive; inattentive.

29150

incuriousness
INCU'RIOUSNESS, n. Want of curiosity or inquisitiveness.

29151

incurred
INCUR'RED, pp. Brought on.

29152

incurring
INCUR'RING, ppr. Becoming subject or liable to; bringing on.

29153

incursion
INCUR'SION, n. [L. incursio, from incurro. See Incur.]1. Literally, a running into; hence, an ...

29154

incurvate
INCURV'ATE, v.t. [L. incurvo; in and curvus, bent.]To bend; to crook; to turn from a right line or ...

29155

incurvated
INCURV'ATED, pp. Bent; turned from a rectilinear direction.

29156

incurvating
INCURV'ATING, ppr. Bending; turning from a right line.

29157

incurvation
INCURVA'TION, n. The act of bending.1. The state of being bent, or turned from a rectilinear ...

29158

incurve
INCURVE, v.t. incurv'. To bend; to make crooked.

29159

incurvity
INCURV'ITY, n. [L. incurvus.] A state of being bent or crooked; crookedness; a bending inward.

29160

indagate
IN'DAGATE, v.t. [L. indago.] To seek or search out. [Not used.]

29161

indagation
INDAGA'TION, n. The act of searching; search; inquiry; examination. [Little used.]

29162

indagator
IN'DAGATOR, n. A searcher; one who seeks or inquires with diligence. [Little used.]

29163

indart
IND`ART, v.t. [in and dart.] To dart in; to thrust or strike in.Indebitatus assumpsit. [See ...

29164

indebt
INDEBT, a verb, is never used.

29165

indebted
INDEBT'ED, a. indet'ted.1. Being in debt; having incurred a debt; held or obliged to pay. A is ...

29166

indebtedness
INDEBT'EDNESS, n. indet'tedness. The state of being indebted.

29167

indebtment
INDEBT'MENT, n. indet'ment. The state of being indebted. [Little used.]

29168

indecency
INDE'CENCY, n. [L. indecens, indeceo; in and deceo, to become.]That which is unbecoming in language ...

29169

indecent
INDE'CENT, a. [L. indecens.] Unbecoming; unfit to be seen or heard; offensive to modesty and ...

29170

indecently
INDE'CENTLY, adv. In a manner to offend modesty or delicacy.

29171

indeciduous
INDECID'UOUS, a. [in and deciduous.]Not falling, as the leaves of trees in autumn; lasting; ...

29172

indecimable
INDEC'IMABLE, a. Not liable to the payment of tithes.

29173

indecision
INDECIS'ION, n. s as z. [in and decision.] Want of decision; want of settled purpose or of ...

29174

indecisive
INDECI'SIVE, a. [in and decisive.] Not decisive; not bringing to a final close or ultimate issue; ...

29175

indecisively
INDECI'SIVELY, adv. Without decision.

29176

indecisiveness
INDECI'SIVENESS, n. The state of being undecided; unsettled state; state of not being brought to a ...

29177

indeclinable
INDECLI'NABLE, a. [L. indeclinabilis; in and declino.]Not declinable; not varied by terminations; ...

29178

indeclinably
INDECLI'NABLY, adv. Without variation.

29179

indecomposable
INDECOMPO'SABLE, a. s as z. [in and decomposable, decompose.]Not capable of decomposition, or of ...

29180

indecomposableness
INDECOMPO'SABLENESS, n. Incapableness of decomposition.

29181

indecorous
INDEC'OROUS, a. [L. indecorus; in and decor, decus, deceo, to become.] Unbecoming; violating good ...

29182

indecorously
INDEC'OROUSLY, adv. In an unbecoming manner.

29183

indecorousness
INDEC'OROUSNESS, n. Violation of good manners in words or behavior.

29184

indecorum
INDECO'RUM, n. [L. in and decorum.] Impropriety of behavior; that in behavior or manners which ...

29185

indeed
INDEE'D, adv. [in and deed.] In reality; in truth; in fact. The carnal mind is enmity against God; ...

29186

indefatigable
INDEFAT'IGABLE, a. [L. indefatigabilis; in and defatigo, fatigo, to fatigue.] Unwearied; not ...

29187

indefatigableness
INDEFAT'IGABLENESS, n. Unweariedness; persistency.

29188

indefatigably
INDEFAT'IGABLY, adv. Without weariness; without yielding to fatigue.

29189

indefatigation
INDEFATIGA'TION, n. Unweariedness. [Not used.]

29190

indefeasibility
INDEFEASIBIL'ITY, n. [from indefeasible.] The quality or state of being not subject to be made ...

29191

indefeasible
INDEFE'ASIBLE, a. s as z. [in and defeasible; facio.]Not to be defeated; that cannot be made void; ...

29192

indefeasibly
INDEFE'ASIBLY, adv. In a manner not to be defeated or made void.

29193

indefectibility
INDEFECTIBIL'ITY, n. [from indefectible.]The quality of being subject to no defect or decay.

29194

indefectible
INDEFECT'IBLE, a. [in and defect.] Unfailing; not liable to defect, failure or decay.

29195

indefective
INDEFECT'IVE, a. Not defective; perfect; complete.

29196

indefeisible
INDEFE'ISIBLE, a. Indefeasible. [Not used.]

29197

indefensibility
INDEFENSIBIL'ITY, n. [form indefensible.]The quality or state of not being capable of defense or ...

29198

indefensible
INDEFENS'IBLE, a. [in and defensible, from defend.]1. That cannot be defended or maintained. A ...

29199

indefensive
INDEFENS'IVE, a. Having no defense.

29200

indeficiency
INDEFI'CIENCY, n. The quality of not being deficient, or of suffering no delay.

29201

indeficient
INDEFI'CIENT, a. Not deficient; not failing; perfect.

29202

indefinable
INDEFI'NABLE, a. That cannot be defined.

29203

indefinite
INDEF'INITE, a. [L. indefinitus; in and definitus, definio, to define; de and finio, to end, finis, ...

29204

indefinitely
INDEF'INITELY, adv. Without any settled limitation; as space indefinitely extended.1. Not ...

29205

indefiniteness
INDEF'INITENESS, n. The quality of being undefined, unlimited, or not precise and certain.

29206

indefinitude
INDEFIN'ITUDE, n. Quantity not limited by our understanding, though yet finite. [Not used.]

29207

indeliberate
INDELIB'ERATE, a. [in and deliberate.] Done or performed without deliberation or consideration; ...

29208

indeliberately
INDELIB'ERATELY, adv. Without deliberation or premeditation.

29209

indelibility
INDELIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being indelible.

29210

indelible
INDEL'IBLE, a. [L. indelebilis; in and delebilis, from deleo,to blot out.]1. Not to be blotted ...

29211

indelibly
INDEL'IBLY, adv. In a manner not to be blotted out or effaced; too deeply imprinted to be effaced, ...

29212

indelicacy
INDEL'ICACY, n. [in and delicacy.] Want of delicacy; want of decency in language or behavior, ...

29213

indelicate
INDEL'ICATE, a. Wanting delicacy; indecent; but it expresses less than indecent; as an indelicate ...

29214

indelicately
INDEL'ICATELY, adv. Indecently; in a manner to offend against good manners or purity of mind.

29215

indemnification
INDEMNIFICA'TION, n. [from indemnify.]1. The act of indemnifying, saving harmless, or securing ...

29216

indemnified
INDEM'NIFIED, pp. Saved harmless; secured against damage.

29217

indemnify
INDEM'NIFY, v.t. [in and damnify; L. damnificus; damnum, loss.]1. To save harmless; to secure ...

29218

indemnifying
INDEM'NIFYING, ppr. Saving harmless; securing against loss; reimbursing loss.

29219

indemnity
INDEM'NITY, n. [L. in and damnum, loss.]1. Security given to save harmless; a writing or pledge by ...

29220

indemonstrable
INDEMON'STRABLE, a. [in and demonstrable.]That cannot be demonstrated.

29221

indenization
INDENIZA'TION, n. The act of naturalizing, or the patent by which a person is made free.

29222

indenize
IN'DENIZE, v.t. To endenize, which see.

29223

indenizen
INDEN'IZEN, v.t. To invest with the privileges of a free citizen.

29224

indent
INDENT', v.t. [L. dens, a tooth.]1. To notch; to jag; to cut any margin into points or ...

29225

indentation
INDENTA'TION

29226

indented
INDENT'ED, pp. Cut in the edge into points, like teeth.1. Bound out by indented writings; as an ...

29227

indenting
INDENT'ING, ppr. Cutting into notches.1. Binding out by covenants in writing.

29228

indentment
INDENT'MENT, n. A notch; a cut in the margin of paper or other things.1. A recess or depression ...

29229

indenture
INDENT'URE,n. A writing containing a contract. Indentures are generally duplicates, laid together ...

29230

independence
INDEPEND'ENCE, n. [in and dependence.]1. A state of being not dependent; complete exemption from ...

29231

independent
INDEPEND'ENT, a. [in and dependent.]1. Not dependent; not subject to the control of others; not ...

29232

independently
INDEPEND'ENTLY, adv. Without depending or relying on others; without control.1. Without undue ...

29233

indeprecable
INDEP'RECABLE, a. That cannot be deprecated.

29234

indeprehensible
INDEPREHENS'IBLE, a. That cannot be found out.

29235

indeprivable
INDEPRI'VABLE, a. That cannot be deprived.

29236

indescribable
INDESCRI'BABLE, a. That cannot be described.

29237

indescriptive
INDESCRIP'TIVE, a. Not descriptive or containing just description.

29238

indesert
INDESERT', n. s as z. [in and desert.] Want of merit or worth.

29239

indesinent
INDES'INENT, a. [L. in and desino, to cease; de and sino.]Not ceasing; perpetual.

29240

indesinently
INDES'INENTLY, adv. Without cessation.

29241

indestructibility
INDESTRUCTIBIL'ITY,n. [from indestructible.]The quality of resisting decomposition, or of being ...

29242

indestructible
INDESTRUC'TIBLE, a. [in and destructible.] That cannot be destroyed; incapable of decomposition; ...

29243

indeterminable
INDETERM'INABLE, a. [in and determinable.]1. That cannot be determined ascertained or fixed.2. Not ...

29244

indeterminate
INDETERM'INATE, a. [in and determinate.]1. Not determinate; not settled or fixed; not definite; ...

29245

indeterminately
INDETERM'INATELY, adv. Not in any settled manner; indefinitely;not with precise limits; as a space ...

29246

indeterminateness
INDETERM'INATENESS, n. Indefiniteness; want of certain limits; want of precision.

29247

indetermination
INDETERMINA'TION, n. [in and determination.]1. Want of determination; an unsettled or wavering ...

29248

indetermined
INDETERM'INED, a. [in and determined.] Undetermined; unsettled; unfixed.

29249

indevote
INDEVO'TE, a. Not devoted.

29250

indevoted
INDEVO'TED, a. Not devoted.

29251

indevotion
INDEVO'TION, n. Want of devotion; absence of devout affections.

29252

indevout
INDEVOUT, a. Not devout; not having devout affections.

29253

indevoutly
INDEVOUT'LY, adv. Without devotion.

29254

index
IN'DEX, n. plu. indexes, sometimes indices. [L. connected with idico, to show; in and dico.]1. ...

29255

indexical
INDEX'ICAL, a. Having the form of an index; pertaining to an index.

29256

indexically
INDEX'ICALLY, adv. In the manner of an index.

29257

indexterity
INDEXTER'ITY, n. [in and dexterity.]1. Want of dexterity or readiness in the use of the hands; ...

29258

india
IN'DIA, n. A country in Asia, so named from the river Indus.

29259

indian
IN'DIAN, a. [from India, and this from Indus, the name of a river in Asia.] Pertaining to either ...

29260

indianite
IN'DIANITE, n. [from India.] A mineral occurring in masses having a foliated structure and shining ...

29261

indicant
IN'DICANT, n. [L. indicans; in and dico, to show.]Showing; pointing out what is to be done for the ...

29262

indicate
IN'DICATE, v.t. [L. indico; in and dico, to show.]1. To show; to point out; to discover; to direct ...

29263

indicated
IN'DICATED, pp. Shown; pointed out; directed.

29264

indicating
IN'DICATING, ppr. Showing; pointing out; directing.

29265

indication
INDICA'TION, n. The act of pointing out.1. Mark; token; sign; symptom; whatever serves to ...

29266

indicative
INDIC'ATIVE,a. [L. indicativus.] Showing; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible ...

29267

indicatively
INDIC'ATIVELY, adv. In a manner to show or signify.

29268

indicator
IN'DICATOR, n. He or that which shows or points out.

29269

indicatory
IN'DICATORY, a. Showing; serving to show or make known.

29270

indice
INDICE. [See Index.]

29271

indicolite
IN'DICOLITE, n. [indigo, or indico,and a stone.]In mineralogy, a variety of shorl or tourmalin, of ...

29272

indict
INDICT, v.t. indi'te. [L. indictus, from indico; in and dico, to speak.] In law, to accuse or ...

29273

indictable
INDICTABLE, a. indi'table. That may be indicted; as an indictable offender.1. Subject to be ...

29274

indicted
INDICTED, pp. indi'ted. Accused by a grand jury.

29275

indicter
INDICTER, n. indi'ter. One who indicts.

29276

indicting
INDICTING, ppr. indi'ting. Accusing, or making a formal or written charge of a crime by a grand ...

29277

indiction
INDIC'TION, n. [Low L. indictio, indico.]1. Declaration; proclamation.2. In chronology, a cycle ...

29278

indictive
INDIC'TIVE, a. Proclaimed; declared.

29279

indictment
INDICTMENT, n. indi'tement. A written accusation or formal charge of a crime or misdemeanor, ...

29280

indies
IN'DIES, n. plu. of India.

29281

indifference
INDIF'FERENCE, n. [L. indifferentia; in and differo, to differ. Indifferency is little used.]1. ...

29282

indifferent
INDIF'FERENT, a. [L. indifferens.]1. Neutral; not inclined to one side, party or thing more than ...

29283

indifferently
INDIF'FERENTLY, adv. Without distinction or preference; as, to offer pardon indifferently to ...

29284

indigence
IN'DIGENCE

29285

indigency
IN'DIGENCY, n. [L. indigentia, from indigeo; in or ind, and egeo, to want, to lack.] Want of ...

29286

indigene
IN'DIGENE, n. [L. indigena; in or ind, and geno, gigno, to beget, or to be born.] One born in a ...

29287

indigenous
INDIG'ENOUS, a. [L. indigena, supra.]1. Native; born in a country; applied to persons.2. Native; ...

29288

indigent
IN'DIGENT, a. [L. indigens.] Destitute of property or means of comfortable subsistence; needy; ...

29289

indigest
INDIGEST', n. A crude mass. [Not used.]

29290

indigested
INDIGEST'ED, a. [in and digested; L. indigestus.]1. Not digested; not concocted in the stomach; ...

29291

indigestible
INDIGEST'IBLE, a. [in and digestible.]1. Not digestible; not easily converted into chyme, or ...

29292

indigestion
INDIGES'TION, n. [in and digestion.] Want of due coction in the stomach; a failure of that change ...

29293

indigitate
INDIG'ITATE, v.t. To point out with the finger.

29294

indigitation
INDIGITA'TION, n. The act of pointing out with the finger.

29295

indign
INDIGN, a. indi'ne. [L. indignus.] Unworthy; disgraceful.

29296

indignance
INDIG'NANCE, n. Indignation. [Not in use.]

29297

indignant
INDIG'NANT, a. [L. indignans, from indignor, to disdain; in and dignor,dignus.] Affected at once ...

29298

indignation
INDIGNA'TION, n. [L. indignatio.]1. Anger or extreme anger, mingled with contempt, disgust or ...

29299

indignify
INDIG'NIFY, v.t. To treat disdainfully. [Not used.]

29300

indignity
INDIG'NITY, n. [L. indignitas.] Unmerited, contemptuous conduct towards another; any action ...

29301

indignly
INDIGNLY, adv. indi'nely. Unworthily.

29302

indigo
IN'DIGO, n. [L. indicum, from India.] A substance or dye, prepared from the leaves and stalks of ...

29303

indigo-plant
IN'DIGO-PLANT, n. A plant of the genus Indigofera, from which is prepared indigo. It is a native ...

29304

indigometer
INDIGOM'ETER, n. An instrument for ascertaining the strength of indigo.

29305

indilatory
INDIL'ATORY, n. [in and dilatory. Not dilatory or slow.

29306

indiligence
INDIL'IGENCE, n. [in and diligence.] Want of diligence; slothfulness.

29307

indiligent
INDIL'IGENT, a. Not diligent; idle; slothful.

29308

indiligently
INDIL'IGENTLY, adv. Without diligence.

29309

indiminishable
INDIMIN'ISHABLE, a. That cannot be diminished.

29310

indirect
INDIRECT', a. [L. indirectus; in and directus, from dirigo.]1. Not straight or rectilinear; ...

29311

indirection
INDIREC'TION, n. [in and direction.] Oblique course or means.1. Dishonest practice.

29312

indirectly
INDIRECT'LY, adv. Not in a straight line or course; obliquely.1. Not by direct means.2. Not in ...

29313

indirectness
INDIRECT'NESS, n. Obliquity; devious course.1. Unfairness; dishonesty.

29314

indiscernible
INDISCERN'IBLE, a. [in and discernible.] That cannot be discerned; not visible or perceptible; not ...

29315

indiscernibleness
INDISCERN'IBLENESS, n. Incapability of being discerned.

29316

indiscernibly
INDISCERN'IBLY, adv. In a manner not to be seen or perceived.

29317

indiscerpible
INDISCERP'IBLE, a. Indiscerptible.

29318

indiscerptibility
INDISCERPTIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of being incapable of dissolution, or separation of parts.

29319

indiscerptible
INDISCERP'TIBLE, a. [in and discerptible.] Incapable of being destroyed by dissolution, or ...

29320

indisciplinable
INDIS'CIPLINABLE, a. [in and disciplinable.] That cannot be disciplined or subjected to ...

29321

indiscoverable
INDISCOV'ERABLE, a. [in and discoverable.] That cannot be discovered; undiscoverable.

29322

indiscovery
INDISCOV'ERY, n. [in and discovery.] Want of discover. [Unusual.]

29323

indiscreet
INDISCREE'T, a. [in and discreet.] Not discreet; wanting in discretion; imprudent; inconsiderate; ...

29324

indiscreetly
INDISCREE'TLY, adv. Not discreetly; without prudence; inconsiderately; without judgment.

29325

indiscrete
INDISCRE'TE, a. Not discrete or separated.

29326

indiscretion
INDISCRE'TION,n. [in and discretion.] Want of discretion; imprudence. The grossest vices pass ...

29327

indiscriminate
INDISCRIM'INATE, a. [L. indiscriminatus. See Discriminate.]1. Undistinguishing; not making any ...

29328

indiscriminately
INDISCRIM'INATELY, adv. Without distinction; in confusion.

29329

indiscriminating
INDISCRIMIN'ATING, ppr. or a. Not making any distinction; as the victims of an indiscriminating ...

29330

indiscrimination
INDISCRIMINA'TION, n. Want of discrimination or distinction.

29331

indiscussed
INDISCUS'SED, a. Not discussed.

29332

indispensability
INDISPENSABIL'ITY, a. Indispensableness. [Little used.]

29333

indispensable
INDISPENS'ABLE, a. Not to be dispensed with; that cannot be omitted, remitted, or spared; ...

29334

indispensableness
INDISPENS'ABLENESS, n. The state or quality of being absolutely necessary.

29335

indispensably
INDISPENS'ABLY, adv. Necessarily; in a manner or degree that forbids dispensation, omission or ...

29336

indispersed
INDISPERS'ED, a. Not dispersed.

29337

indispose
INDISPO'SE, v.t. s as z.1. To disincline; to alienate the mind and render it averse or unfavorable ...

29338

indisposed
INDISPO'SED, pp. or a. Disinclined; averse; unwilling; unfavorable.1. Disordered; disqualified for ...

29339

indisposedness
INDISPO'SEDNESS, n. Disinclination; slight aversion; unwillingness; unfavorableness.1. Unfitness; ...

29340

indisposing
INDISPO'SING, ppr. Disinclining; rendering somewhat averse, unwilling or unfavorable.1. ...

29341

indisposition
INDISPOSI'TION, n.1. Disinclination; aversion; unwillingness; dislike; as the indisposition of men ...

29342

indisputable
INDIS'PUTABLE, a. Not to be disputed; incontrovertible; incontestable; too evident to admit of ...

29343

indisputableness
INDIS'PUTABLENESS, n. The state or quality of being indisputable, or too clear to admit of ...

29344

indisputably
INDIS'PUTABLY, adv. Without dispute; in a manner or degree not admitting of controversy; ...

29345

indisputed
INDISPU'TED, a. Not disputed or controverted; undisputed.

29346

indissolubility
INDISSOLUBIL'ITY, n.1. The quality of being indissoluble, or not capable of being dissolved, ...

29347

indissoluble
INDIS'SOLUBLE, a. [L. indissolubilis; in and dissolubilis, from dissolvo; dis and solvo,to ...

29348

indissolubleness
INDIS'SOLUBLENESS, The quality of being incapable of dissolution, separation or breach; ...

29349

indissolubly
INDIS'SOLUBLY, adv. In a manner resisting separation; firmly united beyond the power of separation; ...

29350

indissolvable
INDISSOLV'ABLE, a. [in and dissolvable.]1. That cannot be dissolved; not capable of being melted or ...

29351

indistancy
INDIS'TANCY, n. Want of distance or separation. [A bad word and not used.]

29352

indistinct
INDISTINCT', a. [L. indistinctus; in and distinctus. See Distinct.]1. Not distinct or ...

29353

indistinctible
INDISTINCT'IBLE, a. Undistinguishable. [Little used.]

29354

indistinction
INDISTINC'TION, n. Want of distinction; confusion; uncertainty. The indistinction of many of the ...

29355

indistinctly
INDISTINCT'LY, adv. Without distinction or separation; as when parts of a thing are indistinctly ...

29356

indistinctness
INDISTINCT'NESS, n. Want of distinction or discrimination; confusion; uncertainty.1. Obscurity; ...

29357

indistinguishable
INDISTIN'GUISHABLE, a. [in and distinguishable.]That cannot be distinguished or separated; ...

29358

indistinguishing
INDISTIN'GUISHING, a. Making no difference; as indistinguishing liberalities.

29359

indisturbance
INDISTURB'ANCE, n. [in and disturbance.]Freedom from disturbance; calmness; repose; tranquillity.

29360

inditch
INDITCH', v.t. To bury in a ditch. [Little used.]

29361

indite
INDI'TE, v.t. [L. indico, indictum; in and dico, to speak.]1. To compose; to write; to commit to ...

29362

indited
INDI'TED, pp. Composed; written; dictated.

29363

inditement
INDI'TEMENT, n. The act of inditing.

29364

inditing
INDI'TING, ppr. Committing to words in writing; dictating what shall be written.

29365

individable
INDIVI'DABLE, a. Not capable of division.

29366

individed
INDIVI'DED, a. Undivided.

29367

individual
INDIVID'UAL, . [L. individuus; in and dividuus, from divido, to divide.]1. Not divided, or not to ...

29368

individuality
INDIVIDUAL'ITY, n. Separate or distinct existence; a state of oneness.

29369

individualize
INDIVID'UALIZE, v.t. To distinguish; to select or mark as an individual, or to distinguish the ...

29370

individualized
INDIVID'UALIZED, pp. Distinguished as a particular person or thing.

29371

individualizing
INDIVID'UALIZING, ppr. Distinguishing as an individual.

29372

individually
INDIVID'UALLY, adv. Separately; by itself; to the exclusion of others. Thirty men will unitedly ...

29373

individuate
INDIVID'UATE, a. Undivided.INDIVID'UATE, v.t. To make single to distinguish from others of the ...

29374

individuation
INDIVIDUA'TION, a. The act of making single or the same, to the exclusion of others.1. The act of ...

29375

individuity
INDIVIDU'ITY, n. Separate existence. [Not used.]

29376

indivinity
INDIVIN'ITY, n. Want of divine power.

29377

indivisibility
INDIVISIBIL'ITY, n. [See Indivisible.]The state or property of being indivisible.

29378

indivisible
INDIVIS'IBLE, a. s as z. [in and divisible. See Divide.]That cannot be divided, separated or ...

29379

indivisibleness
INDIVIS'IBLENESS, n. Indivisibility, which see.

29380

indivisibly
INDIVIS'IBLY, adv. So as not to be capable of division.

29381

indocible
INDO'CIBLE, a. [in and docible; L. doceo, to teach.]1. Unteachable; not capable of being taught, ...

29382

indocility
INDOCIL'ITY, n. Unteachableness; dullness of intellect.1. Intractableness, as of a beast.

29383

indoctrinate
INDOC'TRINATE, v.t. [L. in and doctrina, learning.]To teach; to instruct in rudiments or ...

29384

indoctrinated
INDOC'TRINATED, pp. Taught; instructed in the principles of any science.

29385

indoctrinating
INDOC'TRINATING, ppr. Teaching; instructing in principles or rudiments.

29386

indoctrination
INDOCTRINA'TION, n. Instruction in the rudiments and principles of any science; information.

29387

indolence
IN'DOLENCE, n. [L. indolentia; in and doleo, to be pained.]1. Literally, freedom from pain.2. ...

29388

indolent
IN'DOLENT, a. Habitually idle or indisposed to labor; lazy; listless; sluggish; indulging in ease; ...

29389

indolently
IN'DOLENTLY, adv. In habitual idleness and ease; without action, activity or exertion; lazily. ...

29390

indomitable
INDOM'ITABLE, a. Untamable. [Not used.]

29391

indomptable
INDOMPT'ABLE, a. [L. domo, to tame.] Not to be subdued. [Unusual.]

29392

indorsable
INDORS'ABLE, a. That may be indorsed, assigned and made payable to order.

29393

indorse
INDORSE, v.t. indors'. [L. in and dorsum, the back.]1. To write on the back of a paper or written ...

29394

indorsee
INDORSEE', n. The person to whom a note or bill is indorsed, or assigned by indorsement.

29395

indorsement
INDORSEMENT, n. indors'ment. The act of writing on the back of a note, bill, or other written ...

29396

indorser
INDORS'ER, n. The person who indorses, or writes his name on the back of a note or bill of ...

29397

indraught
IN'DRAUGHT, n. in'draft. [in and draught.]An opening from the sea into the land; an inlet.

29398

indrench
INDRENCH', v.t. [in and drench.] To overwhelm with water; to drown; to drench.

29399

indubious
INDU'BIOUS, a. [L. indubius; in and dubius, doubtful.]1. Not dubious or doubtful; certain.2. Not ...

29400

indubitable
INDU'BITABLE, a. [L. indubitabilis; in and dubitabilis, from dubito, to doubt.] Not to be doubted; ...

29401

indubitableness
INDU'BITABLENESS, n. State of being indubitable.

29402

indubitably
INDU'BITABLY, adv. Undoubtedly; unquestionably; in a manner to remove all doubt.

29403

indubitate
INDU'BITATE, a. [L. indubitatus.]Not questioned; evident; certain. [Not used.]

29404

induce
INDU'CE, v.t. [L. induco; in and duco, to lead.]1. To lead, as by persuasion or argument; to ...

29405

induced
INDU'CED, pp. Persuaded by motives; influenced; produced; caused.

29406

inducement
INDU'CEMENT, n. Motive; any thing that leads the mind to will or to act; any argument, reason or ...

29407

inducer
INDU'CER, n. He or that which induces persuades or influences.

29408

inducible
INDU'CIBLE, a. That may be induced; that may be offered by induction.1. That may be caused.

29409

inducing
INDU'CING, ppr. Leading or moving by reason or arguments; persuading; producing; causing.

29410

induct
INDUCT', v.t. [L. inductus, from induco; in and duco, to lead.]Literally, to being in or introduce. ...

29411

inducted
INDUCT'ED, pp. Introduced into office with the usual formalities.

29412

inductile
INDUCT'ILE, a. [in and ductile.] Not capable of being drawn into threads, as a metal. [See ...

29413

inductility
INDUCTIL'ITY, n. The quality of being inductile.

29414

inducting
INDUCT'ING, ppr. Introducing into office with the usual formalities.

29415

induction
INDUC'TION, n. [L. inductio. See Induct.]1. Literally, a bringing in; introduction; entrance. ...

29416

inductive
INDUCT'IVE, a. Leading or drawing; with to. A brutish vice, Inductive mainly to the sin of Eve.1. ...

29417

inductively
INDUCT'IVELY, adv. By induction or inference.

29418

inductor
INDUCT'OR, n. The person who inducts another into an office or benefice.

29419

indue
INDUE, v.t. indu'. [L. induo. This word coincides nearly in signification with endow, that is, to ...

29420

indued
INDU'ED, pp. Clothed; invested.

29421

induement
INDUEMENT, n. indu'ment. A putting on; endowment.

29422

induing
INDU'ING, ppr. Investing; putting on.

29423

indulge
INDULGE, v.t. indulj'. [L. indulgeo; tolero.]1. To permit to be or to continue; to suffer; not to ...

29424

indulged
INDUL'GED, pp. Permitted to be and to operate without check or control; as love of pleasure ...

29425

indulgence
INDUL'GENCE

29426

indulgency
INDUL'GENCY, n. Free permission to the appetites,humor, desires, passions or will to act or ...

29427

indulgent
INDUL'GENT, a. Yielding to the wishes, desires,humor or appetites of those under one's care; ...

29428

indulgential
INDULGEN'TIAL, a. Relating to the indulgencies of the Romish church. [Not well authorized.]

29429

indulgently
INDUL'GENTLY, adv. With unrestrained enjoyment.1. Mildly; favorably; not severely.

29430

indulger
INDUL'GER, n. One who indulges.

29431

indulging
INDUL'GING, ppr. Permitting to enjoy or to practice; gratifying.

29432

indult
INDULT'

29433

indulto
INDULT'O, n. [L. indultus, indulged.]1. In the church of Rome, the power of presenting to ...

29434

indurate
IN'DURATE, v.i. [L. induro; in and duro, to harden.]To grow hard; to harden or become hard. Clay ...

29435

indurated
IN'DURATED, pp. Hardened; made obdurate.

29436

indurating
IN'DURATING, ppr. Hardening; rendering insensible.

29437

induration
INDURA'TION, n. The act of hardening, or process of growing hard.1. Hardness of heart; obduracy.

29438

industrious
INDUS'TRIOUS, a. [L. industrius, from industria.]1. Diligent in business or study; constantly, ...

29439

industriously
INDUS'TRIOUSLY, adv. With habitual diligence; with steady application of the powers of body or of ...

29440

industry
IN'DUSTRY, n. [L. industria.] Habitual diligence in any employment, either bodily or mental; ...

29441

indweller
INDWELL'ER, n. An inhabitant.

29442

indwelling
INDWELL'ING, a. [in and dwelling.] Dwelling within; remaining in the heart, even after it is ...

29443

inebriant
INE'BRIANT, a. [See Inebriate.] Intoxicating.INE'BRIANT, n. Any thing that intoxicates, as ...

29444

inebriate
INE'BRIATE, v.t. [L. inebrio, inebriatus; in and ebrio, to intoxicate; ebrius, soaked, drenched, ...

29445

inebriated
INE'BRIATED, pp. Intoxicated.

29446

inebriating
INE'BRIATING, ppr. Making drunk; intoxicating.

29447

inebriation
INEBRIA'TION, n. Drunkenness; intoxication.

29448

inebriety
INEBRI'ETY, n. Drunkenness; intoxication.

29449

inedited
INED'ITED, a. [in and edited.] Unpublished.

29450

ineffable
INEF'FABLE, a. [L. ineffabilis; in and effabilis, from effor, to speak.] Unspeakable; unutterable; ...

29451

ineffableness
INEF'FABLENESS, n. Unspeakableness; quality of being unutterable.

29452

ineffably
INEF'FABLY, adv. Unspeakably; in a manner not to be expressed in words.

29453

ineffective
INEFFECT'IVE, a. [in and effective.] Not effective; not producing any effect, or the effect ...

29454

ineffectual
INEFFECT'UAL, a. [in and effectual.] Not producing its proper effect, or not able to produce its ...

29455

ineffectually
INEFFECT'UALLY, adv. Without effect; in vain.

29456

ineffectualness
INEFFECT'UALNESS, n. Want of effect, or of power to produce it; inefficacy. James speaks of the ...

29457

ineffervescence
INEFFERVES'CENCE, n. [in and effervescence.] Want of effervescence; a state of not effervescing.

29458

ineffervescent
INEFFERVES'CENT, a. Not effervescing, or not susceptible of effervescence.

29459

ineffervescibility
INEFFERVESCIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of not effervescing, or not being susceptible of ...

29460

ineffervescible
INEFFERVES'CIBLE, a. Not capable of effervescence.

29461

inefficacious
INEFFICA'CIOUS, a. [L. inefficax; in and efficax, efficio, to effect; ex and facio, to make.]Not ...

29462

inefficaciously
INEFFICA'CIOUSLY, adv. Without efficacy or effect.

29463

inefficaciousness
INEFFICA'CIOUSNESS, n. Want of power to produce the effect, or want of effect.

29464

inefficacy
INEF'FICACY, n. [in and efficacy, L. efficacia.]1. Want of power to produce the desired or proper ...

29465

inefficiency
INEFFI'CIENCY, n. [in and efficiency.] Want of power or exertion of power to produce the effect; ...

29466

inefficient
INEFFI'CIENT, a. [in and efficient.] Not efficient; not producing the effect; inefficacious.1. ...

29467

inefficiently
INEFFI'CIENTLY, adv. Ineffectually; without effect.

29468

inelaborate
INELAB'ORATE, a. Not elaborate; not wrought with care.

29469

inelastic
INELAS'TIC, a. [in and elastic.]Not elastic; wanting elasticity; unelastic.

29470

inelasticity
INELASTIC'ITY, n. The absence of elasticity; the want of elastic power.

29471

inelegance
INEL'EGANCE

29472

inelegancy
INEL'EGANCY, n. [See Inelegant.] Want of elegance; want of beauty or polish in language, ...

29473

inelegant
INEL'EGANT, a. [L. inelegans; in and elegans, from the root of eligo, to choose.] Not elegant; ...

29474

inelegantly
INEL'EGANTLY, adv. In an inelegant or unbecoming manner; coarsely; roughly.

29475

ineligibility
INELIGIBIL'ITY, n. [from ineligible.] Incapacity of being elected to an office.1. State or ...

29476

ineligible
INEL'IGIBLE, a. [in and eligible.] Not capable of being elected to an office.1. Not worthy to be ...

29477

ineloquent
INEL'OQUENT, a. [in and eloquent.] Not eloquent; not speaking with fluency, propriety, grace and ...

29478

ineloquently
INEL'OQUENTLY, adv. Without eloquence.

29479

ineluctable
INELUCT'ABLE, a. [L. ineluctabilis.] Not to be resisted by struggling; not to be overcome. [Not ...

29480

ineludible
INELU'DIBLE, a. [in and eludible.] That cannot be eluded or defeated.

29481

inenarrable
INENAR'RABLE, a. [L. inenarrabilis.] That cannot be narrated or told.

29482

inept
INEPT', a. [L. ineptus; in and aptus, fit, apt.]1. Not apt or fit; unfit; unsuitable.2. Improper; ...

29483

ineptitude
INEPT'ITUDE, n. Unfitness; inaptitude; unsuitableness; as an ineptitude to motion.

29484

ineptly
INEPT'LY, adv. Unfitly; unsuitably; foolishly.

29485

ineptness
INEPT'NESS, n. Unfitness.

29486

inequal
INE'QUAL, a. [in and equal.] Unequal; uneven; various.

29487

inequality
INEQUAL'ITY, n. [L. inoequalitas; in and oequalis, equal.]1. Difference or want of equality in ...

29488

inequidistant
INEQUIDIS'TANT, a. Not being equally distant.

29489

inequilateral
INEQUILAT'ERAL, a. Having unequal sides.

29490

inequitable
INEQ'UITABLE, a. [in and equitable.] Not equitable; not just.

29491

inequivalve
INE'QUIVALVE

29492

inequivalvular
INEQUIVAL'VULAR, a. Having unequal valves.

29493

inerm
INERM'

29494

inermous
INERM'OUS, a. [L. inermis; in and arma, arms.]Unarmed; destitute of prickles or thorns, as a leaf; ...

29495

inerrability
INERRABIL'ITY, n. [from inerrable.] Exemption from error or from the possibility of erring; ...

29496

inerrable
INER'RABLE, a. [in and err.] That cannot err; exempt from error or mistake; infallible.

29497

inerrableness
INER'RABLENESS, n. Exemption from error; inerrability.

29498

inerrably
INER'RABLY, adv. With security from error; infallibly.

29499

inerratic
INERRAT'IC, a. [in and erratic.] Not erratic or wandering; fixed.

29500

inerringly
INER'RINGLY, adv. Without error, mistake or deviation.

29501

inert
INERT', a. [L. iners; in and ars, art. The English sense is drawn not from art, but from the ...

29502

inertion
INER'TION, n. Want of activity; want of action or exertion. These vicissitudes of exertion and ...

29503

inertitude
INERT'ITUDE, n. The state of being inert, or a tendency to remain quiescent till impelled by ...

29504

inertly
INERT'LY, adv. Without activity; sluggishly.

29505

inertness
INERT'NESS, n. The state or quality of being inert, or destitute of the power to move per se; that ...

29506

inescate
INES'CATE, v.t. [L. inesco.] To bait; to lay a bait for.

29507

inescation
INESCA'TION, n. The act of baiting.

29508

inestimable
INES'TIMABLE, a. [L. inoestimabilis. See Estimate.]1. That cannot be estimated or computed; as an ...

29509

inestimably
INES'TIMABLY, adv. In a manner not to be estimated or rated.

29510

inevidence
INEV'IDENCE, n. Want of evidence; obscurity.

29511

inevident
INEV'IDENT, a. [in and evident.]Not evident; not clear or obvious; obscure.

29512

inevitability
INEVITABIL'ITY, n. [from inevitable.]to be avoided; certainty to happen.

29513

inevitable
INEV'ITABLE, a. [L. inevitabilis; in and evitabilis, from evito, to shun.] Not to be avoided; that ...

29514

inevitableness
INEV'ITABLENESS, n. The state of being unavoidable.

29515

inevitably
INEV'ITABLY, adv. Without possibility of escape or evasion; unavoidably; certainly. How inevitably ...

29516

inexact
INEXACT', a. [in and exact.] Not exact; not precisely correct or true.

29517

inexactness
INEXACT'NESS, n. Incorrectness; want of precision.

29518

inexcitable
INEXCI'TABLE, a. [in and excitable.] Not susceptible of excitement; dull; lifeless; torpid.

29519

inexcusable
INEXCU'SABLE, a. s as z. [L. inexcusabilis; in and excusabilis, excuso. See Excuse.] Not to be ...

29520

inexcusableness
INEXCU'SABLENESS, n. The quality of not admitting of excuse or justification; enormity beyond ...

29521

inexcusably
INEXCU'SABLY, adv. With a degree of guilt or folly beyond excuse or justification.

29522

inexecution
INEXECU'TION, n. Neglect of execution; non-performance; as the inexecution of a treaty.

29523

inexertion
INEXER'TION, n. [in and exertion.] Want of exertion; want of effort; defect of action.

29524

inexhalable
INEXHA'LABLE, a. [in and exhalable, L. exhalo.]Not to be exhaled or evaporated; not evaporable.

29525

inexhausted
INEXHAUST'ED, a. [in and exhausted.]1. Not exhausted; not emptied; unexhausted.2. Not spent; not ...

29526

inexhaustible
INEXHAUST'IBLE, a. [in and exhaustible.]1. That cannot be exhausted or emptied; unfailing; as an ...

29527

inexhaustibleness
INEXHAUST'IBLENESS, n. The state of being inexhaustible.

29528

inexhaustive
INEXHAUST'IVE, a. Not to be exhausted.

29529

inexistence
INEXIST'ENCE, n. [in and existence.]1. Want of being or existence.2. Inherence.

29530

inexistent
INEXIST'ENT, a. [in and existent.] Not having being; not existing.1. Existing in something else.

29531

inexorability
INEXORABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being inexorable or unyielding to entreaty.

29532

inexorable
INEX'ORABLE, a. [L. inexorabilis; in and exorabilis, from exoro, to entreat; ex and oro, to ...

29533

inexorably
INEX'ORABLY, adv. So as to be immovable by intreaty.

29534

inexpectation
INEXPECTA'TION, n. State of having no expectation.

29535

inexpected
INEXPECT'ED, a. Not expected. [Not in use.]

29536

inexpedience
INEXPE'DIENCE

29537

inexpediency
INEXPE'DIENCY, n. [in and expedience.] Want of fitness; impropriety; unsuitableness to the ...

29538

inexpedient
INEXPE'DIENT, a. [in and expedient.] Not expedient; not tending to promote a purpose; not tending ...

29539

inexperience
INEXPE'RIENCE, n. [in and experience.] Want of experience or experimental knowledge; as the ...

29540

inexperienced
INEXPE'RIENCED, a. Not having experience; unskilled.

29541

inexpert
INEXPERT', a. [in and expert.] Not expert; not skilled; destitute of knowledge or dexterity ...

29542

inexpiably
INEX'PIABLY, adv. To a degree that admits of no atonement.

29543

inexpialbe
INEX'PIALBE, a. [L. inexpiabilis. See Expiate.]1. That admits of no atonement or satisfaction; as ...

29544

inexplainable
INEXPLA'INABLE, a. That cannot be explained; inexplicable. [The latter word is generally used.]

29545

inexpleably
INEXPLE'ABLY, adv. Insatiably. [Not used.]

29546

inexplicable
INEX'PLICABLE, a. [L. inexplicabilis; in and explico, to unfold.]That cannot be explained or ...

29547

inexplicably
INEX'PLICABLY, adv. In a manner not to be explained.

29548

inexplorable
INEXPLO'RABLE, a. [in and explorable, from explore.]That cannot be explored, searched or ...

29549

inexposure
INEXPO'SURE, n. [in and exposure.]A state of not being exposed.

29550

inexpressible
INEXPRESS'IBLE, a. [in and expressible, from express.]Not to be expressed in words; not to be ...

29551

inexpressibly
INEXPRESS'IBLY, adv. In a manner or degree not to be told or expressed in words; unspeakably; ...

29552

inexpressive
INEXPRESS'IVE, a. Not tending to express; not expressing; inexpressible.

29553

inexpugnable
INEXPUG'NABLE, a. [L. inexpugnabilis; in and expugno; ex and pugno, to fight.] Not to be subdued ...

29554

inexsuperable
INEXSU'PERABLE, a. [L. inexsuperabilis.]Not to be passed over or surmounted.

29555

inextended
INEXTEND'ED, a. Having no extension.

29556

inextension
INEXTEN'SION, n. [in and extension.] Want of extension; unextended state.

29557

inexterminable
INEXTERM'INABLE, a. [in and exterminable.] That cannot be exterminated.

29558

inextinct
INEXTINCT', a. Not quenched; not extinct.

29559

inextinguishable
INEXTIN'GUISHABLE, a. [in and extinguishable.] That cannot be extinguished; unquenchable; as ...

29560

inextirpable
INEXTIR'PABLE, a. That cannot be extirpated.

29561

inextricable
INEX'TRICABLE, a. [L. inextricabilis. See Extricate.]1. Not to be disentangled; not to be freed ...

29562

inextricableness
INEX'TRICABLENESS, n. The state of being inextricable.

29563

inextricably
INEX'TRICABLY, adv. To a degree of perplexity not to be disentangled.

29564

ineye
INEYE, v.t. To inoculate; as a tree or a bud.

29565

infabricated
INFAB'RICATED, a. Unfabricated; unwrought. [Not used.]

29566

infallibility
INFALLIBIL'ITY

29567

infallible
INFAL'LIBLE, a. [L. fallo.]1. Not fallible; not capable of erring; entirely exempt from liability ...

29568

infallibleness
INFAL'LIBLENESS, n. [from infallible.] The quality of being incapable of error or mistake; entire ...

29569

infallibly
INFAL'LIBLY, adv. Without a possibility of erring or mistaking.1. Certainly; without a ...

29570

infame
INFA'ME, v.t. To defame. [Not used.]

29571

infamous
IN'FAMOUS, a. [L. infamis; infamo, to defame; in and fama, fame.]1. Of ill report, emphatically; ...

29572

infamously
IN'FAMOUSLY, adv. In a manner or degree to render infamous; scandalously; disgracefully; ...

29573

infamousness
IN'FAMOUSNESS

29574

infamy
IN'FAMY, n. [L. infamia; in and fama, report.]1. Total loss of reputation; public disgrace. Avoid ...

29575

infancy
IN'FANCY, n. [L. infantia. See Infant.]1. The first part of life, beginning at the birth. In ...

29576

infandous
INFAND'OUS, a. [L. infandus.] Too odious to be expressed. [Not in use.]

29577

infangthef
INFANG'THEF, n. In English law, the privilege granted to lords to judge thieves taken on their ...

29578

infant
IN'FANT, n. [L. infans; in and fans, speaking, fari, to speak.]1. A child in the first period of ...

29579

infanta
INFANT'A, n. In Spain and Portugal, any princes of the royal blood, except the eldest daughter when ...

29580