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Monday - August 29, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comBROWSING [V]

Please click on the word of the partial definition to see the complete definition

ID Word Definition

60222

v
V is the twenty second letter of the English Alphabet, and a labial articulation, formed by the ...

60223

vacancy
VA'CANCY, n. [L. vacans, from vaco, to be empty; Heb. to empty.]1. Empty space; vacuity. [In ...

60224

vacant
VA'CANT, a. [L. vacans.]1. Empty; not filled; void of every substance except air; as a vacant ...

60225

vacate
VA'CATE, v.t.1. To annul; to made void; to make of no authority or validity; as, to vacate a ...

60226

vacated
VA'CATED, pp. Annulled; made void; made vacant.

60227

vacating
VA'CATING, ppr. Making void; making vacant.

60228

vacation
VACA'TION, n. [L. vacatio.]1. The act of making void, vacant, or of no validity; as the vacation ...

60229

vaccary
VAC'CARY, n. [L. vacca, a cow.] An old word signifying a cow house, dairy house, or a cow ...

60230

vaccinate
VAC'CINATE, v.t. [L. vacca, a cow.] To inoculate with the cow-pox, or a virus originally taken ...

60231

vaccinated
VAC'CINATED, pp. Inoculated with the cow-pox.

60232

vaccinating
VAC'CINATING, ppr. Inoculating with the cow-pox.

60233

vaccination
VACCINA'TION, n. The act, art or practice of inoculating persons with the cow-pox.

60234

vaccine
VAC'CINE, a. [L. vaccinus, from vacca, a cow.]Pertaining to cows; originating with or derived from ...

60235

vacillancy
VAC'ILLANCY, n. [L. vacillans, from vacillo, to waver, Eng. to waggle, from the root of wag, ...

60236

vacillant
VAC'ILLANT, a. [supra.] Wavering; fluctuating; unsteady.

60237

vacillate
VAC'ILLATE, v.i. [L. vacillo; Eng. to waggle, a diminutive of wag. See Wag.]1. To waver; to move ...

60238

vacillating
VAC'ILLATING, ppr. 1. Wavering; reeling; fluctuating.2. a. Unsteady; inclined to fluctuate.

60239

vacillation
VACILLA'TION, n. [L. vacillatio.]1. A wavering; a moving one way and the other; a reeling or ...

60240

vacuation
VACUA'TION, n. [L. vacuo.] The act of emptying. [Little used.] [See Evacuation.]

60241

vacuist
VAC'UIST, n. [from vacuum.] One who holds to the doctrine of a vacuum in nature; opposed to a ...

60242

vacuity
VACU'ITY, n. [L. vacuitas, from vacuus.]1. Emptiness; a state of being unfilled.Hunger is such a ...

60243

vacuous
VAC'UOUS, a. Empty; unfilled; void.

60244

vacuousness
VAC'UOUSNESS, n. The state of being empty.

60245

vacuum
VAC'UUM, n. [L.] Space empty or devoid of all matter or body. Whether there is such a thing as ...

60246

vade
VADE, v.i. [L. vado.] To vanish; to pass away. [Not in use.]

60247

vade-mecum
VADE-ME'CUM, n. [L. go with me.] A book or other thing that a person carries with him as a ...

60248

vagabond
VAG'ABOND, a. [L. vagabundus, from vagor, to wander; from the root of wag.]1. Wandering; moving ...

60249

vagabondry
VAG'ABONDRY, n. A state of wandering in idleness.

60250

vagary
VAGA'RY, n. [L. vagus, wandering.] A wandering of the thoughts; a wild freak; a whim; a whimsical ...

60251

vagient
VA'GIENT, a. [L. vagiens.] Crying like a child. [Not in use.]

60252

vaginal
VAG'INAL, a. [L. vagina, a sheath. See Wain.]Pertaining to a sheath, or resembling a sheath; as a ...

60253

vaginant
VAG'INANT, a. [L. vagina.] In botany, sheathing; as a vaginant leaf, one investing the stem or ...

60254

vaginated
VAG'INATED, a. In botany, sheathed; invested by the tubular base of the leaf; as a stem.

60255

vaginopennous
VAGINOPEN'NOUS, a. [L. vagina and penna.]Having the wings covered with a hard case or sheath, as ...

60256

vagous
VA'GOUS, a. [L. vagus.] Wandering; unsettled. [Little used.]

60257

vagrancy
VA'GRANCY, n. [from vagrant.] A state of wandering without a settled home. Vagrancy in idle ...

60258

vagrant
VA'GRANT, a. [L. vagor.]1. Wandering from place to place without any settled habitation; as a ...

60259

vague
VAGUE, a. vag. [L. vagus, wandering.]1. Wandering; vagrant; vagabond; as vague villains. [In ...

60260

vail
VAIL, n. [L. velum, from velo, to cover, to spread over. It is correctly written vail for e, in ...

60261

vailed
VA'ILED, pp. Covered; concealed.

60262

vailer
VA'ILER, n. One who yields from respect. Obs.

60263

vailing
VA'ILING, ppr. Covering; hiding from the sight.

60264

vain
VAIN, a. [L. vanus; Eng. wan, wane, want.]1. Empty; worthless; having no substance, value or ...

60265

vainglorious
VAINGLO'RIOUS, a. [vain and glorious.]1. Vain to excess of one's own achievements; elated beyond ...

60266

vaingloriously
VAINGLO'RIOUSLY, adv. With empty pride.

60267

vainglory
VAINGLO'RY, n. [vain and glory.] Exclusive vanity excited by one's own performances; empty pride; ...

60268

vainly
VA'INLY, adv.1. Without effect; to no purpose; ineffectually; in vain.In weak complaints you ...

60269

vainness
VA'INNESS, n. 1. The state of being vain; inefficacy; ineffectualness; as the vainness of ...

60270

vair
VAIR, n. In heraldry, a kind of fur or doubling, consisting of divers little picees, argent and ...

60271

vairy
VA'IRY, a. In heraldry, charged with vair; variegated with argent and azure colors, when the term ...

60272

vaivode
VA'IVODE, n. A prince of the Dacian provinces; sometimes written waiwode, for this is the ...

60273

valance
VAL'ANCE, n. The fringes of drapery hanging round the tester and head of a bed.VAL'ANCE, v.t. To ...

60274

vale
VALE, n. [L. vallis; Eng. to fall.]1. A tract of low ground or of land between hills; a valley. ...

60275

valediction
VALEDIC'TION, n. [L. valedico; vale, farewell, and dico, to say.] A farewell; a bidding farewell.

60276

valedictory
VALEDIC'TORY, a. Bidding farewell; as a valedictory oration.VALEDIC'TORY, n. An oration or ...

60277

valentine
VAL'ENTINE, n.1. A sweetheart or choice made on Valentine's day.2. A letter sent by one young ...

60278

valerian
VALE'RIAN, n. A plant of the genus Valleriana, of many species.

60279

valet
VAL'ET, n.1. A waiting servant; a servant who attends on a gentleman's person.2. In the manege, a ...

60280

valetudinarian
VALETUDINA'RIAN,

60281

valetudinary
VALETU'DINARY, a. [L. valetudinarius, from valetudo, from valeo, to be well.]Sickly; weak; infirm; ...

60282

valiance
VAL'IANCE, n. val'yance. Bravery; valor. [Not in use.]

60283

valiant
VALIANT, a. val'yant. [L. valeo, to be strong.]1. Primarily, strong; vigorous in body; as a ...

60284

valiantly
VAL'IANTLY, adv.1. Stoutly; vigorously; with personal strength.2. Courageously; bravely; ...

60285

valiantness
VAL'IANTNESS, n. 1. Stoutness; strength.2. Most generally, valor; bravery; intrepidity in ...

60286

valid
VAL'ID, a. [L. validus, from valeo, to be strong. The primary sense of the root is to strain or ...

60287

validity
VALID'ITY, n.1. Strength or force to convince; justness; soundness; as the validity of an argument ...

60288

validly
VAL'IDLY, adv. In a valid manner; in such a manner or degree as to make firm or to convince.

60289

validness
VAL'IDNESS, n. Validity, which see.

60290

valise
VALISE, n. A horseman's case or portmanteau.

60291

vallancy
VALLAN'CY, n. [from valance.] A large wig that shades the face.

60292

vallation
VALLA'TION, n. [L. vallatus, from vallum, a wall.] A rampart or entrenchment.

60293

valley
VAL'LEY, n. plu. valleys. [L. vallis. See Vale.]1. A hollow or low tract of land between hills ...

60294

vallum
VAL'LUM, n. [L.] A trench or wall.

60295

valor
VAL'OR, n. [L. valor, valeo, to be strong, to be worth.]Strength of mind in regard to danger; that ...

60296

valorous
VAL'OROUS, a. Brave; courageous; stout; intrepid; as a valorous knight.

60297

valorously
VAL'OROUSLY, adv. In a brave manner; heroically.

60298

valuable
VAL'UABLE, a. 1. Having value or worth; having some good qualities which are useful and esteemed; ...

60299

valuation
VALUA'TION, n. [from value.] 1. The act of estimating the value or worth; the act of setting a ...

60300

valuator
VALUA'TOR, n. One who sets a value; an apprizer.

60301

value
VALUE, n. val'u. [L. valor, from valeo, to be worth.]1. Worth; that property or those properties ...

60302

valued
VAL'UED, pp. Estimated at a certain rate; apprized; esteemed.

60303

valueless
VAL'UELESS, a. Being of no value; having no worth.

60304

valuer
VAL'UER, n. One who values; an apprizer; one who holds in esteem.

60305

valuing
VAL'UING, ppr. Setting a price on; estimating the worth of; esteeming.

60306

valvate
VALV'ATE, a. [See Valve.] Having or resembling a valve.

60307

valve
VALVE, n. valv. [L. valvae, folding doors; coinciding with valvo.]1. A folding door.Swift ...

60308

valved
VALV'ED, a. Having valves; composed of valves.

60309

valvlet
VALV'LET,

60310

valvular
VALV'ULAR, a. Containing valves.

60311

valvule
VALV'ULE, n. A little valve; one of the pieces which compose the outer covering of a pericarp.

60312

vamp
VAMP, n. The upper leather of a shoe.VAMP, v.t. To piece an old thing with a new part; to ...

60313

vamped
VAMP'ED, pp. Pieced; repaired.

60314

vamper
VAMP'ER, n. One who pieces an old thing with something new.

60315

vamping
VAMP'ING, ppr. Piecing with something new.

60316

vampire
VAMP'IRE, n.1. In mythology, an imaginary demon, which was fabled to suck the blood of persons ...

60317

van
VAN, n. [Eng. advance, advantage. It is from the root of L. venio, the primary sense of which is ...

60318

van-couriers
VAN-COURIERS, n. In armies, light armed soldiers sent before armies to beat the road upon the ...

60319

van-foss
VAN-FOSS, n. A ditch on the outside of the counterscarp.

60320

vandal
VAN'DAL, n. A ferocious, cruel person.

60321

vandalic
VANDAL'IC, a. Pertaining to the Vandals; designating the south shore of the Baltic where once ...

60322

vandalism
VAN'DALISM, n. Ferocious cruelty; indiscriminate destruction of lives and property.

60323

vandyke
VANDY'KE, n. A small round handkerchief with a collar for the neck, worn by females.

60324

vane
VANE, n. A plate placed on a spindle, at the top of a spire, for the purpose of showing by its ...

60325

vang
VANG, n.1. The vangs of a ship are a sort of braces to steady the mizen-gaff.2. The thin ...

60326

vanilla
VANIL'LA, n. A genus of plants which have an unctuous aromatic taste, and a fragrant smell; ...

60327

vanish
VAN'ISH, v.i. [L. vanesco, vanus, vain, or its root; Eng. to wane. The primary sense is to ...

60328

vanished
VAN'ISHED, a. Having no perceptible existence.

60329

vanishing
VAN'ISHING, ppr. Disappearing; passing from the sight or possession; departing forever.

60330

vanity
VAN'ITY, n. [L. vanitas, from vanus, vain.]1. Emptiness; want of substance to satisfy desire; ...

60331

vanquish
VAN'QUISH, v.t. [L. vinco, vincio, to bind.]1. To conquer; to overcome; to subdue in battle; as ...

60332

vanquishable
VAN'QUISHABLE, a. That may be conquered.

60333

vanquished
VAN'QUISHED, pp. Overcome in battle; subdued; defeated.

60334

vanquisher
VAN'QUISHER, n. A conqueror; a victor.

60335

vanquishing
VAN'QUISHING, ppr. Conquering; subduing; defeating; refuting.

60336

vansire
VAN'SIRE, n. In zoology, a species of weasel with short ears, found in Madagascar.

60337

vant
V'ANT, v.i. To boast. [This is the more correct orthography. See Vaunt.]

60338

vantage
V'ANTAGE, n. [L. venio. See Advantage and Van.]

60339

vantage-ground
V'ANTAGE-GROUND, n. Superiority of state or place; the place or condition which gives one an ...

60340

vantbrass
VANT'BRASS, n. Armor for the arm. Obs.

60341

vaorate
VA'ORATE, v.i. To emit vapor. [See Evaporate.]

60342

vapid
VAP'ID, a. [L. vapidus. The radical verb is not in the Latin, but the sense must be to pass or ...

60343

vapidness
VAP'IDNESS, n. 1. The state of having lost its life or spirit; deadness; flatness; as the ...

60344

vapor
VA'POR, n. [L. vapor.]1. In a general sense, an invisible elastic fluid, rendered aeriform by ...

60345

vapor-bath
VA'POR-BATH, n. [vapor and bath.] 1. The application of vapor to the body in a close place.2. ...

60346

vaporability
VAPORABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being capable of vaporization.

60347

vaporable
VAP'ORABLE, a. Capable of being converted into vapor by the agency of caloric.

60348

vaporation
VAPORA'TION, n. [L. vaporatio.] The act or process of converting into vapor, or of passing off in ...

60349

vapored
VA'PORED, a.1. Moist; wet with vapors.2. Splenetic; peevish.

60350

vaporer
VA'PORER, n. A boaster; one who makes a vaunting display of his prowess or worth; a braggart.

60351

vaporific
VAPORIF'IC, a. [L. vapor and facio, to make.]Forming into vapor; converting into steam, or ...

60352

vaporing
VA'PORING, ppr. Boasting; vaunting ostentatiously and vainly.

60353

vaporingly
VA'PORINGLY, adv. In a boasting manner.

60354

vaporish
VA'PORISH, a.1. Full of vapors.2. Hypochondriac; splenetic; affected by hysterics.

60355

vaporization
VAPORIZA'TION, n. The artificial formation of vapor.

60356

vaporize
VAP'ORIZE, v.t. To convert into vapor by the application of heat or artificial means.VAP'ORIZE, ...

60357

vaporized
VAP'ORIZED, pp. Expelled in vapor.

60358

vaporizing
VAP'ORIZING, ppr. Converting into vapor.

60359

vaporous
VA'POROUS, a. 1. Full of vapors or exhalations; as the vaporous air of valleys.2. Vain; unreal; ...

60360

vaporousness
VA'POROUSNESS, n. State of being full of vapors.

60361

vapory
VA'PORY, a. 1. Vaporous; full of vapors.2. Hypochondriac; splenetic; peevish.

60362

vapulation
VAPULA'TION, n. [L. vapulo.] The act of beating or shipping. [Not in use.]

60363

vare
VARE, n. A wand or staff of justice. [Not in use.]

60364

varec
VAR'EC, n. The French name for kelp or incinerated sea weed; wrack.

60365

vari
VA'RI, n. In zoology, a species of quadruped, the maucauco or Lemur catta of Linne, having its ...

60366

variable
VA'RIABLE, a. 1. That may vary or alter; capable of alteration in any manner; changeable; as ...

60367

variableness
VA'RIABLENESS, n.1. Susceptibility of change; liableness or aptness to alter; changeableness; as ...

60368

variably
VA'RIABLY, adv. Changeably; with alteration; in an inconstant or fickle manner.

60369

variance
VA'RIANCE, n. [See Vary.] 1. In law, an alteration of something formerly laid in a writ; or a ...

60370

variate
VA'RIATE, v.t. 1. To alter; to make different.2. To vary. [A bad word.]

60371

variation
VARIA'TION, n. [L. variatio. See Vary.]1. Alteration; a partial change in the form, position, ...

60372

varicocele
VAR'ICOCELE, n. [L. varix, a dilated vein, and Gr. a tumor.]In surgery, a varicous enlargement of ...

60373

varicose
VAR'ICOSE,

60374

varicous
VAR'ICOUS, a. [L. varicosus, having enlarged veins.]1. Preternaturally enlarged, or permanently ...

60375

varied
VA'RIED, pp. of vary. Altered; partially changed; changed.

60376

variegate
VA'RIEGATE, v.t. [L. vario, varius. See Vary.]To diversify in external appearance; to mark with ...

60377

variegated
VA'RIEGATED, pp. Diversified in colors or external appearance. Variegated leaves, in botany, are ...

60378

variegating
VA'RIEGATING, ppr. Diversifying with colors.

60379

variegation
VARIEGA'TION, n. The act of diversifying, or state of being diversified by different colors; ...

60380

variety
VARI'ETY, n. [L. varietas, from vario, to vary.]1. Intermixture of different things, or of things ...

60381

variolite
VA'RIOLITE, n. [L. varius and Gr. stone.]In mineralogy, a kind of porphyritic rock, in which the ...

60382

varioloid
VA'RIOLOID, n. [L. variolae and Gr. form.The name recently given to a disease resembling the small ...

60383

variolous
VA'RIOLOUS, a. [L. variolae, from vario, to diversify.] Pertaining to or designating the small ...

60384

various
VA'RIOUS, a. [L. varius, See Vary.]1. different; several; manifold; as men of various names and ...

60385

variously
VA'RIOUSLY, adv. In different ways; with change; with diversity; as objects variously represented; ...

60386

varix
VA'RIX, n. [L.] 1. An uneven swelling of a dilated vein.2. In beasts, a sort of puffy ...

60387

varlet
V'ARLET, n. [See Valet.]1. Anciently, a servant or footman.2. A scoundrel; a rascal; as an ...

60388

varletry
V'ARLETRY, n. The rabble; the crowd. [Not in use.]

60389

varnish
V'ARNISH, n. [Low L. vernix.]1. A thick, viscid, glossy liquid, laid on work by painters and ...

60390

varnish-tree
V'ARNISH-TREE, n. The Rhus vernix, poison ash, or poison oak.

60391

varnished
V'ARNISHED, pp.1. Covered with varnish; made glossy.2. Rendered fair in external appearance.

60392

varnisher
V'ARNISHER, n. 1. One who varnishes, or whose occupation is to varnish.2. One who disguises or ...

60393

varnishing
V'ARNISHING, ppr. Laying on varnish; giving a fair external appearance.

60394

varvels
V'ARVELS,

60395

vary
VA'RY, v.t. [L. vario, verto.]1. To alter in form, appearance, substance or position; to make ...

60396

varying
VA'RYING, ppr. Altering; changing; deviating.

60397

vascular
VAS'CULAR, a. [L. vasculum, a vessel, from vas, id.]1. Pertaining to the vessels of animal or ...

60398

vascularity
VASCULAR'ITY, n. The state of being vascular.

60399

vasculiferous
VASCULIF'EROUS, a. [L. vasculum and fero, to bear.]Vasculiferous plants are such as have seed ...

60400

vase
VASE, n. [L. vas, vasa, a vessel.]1. A vessel for domestic use, or for use in temples; as a vase ...

60401

vassal
VAS'SAL, n. 1. A feudatory; a tenant; one who holds land of a superior, and who vows fidelity and ...

60402

vassalage
VAS'SALAGE,1. The state of being a vassal or feudatory.2. Political servitude; dependence; ...

60403

vassaled
VAS'SALED, pp. or a. Enslaved; subjected to absolute power; as a vassaled land.

60404

vast
V'AST, a. [L. vastus. The primary sense of the root must be a part or spread, as this is ...

60405

vastation
VASTA'TION, n. [L. vastatio, from vasto, to waste.]A laying waste; waste; depopulation. ...

60406

vastidity
VASTID'ITY, n. Vastness; immensity. [Not English.]

60407

vastly
V'ASTLY, adv. Very greatly; to a great extent or degree; as a space vastly extended. Men differ ...

60408

vastness
V'ASTNESS, n.1. Great extent; immensity; as the vastness of the ocean or of space.2. Immense bulk ...

60409

vasty
V'ASTY, a. Being of great extent; very spacious.I can call spirits from the vasty deep. [Little ...

60410

vat
VAT, n. 1. A large vessel or cistern for holding liquors in an immature state; as vats for ...

60411

vatican
VAT'ICAN, n. In Rome, the celebrated church of St. Peter; and also, a magnificent palace of the ...

60412

vaticide
VAT'ICIDE, n. [L. vates, a prophet, and caedo, to kill.]The murderer of a prophet.

60413

vaticinal
VATIC'INAL, a. [L. vaticinor, to prophesy.] Containing prophecy.

60414

vaticinate
VATIC'INATE, v.i. [L. vaticinor, from vates, a prophet.]To prophesy; to foretell; to practice ...

60415

vaticination
VATICINA'TION, n. Prediction; prophecy.

60416

vault
VAULT, n. [L. vultus; a derivative of L. volvo, volutus.]1. A continued arch, or an arched roof. ...

60417

vaultage
VAULT'AGE, n. Vaulted work; an arched cellar. [Not in use.]

60418

vaulted
VAULT'ED, pp. 1. Arched; concave; as a vaulted roof.2. Covered with an arch or vault.3. a. In ...

60419

vaulter
VAULT'ER, n. One that vaults; a leaper; a tumbler.

60420

vaulting
VAULT'ING, ppr.1. Arching; covering with an arch.2. Leaping; tumbling; exhibiting feats of ...

60421

vaulty
VAULT'Y, a. Arched; concave. [Not in use.]

60422

vaunt
V'AUNT, v.i. [L. vanus. This ought to be written vant.]To boast; to make a vain display of one's ...

60423

vaunt-courier
VAUNT-COURIER, n. A precursor.

60424

vaunt-mure
V'AUNT-MURE, n. A false wall; a work raised in front of the main wall.

60425

vaunted
V'AUNTED, pp. Vainly boasted of or displayed.

60426

vaunter
V'AUNTER, n. A vain conceited boaster; a braggart; a man given to vain ostentation.

60427

vauntful
V'AUNTFUL, a. Boastful; vainly ostentatious.

60428

vaunting
V'AUNTING, ppr. Vainly boasting; ostentatiously setting forth what one is or has.

60429

vauntingly
V'AUNTINGLY, adv. Boastfully; with vain ostentation.

60430

vavasor
VAV'ASOR, n. [This word in old books is variously written, valvasor, vavasour, valvasour. It is ...

60431

vavasory
VAV'ASORY, n. The quality or tenure of the fee held by a vavasor.

60432

vaward
VA'WARD, n. [van and ward.] The fore part. Obs.

60433

veal
VEAL, n. [L. vitellus.]The flesh of a calf killed for the table.

60434

vection
VEC'TION, n. [L. vectio, from veho, to carry.]The act of carrying, or state of being carried. ...

60435

vectitation
VECTITA'TION, n. [L. vectito.] A carrying. [Not in use.]

60436

vector
VEC'TOR, n. [L. from veho, to carry.] In astronomy, a line supposed to be drawn from any planet ...

60437

vecture
VEC'TURE, n. [L. vectura, from veho, supra.]A carrying; carriage; conveyance by carrying. [Little ...

60438

veda
VEDA, n. vedaw'. The name of the collective body of the Hindoo sacred writings. These are ...

60439

vedet
VEDET',

60440

vedette
VEDETTE, n. [L. video, to see.] a sentinel on horseback.

60441

veer
VEER, v.i. [L. vario and verto. See Ware.]To turn; to change direction; as, the wind veers to the ...

60442

veerable
VEE'RABLE, a. Changeable; shifting. [Not in use.]

60443

veered
VEE'RED, pp. turned; changed in direction; let out.

60444

veering
VEE'RING, ppr. turning; letting out to a greater length.

60445

vegetability
VEGETABIL'ITY, n. [from vegetable.] Vegetable nature; the quality of growth without sensation.

60446

vegetable
VEG'ETABLE, n. [L. vigeo, to grow.]1. A plant; an organized body destitute of sense and voluntary ...

60447

vegetate
VEG'ETATE, v.i. [L. vegeto, vigeo, to flourish.]To sprout; to germinate; to grow; as plants; to ...

60448

vegetating
VEG'ETATING, ppr. germinating; sprouting; growing; as plants.

60449

vegetation
VEGETA'TION, n. 1. The process of growing; as plants, by means of nourishment derived from the ...

60450

vegetative
VEG'ETATIVE, a.1. Growing, or having the power of growing, as plants.2. Having the power to ...

60451

vegetativeness
VEG'ETATIVENESS, n. the quality of producing growth.

60452

vegete
VEGE'TE, a. [L. vegetus.] Vigorous; active. [Little used.]

60453

vegetive
VEG'ETIVE, a. [L. vegeto, vigeo.] Vegetable; having the nature of plants; as vegetive life. ...

60454

vegeto-animal
VEG'ETO-ANIMAL, a. Vegeto-animal matter, is a term formerly applied to vegetable gluten, which is ...

60455

vegetous
VEGE'TOUS, a. Vigorous; lively; vegete. [Not in use.]

60456

vehemence
VE'HEMENCE,

60457

vehemency
VE'HEMENCY, n. [L. vehemens, from veho, to carry, that is, to rush or drive.]1. Violence; great ...

60458

vehement
VE'HEMENT, a. [L. vehemens.]1. Violent; acting with great force; furious; very forcible; as a ...

60459

vehemently
VE'HEMENTLY, adv. 1. With great force and violence.2. Urgently; forcibly; with great zeal or ...

60460

vehicle
VE'HICLE, n. [L. vehiculum, from veho, to carry.]1. That in which any thing is or may be carried; ...

60461

vehicled
VE'HICLED, a. Conveyed in a vehicle.

60462

veil
VEIL, n. [L. velum.1. A cover; a curtain; something to intercept the view and lude an object.2. ...

60463

vein
VEIN, n. [L. vena, from the root of venio, to come, to pass. The sense is a passage, a ...

60464

veined
VEINED, a. [from vein.]1. Full of veins; streaked; variegated; as veined marble.2. In botany, ...

60465

veinless
VEINLESS, a. In botany, having no veins; as a veinless leaf.

60466

veiny
VEINY, a. Full of veins; as veiny marble.

60467

veliferous
VELIF'EROUS, a. [L. velum, a sail, and fero, to bear.] Bearing or carrying sails.

60468

velitation
VELITA'TION, n. [L. velitatio.] A dispute or contest; a slight skirmish. [Not in use.]

60469

vell
VELL, n. A rennet bag. [Local.]VELL, v.t. To cut off the turf or sward of land. [Local.]

60470

velleity
VELLE'ITY, n. [L. velle, to will.]A term by which the schools express the lowest degree of desire.

60471

vellicate
VEL'LICATE, v.t. [L. vellico, from vello, to pull. It may be from the root of pull.]To twitch; to ...

60472

vellicated
VEL'LICATED, pp. Twitched or caused to twitch.

60473

vellicating
VEL'LICATING, ppr. Twitching; convulsing.

60474

vellication
VELLICATION, n.1. The act of twitching, or of causing to twitch.2. A twitching or convulsive ...

60475

vellum
VEL'LUM, n. [L. vello.]A finer kind of parchment or skin, rendered clear and white for writing.

60476

velocity
VELOC'ITY, n. [L. velositas, from velox, swift, allied to volo, to fly.]1. Swiftness; celerity; ...

60477

velure
VEL'URE, n. Velvet. Obs.

60478

velvet
VEL'VET, n. [L. vellus, hair, nap.]A rich silk stuff, covered on the outside with a close, short, ...

60479

velveted
VEL'VETED, a. Made of velvet; or soft and delicate, like velvet.

60480

velveteen
VELVETEE'N, n. A kind of cloth made in imitation of velvet.

60481

velveting
VEL'VETING, n. The fine shag of velvet.

60482

velvety
VEL'VETY, a. Made of velvet, or like velvet; soft; smooth; delicate.

60483

venal
VE'NAL, a. [L. vena, a vein.] Pertaining to a vein or to veins; contained in the veins; as venal ...

60484

venality
VENAL'ITY, n. Mercenariness; the state of being influenced by money; prostitution of talents, ...

60485

venary
VEN'ARY, a. [L. venor, to hunt.] Relating to hunting.

60486

venatic
VENAT'IC,

60487

venatical
VENAT'ICAL, a. [L. venaticus, from venor, to hunt.] Used in hunting.

60488

venation
VENA'TION, n. [L. venatio, from venor, to hunt.]1. The act or practice of hunting.2. The state ...

60489

vend
VEND, v.t. [L. vendo.]To sell; to transfer a thing and the exclusive right of possessing it, to ...

60490

vended
VEND'ED, pp. Sold; transferred for money; as goods.

60491

vendee
VENDEE', n. The person to whom a thing is sold.

60492

vender
VEND'ER, n. A seller; one who transfers the exclusive right of possessing a thing, either his own, ...

60493

vendibility
VENDIBIL'ITY,

60494

vendible
VEND'IBLE, a. [L. vendibilis.] Salable; that may be sold; that can be sold; as vendible goods. ...

60495

vendibleness
VEND'IBLENESS, n. The state of being vendible or salable.

60496

vendibly
VEND'IBLY, adv. In a salable manner.

60497

venditation
VENDITA'TION, n. [L. venditatio.] A boastful display. [Not in use.]

60498

vendition
VENDI'TION, n. [L. venditio.] The act of selling; sale.

60499

vendor
VEND'OR, n. A vender; a seller.

60500

vendue
VENDUE, n. Auction; a public sale of any thing by outcry, to the highest bidder.

60501

vendue-master
VENDUE-M'ASTER, n. One who is authorized to make sale of any property to the highest bidder, by ...

60502

veneer
VENEE'R, v.t. To inlay; to lay thin slices or leaves of fine wood of different kinds on a ground ...

60503

veneered
VENEE'RED, pp. Inlaid; ornamented with marquetry.

60504

veneering
VENEE'RING, ppr. Inlaying; adorning with inlaid work.VENEE'RING, n. The act or art of inlaying, ...

60505

venefice
VEN'EFICE, n. [L. veneficium.] The practice of poisoning. [Not in use.]

60506

veneficial
VENEFI'CIAL,'CIOUS, a. [L. veneficium.] Acting by poison; bewitching. [Little used.]

60507

veneficiously
VENEFI'CIOUSLY, adv. By poison or witchcraft. [Little used.]

60508

venemous
VEN'EMOUS, [See Venomous.]

60509

venenate
VEN'ENATE, v.t. [L. veneno; venenum, poison.]To poison; to infect with poison. [Not used.]

60510

venenation
VENENA'TION, n.1. The act of poisoning.2. Poison; venom. [Not used.]

60511

venene
VENE'NE,

60512

venenose
VENE'NOSE, a. Poisonous; venomous. [Not used.]

60513

venerability
VENERABIL'ITY, n. State or quality of being venerable. [Not used.]

60514

venerable
VEN'ERABLE, a. [L. venerabilis, from veneror, to honor, to worship.]1. Worthy of veneration or ...

60515

venerableness
VEN'ERABLENESS, n. The state or quality of being venerable.

60516

venerably
VEN'ERABLY, adv. In a manner to excite reverence.- An awful pile! stands venerably great.

60517

venerate
VEN'ERATE, v.t. [L. veneror.]To regard with respect and reverence; to reverence; to revere. We ...

60518

venerated
VEN'ERATED, pp. Reverenced; treated with honor and respect.

60519

venerating
VEN'ERATING, ppr. Regarding with reverence.

60520

veneration
VENERA'TION, n. [L. veneratio.]The highest degree of respect and reverence; respect mingled with ...

60521

venerator
VEN'ERATOR, n. One who venerates and reverences.

60522

venereal
VENE'REAL, a. [L. venereus, from Venus. See Venus.]1. Pertaining to the pleasures of sexual ...

60523

venerean
VENE'REAN, a. Venereal. [Not used.]

60524

venereous
VENE'REOUS, a. [L. venereus.] Lustful; libidinous.

60525

venerous
VEN'EROUS, for venereous. [Not used.]

60526

venery
VEN'ERY, n. [from Venus.] The pleasures of the bed.Contentment, without the pleasure of lawful ...

60527

venesection
VENESEC'TION, n. [L. vena, vein, and sectio, a cutting.]The act or operation of opening a vein for ...

60528

veney
VEN'EY, n. A bout; a thrust; a hit; a turn at fencing.Three veneys for a dish of stewed prunes. ...

60529

venge
VENGE, v.t. venj. To avenge; to punish. [Not in use.] [See Avenge and Revenge.]

60530

vengeable
VENGEABLE, a. venj'able. [from venge.] Revengeful; as vengeable despite. [Not in use.]

60531

vengeance
VENGEANCE, n. venj'ance. [L. vindico.]The infliction of pain on another, in return for an injury ...

60532

vengeful
VENGEFUL, a. venj'ful. 1. Vindictive; retributive; as God's vengeful ire.2. Revengeful.

60533

vengement
VENGEMENT, n. venj'ment. Avengement; penal retribution. [Avengement is generally used.]

60534

venger
VENG'ER, n. An avenger. [Not in use.]

60535

veniable
VE'NIABLE, a. [See Venial.] Venial; pardonable. [Not in use.]

60536

veniably
VE'NIABLY, adv. Pardonably; excusably. [Not in use.]

60537

venial
VE'NIAL, a. [L. venia, pardon, leave to depart, from the root of venio, and signifying literally a ...

60538

venialness
VE'NIALNESS, n. State of being excusable or pardonable.Venire facias, or venire, in law, a writ or ...

60539

venison
VENISON, n. ven'izn, or ven'zn. [L. venactio, a hunting, from venor, to hunt.]The flesh of beasts ...

60540

venom
VEN'OM, n. [L. venenum, venor, to hunt, to drive or chase; venio, to come. See Venus, &c.]1. ...

60541

venomous
VEN'OMOUS, a.1. Poisonous; noxious to animal life; as, the bite of a serpent may be venomous. The ...

60542

venomously
VEN'OMOUSLY, adv. Poisonously; malignantly; spitefully.

60543

venomousness
VEN'OMOUSNESS, n. 1. Poisonousness; noxiousness to animal life.2. Malignity; spitefulness.

60544

venous
VE'NOUS, a. [L. venosus, from vena, a vein.]1. Pertaining to a vein or to veins; contained in ...

60545

vent
VENT, n. [L. venio, Eng. wind, &c.; properly a passage.]1. A small aperture; a hole or passage ...

60546

ventage
VENT'AGE, n. A small hole. [Not in use.]

60547

ventail
VENT'AIL, n. That part of a helmet made to be lifted up; the part intended for the admission of ...

60548

ventana
VENTAN'A, n. A window. [Not English.]

60549

ventanna
VENTAN'NA,

60550

venter
VENT'ER, n. One who utters, reports or publishes.

60551

ventiduct
VEN'TIDUCT, n. [L. ventus, wind, and ductus, a canal.]In building, a passage for wind or air; a ...

60552

ventilate
VEN'TILATE, v.t. [L. ventilo, from ventus, wind.]1. To fan with wind; to open and expose to the ...

60553

ventilated
VEN'TILATED, pp. Exposed to the action of the air; fanned; winnowed; discussed.

60554

ventilating
VEN'TILATING, ppr. Exposing to the action of wind; fanning; discussing.

60555

ventilation
VENTILA'TION, n. [L. ventilatio.]1. The act of ventilating; the act or operation of exposing to ...

60556

ventilator
VEN'TILATOR, n. An instrument or machine for expelling foul or stagnant air from any close place ...

60557

ventiloquous
VENTIL'OQUOUS, a. Speaking in such a manner as to make the sound appear to come from a place ...

60558

ventosity
VENTOS'ITY, n. [L. ventosus.] Windiness; flatulence.

60559

ventral
VEN'TRAL, a. [from L. venter, belly.] Belonging to the belly.The ventral fins, in fishes, are ...

60560

ventricle
VEN'TRICLE, n. [L. ventriculus, from venter, belly.]In a general sense, a small cavity in an ...

60561

ventricous
VEN'TRICOUS, a. [L. ventricosus, from venter, belly.]In botany, bellied; distended; swelling out ...

60562

ventriculous
VENTRIC'ULOUS, a. [supra.] Somewhat distended in the middle.

60563

ventriloquism
VENTRIL'OQUISM,

60564

ventriloquist
VENTRIL'OQUIST, n. One who speaks in such a manner that his voice appears to come from some ...

60565

ventriloquy
VENTRIL'OQUY, n. [L. venter, belly, and loquor, to speak.]The act, art or practice of speaking in ...

60566

venture
VEN'TURE, n. [L. venio, ventus, venturus, to come.]1. A hazard; an undertaking of chance or ...

60567

ventured
VEN'TURED, pp. Put to the hazard; risked.

60568

venturer
VEN'TURER, n. One who ventures or puts to hazards.

60569

venturesome
VEN'TURESOME, a. Bold; daring; intrepid; as a venturesome boy.

60570

venturesomely
VEN'TURESOMELY, adv. In a bold, daring manner.

60571

venturing
VEN'TURING, ppr. Putting to hazard; daring.VEN'TURING, n. The act of putting to risk; a ...

60572

venturous
VEN'TUROUS, a. Daring; bold; hardy; fearless; intrepid; adventurous; as a venturous soldier.With ...

60573

venturously
VEN'TUROUSLY, adv. Daringly; fearlessly; boldly.

60574

venturousness
VEN'TUROUSNESS, n. Boldness; hardiness; fearlessness; intrepidity. The event made then repent of ...

60575

venue
VEN'UE,

60576

venulite
VEN'ULITE, n. A petrified shell of the genus Venus.

60577

venus
VE'NUS, n. [L. ventus, venenum; Eng. venom to poison, to fret or irritate. These affinities lead ...

60578

venust
VENUST', a. [L. venustus.] Beautiful. [Not used.]

60579

veracious
VERA'CIOUS, a. [L. verax, from verus, true.]1. Observant of truth; habitually disposed to speak ...

60580

veracity
VERAC'ITY, n. [L. verax, from verus, true.]1. Habitual observance of truth, or habitual truth; as ...

60581

veranda
VERAN'DA, n. An oriental word denoting a kind of open portico, formed by extending a sloping roof ...

60582

veratria
VERA'TRIA, n. [L. veratrum, hellebore.] A newly discovered vegetable alkali, extracted from the ...

60583

verb
VERB, n. [L. verbum, fero.]1. In grammar, a part of speech that expresses action, motion, being, ...

60584

verbal
VERB'AL, a. [L. verbalis.]1. Spoken; expressed to the ear in words; not written; as a verbal ...

60585

verbality
VERBAL'ITY, n. Mere words; bare literal expressions.

60586

verbalize
VERB'ALIZE, v.t. To convert into a verb.

60587

verbally
VER'BALLY, adv.1. In words spoken; by words uttered; orally.2. Word for word; as, to translate ...

60588

verbatim
VERBA'TIM adv. [L.] Word for word; in the same words; as, to tell a story verbatim as another has ...

60589

verberate
VERB'ERATE, v.t. [L. verbero.] To beat; to strike. [Not in use.]

60590

verberation
VERBERA'TION, n1. A beating or striking; blows.2. The impulse of a body, which causes sound.

60591

verbiage
VERB'IAGE, n. Verbosity; use of many words without necessity; superabundance of words.

60592

verbose
VERBO'SE, a. [L. verbosus.] Abounding in words; using or containing more words than are ...

60593

verboseness
VERBO'SENESS, n. 1. Employment of a superabundance of words; the use of more words than are ...

60594

verbosity
VERBOS'ITY,

60595

verdancy
VER'DANCY, n. [See Verdant.] Greenness.

60596

verdant
VER'DANT, a. [L. vividans, from viridis, from vireo, to be green.] The radical sense of the verb ...

60597

verderer
VER'DERER,

60598

verderor
VER'DEROR, n. [Low L. viridarius.]An officer in England, who has the charge of the king's forest, ...

60599

verdict
VER'DICT, n. [L. verum dictum, true declaration.]1. The answer of a jury given to the court ...

60600

verdigris
VER'DIGRIS, n. Rust of copper, or an acetate of copper, formed by the combination of an acid with ...

60601

verditer
VER'DITER, n. [verde-terre, green earth; terre-verde.]A preparation of copper sometimes used by ...

60602

verdure
VER'DURE, n. [L. vireo.] Green; greenness; freshness of vegetation; as the verdure of the meadows ...

60603

verdurous
VER'DUROUS, a. Covered with green; clothed with the fresh color of vegetables; as verdurous ...

60604

verecund
VER'ECUND, a. [L. vrcundus.] Bashful; modest. [Not much used.]

60605

verecundity
VERECUND'ITY, n. Bashfulness; modesty; blushing. [Not in much use.]

60606

verge
VERGE, n. verj. [L. virga, a rod, that is, a shoot.]1. A rod, or something in the form of a rod ...

60607

verger
VERG'ER, n. 1. He that carries the mace before the bishop, dean, &c.2. An officer who carries a ...

60608

verging
VERG'ING, ppr. Bending or inclining; tending.

60609

vergouleuse
VER'GOULEUSE, n. A species of pear; contracted to vergaloo.

60610

veridical
VERID'ICAL, a. [L. veridicus; verus and dico.] Telling truth. [Not used.]

60611

verifiable
VER'IFIABLE, a. [from verify.] That may be verified; that may be proved or confirmed by ...

60612

verification
VERIFICA'TION, n. [See Verify.] The act of verifying or proving to be true; the act of confirming ...

60613

verified
VER'IFIED, pp. Proved; confirmed by competent evidence.

60614

verifier
VER'IFIER, n. One that proves or makes appear to be true.

60615

verify
VER'IFY, v.t. [L. verus, true, and facio, to make.]1. To prove to be true; to confirm.This is ...

60616

verifying
VER'IFYING, ppr. Proving to be true; confirming; establishing as authentic.

60617

verily
VER'ILY, adv. [from very.] 1. In truth; in fact; certainly.2. Really; truly; with great ...

60618

vering
'VERING, n. A silver coin. Isa. 7.

60619

verisimilar
VERISIM'ILAR, a. [L. verisimilis; verus, true, and similis, like.] having the appearance of ...

60620

verisimilitude
VERISIMIL'ITUDE, n. [L. verisimilitudo.] the appearance of truth; probability; ...

60621

verisimility
VERISIMIL'ITY, for verisimilitude, is not in use.

60622

veritable
VER'ITABLE, a. True; agreeable to fact. [Little used.]

60623

veritably
VER'ITABLY, adv. In a true manner. [Not in use.]

60624

verity
VER'ITY, n. [L. veritas, from verus, true.]1. Truth; consonance of a statement, proposition or ...

60625

verjuice
VER'JUICE, n. A liquor expressed from wild apples, sour grapes, &c. used in sauces, ragouts and ...

60626

vermeil
VERMEIL. [See Vermilion.]

60627

vermeologist
VERMEOL'OGIST, n. [infra.] One who treats of vermes.

60628

vermeology
VERMEOL'OGY, n. [L. vermes, worms, and Gr. discourse.]A discourse or treatise on vermes, or that ...

60629

vermicelli
VERMICEL'LI, n. [L. vermiculus, from vermis, a worm.]A cookery, little rolls or threads of paste, ...

60630

vermicular
VERMIC'ULAR, a. [L. vermiculus, a little worm, from vermis, a worm.]Pertaining to a worm; ...

60631

vermiculate
VERMIC'ULATE, v.t. [L. vermiculatus.] To inlay; to form work by inlaying, resembling the motion ...

60632

vermiculated
VERMIC'ULATED, pp. Formed in the likeness of the motion of a worm.

60633

vermiculating
VERMIC'ULATING, ppr. Forming so as to resemble the motion of a worm.

60634

vermiculation
VERMICULA'TION, n.1. The act or operation of moving in the form of a worm; continuation of motion ...

60635

vermicule
VERM'ICULE, n. [L. vermiculus.] A little worm or grub.

60636

vermiculous
VERMIC'ULOUS, a. [L. vermiculosus.]1. Full of worms or grubs.2. Resembling worms.

60637

vermiform
VERM'IFORM, a. [L. vermis, a worm, and forma, form.]Having the form or shape of a worm; as the ...

60638

vermifuge
VERM'IFUGE, n. [L. vermis, a worm, and fugo, to expel.]A medicine or substance that destroys or ...

60639

vermil
VER'MIL,'

60640

vermilion
VERMILION, a. vermil'yon. [L. vermiculus, vermes; a name sometimes improperly given to the ...

60641

vermilioned
VERMIL'IONED, pp. or a. Dyed or tinged with a bright red.

60642

vermin
VERM'IN, n. sing, and plu; used chiefly in the plural. [L. vermes, worms.]1. All sorts of small ...

60643

verminate
VERM'INATE, v.i. [L. vermino.] To breed vermin.

60644

vermination
VERMINA'TION, n.1. The breeding of vermin.2. A griping of the bowels.

60645

verminous
VERM'INOUS, a. Tending to breed vermin.The verminous disposition of the body.

60646

vermiparous
VERMIP'AROUS, a. [L. vermes, worms, and pario, to bear.] Producing worms.

60647

vermivorous
VERMIV'OROUS, a. [L. vermes, worms, and voro, to devour.]Devouring worms; feeding on worms. ...

60648

vernacular
VERNAC'ULAR, a. [L. vernaculus, born in one's house, from verns, a servant.]1. Native; belonging ...

60649

vernaculous
VERNAC'ULOUS, a. [supra.] Vernacular; also, scoffing. Obs.

60650

vernal
VER'NAL, a. [L. vernalis, from ver, spring.]1. Belonging to the spring; appearing in spring; as ...

60651

vernant
VER'NANT, a. [L. vernans; verno, to flourish.] Flourishing, as in spring; as vernant flowers.

60652

vernate
VER'NATE, v.i. to become young again. [Not in use.]

60653

vernation
VERNA'TION, n. [L. verno.] In botany, the disposition of the nascent leaves within the bud. it ...

60654

vernier
VER'NIER, n. [from the inventor.] A graduated index which subdivides the smallest divisions on a ...

60655

vernility
VERNIL'ITY, n. [L. vernilis, from verna, a slave.] Servility; fawning behavior, like that of a ...

60656

veronica
VERON'ICA, n. [vera-icon, true image.]1. A portrait or representation of the face of our Savior ...

60657

verrucous
VER'RUCOUS, a. [L. verruca, a wart; verrucosus, full of warts.]Warty; having little knobs or warts ...

60658

versability
VERSABIL'ITY,

60659

versable
VERS'ABLE, a. [supra.] That may be turned. [Not used.]

60660

versableness
VERS'ABLENESS, n. [L. versabilis, from versor, to turn.]Aptness to be turned round. [Not used.]

60661

versal
VERSAL, for universal. [Not used or very vulgar.]

60662

versatile
VERS'ATILE, a. [L. versatilis, from versor, to turn.]1. That may be turned round; as a versatile ...

60663

versatility
VERSATIL'ITY, n. 1. The quality of being versatile; aptness to change; readiness to be turned; ...

60664

verse
VERSE, n. vers. [L. versus; verto, to turn.]1. In poetry, a line, consisting of a certain number ...

60665

verse-man
VERSE-MAN, n. [verse and man.] A writer of verses; in ludicrous language.

60666

verser
VERS'ER, n. A maker of verses; a versifier.

60667

versicle
VERS'ICLE, n. [L. versiculus.] A little verse. [Not used.]

60668

versicolor
VERS'ICOLOR,

60669

versicolored
VERS'ICOLORED, a. [L. versicolor.] Having various colors; changeable in color.

60670

versicular
VERSIC'ULAR, a. Pertaining to verses; designating distinct divisions of a writing.

60671

versification
VERSIFICA'TION, n. The act, art or practice of composing poetic verse. Versification is the ...

60672

versificator
VERS'IFICATOR, n. A versifier. [Little used. See Versifier.]

60673

versified
VERS'IFIED, pp. [from versify.] Formed into verse.

60674

versifier
VERS'IFIER, n.1. One who makes verses. Not every versifier is a poet.2. One who converts into ...

60675

versify
VERS'IFY, v.i. To make verses.I'll versify in spite, and do my best.VERS'IFY, v.t.1. To relate or ...

60676

version
VER'SION, n. [L. versio.]1. A turning; a change or transformation; as the version of air into ...

60677

verst
VERST, n. A Russian measure of length, containing 1166 2/3 yards, or 3500 feet; about three ...

60678

vert
VERT, n. [L. viridis.] 1. In the forest laws, every thing that grows and bears a green leaf ...

60679

verteber
VERT'EBER,

60680

vertebra
VERT'EBRA, n. [L. vertebra, from verto, to turn.] A joint of the spine or backbone of an animal.

60681

vertebral
VERT'EBRAL, a.1. Pertaining to the joints of the spine or backbone.2. Having a backbone or spinal ...

60682

vertebrated
VERT'EBRATED, a. [L. vertebratus.] Having a backbone, or vertebral column, containing the spinal ...

60683

vertex
VERT'EX, n. [L. from veto, to turn; primarily a round point.]1. The crown or top of the head.2. ...

60684

vertical
VERT'ICAL, a. [L. vertex.]1. Placed or being in the zenith, or perpendicularly over the head. ...

60685

vertically
VERT'ICALLY, adv. In the zenith.

60686

verticalness
VERT'ICALNESS, n. The state of being in the zenith or perpendicularly over the head. [Verticality ...

60687

verticil
VERT'ICIL, n. [L. verticillus, from vertex, supra.]In botany, a little whirl; a mode of ...

60688

verticillate
VERTIC'ILLATE, a. [supra.] In botany, verticillate flowers are such as grow in a whirl, or round ...

60689

verticity
VERTIC'ITY, n. [from vertex, supra.]1. The power of turning; revolution; rotation.2. That ...

60690

vertiginous
VERTIG'INOUS, a. [L. vertiginousus.]1. Turning round; whirling; rotary; as a vertiginous ...

60691

vertiginousness
VERTIG'INOUSNESS, n. Giddiness; a whirling, or sense of whirling; unsteadiness.

60692

vertigo
VERT'IGO, n. [L. from verto, to turn.] Giddiness; dizziness or swimming of the head; an affection ...

60693

vervain
VER'VAIN, n. A plant of the genus Verbena, or rather the genus so called.

60694

vervain-mallow
VERVAIN-MALLOW, n. A species of mallow, the Malva alcea.

60695

vervels
VER'VELS, n. Silver rings about the legs of a hawk, on which the owner's name is engraved.

60696

very
VER'Y, a. [L. verus.] True; real.Whether thou be my very son Esau or not. Gen. 27.He that ...

60697

vesation
VESA'TION, n. [L. vesatio.] 1. The act of irritating, or of troubling, disquieting and ...

60698

vesicant
VES'ICANT, n. [infra.] A blistering application; an epispastic.

60699

vesicate
VES'ICATE, v.t. [L. vesica, a little bladder. Gr. from to inflate.]To blister; to raise little ...

60700

vesicated
VES'ICATED, pp. Blistered.

60701

vesicating
VES'ICATING, ppr. Blistering.

60702

vesication
VESICA'TION, n. The process of raising blisters or little cuticular bladders on the skin.

60703

vesicatory
VES'ICATORY, n. A blistering application or plaster; an epispastic. Vesicatories made of ...

60704

vesicle
VES'ICLE, n. [. vesicula. See Vesicate.]1. A little bladder, or a portion of the cuticle ...

60705

vesicular
VESIC'ULAR,

60706

vesiculate
VESIC'ULATE, a. Bladdery; full of bladders.

60707

vesiculous
VESIC'ULOUS, a.1. Pertaining to vesicles; consisting of vesicles.2. Hollow; full of ...

60708

vesper
VES'PER, n. [L. This word and Hesperus are probably of one origin, and both from the root of ...

60709

vespertine
VES'PERTINE, a. [L. vespertinus. See Vesper.]Pertaining to the evening; happening or being in the ...

60710

vessel
VES'SEL, n. [L. vas, vasis. This word is probably the English vat.]1. A cask or utensil proper ...

60711

vessets
VES'SETS, n. A kind of cloth.

60712

vessicon
VES'SICON,

60713

vessigon
VES'SIGON, n. [L. vesica.] A soft swelling on a horse's leg, called a windgall.

60714

vest
VEST, n. [L. vestis, a coat or garment; vestio, to cover or clothe.]1. An outer garment.Over his ...

60715

vestal
VEST'AL, a. [L. vestalis, from Vesta, the goddess of fire, Gr.]1. Pertaining to Vesta, the ...

60716

vested
VEST'ED, pp. 1. Clothed; covered; closely encompassed.2. a. Fixed; not in a state of contingency ...

60717

vestibule
VES'TIBULE, n. [L. vestibulum.]1. The porch or entrance into a house, or a large open space ...

60718

vestige
VES'TIGE, n. [L. vestigium. This word and vestibule, show that some verb signifying to tread, ...

60719

vesting
VEST'ING, ppr. [from vest.] Clothing; covering; closely encompassing; descending to and becoming ...

60720

vestment
VEST'MENT, n. [L. vestimentum, from vestio, to clothe.]A garment; some part of clothing or dress; ...

60721

vestry
VEST'RY, n. [L. vestiarium.]1. A room appendant to a church, in which the sacerdotal vestments, ...

60722

vestry-clerk
VEST'RY-CLERK, n. [vestry and clerk.] An officer chosen by the vestry, who keeps the parish ...

60723

vestry-man
VEST'RY-MAN, n. [vestry and man.] In London, vestry-men are a select number of principal persons ...

60724

vesture
VEST'URE, n. [See Vest.]1. A garment; a robe.There polish'd chests embroider'd vesture grac'd.2. ...

60725

vesuvian
VESU'VIAN, a. Pertaining to Vesuvius, a volcano near Naples.VESU'VIAN, n. In mineralogy, a ...

60726

vetch
VETCH, n. [L. vicia. We see vetch if from the root of weigh, wag, wiggle, and signifies a little ...

60727

vetchling
VETCH'LING, n. [from vetch.] In botany, a name of the Lathyrus aphaca, expressive of its ...

60728

vetchy
VETCH'Y, a.1. Consisting of vetches or of pea straw; as a vetchy bed.2. Abounding with vetches.

60729

veteran
VET'ERAN, a. [L. veteranus, from vetero, to grow old, from vetus, old.]Having been long exercised ...

60730

veterinarian
VETERINA'RIAN, n. [L. veterinarius.] One skilled in the diseases of cattle or domestic animals.

60731

veterinary
VET'ERINARY, a. [supra.] Pertaining to the art of healing or treating the diseases of domestic ...

60732

veto
VE'TO, n. [L. veto, I forbid.] A forbidding; prohibition; or the right of forbidding; applied to ...

60733

vex
VEX, v.t. [L. vexo.]1. To irritate; to make angry by little provocations; a popular use of the ...

60734

vexatious
VEXA'TIOUS, a.1. Irritating; disturbing or agitating to the mind; causing disquiet; afflictive; as ...

60735

vexatiously
VEXA'TIOUSLY, adv. In a manner to give great trouble or disquiet.

60736

vexatiousness
VEXA'TIOUSNESS, n. The quality of giving great trouble and disquiet, or of teasing and provoking.

60737

vexed
VEX'ED, pp. Teased; provoked; irritated; troubled; agitated; disquieted; afflicted.

60738

vexer
VEX'ER, n. One who vexes, irritates or troubles.

60739

vexil
VEX'IL, n. [L. vexillum, a standard.] A flag or standard. In botany, the upper petal of a ...

60740

vexillary
VEX'ILLARY, n. A standard bearer.VEX'ILLARY, a. Pertaining to an ensign or standard.

60741

vexillation
VEXILLA'TION, n. [L. vexillatio.] A company of troops under one ensign.

60742

vexing
VEX'ING, ppr. Provoking; irritating; afflicting.

60743

vexingly
VEX'INGLY, adv. So as to vex, tease or irritate.

60744

vial
VI'AL, n. [L. phiala.] A phial; a small bottle of thin glass, used particularly by apothecaries ...

60745

viand
VI'AND, n. [L. vivendus, vivo, to live.] Meat dressed; food.Viands of various kinds allure the ...

60746

viatic
VIAT'IC, a. [L. viaticum, from via, way.]Pertaining to a journey or to traveling.

60747

viaticum
VIAT'ICUM, n. [L. supra.]1. Provisions for a journey.2. Among the ancient Romans, an allowance ...

60748

vibrant
VI'BRANT,

60749

vibrate
VI'BRATE, v.i. [L. vibro; Eng. wabble.]1. To swing; to oscillate; to move one way and the other; ...

60750

vibrated
VI'BRATED, pp. Brandished; moved one way and the other.

60751

vibratility
VIBRATIL'ITY, n. Disposition to preternatural vibration or motion. [Not much used.]

60752

vibrating
VI'BRATING, ppr. Brandishing; moving to and fro, as a pendulum or musical chord.

60753

vibration
VIBRA'TION, n. [L. vibro.] 1. The act of brandishing; the act of moving or state of being moved ...

60754

vibratiuncle
VIBRAT'IUNCLE, n. A small vibration.

60755

vibrative
VI'BRATIVE, a. That vibrates.

60756

vibratory
VI'BRATORY, a.1. Vibrating; consisting in vibration or oscillation; as a vibratory motion.2. ...

60757

vibrion
VIB'RION, n. [L. vibrans.] A name given to the ichneumon fly, from the continual vibration of its ...

60758

vicar
VIC'AR, n. [L. vicarius, from vicis, a turn, or its root.]1. In a general sense, a person deputed ...

60759

vicar-general
VICAR-GEN'ERAL, n. A title given by Henry VIII to the earl of Essex, with power to oversee all the ...

60760

vicarage
VIC'ARAGE, n. The benefice of a vicar. A vicarage by endowment, becomes a benefice distinct from ...

60761

vicarial
VICA'RIAL, a. [from vicar.] Pertaining to a vicar; small; as vicarial tithes.

60762

vicariate
VICA'RIATE, a. Having delegated power, as vicar.VICA'RIATE, n. A delegated office or power.

60763

vicarious
VICA'RIOUS, a. [L. vicarius.]1. Deputed; delegated; as vicarious power or authority.2. Acting ...

60764

vicariously
VICA'RIOUSLY, adv. In the place of another; by substitution.

60765

vicarship
VIC'ARSHIP, n. The office of a vicar; the ministry of a vicar.

60766

vice
VICE, n. [L. vitium.]1. Properly, a spot or defect; a fault; a blemish; as the vices of a ...

60767

vice-admiral
VICE-AD'MIRAL, n.1. In the navy, the second officer in command. His flag is displayed at the fore ...

60768

vice-admiralty
VICE-AD'MIRALTY, n. The office of a vice-admiralty; a vice-admiralty court.

60769

vice-agent
VICE-A'GENT, n. [vice and agent.] One who acts in the place of another.

60770

vice-chamberlain
VICE-CH'AMBERLAIN,CHAMBERLAIN, n. An officer in court, next in command to the lord chamberlain.

60771

vice-chancellor
VICE-CH'ANCELLOR, n. An officer in a university in England, a distinguished member, who is ...

60772

vice-consul
VICE-CONSUL, n. One who acts in the place of a consul.

60773

vice-doge
VICE-DO'GE, n. A counsellor at Venice, who represents the doge when sick or absent.

60774

vice-legate
VICE-LEG'ATE, n. An officer employed by the pope to perform the office of spiritual and temporal ...

60775

vice-president
VICE-PRES'IDENT, n. s as z. An officer next in rank below a president.

60776

viced
VI'CED, a. Vitious; corrupt. [Not in use.]

60777

vicegerency
VICEGE'RENCY, n. [See Vicegerent.] The office of a vicegerent; agency under another; deputed ...

60778

vicegerent
VICEGE'RENT, n. [L. vicem gereus, acting in the place of another.]A lieutenant; a vicar; an ...

60779

vicenary
VIC'ENARY, a. [L. vicenarius.] Belonging to twenty.

60780

viceroy
VI'CEROY, n. The governor of a kingdom or country, who rules in the name of the king with regal ...

60781

viceroyalty
VICEROY'ALTY, n. the dignity, office or jurisdiction of a viceroy.

60782

viceroyship
VI'CEROYSHIP, n. the dignity, office or jurisdiction of a viceroy.

60783

vicety
VI'CETY, n. Nicety; exactness. [Not in use; probably a mistake.]

60784

viciate
VI'CIATE, v.t. [L. vitio. This veb is usually written vitiate; but as vice, from L. vitius, is ...

60785

viciated
VI'CIATED, pp. Depraved; impaired in substance or quality; rendered defective and void.

60786

viciating
VI'CIATING, ppr. Injuring in subtance or properties; rendering defective; making void.

60787

viciation
VICIA'TION, n. Depravation; corruption.

60788

vicinage
VIC'INAGE, n. [from L. vicinia, neighborhood; vicinus, near.]Neighborhood; the place or places ...

60789

vicinal
VIC'INAL,

60790

vicine
VIC'INE, a. Near; neighboring. [Little used.]

60791

vicinity
VICIN'ITY, n. [L. vicinitas.]1. Nearness in place; as the vicinity of two country seats.2. ...

60792

viciosity
VICIOS'ITY, n. Depravity; corruption of manners. [But viciousness is generally used.]

60793

vicious
VI'CIOUS, a. [L. vitiosus.]1. Defective; imperfect; as a system of government vicious and ...

60794

viciously
VI'CIOUSLY, adv. 1. Corruptly; in a manner contrary to rectitude, moral principles, propriety or ...

60795

viciousness
VI'CIOUSNESS, n. 1. Addictedness to vice; corruptness of moral principles or practice; habitual ...

60796

vicissitude
VICIS'SITUDE, n. [L. vicissitudo; from vicis, a turn.]1. Regular change or succession of one ...

60797

vicissitudinary
VICISSITU'DINARY, a. Changing in succession.

60798

vicontiel
VICON'TIEL, a. [vice-comitalia. See Viscount.]In old law books, pertaining to the ...

60799

vicontiels
VICON'TIELS, n. Things belonging to the sheriff; particularly, farms for which the sheriff pays ...

60800

vicount
VI'COUNT, n. [vice-comes.]1. In law books, the sheriff.2. A degree of nobility next below a ...

60801

victim
VIC'TIM n. [L. victima.]1. A living being sacrificed to some deity, or in the performance of a ...

60802

victimate
VIC'TIMATE, v.t. To sacrifice. [Not in use.]

60803

victor
VIC'TOR, n. [L. from vinco, victus, to conquer, or the same root.] 1. One who conquers in war; a ...

60804

victoress
VIC'TORESS, n. A female who vanquishes.

60805

victorious
VICTO'RIOUS, a. 1. Having conquered in battle or contest; having overcome an enemy or antagonist; ...

60806

victoriously
VICTO'RIOUSLY, adv. With conquest; with defeat of an enemy or antagonist; triumphantly; as, grace ...

60807

victoriousness
VICTO'RIOUSNESS, n. The state of being victorious.

60808

victory
VIC'TORY, n. [L. victoria, from vinco, victus, to conquer.]1. Conquest; the defeat of an enemy in ...

60809

victress
VIC'TRESS, n. A female that conquers.

60810

victual
VICTUAL. [See Victuals.]

60811

victualed
VICTUALED, pp. vit'ld. Supplied with provisions.

60812

victualer
VICTUALER, n. vit'ler. 1. One who furnishes provisions.2. One who keeps a house of ...

60813

victualing
VICTUALING, ppr. vit'ling. Supplying with provisions.

60814

victualing-house
VICTUALING-HOUSE, n. A house where provision is made for strangers to eat.

60815

victuals
VICTUALS, n. vit'lz. [L. victus, food, from the root of vivo, which was vigo or vico, coinciding ...

60816

videlicet
VIDEL'ICET, adv. [L. for videre licet.] To wit; namely. An abbreviation for this word is viz.

60817

vidual
VID'UAL, a. [L. viduus, deprived. Belonging to the state of a widow. [Not used.]

60818

viduity
VIDU'ITY, n. [L. viduitas.] Widowhood. [Not used.]

60819

vie
VIE, v.i. [See Victor.]To strive for superiority; to contend; to use effort in a race, contest, ...

60820

vielleur
VIELLEUR, n. A species of fly in Surinam, less than the lantern fly.

60821

view
VIEW, v.t. vu. [L. videre. The primary sense is to reach or extend to.]1. To survey; to examine ...

60822

viewed
VIEWED, pp. vu'ed. Surveyed; examined by the eye; inspected; considered.

60823

viewer
VIEWER, n. vu'er.1. One who views, surveys or examines.2. In New England, a town officer whose ...

60824

viewing
VIEWING, ppr. vu'ing. Surveying; examining by the eye or by the mind; inspecting; ...

60825

viewless
VIEWLESS, a. vu'less. That cannot be seen; not being perceivable by the eye; invisible; as ...

60826

vigesimation
VIGESIMA'TION, n. [L. vigesimus, twentieth.]The act of putting to death every twentieth man.

60827

vigil
VIG'IL, n. [L. vigilia, vigil, walking, watchful; vigilo, to watch. This is formed on the root of ...

60828

vigilance
VIG'ILANCE, n. [L. vigilans. See Vigil.]1. Forbearance of sleep; a state of being awake.2. ...

60829

vigilancy
VIG'ILANCY, for vigilance, is not used.

60830

vigilant
VIG'ILANT, a. [L. vigilans.] Watchful; circumspect; attentive to discover and avoid danger, or to ...

60831

vigilantly
VIG'ILANTLY, adv. [supra.] Watchfully; with attention to danger and the means of safety; ...

60832

vignet
VIGNET', n. An ornament placed at the beginning of a book, preface or dedication; a head piece. ...

60833

vignette
VIGNETTE,

60834

vigor
VIG'OR, n. [L. from vigeo, to be brisk, to grow, to be strong; allied to vivo, vixi, to live.]1. ...

60835

vigorous
VIG'OROUS, a.1. Full of physical strength or active force; strong; lusty; as a vigorous youth; a ...

60836

vigorously
VIG'OROUSLY, adv. With great physical force or strength; forcibly; with active exertions; as, to ...

60837

vigorousness
VIG'OROUSNESS, n. The quality of being vigorous or possessed of active strength.[Vigor and all its ...

60838

vild
VILD,

60839

vile
VILE, a. [L. vilis. Gr.]1. Base; mean; worthless; despicable.The inhabitants account gold a vile ...

60840

viled
VI'LED, a. Vile. [Not in use.]

60841

vilely
VI'LELY, adv.1. Basely; meanly; shamefully; as Hector vilely dragged about the walls of Troy.2. ...

60842

vileness
VI'LENESS, n.1. Baseness; meanness; despicableness.His vileness us shall never awe.2. Moral ...

60843

vilified
VIL'IFIED, pp. [from vilify.] Defamed; traduced; debased.

60844

vilifier
VIL'IFIER, n. One who defames or traduces.

60845

vilify
VIL'IFY, v.t. [from vile.] 1. To make vile; to debase; to degrade.Their Maker's image forsook ...

60846

vilifying
VIL'IFYING, ppr. Debasing; defaming.

60847

vilipend
VIL'IPEND, v.t. [L. vilipendo.] To despise. [Not in use.]

60848

vilipendency
VILIPEND'ENCY, n. Disesteem; alight. [Not in use.]

60849

vility
VIL'ITY, n. Vileness; baseness. [Not in use.]

60850

vill
VILL, n. [L. villa.] A village; a small collection of houses.The statute of Exeter, 14 Edward I ...

60851

villa
VIL'LA, n. [L. villa.]A country seat or a farm, furnished with a mansion and convenient ...

60852

village
VIL'LAGE, n. A small assemblage of houses, less than a town or city, and inhabited chiefly by ...

60853

villager
VIL'LAGER, n. An inhabitant of a village.

60854

villagery
VIL'LAGERY, n. a district of villages.

60855

villain
VIL'LAIN,

60856

villainous
VIL'LAINOUS, a. [from villain.]1. Base; very vile.2. Wicked; extremely depraved; as a villanous ...

60857

villainy
VIL'LAINY, n. 1. Extreme depravity; atrocious wickedness; as the villany of the thief or the ...

60858

villakin
VIL'LAKIN, n. A little village; a word used by Gay.

60859

villan
VIL'LAN, n. 1. In feudal law, a villain or villein is one who holds lands by a base or servile ...

60860

villanage
VIL'LANAGE, n.1. The state of a villain; base servitude.2. A base tenure of lands; tenure on ...

60861

villanize
VIL'LANIZE, v.t. to debase; to degrade; to defame; to revile.Were virtue by descent, a noble name ...

60862

villanized
VIL'LANIZED, pp. Defamed; debased. [Little used.

60863

villanizing
VIL'LANIZING, ppr. Defaming; debasing. [Little used.]

60864

villanous
VIL'LANOUS,

60865

villanously
VIL'LANOUSLY, adv. Basely; with extreme wickedness or depravity.

60866

villanousness
VIL'LANOUSNESS, n. Baseness; extreme depravity.

60867

villany
VIL'LANY,

60868

villatic
VILLAT'IC, a. [L. villaticus.] Pertaining to a village.Tame villatic fowl.

60869

villenage
VIL'LENAGE, n. [from villain.] a tenure of lands and tenements by base services.

60870

villous
VIL'LOUS, a. [l. villosus, from villus, hair, Eng. wool.]1. Abounding with fine hairs or wooly ...

60871

viminal
VIM'INAL,a. [L. viminalis.] Pertaining to twigs; consisting of twigs; producing twigs.

60872

vimineous
VIMIN'EOUS, a. [L. vimineus, from vimen, a twig. Made of twigs or shoots.In the hive's vimineous ...

60873

vinaceous
VINA'CEOUS, a. [from L. vinacceus.] Belonging to wine or grapes.

60874

vincible
VIN'CIBLE, a. [from L. vinco, to conquer. See Victor.Conquerable; that may be overcome or ...

60875

vincibleness
VIN'CIBLENESS, n. the capacity of being conquered; conquerableness.

60876

vincture
VINC'TURE, n. [L. vinctura.] a binding. [Not in use.]

60877

vindemial
VINDE'MIAL, a. [L. vindemialis, from vindemia, vintage; vinea and demo.] Belonging to a vintage ...

60878

vindemiate
VINDE'MIATE, v.i. [supra.] to gather the vintage.

60879

vindemiation
VINDEMIA'TION, n. The operation of gathering grapes.

60880

vindicability
VINDICABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being vindicable, or capable of support or justification.

60881

vindicable
VIN'DICABLE, a. [infra.] That may be vindicated, justified or supported.

60882

vindicate
VIN'DICATE, v.t. [L. vindico.] 1. To defend; to justify; to support or maintain as true or ...

60883

vindicated
VIN'DICATED, pp. Defended; supported; maintained; proved to be just or true.

60884

vindicating
VIN'DICATING, ppr. Defending; supporting against denial, censure, charge or impeachment; proving ...

60885

vindication
VINDICA'TION, n. [L. vindico.]1. The defense of any thing, or a justification against denial or ...

60886

vindicative
VIN'DICATIVE, a.1. Tending to vindicate.2. Revengeful. [This is now generally vindictive.]

60887

vindicator
VIN'DICATOR, n. One who vindicates; one who justifies or maintains; one who defends.

60888

vindicatory
VIN'DICATORY, a. 1. Punitory; inflicting punishment; avenging.The afflictions of Job were not ...

60889

vindictive
VINDIC'TIVE, a. Revengeful; given to revenge.I am vindictive enough to repel force by force.

60890

vindictively
VINDIC'TIVELY, adv. By way of revenge; revengefully.

60891

vindictiveness
VINDIC'TIVENESS, n. 1. A revengeful temper.2. Revengefulness.

60892

vine
VINE, n. [L. vinca. See Wine.]1. A plant that produces grapes, of the genus Vitis, and of a ...

60893

vine-dresser
VI'NE-DRESSER, n. [vine and dresser.] One who dresses, trims, prunes and cultivates vines.

60894

vine-fretter
VI'NE-FRETTER, n. [vine and fret.] A small insect that injures vines, the aphis or puceron.

60895

vine-grub
VI'NE-GRUB, n. [vine and grub.] A little insect that infests vines; the vine-fretter or puceron.

60896

vined
VI'NED, a. Having leaves like those of the vine.

60897

vinegar
VIN'EGAR, n. 1. Vegetable acid; an acid liquor obtained from wine, cider, beer or other liquors, ...

60898

vinery
VI'NERY, n. In gardening, an erection for supporting vines and exposing them to artificial heat, ...

60899

vineyard
VINEYARD,

60900

vinnewed
VIN'NEWED, a. Moldy; musty. [Not in use.]

60901

vinnewedness
VIN'NEWEDNESS, n. Mustiness; moldiness. [Not in use.]

60902

vinny
VIN'NY, a. [supra.] Moldy; musty. [Not in use.]

60903

vinolency
VIN'OLENCY, n. [L. vinolentia, from vinum, wine.] Drunkenness. [Not used.]

60904

vinolent
VIN'OLENT, a. Given to wine. [Not used.]

60905

vinosity
VINOS'ITY, n. State or quality of being vinous.

60906

vinous
VI'NOUS, a. [L. vinum, wine.]Having the qualities of wine; pertaining to wine; as a vinous taste; ...

60907

vintage
VINT'AGE, n. [L. vindemia.]1. The produce of the vine for the season. The vintage is abundant.2. ...

60908

vintager
VINT'AGER, n. One that gathers the vintage.

60909

vintner
VINT'NER, n. One who deals in wine; a wine-seller.

60910

vintry
VINT'RY, n. A place where wine is sold.

60911

viny
VI'NY, a.1. Belonging to vines; producing grapes.2. Abounding in vines.

60912

vinyard
VIN'YARD, n. A plantation of vines producing grapes; properly, an inclosure or yard for ...

60913

viol
VI'OL, n. A stringed musical instrument, of the same form as the violin, but larger, and having ...

60914

violable
VI'OLABLE, a. [L. violabilis. See Violate.]That may be violated, broken or injured.

60915

violaceous
VIOLA'CEOUS, a. [L. viola, a violet.] Resembling violets.

60916

violate
VI'OLATE, v.t. [L. violo.]1. To injure; to hurt; to interrupt; to disturb; as, to violate ...

60917

violated
VI'OLATED, pp. Injured; broken; transgressed; ravished.

60918

violating
VI'OLATING, ppr. Injuring; infringing; ravishing.

60919

violation
VIOLA'TION, n. 1. The act of violating or injuring; interruption, as of sleep or peace.2. ...

60920

violator
VI'OLATOR, n.1. One who violates, injures, interrupts or disturbs; as a violator of repose.2. One ...

60921

violence
VI'OLENCE, n. [L. violentia.]1. Physical force; strength of action or motion; as the violence of ...

60922

violent
VI'OLENT, a. [L. violentus.1. Forcible; moving or acting with physical strength; urged or driven ...

60923

violently
VI'OLENTLY, adv. With force; forcibly; vehemently; as, the wind blows violently.Forfeitures must ...

60924

violet
VI'OLET, n. [L. viola.]A plant and flower of the genus Viola, of many species.

60925

violin
VI'OLIN, n. A musical instrument with four strings, played with a bow; a fiddle; one of the most ...

60926

violinist
VI'OLINIST, n. A person skilled in playing on a violin.

60927

violist
VI'OLIST, n. A player on the viol.

60928

violoncello
VIOLONCEL'LO, n. A stringed instrument of music; a base viol of four strings, or a little base ...

60929

violono
VIOLO'NO, n. A double base, a deep toned instrument.

60930

viper
VI'PER, n. [L. vipera.]1. A serpent, a species of coluber, whose bite is remarkably venomous.A ...

60931

viperine
VI'PERINE, a. [L. viperinus.] Pertaining to a viper or to vipers.

60932

viperous
VI'PEROUS, a. [L. viperus.] Having the qualities of a viper; malignant; venomous; as a viperous ...

60933

virago
VIRA'GO, n. [L. from vir, a man.] 1. A woman of the extraordinary stature, strength and courage; ...

60934

vire
VIRE, n. An arrow. Obs.

60935

virelay
VI'RELAY n.A song or little poem among the Provencal poets in France; a roundelay. It sometimes ...

60936

virent
VI'RENT, a. [L. virens, from vireo, to flourish or be green.]Green; verdant; fresh.

60937

virgate
VIR'GATE, a. nearly vurgate. [L. virga, a rod.]In botany, having the shape of a rod or wand; as a ...

60938

virge
VIRGE, [See Verge.]

60939

virgilian
VIRGIL'IAN, a. 1. Pertaining to Virgil, the Roman poet.2. Resembling the style of Virgil.

60940

virgin
VIR'GIN, n. nearly vur'gin. [L. virgo.]1. A woman who has had no carnal knowledge of man.2. A ...

60941

virginal
VIR'GINAL, a. Pertaining to a virgin; maidenly; as virginal chastity.VIR'GINAL, n. A keyed ...

60942

virginity
VIRGIN'ITY, n. [L. virginitas.] Maidenhood; the state of having had no carnal knowledge of man.

60943

virgo
VIR'GO, n. [L.] A sign of the zodiac which the sun enters in August; a constellation, containing ...

60944

viridity
VIRID'ITY, n. [L. virditas, from vireo, to be green.]Greenness; verdure; the color of fresh ...

60945

virile
VI'RILE, a. [L. virilis, from vir, a man, vireo.]1. Pertaining to a man, in the eminent sense of ...

60946

virility
VIRIL'ITY, n. [L. virilitas.]1. Manhood; the state of the male sex, which has arrived to the ...

60947

virtu
VIR'TU, n. A love of the fine arts; a taste for curiosities.

60948

virtual
VIR'TUAL, a. [See Virtue.]1. Potential; having the power of acting or of invisible efficacy ...

60949

virtuality
VIRTUAL'ITY, n. Efficacy.

60950

virtually
VIR'TUALLY, adv. In efficacy or effect only; by means of some virtue or influence, or the ...

60951

virtuate
VIR'TUATE, v.t. To make efficacious. [Not in use.]

60952

virtue
VIRTUE, n. vur'tu. [L. virtus, from vireo, or its root. See Worth.] The radical sense is ...

60953

virtueless
VIR'TUELESS, a.1. Destitute of virtue.2. Destitute of efficacy or operating qualities.Virtueless ...

60954

virtuoso
VIRTUO'SO, n. A man skilled in the fine arts, particularly in music; or a man skilled in ...

60955

virtuosoship
VIRTUO'SOSHIP, n. The pursuits of a virtuoso.

60956

virtuous
VIR'TUOUS, a.1. Morally good; acting in conformity to the moral law; practicing the moral duties, ...

60957

virtuously
VIR'TUOUSLY, adv. In a virtuous manner; in conformity with the moral law or with duty; as a life ...

60958

virtuousness
VIR'TUOUSNESS, n. The state or character of being virtuous.

60959

virulence
VIR'ULENCE,'ULENCY, n. [from virulent.]1. That renders it extremely active in doing injury; ...

60960

virulent
VIR'ULENT, a. [L. virulentus, from virus, poison, that is, strength, from the same root as vir, ...

60961

virulently
VIR'ULENTLY, adv. With malignant activity; with bitter spite or severity.

60962

virus
VI'RUS, n. [L. See Virulent.] Foul or contagious matter of an ulcer, postule, &c.; poison.

60963

vis-a-vis
VIS-A-VIS, n. A carriage in which two persons sit face to face.

60964

visage
VIS'AGE, n. s as z. [L. visus, video.]The face; the countenance or look of a person, or of other ...

60965

visaged
VIS'AGED, a. Having a visage or countenance.

60966

viscera
VIS'CERA, n. [L.] The bowels or intestines; the contents of the abdomen and thorax.In its most ...

60967

visceral
VIS'CERAL, a. [L. viscera.]1. Pertaining to the viscera or intestines.2. Feeling; having ...

60968

viscerate
VIS'CERATE, v.t. [supra.] To exenterate; to embowel; to deprive of the entrails or viscera. ...

60969

viscid
VIS'CID, a. [L. viscidus; viscus, birdlime.] Glutinous; sticky; tenacious; not readily ...

60970

viscidity
VISCID'ITY, n.1. Glutinousness; tenacity; stickiness.2. Glutinous concretion.

60971

viscosity
VISCOS'ITY,

60972

viscount
VISCOUNT, n. vi'count. [L. vice-comes.]1. An officer who formerly supplied the place of the ...

60973

viscountess
VISCOUNTESS, n. vi'countess. The lady of a viscount; a peeress of the fourth order.

60974

viscountship
VISCOUNTSHIP, n. vi'countship.

60975

viscounty
VISCOUNTY, n. vi'county. The quality and office of a viscount.

60976

viscous
VIS'COUS, a. [L. viscus, birdlime.]Glutinous; clammy; sticky; adhesive; tenacious; as a viscous ...

60977

viscousness
VIS'COUSNESS, n. Glutinousness; tenacity; viscidity; that quality of soft substances which makes ...

60978

vise
VISE, n. An engine or instrument for griping and holding things, closed by a screw; used by ...

60979

vishnu
VISH'NU, n. In the Hindoo mythology, the name of one of the chief deities of the trimurti or ...

60980

visibility
VISIBIL'ITY, n. s as z. 1. The state or quality of being perceivable to the eye; as the ...

60981

visible
VIS'IBLE, a. s as z. [L. visibilis.]1. Perceivable by the eye; that can be seen; as a visible ...

60982

visibleness
VIS'IBLENESS, n. State or quality of being visible; visibility.

60983

visibly
VIS'IBLY, adv. In a manner perceptible to the eye. The day is visibly governed by the sun; the ...

60984

vision
VI'SION, n. s as z. [L. visio, from video, visus.]1. The act of seeing external objects; actual ...

60985

visional
VI'SIONAL, a. Pertaining to a vision.

60986

visionary
VI'SIONARY, a. 1. Affected by phantoms; disposed to receive impressions on the imagination.Or ...

60987

visit
VIS'IT, v.t. [L. visito, viso, to go to see. We see the sense is to go, to move to.]1. To go or ...

60988

visitable
VIS'ITABLE, a. Liable or subject to be visited. all hospitals built since the reformation are ...

60989

visitant
VIS'ITANT, n. One that goes or comes to see another; one who is a guest in the house of a ...

60990

visitation
VISITA'TION, n. [L. visito.] 1. The act of visiting.Nothing but peace and gentle visitation.2. ...

60991

visited
VIS'ITED, pp. Waited on; attended; inspected; subjected to sufferings; favored with relief or ...

60992

visiting
VIS'ITING, ppr. 1. Going or coming to see; attending on, as a physician; inspecting officially; ...

60993

visitor
VIS'ITOR, n.1. One who comes or goes to see another, as in civility or friendship.2. A superior ...

60994

visitorial
VISITO'RIAL, a. [from visitor; written improperly visitatorial.]Belonging to a judicial visitor or ...

60995

visive
VI'SIVE, a. [from L. visus.] Pertaining to the power of seeing; formed in the act of seeing. ...

60996

visne
VISNE, n. [L. vicinia.] In law, a neighborhood or near place; the place where an action is laid. ...

60997

visnomy
VIS'NOMY, n. [a barbarous contraction of physiognomy.] Face; countenance. [Not in use.]

60998

visor
VI'SOR, n. s as z. [L. visus, video; written also visard, visar, vizard.]1. A head piece or mask ...

60999

visored
VI'SORED, a. Wearing a visor; masked; disguised.

61000

vista
VIS'TA, n. [L. visus, video.] A view or prospect through an avenue, as between rows of trees; ...

61001

visual
VIS'UAL, a. s as z. [L. visus.]Pertaining to sight; used in sight; serving as the instrument of ...

61002

vital
VI'TAL, a. [L. vitalis, from vita, life. This must be a contraction of victa, for vivo forms ...

61003

vitality
VITAL'ITY, n. [from vital.]1. Power of subsisting in life; the principle of animation, or of ...

61004

vitalize
VI'TALIZE, v.t. To give life.

61005

vitally
VI'TALLY, adv. 1. In such a manner as to give life.The organic structure of human bodies, by ...

61006

vitals
VI'TALS, n. plu. 1. Parts of animal bodies essential to life, such as the viscera.2. The part ...

61007

vitellary
VIT'ELLARY, n. [L. vitellus, the yolk of an egg.]The place where the yolk of an egg swims in the ...

61008

vitiate
VI'TIATE, v.t. [L. vitio. See vice and Viciate.]1. To injure the substance or qualities of a ...

61009

vitiated
VI'TIATED, pp. Depraved; rendered impure; rendered defective and void.

61010

vitiating
VI'TIATING, ppr. Depraving; rendering of no validity.

61011

vitiation
VITIA'TION, n. 1. The act of vitiating; depravation; corruption; as the vitiation of the blood.2. ...

61012

vitilitigate
VITILIT'IGATE, v.i. [L. vitiosus and litigo.] To contend in law litigiously or cavilously. [Not ...

61013

vitilitigation
VITILITIGA'TION, n. Cavilous litigation. [Not in use.]Vitious, vitiously, vitiousness. [See ...

61014

vitreo-electric
VITREO-ELEC'TRIC, a. Containing or exhibiting positive electricity, or that which is excited by ...

61015

vitreous
VIT'REOUS, a. [L. vitreus, from vitrum, glass or woad.]1. Pertaining to glass.2. Consisting of ...

61016

vitreousness
VIT'REOUSNESS, n. The quality or state of being vitreous; resemblance of glass.

61017

vitrescence
VITRES'CENCE, n. [from L. vitrum, glass.] Glassiness; or the quality of being capable of ...

61018

vitrescent
VITRES'CENT, a. Capable of being formed into glass; tending to become glass.

61019

vitrescible
VITRES'CIBLE, a. That can be vitrified.

61020

vitrifaction
VITRIFAC'TION, n. [See vitrify.] The act, process or operation of converting into glass by heat; ...

61021

vitrifiable
VIT'RIFIABLE, a. [from vitrify.] Capable of being converted into glass by heat and fusion. Flint ...

61022

vitrificable
VIT'RIFICABLE, for vitrifiable. [Not used.]

61023

vitrificate
VIT'RIFICATE, for vitrify. [Not used.]

61024

vitrification
VITRIFICA'TION, for vitrifaction. [See Vitrifaction, which is generally used.]

61025

vitrified
VIT'RIFIED, pp. Converted into glass.

61026

vitriform
VIT'RIFORM, a. [L. vitrum, glass, and form.]Having the form or resemblance of glass.

61027

vitrify
VIT'RIFY, v.t. [L. vitrum, glass, and facio, to make.]To convert into glass by fusion or the ...

61028

vitriol
VIT'RIOL, n. [L. vitrum, glass; perhaps from its color.]1. In mineralogy, native vitriol is a ...

61029

vitriolate
VIT'RIOLATE, v.t. To convert, as sulphur in any compound, into sulphuric acid, formerly called ...

61030

vitriolated
VIT'RIOLATED, pp. Converted into sulphuric acid or vitriol.

61031

vitriolating
VIT'RIOLATING, ppr. Turning into sulphuric acid or vitrol.

61032

vitriolation
VITRIOLA'TION, n. The act or process of converting into sulphuric acid or vitriol.

61033

vitriolic
VITRIOL'IC, a. Pertaining to vitriol; having the qualities of vitriol, or obtained from ...

61034

vitriolizable
VIT'RIOLIZABLE, a. Capable of being converted into sulphuric acid.

61035

vitriolization
VITRIOLIZA'TION. [See Vitriolation.]

61036

vitriolize
VIT'RIOLIZE. [See Vitriolate.]

61037

vitriolized
VIT'RIOLIZED. [See Vitriolated.]

61038

vitriolizing
VIT'RIOLIZING, [See Vitriolating.]

61039

vituline
VIT'ULINE, a. [L. vitulinus.] Belonging to a calf, or to veal.

61040

vituperable
VITU'PERABLE, a. [See Vituperate.]Blameworthy; censurable. [Not used.]

61041

vituperate
VITU'PERATE, v.t. [L. vitupero.] To blame; to censure. [Little used.]

61042

vituperation
VITUPERA'TION, n. [L. vituperatio.] Blame; censure. [Little used.]

61043

vituperative
VITU'PERATIVE, a. Uttering or writing censure; containing censure.

61044

vivacious
VIVA'CIOUS, a. [L. vivax, from vivo, to live.]1. Lively; active; sprightly in temper or ...

61045

vivaciousness
VIVA'CIOUSNESS, n.1. Activity; liveliness; sprightliness of temper or behavior; vivacity.2. Power ...

61046

vivacity
VIVAC'ITY, n. [L. vivacitas.]1. Liveliness; sprightliness of temper or behavior; as a lady of ...

61047

vivary
VI'VARY, n. [L. vivarium, from vivo, to live.]A warren; a place for keeping living animals, as a ...

61048

vive
VIVE, a. [L. vivus.] Lively; forcible. [Not in use.]

61049

vively
VI'VELY, adv. In a lively manner. [Not used.]

61050

vivency
VI'VENCY, n. [L. vivens, from vivo.] Manner of supporting life or vegetation. [Not in use.]

61051

vives
VIVES, n. A disease of animals, particularly of horses, seated in the glads under the ear, where a ...

61052

vivianite
VIV'IANITE, n. A phosphate of iron, of various shades of blue and green.

61053

vivid
VIV'ID, a. [L. vividus, from vivo, to live.]1. Lively; sprightly; active.Body is a fit workhouse ...

61054

vividly
VIV'IDLY, adv. 1. With life; with strength.Sensitive objects affect a man much more vividly than ...

61055

vividness
VIV'IDNESS, n.1. Life; strength; sprightliness.2. Strength of coloring; brightness.

61056

vivific
VIVIF'IC,

61057

vivifical
VIVIF'ICAL, a. [L. vivificus. See Vivify.] Giving life; reviving; enlivening.

61058

vivificate
VIV'IFICATE, v.t. [L. vivifico, vivus, alive, and facio, to make.]1. to give life to; to animate. ...

61059

vivification
VIVIFICA'TION, n.1. The act of giving life; revival.2. Among chimists, the act of giving new ...

61060

vivificative
VIV'IFICATIVE, a. Able to animate or give life.

61061

vivified
VIV'IFIED, pp. revived; endued with life.

61062

vivify
VIV'IFY, v.t. [L. vivfico; vivus, alive, and facio, to make.]To endue with life; to animate; to ...

61063

vivifying
VIV'IFYING, ppr. enduing with life; communicating life to.

61064

viviparous
VIVIP'AROUS, a. [L. vivus, alive, and pario, to bear.]1. Producing young in a living state, as ...

61065

vixen
VIX'EN, n. [vixen is a she fox, or a fox's cub.A froward, turbulent, quarrelsome woman.

61066

vixenly
VIX'ENLY, a. having the qualities of a vixen.

61067

viz
VIZ. a contraction of videlicet; to wit, that is, namely.

61068

vizard
VIZ'ARD, n. a mask. [See Visor.]VIZ'ARD, v.t. To mask.

61069

vizer
VI'ZER, n. The chief minister of the Turkish empire.

61070

vizier
VIZ'IER,

61071

vocable
VO'CABLE, n. [L. vocabulum. See Voice.]A word; a term; a name.

61072

vocabulary
VOCAB'ULARY, n. [L. vocabulum, a word.]A list or collection of the words of a language, arranged ...

61073

vocal
VO'CAL, a. [L. vocalis. See Voice.]1. Having a voice.To hill or valley, fountain or fresh shade, ...

61074

vocality
VOCAL'ITY, n. [L. vocalitas.] Quality of being utterable by the voice; as the vocality of the ...

61075

vocalize
VO'CALIZE, v.t. to form into voice; to make vocal.It is one thing to give impulse to breath alone, ...

61076

vocalized
VO'CALIZED, pp. Made vocal; formed into voice.

61077

vocalizing
VO'CALIZING, ppr. Forming into voice or sound.

61078

vocally
VO'CALLY, adv.1. With voice; with an audible sound.2. In words; as, to express desires vocally.

61079

vocation
VOCA'TION, n. [L. vocatio, from voco, to call. See Voice.]1. Among divines, a calling by the ...

61080

vocative
VOC'ATIVE, a. [L. vocativus.] Relating to calling; as the vocative case in grammar.VOC'ATIVE, n. ...

61081

vociferate
VOCIF'ERATE, v.i. [L. vocifero, vex and fero.] To cry out with vehemence; to exclaim.VOCIF'ERATE, ...

61082

vociferating
VOCIF'ERATING, ppr. Crying out with vehemence; uttering with a loud voice.

61083

vociferation
VOCIFERA'TION, n. A violent outcry; vehement utterance of the voice.

61084

vociferous
VOCIF'EROUS, a. Making a loud outcry; clamorous; noisy; as vociferous heralds.

61085

vogue
VOGUE, n. vig. [The sense of vogue is way, or the going of the world.]The way or fashion of ...

61086

voice
VOICE, n. [L. vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is ...

61087

voiced
VOIC'ED, pp. 1. Fitted to produce the proper tones.2. a. Furnished with a voice.

61088

voiceless
VOICELESS, a vois'less. Having no voice or vote.

61089

void
VOID, a. [L. viduus, divido. Gr.]1. Empty; vacant; not occupied with any visible matter; as a ...

61090

voidable
VOID'ABLE, a. That may be annulled or made void, or that may be adjudged void, invalid or of no ...

61091

voidance
VOID'ANCE, n.1. The act of emptying.2. The act of ejecting from a benefice; ejection.3. Vacancy; ...

61092

voided
VOID'ED, pp.1. Thrust out; evacuated.2. a. In heraldry, having the inner or middle part cut out, ...

61093

voider
VOID'ER, n.1. A basket in which broken meat is carried from the table.2. One who evacuates.3. ...

61094

voiding
VOID'ING, ppr.1. Ejecting; evacuating.2. Making or declaring void, or of no force.3. Quitting; ...

61095

voidness
VOID'NESS, n. 1. Emptiness; vacuity; destitution.2. Nullify; inefficacy; want of binding ...

61096

voiture
VOI'TURE, n. [L. vectus, veho.] Carriage. [Not English.]

61097

volalkali
VOLAL'KALI, n. Volatile alkali; by contraction.

61098

volant
VO'LANT, a. [L. volo, to fly.]1. Flying; passing through the air; as volant automata.2. Nimble; ...

61099

volatile
VOL'ATILE, a. [L. volatilis, from volo, to fly.]1. Flying; passing through the air on wings, or ...

61100

volatileness
VOL'ATILENESS,

61101

volatility
VOLATIL'ITY, n. 1. Disposition to exhale or evaporate; the quality of being capable of ...

61102

volatilization
VOLATILIZA'TION, n. [from volatilize.] The act or process of rendering volatile, or rather of ...

61103

volatilize
VOL'ATILIZE, v.t. To render volatile; to cause to exhale or evaporate; to cause to pass off in ...

61104

volatilized
VOL'ATILIZED, pp. Rendered volatile; caused to rise and float in air.

61105

volatilizing
VOL'ATILIZING, ppr. Rendering volatile; causing to rise and float in air.

61106

volcanic
VOLCAN'IC, a. [from volcano.] 1. Pertaining to volcanoes; as volcanic heat.2. Produced by a ...

61107

volcanist
VOL'CANIST, n. [from volcano.]1. One versed in the history and phenomena of volcanoes.2. One who ...

61108

volcanite
VOL'CANITE, n. A mineral, otherwise called augite.

61109

volcanity
VOLCAN'ITY, n. The state of being volcanic or of volcanic origin.

61110

volcanization
VOLCANIZA'TION, n. [from volcanize.] The process of undergoing volcanic heat and being affected ...

61111

volcanize
VOL'CANIZE, v.t. To subject to or cause to undergo volcanic heat and to be affected by its action.

61112

volcanized
VOL'CANIZED, pp. Affected by volcanic heat.

61113

volcano
VOLCA'NO, n. 1. In geology, an opening in the surface of the earth or in a mountain, from which ...

61114

vole
VOLE, n. A deal at cards that draws all the tricks.

61115

volery
VO'LERY, n.1. A flight of birds.2. A large bird-cage, in which the birds have room to fly.

61116

volitation
VOLITA'TION, n. [L. volito, dim. of volo, to fly.] The act of flying; flight.

61117

volition
VOLI'TION, n. [L. volitio, from volo, to will. See Will.]1. The act of willing the act of ...

61118

volitive
VOL'ITIVE, a. Having the power to will.They not only perfect the intellectual faculty, but the ...

61119

volley
VOL'LEY, n. plu. volleys. [L. volo.]1. A flight of shot; the discharge of many small arms at ...

61120

volleyed
VOL'LEYED, a. [from volley.] disploded; discharged with a sudden burst; as volleyed thunder.

61121

volt
VOLT, n. [L. volutus, volvo.]1. a round or circular tread; a gait of two treads, made by a horse ...

61122

voltaic
VOLTA'IC, a. Pertaining to Volta, the discoverer of voltaism; as the voltaic pile.Volatic ...

61123

voltaism
VOL'TAISM, n. That branch of electrical science which has its source in the chimical action ...

61124

volubilate
VOLU'BILATE,

61125

volubile
VOL'UBILE, a. In gardening, a volubilate stem is one that climbs by winding or twining round ...

61126

volubility
VOLUBIL'ITY, n. [L. volubilitas, from volvo, to roll.]1. The capacity of being rolled; aptness to ...

61127

voluble
VOL'UBLE, a. [L. volubilis.] 1. Formed so as to roll with ease, or to be easily set in motion; ...

61128

volubly
VOL'UBLY, adv. In a rolling or fluent manner.

61129

volume
VOL'UME, n. [L. volumen, a roll; volvo, to roll. to make u long, in this word, is palpably ...

61130

volumed
VOL'UMED, a. Having the form of a volume or roll; as volumed mist.

61131

voluminous
VOLU'MINOUS, a.1. Consisting of many coils or complications.The serpent roll'd voluminous and ...

61132

voluminously
VOLU'MINOUSLY, adv. In many volumes; very copiously.

61133

voluminousness
VOLU'MINOUSNESS, n. State of being bulky or in many volumes.

61134

volumist
VOL'UMIST, n. One who writes a volume; an author. [Not in use.]

61135

voluntarily
VOL'UNTARILY, adv. [from voluntary.] Spontaneously; of one's own will; without being moved, ...

61136

voluntariness
VOL'UNTARINESS, n. The state of being voluntary or optional.

61137

voluntary
VOL'UNTARY, a. [L. voluntarius, from voluntas, will, from volo.]1. Acting by choice or ...

61138

volunteer
VOLUNTEE'R, n. A person who enters into military or other service of his own free will. In ...

61139

voluptuary
VOLUP'TUARY, n. [L. volupturius, from voluptas, pleasure.]A man addicted to luxury or the ...

61140

voluptuous
VOLUP'TUOUS, a. [L. voluptuoosus.]Given to the enjoyments of luxury and pleasure; indulging to ...

61141

voluptuously
VOLUP'TUOUSLY, adv. Luxuriously; with free indulgence of sensual pleasures; as, to live ...

61142

voluptuousness
VOLUP'TUOUSNESS, n. Luxuriousness; addictedness to pleasure or sensual gratification.Where no ...

61143

volutation
VOLUTA'TION, n. [L. volutatio, from voluto, from volvo, Eng. to wallow.]A wallowing; a rolling of ...

61144

volute
VOLU'TE, n. [L. volutus, volvo.]1. In architecture, a kind of spiral scroll, used in the Ionic ...

61145

volution
VOLU'TION, n. A spiral turn.

61146

volutite
VOL'UTITE, n. A petrified shell of the genus Voluta.

61147

volvic
VOL'VIC, a. Denoting a species of stone or lava.

61148

vomic
VOM'IC, a. The vomic nut, nux vomica, is the seed of the Strychnos nux vomica, a native of the ...

61149

vomica
VOM'ICA, n. [L.] An encysted tumor on the lungs.

61150

vomit
VOM'IT, v.i. [L. vomo. probably the Gr. is the same word, with the loss of its first letter.]To ...

61151

vomited
VOM'ITED, pp. Ejected from the stomach through the mouth, or from any deep place through an ...

61152

vomiting
VOM'ITING, ppr. Discharging from the stomach through the mouth, or ejecting from any deep ...

61153

vomition
VOMI'TION, n. The act or power of vomiting.

61154

vomitive
VOM'ITIVE, a. Causing the ejection of matter from the stomach; emetic.

61155

vomitory
VOM'ITORY, a. [L. vomitorius.] Procuring vomits; causing to eject from the stomach; ...

61156

voracious
VORA'CIOUS, a. [L. vorax, from voro, to devour; Heb. to clear away, to consume; Gr. food.]1. ...

61157

voraciously
VORA'CIOUSLY, adv. With greedy appetite; ravenously.

61158

voraciousness
VORA'CIOUSNESS, n. Greediness of appetite; ravenousness; eagerness to devour; rapaciousness.

61159

voracity
VORAC'ITY, n. Greediness of appetite; voraciousness.Creatures by their voracity pernicious, have ...

61160

voraginous
VORAG'INOUS, a. [L. voraginosus, vorago.] Full of gulfs.

61161

vortex
VOR'TEX, n. plu. vortices or vortexes. [L. from verto.]1. A whirlpool; a whirling or circular ...

61162

vortical
VOR'TICAL, a. Whirling; turning; as a vortical motion.

61163

votaress
VO'TARESS, n. A female devoted to any service, worship or state of life.No rosary this votaress ...

61164

votarist
VO'TARIST, n. [See votary.] One devoted or given up to any person or thing, to any service, ...

61165

votary
VO'TARY, a. [from L. votus, from voveo. See Vow.]Devoted; promised; consecrated by a vow or ...

61166

vote
VOTE, n. [L. votum, from voveo, to vow. Votum is properly wish or will.]1. Suffrage; the ...

61167

voted
VOTED, pp. Expressed by vote or suffrage; determined.

61168

voter
VOTER, n. One who has a legal right to vote or give his suffrage.

61169

voting
VOTING, ppr. Expressing the mind, will or preference in election, or in determining questions ...

61170

votive
VOTIVE, a. Given by vow; devoted; as votive offereings. Votive medals, are those on which vows of ...

61171

vouch
VOUCH, v.i. To bear witness; to give testimony or full attestation. I canot vouch for the truth of ...

61172

vouched
VOUCHED, pp. Called to witness; affirmed or fully attested; called into court to make good a ...

61173

vouchee
VOUCHEE, n. In law, the person who is vouched or called into court to support or make good his ...

61174

voucher
VOUCHER, n. 1. One who gives witness or full attestation to any thing.The great writers of that age ...

61175

vouching
VOUCHING, ppr. Calling to witness; attesting by affirmation; calling in to maintain warranty of ...

61176

vouchor
VOUCHOR, n. In law, the tenant in a writ of right; one who calls in another to establish his ...

61177

vouchsafe
VOUCHSAFE, v.t [vouch and safe; to vouch or answer for safety.]1. To permit to be done without ...

61178

vouchsafed
VOUCHSAFED, pp. Granted in condescension.

61179

vouchsafement
VOUCHSAFEMENT, n. Grant in condescension; as, Gods greatest communicated vouchsafements.

61180

vouchsafing
VOUCHSAFING, ppr. Condescending to grant; deigning.

61181

vow
VOW, n.1. A solemn promisemade to God, or by a pagan to his deity. The Roman generals when they ...

61182

vowed
VOWED, pp. Solemnly promised to God; given or consecrated by solemn promise.

61183

vowel
VOWEL, n.1. In grammer, a simple sound; a sound utterd by simply opening the mouth or organs; as ...

61184

voweled
VOWELED, a. Furnished with vowels.

61185

vower
VOWER, n. One who makes a vow.

61186

vowing
VOWING, ppr. Making a vow.

61187

voyage
VOYAGE, n.1. A passing by sea or water from one place, port or country to another, especially a ...

61188

voyager
VOYAGER, n. One who sails or passes by sea or water.A private voyager I pass the main.

61189

vulcanist
VULCANIST. [See Volcanist.]

61190

vulcano
VULCANO. [See Volcano.]

61191

vulgar
VULGAR , a. 1. Pertaining to the common unlettered people; as vulgar life.2. Used or practiced by ...

61192

vulgarism
VULGARISM, n. 1. Grossness of manners; vulgarity. [Little used.]2. A vulgar phrase or expression. ...

61193

vulgarity
VULGARITY, n. 1. Mean condition in life; the state of the lower classes of society.2. Grossness or ...

61194

vulgarize
VULGARIZE, v.t. To make vulgar.

61195

vulgarly
VULGARLY, adv. 1. Commonly; in the ordinary manner among the common people. Such an one we vulgarly ...

61196

vulgate
VULGATE, n. A very ancient Latin version of the scriptures, one the only one which the Romish ...

61197

vulnerable
VULNERABLE, a.1. That may be wounded; susceptible of wounds or external injuries; as a vulnerable ...

61198

vulnerary
VULNERARY, a. Useful in healing wounds; adapted to the cure of external injuries; as vulnerary ...

61199

vulnerate
VULNERATE, v.t. To wound; to hurt. [Not in use.]

61200

vulneration
VULNERATION, n. The act of wounding. [not in use.]

61201

vulpine
VULPINE, a. Pertaining to the fox; cunning; crafty; artful.

61202

vulpinite
VULPINITE, n. A mineral of a grayish white color, splendent and massive; its fracture foliated. It ...

61203

vultur
VULTUR,

61204

vulture
VULTURE, n. A genus of fowls, belonging to the order of Accipiters. The bill is straight, but ...

61205

vulturine
VULTURINE, a. Belonging to the Vultur; having the qualities of the Vultur; resembling the Vultur; ...

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prodigality

PRODIGAL'ITY, n.

1. Extravagance in the expenditure of what one possesses, particularly of money; profusion; waste; excessive liberality. It is opposed to frugality, economy, and parsimony.

By the Roman law a man of notorious prodigality was treated as non compos.

The most severe censor cannot but be pleased with the prodigality of his wit.

2. Profuse liberality.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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