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Wednesday - December 7, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

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Please click on the word of the partial definition to see the complete definition

ID Word Definition

18193

e
DESCRIPTIV,E, a. Containing description; tending to describe; having the quality of representing; ...

18194

each
EACH, a. Every one of any number separately considered or treated.To all of them he gave each man ...

18195

eachwhere
E'ACHWHERE, adv. Every where.

18196

ead
EAD,ED, in names, is a Saxon word signifying happy, fortunate; as in Edward, happy preserver; ...

18197

eadish
E'ADISH, n. The latter pasture or grass that comes after mowing or reaping; called also eagrass, ...

18198

eager
E'AGER, a. [L. acer, fierce, brisk, sharp, sour; acus, Eng.edge.]1. Excited by ardent desire in ...

18199

eagerly
E'AGERLY, adv. With great ardor of desire; ardently; earnestly; warmly; with prompt zeal; as, he ...

18200

eagerness
E'AGERNESS, n. Ardent desire to do, pursue or obtain any thing; animated zeal; vehement longing; ...

18201

eagle
E'AGLE, n. [L. aquila.]1. A rapacious fowl of the genus Falco. The beak is crooked and furnished ...

18202

eagle-eyed
E'AGLE-EYED, a. Sharpsighted as an eagle; having an acute sight.1. Discerning; having acute ...

18203

eagle-sighted
E'AGLE-SIGHTED, a. Having acute sight.

18204

eagle-speed
E'AGLE-SPEED,n. Swiftness like that of an eagle.

18205

eagle-stone
E'AGLE-STONE, n. Etite, a variety of argillaceous oxyd of iron, occurring in masses varying from ...

18206

eagle-winged
E'AGLE-WINGED, a. Having the wings of an eagle; swift as an eagle.

18207

eagless
E'AGLESS, n. A female or hen eagle.

18208

eaglet
E'AGLET, n. A young eagle or a diminutive eagle.

18209

eagre
EA'GRE, n. A tide swelling above another tide, as in the Severn.

18210

ealderman
EALDERMAN. [See Aldlerman.]

18211

eame
EAME, n. Uncle.

18212

ean
EAN, v.t. or i. To yean. [See Yean.]

18213

eanling
E'ANLING, n. A lamb just brought forth. [Not used.]

18214

ear
E'AR, n. [L. auris, whence auricula; audio.]1. The organ of hearing; the organ by which sound is ...

18215

ear-bored
E'AR-BORED, a. Having the ear perforated.

18216

ear-deafening
E'AR-DEAFENING, a. Stunning the ear with noise.

18217

ear-erecting
EAR-ERECT'ING, a. Setting up the ears.

18218

ear-piercing
E'AR-PIERCING, a. Piercing the ear, as a shrill or sharp sound.

18219

ear-witness
E'AR-WITNESS, n. One who is able to give testimony to a fact from his own hearing.

18220

earable
E'ARABLE, a. Used to be tilled.

18221

earache
E'ARACHE, n. [See Ache.] Pain in the ear.

18222

earal
E'ARAL, a. Receiving by the ear. [Not used.]

18223

eared
E'ARED, pp. Having ears; having spikes formed, as corn.

18224

earing
E'ARING, n. In seamen's language, a small rope employed to fasten the upper corner of a sail to ...

18225

earl
EARL, n. erl.A British title of nobility, or a nobleman, the third in rank, being next below a ...

18226

earl-marshal
EARL-M`ARSHAL, n. An officer in Great Britain, who has the superintendence of military ...

18227

earlap
E'ARLAP, n. The tip of the ear.

18228

earldom
EARLDOM, n. erl'dom. The seignory, jurisdiction or dignity of an earl.

18229

earles-penny
EARLES-PENNY, n. Money given in part payment. [L. arrha.] [Not in use.]

18230

earless
E'ARLESS, a. Destitute of ears; disinclined to hear or listen.

18231

earliness
EARLINESS, n. er'liness. [See Early and Ere.]A state of advance or forwardness; a state of being ...

18232

earlock
E'ARLOCK, n. A lock or curl of hair,near the ear.

18233

early
EARLY, a. er'ly. [Eng.ere.]1. In advance of something else; prior in time; forward; as early ...

18234

earmark
E'ARMARK, n. A mark on the ear, by which a sheep is known.E'ARMARK, v.t. To mark, as sheep by ...

18235

earn
EARN, v.t. ern.1. To merit or deserve by labor, or by any performance; to do that which entitles ...

18236

earned
EARNED, pp. ern'ed. Merited by labor or performance; gained.

18237

earnest
EARNEST, a. ern'est.1. Ardent in the pursuit of an object; eager to obtain; having a longing ...

18238

earnestly
EARNESTLY, adv. ern'estly. Warmly; zealously; importunately; eagerly; with real desire.Being in an ...

18239

earnestness
EARNESTNESS, n. ern'estness. Ardor or zeal in the pursuit of any thing; eagerness; animated ...

18240

earnful
EARNFUL, a. ern'ful. Full of anxiety. [Not used.]

18241

earning
EARNING, ppr. ern'ing. Meriting by services; gaining by labor or performance.EARNING, n. ...

18242

earpick
E'ARPICK, n. An instrument for cleansing the ear.

18243

earring
E'ARRING, n. A pendant; an ornament, sometimes set with diamonds, pearls or other jewels, worn at ...

18244

earsh
EARSH, n. [See Ear, to plow.] A plowed field. [Not in use.]

18245

earshot
E'ARSHOT, n. Reach of the ear; the distance at which words may be heard.

18246

earth
EARTH, n. erth.1. Earth, in its primary sense, signifies the particles which compose the mass of ...

18247

earth-created
EARTH-CREA'TED, a. Formed of earth.

18248

earthbag
EARTH'BAG, n. A bag filled with earth, used for defense in war.

18249

earthbank
EARTH'BANK, n. A bank or mound of earth.

18250

earthboard
EARTH'BOARD, n. The board of a plow that turns over the earth; the mold-board.

18251

earthborn
EARTH'BORN, a. Born of the earth; terrigenous; springing originally from the earth; as the fabled ...

18252

earthbound
EARTH'BOUND, a. Fastened by the pressure of the earth.

18253

earthbred
EARTH'BRED, a. Low; abject; groveling.

18254

earthen
EARTH'EN, a. erth'n. Made of earth; made of clay; as an earthen vessel; earthen ware.

18255

earthfed
EARTH'FED, a. Low; abject.

18256

earthflax
EARTH'FLAX, n. Amianth; a fibrous, flexile, elastic mineral substance, consisting of short ...

18257

earthiness
EARTH'INESS, n. The quality of being earthy, or of containing earth; grossness.

18258

earthliness
EARTH'LINESS, n. [from earthly.] The quality of being earthly; grossness.1. Worldliness; strong ...

18259

earthling
EARTH'LING, n. An inhabitant of the earth; a mortal; a frail creature.

18260

earthly
EARTH'LY, a. Pertaining to the earth, or to this world.Our earthly house of this tabernacle. 2 ...

18261

earthly-minded
EARTHLY-MINDED, a. Having a mind devoted to earthly things.

18262

earthly-mindedness
EARTHLY-MINDEDNESS, n. Grossness; sensuality; extreme devotedness to earthly objects.

18263

earthnut
EARTH'NUT, n. The groundnut, or root of the Arachis; a small round bulb or knob, like a nut. This ...

18264

earthquake
EARTH'QUAKE, n. A shaking, trembling or concussion of the earth; sometimes a slight tremor; at ...

18265

earthshaking
EARTH'SHAKING, a. Shaking the earth; having power to shake the earth.

18266

earthworm
EARTH'WORM, n. The dew worm, a species of Lumbricus; a worm that lives under ground.1. A mean ...

18267

earthy
EARTH'Y, a. Consisting of earth; as earthy matter.1. Resembling earth; as an earthy taste or ...

18268

earwax
E'ARWAX, n. The cerumen; a thick viscous substance, secreted by the glands of the ear into the ...

18269

earwig
E'ARWIG, n. A genus of insects of the order of Coleopters. The antennae are bristly; the elytra ...

18270

ease
EASE, n. s as z. [L. otium.]1. Rest; an undisturbed state. Applied to the body, freedom from ...

18271

easeful
E'ASEFUL, a. Quiet; peaceful; fit for rest.

18272

easefully
E'ASEFULLY, adv. With ease or quiet.

18273

easel
E'ASEL, n. The frame on which painters place their canvas.Easel-pieces, among painters, are the ...

18274

easement
E'ASEMENT, n. Convenience; accommodation; that which gives ease, relief or assistance.He has the ...

18275

easily
E'ASILY, adv. [from easy.] Without difficulty or great labor; without great exertion, or sacrifice ...

18276

easiness
E'ASINESS, n. Freedom from difficulty; ease.Easiness and difficulty are relative terms.1. ...

18277

east
EAST, n. [L. oriens, this word may belong to the root of hoise,hoist.]1. The point in the ...

18278

easter
E'ASTER, n. A festival of the christian church observed in commemoration of our Savior's ...

18279

easterling
E'ASTERLING, n. A native of some country eastward of another.1. A species of waterfowl.

18280

easterly
E'ASTERLY, a. Coming from the eastward; as an easterly wind.1. Situated towards the east; as the ...

18281

eastern
E'ASTERN, a. Oriental; being or dwelling in the east; as eastern kings; eastern countries; eastern ...

18282

eastward
E'ASTWARD, adv. [east and ward.] Toward the east; in the direction of east from some point or ...

18283

easy
E'ASY, a. s as z. [See Ease.] Quiet;being at rest; free from pain, disturbance or annoyance. The ...

18284

eat
EAT, v.t. pret. ate; pp. eat or eaten. [L. edo, esse, esum.]1. To bite or chew and swallow, as ...

18285

eatable
E'ATABLE, a. That may be eaten; fit to be eaten; proper for food; esculent.E'ATABLE, n. Any thing ...

18286

eaten
E'ATEN, pp. ee'tn. Chewed and swallowed; consumed; corroded.

18287

eater
E'ATER, n. One who eats; that which eats or corrodes; a corrosive.

18288

eath
EATH, a. easy, and adv. easily.

18289

eating
E'ATING, ppr. Chewing and swallowing; consuming; corroding.

18290

eating-house
E'ATING-HOUSE, n. A house where provisions are sold ready dressed.

18291

eaves
EAVES, n. plu. [In English the word has a plural ending.]The edge or lower border of the roof of a ...

18292

eaves-drop
E'AVES-DROP, v.i. [eaves and drop.] To stand under the eaves or near the windows of a house, to ...

18293

eaves-dropper
E'AVES-DROPPER, n. One who stands under the eaves or near the window or door of a house, to listen ...

18294

ebb
EBB, n. The reflux of the tide; the return of tidewater towards the sea; opposed to flood or ...

18295

ebbing
EBB'ING, ppr. Flowing back; declining; decaying.EBB'ING, n. The reflux of the tide.

18296

ebbtide
EBB'TIDE, n. The reflux of tide-water; the retiring tide.

18297

ebionite
EB'IONITE,n. The ebionites were heretics who denied the divinity of Christ and rejected many parts ...

18298

ebon
EB'ON, a. [See Ebony.] Consisting of ebony; like ebony; black.

18299

ebonize
EB'ONIZE, v.t. [See Ebony.] To make black or tawny; to tinge with the color of ebony; as, to ...

18300

ebony
EB'ONY, n. [L. ebenus.] A species of hard,heavy and durable wood, which admits of a fine polish ...

18301

ebony-tree
EB'ONY-TREE, n. The Ebenus, a small tree constituting a genus, growing in Crete and other isles of ...

18302

ebracteate
EBRAC'TEATE, a. [e priv. and bractea.] In botany,without a bractea or floral leaf.

18303

ebriety
EBRI'ETY, n. [L. ebrietas, from ebrius, intoxicated.]Drunkenness; intoxication by spirituous ...

18304

ebrillade
EBRIL'LADE, n. A check given to a horse, by a sudden jerk of one rein, when he refuses to turn.

18305

ebriosity
EBRIOS'ITY, n. [L. ebriositas.] Habitual drunkenness.

18306

ebulliency
EBUL'LIENCY, n. [See Ebullition.] A boiling over.

18307

ebullient
EBUL'LIENT, a. Boiling over, as a liquor.

18308

ebullition
EBULLI'TION, n. [L. ebullitio, from ebullio, bullio; Eng. to boil,which see.]1. The operation of ...

18309

ecaudate
ECAU'DATE, a. [ e priv. and L. cauda, a tail.] In botany, without a tail or spur.

18310

eccentric
ECCEN'TRIC,

18311

eccentrical
ECCEN'TRICAL, a. [L. eccentricus; ex, from , and centrum, center.]1. Deviating or departing from ...

18312

eccentricity
ECCENTRIC'ITY, n. Deviation from a center.1. The state of having a center different from that of ...

18313

ecchymosis
ECCHYM'OSIS, n. In medicine, an appearance of livid spots on the skin, occasioned by extravasated ...

18314

ecclesiastes
ECCLESIAS'TES, n. [Gr.] a canonical book of the old testament.

18315

ecclesiastic
ECCLESIAS'TIC,

18316

ecclesiastical
ECCLESIAS'TICAL, . [L; Gr.an assembly or meeting, whence a church; to call forth or convoke; to ...

18317

ecclesiasticus
ECCLESIAS'TICUS, n. A book of the aprocrypha.

18318

eccoprotic
ECCOPROT'IC, a. [Gr. out or from, and stercus.] Having the quality of promoting alvine ...

18319

echelon
ECHELON', n. In military tactics,the position of an army in the form of steps,or with one division ...

18320

echinate
ECH'INATE

18321

echinated
ECH'INATED, a. [L. echinum, a hedgehog.] Set with prickles, prickly, like a hedgehog; having ...

18322

echinite
ECH'INITE, n. [See Echinus.] A fossil found in chalk pits, called centronia; a petrified shell ...

18323

echinus
ECH'INUS, n. [L. from Gr.] A hedgehog.1. A shell-fish set with prickles or spines. The Echinus, ...

18324

echo
ECH'O, n. [L. echo; Gr.sound, to sound.]1. A sound reflected or reverberated from a solid body; ...

18325

echoed
ECH'OED, pp. Reverberated, as sound.

18326

echoing
ECH'OING, ppr. Sending back sound; as echoing hills.

18327

echometer
ECHOM'ETER, n. [Gr. sound, and measure.] Among musicians, a scale or rule, with several lines ...

18328

echometry
ECHOM'ETRY, n. The art or act of measuring the duration of sounds.The art of constructing vaults ...

18329

eclaircise
ECLA'IRCISE, v.t. To make clear; to explain; to clear up what is not understood or misunderstood.

18330

eclaircissement
ECLA'IRCISSEMENT, n. Explanation; the clearing up of any thing not before understood.

18331

eclampsy
ECLAMP'SY, n. [Gr. a shining, to shine.] A flashing of light, a symptom of epilepsy. Hence, ...

18332

eclat
ECLAT, n. ecla.1. Primarily, a burst of applause; acclamation. Hence, applause; approbation; ...

18333

eclectic
ECLEC'TIC, a. [Gr. to choose.] Selecting; choosing; an epithet given to certain philosophers of ...

18334

eclectically
ECLEC'TICALLY, adv. By way of choosing or selecting; in the manner of the eclectical philosophers.

18335

eclegm
ECLEGM', n. [Gr.] A medicine made by the incorporation of oils with syrups.

18336

eclipse
ECLIPSE, n. eclips'. [L. eclipsis; Gr. defect, to fail, to leave.]1. Literally, a defect or ...

18337

eclipsed
ECLIPS'ED, pp. Concealed; darkened; obscured; disgraced.

18338

eclipsing
ECLIPS'ING, ppr. Concealing; obscuring; darkening; clouding.

18339

ecliptic
ECLIP'TIC, n. [Gr. to fail or be defective; L. eclipticus, linea ecliptica, the ecliptic line, or ...

18340

eclogue
EC'LOGUE, n. ec'log. [Gr. choice, to select.] Literally, a select piece. Hence, in poetry, a ...

18341

economic
ECONOM'IC

18342

economical
ECONOM'ICAL, a. [See Economy.] Pertaining to the regulation of household concerns; as the ...

18343

economically
ECONOM'ICALLY, adv. With economy; with frugality.

18344

economist
ECON'OMIST, n. One who manages domestic or other concerns with frugality; one who expends money, ...

18345

economize
ECON'OMIZE, v.i. To manage pecuniary concerns with frugality; to make a prudent use of money, or ...

18346

economized
ECON'OMIZED, pp. Used with frugality.

18347

economizing
ECONOMIZING, ppr. Using with frugality.

18348

economy
ECON'OMY, n. [L. oeconomia; Gr. house, and law, rule.]1. Primarily, the management, regulation ...

18349

ecphractic
ECPHRAC'TIC, a. [Gr.] In medicine, deobstruent; attenuating.ECPHRAC'TIC, n. A medicine which ...

18350

ecstasied
EC'STASIED, a. [See Ecstasy.] Enraptured; ravished; transported; delighted.

18351

ecstasy
EC'STASY, n. [Gr. to stand.]1. Primarily, a fixed state; a trance; a state in which the mind is ...

18352

ecstatic
ECSTAT'IC

18353

ecstatical
ECSTAT'ICAL, a. Arresting the mind; suspending the senses; entrancing.In pensive trance, and ...

18354

ectypal
EC'TYPAL, a. [infra.] Taken from the original.

18355

ectype
EC'TYPE, a. [Gr.] A copy. ]Not used.]

18356

ecumenic
ECUMEN'IC

18357

ecumenical
ECUMEN'ICAL, a. [Gr. the habitable world.] General; universal; as an ecumenical council.

18358

ecurie
EC'URIE, n. A stable; a covered place for horses.

18359

ed
EAD,ED, in names, is a Saxon word signifying happy, fortunate; as in Edward, happy preserver; ...

18360

edacious
EDA'CIOUS, a. [L. edax, from edo, to eat.] Eating; given to eating; greedy; voracious.

18361

edacity
EDAC'ITY, n. [L. edacitas, from edax, edo, to eat.] Greediness; voracity; ravenousness; rapacity.

18362

edder
ED'DER, n. In husbandry, such wood as is worked into the top of hedge-stakes to bind them ...

18363

edders
ED'DERS, n. A name given to a variety of the Arum esculentum, an esculent root.

18364

eddish
ED'DISH

18365

eddoes
ED'DOES

18366

eddy
ED'DY, n. [I find this word in no other language. It is usually considered as a compound of ...

18367

eddy-water
ED'DY-WATER, n. Among seamen, the water which falls back on the rudder of a ship under sail, called ...

18368

eddy-wind
ED'DY-WIND, n. The wind returned or beat back from a sail, a mountain or any thing that hinders ...

18369

edelite
ED'ELITE, n. A siliceous stone of a light gray color.

18370

edematous
EDEM'ATOUS, a. [Gr. a tumor; to swell.] Swelling with a serous humor; dropsical. An edematous ...

18371

eden
E'DEN, n. [Heb. pleasure, delight.] The country and garden in which Adam and Eve were placed by ...

18372

edenized
E'DENIZED, a. Admitted into paradise.

18373

edentated
EDEN'TATED, a. [L. edentatus, e and dens.] Destitute or deprived of teeth.

18374

edge
EDGE, n. [L. acies, acus.]1. In a general sense, the extreme border or point of any thing; as the ...

18375

edged
EDG'ED, pp. Furnished with an edge or border.1. Incited; instigated.2. a. Sharp; keen.

18376

edgeless
EDGELESS, a. Not sharp; blunt; obtuse; unfit to cut or penetrate; as an edgeless sword or weapon.

18377

edgetool
EDGETOOL, n. An instrument having a sharp edge.

18378

edgewise
EDGEWISE, adv. [edge and wise.] With the edge turned forward, or towards a particular point; in ...

18379

edging
EDG'ING, ppr. Giving an edge; furnishing with an edge.1. Inciting; urging on; goading; ...

18380

edible
ED'IBLE, a. [from L. edo, to eat.] Eatable; fit to be eaten as food; esculent. Some flesh is not ...

18381

edict
E'DICT, n. [L. edictum, from edico, to utter or proclaim; e and dico, to speak.]That which is ...

18382

edificant
ED'IFICANT, a. [infra.] Building. [Little used.]

18383

edification
EDIFICA'TION, n. [L. oedificatio. See Edify.]1. A building up, in a moral and religious sense; ...

18384

edificatory
ED'IFICATORY, a. Tending to edification.

18385

edifice
ED'IFICE, n. [L. oedificium. See Edify.] A building; a structure; a fabric; but appropriately, ...

18386

edificial
EDIFI'CIAL, a. Pertaining to edifices or to structure.

18387

edified
ED'IFIED, pp. Instructed; improved in literary, moral or religious knowledge.

18388

edifier
ED'IFIER, n. One that improves another by instructing him.

18389

edify
ED'IFY, v.t. [L. oedifico; oedes, a house, and facio, to make.]1. To build, in a literal sense. ...

18390

edifying
ED'IFYING, ppr. Building up in christian knowledge; instructing; improving the mind.

18391

edifyingly
ED'IFYINGLY, adv. In an edifying manner.

18392

edile
E'DILE, n. [L. oedilis, from oedes, a building.] A Roman magistrate whose chief business was to ...

18393

edileship
E'DILESHIP, n. The office of Edile in ancient Rome.

18394

edit
ED'IT, v.t. [from L. edo, to publish; e and do, to give.]1. Properly, to publish; more usually, to ...

18395

edited
ED'ITED, pp. Published; corrected; prepared and published.

18396

editing
ED'ITING, ppr. Publishing; preparing for publication.

18397

edition
EDI'TION, n. [L. editio, from edo, to publish.]1. The publication of any book or writing; as the ...

18398

editor
ED'ITOR, n. [L. from edo, to publish.] A publisher; particularly, a person who superintends an ...

18399

editorial
EDITO'RIAL, a. Pertaining to an editor, as editorial labors; written by an editor, as editorial ...

18400

editorship
ED'ITORSHIP, n. The business of an editor; the care and superintendence of a publication.

18401

edituate
EDIT'UATE, v.t. [Low L. oedituor, from oedes, a temple or house.]To defend or govern the house or ...

18402

educate
ED'UCATE, v.t. [L. educo, educare; e and duco, to lead.]To bring up, as a child; to instruct; to ...

18403

educated
ED'UCATED, pp. Brought up; instructed; furnished with knowledge or principles; trained, ...

18404

educating
ED'UCATING, ppr. Instructing; enlightening the understanding, and forming the manners.

18405

education
EDUCA'TION, n. [L. educatio.] The bringing up, as of a child, instruction; formation of manners. ...

18406

educational
EDUCA'TIONAL, a. Pertaining to education; derived from education; as educational habits.

18407

educator
ED'UCATOR, n. One who educates.

18408

educe
EDU'CE, v.t. [L. educo, eduxi; e and duco, to lead.]To bring or draw out; to extract; to produce ...

18409

educed
EDU'CED, pp. Drawn forth, extracted; produced.

18410

educing
EDU'CING, ppr. Drawing forth; producing.

18411

educt
E'DUCT, n. [L. eductum, from educo.] Extracted matter; that which is educed; that which is ...

18412

eduction
EDUC'TION, n. The act of drawing out or bringing into view.

18413

eductor
EDUCT'OR, n. That which brings forth, elicits or extracts.Stimulus must be called an eductor of ...

18414

edulcorate
EDUL'CORATE, v.t. [Low L. edulco, from dulcis, sweet.]1. To purify; to sweeten. In chimistry, to ...

18415

edulcorated
EDUL'CORATED, pp. Sweetened; purified from acid or saline substances, and rendered more mild.

18416

edulcorating
EDUL'CORATING, ppr. Sweetening; rendering more mild.

18417

edulcoration
EDULCORA'TION, n. The act of sweetening or rendering more mild, by freeing from acid or saline ...

18418

edulcorative
EDUL'CORATIVE, a. Having the quality of sweetening.

18419

eek
EEK. [See Eke.]

18420

eel
EEL, n. A species of Muraena, a genus of fishes belonging to the order of apodes. The head is ...

18421

eel-fishing
EE'L-FISHING, n. The act or art of catching eels.

18422

eelpot
EE'LPOT, n. A kind of basket used for catching eels.

18423

eelpout
EE'LPOUT,n. A species of Gadus, somewhat resembling an eel, but shorter in proportion, seldom ...

18424

eelskin
EE'LSKIN, n. The skin of an eel.

18425

eelspear
EE'LSPEAR, n. A forked instrument used for stabbing eels.

18426

een
E'EN, contracted from even, which see.I have e'en done with you.

18427

eff
EFF, n. A lizard.

18428

effable
EF'FABLE, a. [L. effabilis, from effor; ex and for, to speak.]Utterable; that may be uttered or ...

18429

efface
EFFA'CE, v.t. [L. ex and facio or facies.]1. To destroy a figure on the surface of any thing, ...

18430

effaced
EFFA'CED, pp. Rubbed or worn out; destroyed, as a figure or impression.

18431

effacing
EFFA'CING, ppr. Destroying a figure, character or impression on any thing.

18432

effect
EFFECT', n. [L. effectus, from efficio; ex and facio, to make.]1. That which is produced by an ...

18433

effected
EFFECT'ED, pp. Done; performed; accomplished.

18434

effectible
EFFECT'IBLE, a. That may be done or achieved; practicable; feasible.

18435

effecting
EFFECT'ING, ppr. Producing; performing; accomplishing.

18436

effective
EFFECT'IVE, a. Having the power to cause or produce; efficacious.They are not effective of any ...

18437

effectively
EFFECT'IVELY, adv. With effect; powerfully; with real operation.This effectively resists the ...

18438

effectless
EFFECT'LESS, a. Without effect; without advantage; useless.

18439

effector
EFFECT'OR, n. One who effects; one who produces or causes; a maker or creator.

18440

effectual
EFFECT'UAL, a. Producing an effect, or the effect desired or intended; or having adequate power or ...

18441

effectually
EFFECT'UALLY, adv. With effect; efficaciously; in a manner to produce the intended effect; ...

18442

effectuate
EFFECT'UATE, v.t. To bring to pass; to achieve; to accomplish; to fulfil; as, to effectuate a ...

18443

effectuated
EFFECT'UATED, pp. Accomplished.

18444

effectuating
EFFECT'UATING, ppr. Achieving; performing to effect.

18445

effeminacy
EFFEM'INACY, n. [from effeminate.] The softness, delicacy and weakness in men, which are ...

18446

effeminate
EFFEM'INATE, a. [L. effoeminatus, from effoeminor, to grow or make womanish, from foemina, a ...

18447

effeminately
EFFEM'INATELY, adv. In a womanish manner; weakly; softly.1. By means of a woman; as effeminately ...

18448

effeminateness
EFFEM'INATENESS, n. Unmanlike softness.

18449

effemination
EFFEMINA'TION, n. The state of one grown womanish; the state of being weak or unmanly. [Little ...

18450

effervesce
EFFERVESCE, v.i. efferves'. [L. effervesco, from ferveo, to be hot, to rage.See Fervent.] To be ...

18451

effervescence
EFFERVES'CENCE, n. A kind ofnatural ebullition; that commotion of a fluid,which takes place, when ...

18452

effervescent
EFFERVES'CENT, a. Gently boiling or bubbling by means of the disengagement of an elastic fluid.

18453

effervescible
EFFERVES'CIBLE, a. That has the quality of effervescing; capable of producing effervescence. A ...

18454

effervescing
EFFERVES'CING, ppr. Boiling;bubbling, by means of an elastic fluid extricated in the dissolution of ...

18455

effete
EFFE'TE, a. [L. effoetus, effetus; ex and foetus, embryo.]1. Barren; not capable of producing ...

18456

efficacious
EFFICA'CIOUS, a. [L. efficax, from efficio. See Effect.]Effectual; productive of effects; ...

18457

efficaciously
EFFICA'CIOUSLY, adv. Effectually; in such a manner as to produce the effect desired. We say, a ...

18458

efficaciousness
EFFICA'CIOUSNESS, n. The quality of being efficacious.

18459

efficacy
EF'FICACY, n. [L. efficax.] Power to produce effects;production to the effect intended; as the ...

18460

efficience
EFFI'CIENCE

18461

efficiency
EFFI'CIENCY, n. [L. efficiens, from efficio. See Effect.]1. The act of producing effects; a ...

18462

efficient
EFFI'CIENT, a. Causing effects; producing; that causes any thing to be what is is. The efficient ...

18463

efficiently
EFFI'CIENTLY, adv. With effect; effectively.

18464

effierce
EFFIERCE, v.t. effers'. To make fierce or furious. [Not used.]

18465

effigy
EF'FIGY, n. [L. effigies, from effingo, to fashion; ex and fingo, to form or devise.]1. The image ...

18466

efflate
EFFLA'TE, v.t. [L. efflo.] To fill with breath or air. [Little used.]

18467

effloresce
EFFLORESCE, v.t. efflores'. [L. effloresco, from floresco, floreo, to blossom, flos, a flower. ...

18468

efflorescence
EFFLORES'CENCE, n. In botany,the time of flowering; the season when a plant shows its first ...

18469

efflorescent
EFFLORES'CENT, a. Shooting into white threads or spiculae; forming a white dust on the surface.

18470

effluence
EF'FLUENCE, n. [L. effluens, effluo; ex and fluo, to flow. See Flow.] A flowing out; that which ...

18471

effluvium
EFFLU'VIUM, n. plu. effluvia. [L. from effluo, to flow out. See Flow.] The minute and often ...

18472

efflux
EF'FLUX, n. [L. effluxus, from effluo, to flow out.]1. The act of flowing out, or issuing in a ...

18473

effluxion
EFFLUX'ION, n. [L. effluxum, from effluo.]1. The act of flowing out.2. That which flows out; ...

18474

efforce
EFFO'RCE, v.t.1. To force; to break through by violence.2. To force; to ravish.3. To strain; to ...

18475

efform
EFFORM', v.t. [from form.] To fashion; to shape.[For this we now use form.]

18476

efformation
EFFORMA'TION, n. The act of giving shape or form.[We now use formation.]

18477

effort
EF'FORT, n. [L. fortis. See Force.] A straining; an exertion of strength; endeavor; strenuous ...

18478

effossion
EFFOS'SION, n. [L. effossus, from effodio, to dig out.] The act of digging out of the earth; as ...

18479

effray
EFFRA'Y, v.t. To frighten. [Not in use.]

18480

effrayable
EFFRA'YABLE, a. Frightful; dreadful. [Not in use.

18481

effrenation
EFFRENA'TION, n. [L. effroenatio, from froenum, a rein.]Unbridled rashness or license; unruliness. ...

18482

effrontery
EFFRONT'ERY, n. Impudence; assurance; shameless boldness; sauciness; boldness transgressing the ...

18483

effulge
EFFULGE, v.i. effulj'. [L. effulgeo; ex and fulgeo, to shine.]To send forth a flood of light; to ...

18484

effulgence
EFFUL'GENCE, n. A flood of light; great luster or brightness; splendor; as the effulgence of divine ...

18485

effulgent
EFFUL'GENT, a. Shining; bright; splendid; diffusing a flood of light; as the effulgent sun.

18486

effulging
EFFUL'GING, ppr. Sending out a flood of light.

18487

effumability
EFFUMABIL'ITY, n. The quality of flying off in fumes or vapor.

18488

effume
EFFU'ME, v.t. To breathe out. [Not used.]

18489

effuse
EFFU'SE, v.t. effu'ze. [L. effusus, from effundo; ex and fundo, to pour.] To pour out as a ...

18490

effused
EFFU'SED, pp. effu'zed. Poured out; shed.

18491

effusing
EFFU'SING, ppr. effu'zing. Pouring out; shedding.

18492

effusion
EFFU'SION, n. effu'zhon. The act of pouring out as a liquid.1. The act of pouring out; a ...

18493

effusive
EFFU'SIVE, a. Pouring out; that pours forth largely.Th' effusive south.

18494

eft
EFT, n. A newt; an evet; the common lizard.EFT, adv. After; again; soon; quickly.

18495

eftsoons
EFTSOONS', adv. Soon afterwards; in a short time.

18496

egad
EGAD', exclam. A lucky star, good fortune, as we say, my stars!

18497

eger
E'GER, or E'AGARE, n. An impetuous flood; an irregular tide.

18498

egeran
E'GERAN, n. [from Eger, in bohemia.] A subspecies of pyramidical garnet, of a reddish brown ...

18499

egerminate
EGERM'INATE. [Not used. See Germinate.]

18500

egest
EGEST', v.t. [L.egestum, from egero.] To cast or throw out; to void, as excrement.

18501

egestion
EGES'TION, n. [L. egestio.] The act of voiding digested matter at the natural vent.

18502

egg
EGG, n. [L. ovum, by a change of g into v.] A body formed in the females of fowls and certain ...

18503

eggbird
EGG'BIRD, n. A fowl, a species of tern.

18504

egilopical
EGILOP'ICAL, a. Affected with the egilops.

18505

egilops
E'GILOPS, n. Goat's eye; an abscess in the inner canthus of the eye; fistula lachrymalis.

18506

eglandulous
EGLAND'ULOUS, a. [e neg. and glandulous. See Gland.]Destitute of glands.

18507

eglantine
EG'LANTINE, n. A species of rose; the sweet brier; a plant bearing an odoriferous flower.

18508

egoist
E'GOIST, n. [from L. ego.] A name given to certain followers of Des Cartes, who held the opinion ...

18509

egoity
EGO'ITY, n. Personality. [Not authorized.]

18510

egotism
E'GOTISM, n. [L. ego.] Primarily, the practice of too frequently using the word I. Hence, a ...

18511

egotist
E'GOTIST, n. One who repeats the word I very often in conversation or writing; one who speaks much ...

18512

egotistic
EGOTIST'IC, a. Addicted to egotism.1. Containing egotism.

18513

egotize
E'GOTIZE, v.t. To talk or write much of one's self; to make pretension to self-importance.

18514

egregious
EGRE'GIOUS, a. [L. egregius, supposed to be from e or ex grege, from or out of or beyond the herd, ...

18515

egregiously
EGRE'GIOUSLY, adv. Greatly; enormously; shamefully; usually in a bad sense; as, he is egregiously ...

18516

egregiousness
EGRE'GIOUSNESS, n. The state of being great or extraordinary.

18517

egress
E'GRESS, n. [L. egressus, from egredior; e and gradior, to step.]The act of going or issuing out, ...

18518

egression
EGRES'SION, n. [L. egressio.] The act of going out from any inclosure or place of confinement.

18519

egret
E'GRET, n. The lesser white heron, a fowl of the genus Ardea; an elegant fowl with a white body ...

18520

egriot
E'GRIOT, n. A kind of sour cherry.

18521

egyptian
EGYP'TIAN, a. Pertaining to Egypt in Africa.EGYP'TIAN, n. A native of Egypt; also, a gypsy.

18522

eigh
EIGH, exclam. An expression of sudden delight.

18523

eight
EIGHT, a. [L. octo.] Twice four; expressing the number twice four. Four and four make eight.

18524

eighteen
EIGHTEEN, a 'ateen. Eight and ten united.

18525

eighteenth
EIGHTEENTH, a. 'ateenth. The next in order after the seventeenth.

18526

eightfold
EIGHTFOLD, a. 'atefold. Eight times the number or quantity.

18527

eighth
EIGHTH, a. aitth. Noting the number eight; the number next after seven; the ordinal of eight.

18528

eighthly
EIGHTHLY, adv. aithly. In the eighth place.

18529

eightieth
EIGHTIETH, a. 'atieth. [from eighty.] The next in order to the seventy ninth; the eighth tenth.

18530

eights-core
EIGHTS-CORE, a. or n. 'atescore. [eight and score; score is a notch noting twenty.] Eight times ...

18531

eighty
EIGHTY, a. 'aty. Eight times ten; four score.

18532

eigne
EIGNE, a. Eldest; an epithet, used in law to denote the eldest son; as bastard eigne.1. ...

18533

eisel
E'ISEL, n. Vinegar. [Not in use.]

18534

eisenrahm
EI'SENRAHM, n. The red and brown eisenrahm, the scaly red and brown hematite.

18535

either
E'ITHER, a. or pron. 1. One or another of any number. Here are ten oranges; take either orange of ...

18536

ejaculate
EJAC'ULATE, v.t. [L. ejaculor, from jaculor, to throw or dart, jaculum, a dart, from jacio, to ...

18537

ejaculation
EJACULA'TION, n. The act of throwing or darting out with a sudden force and rapid flight; as the ...

18538

ejaculatory
EJAC'ULATORY, a. Suddenly darted out; uttered in short sentences; as an ejaculatory prayer or ...

18539

eject
EJECT', v.t. [L. ejicio, ejectum; e and jacio, to throw; jacto.]1. To throw out; to cast forth; ...

18540

ejected
EJECT'ED, pp. Thrown out; thrust out; discharged; evacuated; expelled; dismissed; dispossessed; ...

18541

ejecting
EJECT'ING, ppr. Casting out; discharging; evacuating; expelling; dispossessing; rejecting.

18542

ejection
EJEC'TION, n. [L. ejectio.] The act of casting out; expulsion.1. Dismission from office.2. ...

18543

ejectment
EJECT'MENT, n. Literally, a casting out; a dispossession.1. In law, a writ or action which lies ...

18544

ejector
EJECT'OR, n. One who ejects or dispossesses another of his land.

18545

ejulation
EJULA'TION, n. [L. ejulatio, from ejulo, to cry, to yell, to wail.]Outcry; a wailing; a loud cry ...

18546

eke
EKE, v.t. [L. augeo.]1. To increase; to enlarge; as, to eke a store of provisions. 2. To add to; ...

18547

eked
E'KED, pp. Increased; lengthened.

18548

ekerbergite
EKERBERG'ITE, n. [from Ekeberg.] A mineral, supposed to be a variety of scapolite.

18549

eking
E'KING, ppr. Increasing; augmenting; lengthening.E'KING,n. Increase or addition.

18550

elaborate
ELAB'ORATE, v.t. [L. elaboro, from laboro, labor. See Labor.]1. To produce with labor.They in ...

18551

elaborated
ELAB'ORATED, pp. Produced with labor or study; improved.

18552

elaborately
ELAB'ORATELY, adv. With great labor or study; with nice regard to exactness.

18553

elaborateness
ELAB'ORATENESS, n. The quality of being elaborate or wrought with great labor.

18554

elaborating
ELAB'ORATING, ppr. Producing with labor; improving; refining by successive operations.

18555

elaboration
ELABORA'TION, n. Improvement or refinement by successive operations.

18556

elain
ELA'IN, n. [Gr. oily.] The oily or liquid principle of oils and fats.

18557

elamping
ELAMP'ING, a. [See Lamp.] Shining. [Not in use.]

18558

elance
EL'ANCE, v.t. To throw or shoot; to hurl; to dart.While thy unerring hand elanced--a dart.

18559

eland
E'LAND, n. A species of heavy, clumsy antelope in Africa.

18560

elaolite
ELA'OLITE, n. [Gr. olive.] A mineral, called also fettstein [fat-stone.] from its greasy ...

18561

elapse
ELAPSE, v.i. elaps'. [L. elapsus, from elabor,labor, to slide.]To slide away; to slip or glide ...

18562

elapsed
ELAPS'ED, pp. Slid or passed away, as time.

18563

elapsing
ELAPS'ING, ppr. Sliding away; gliding or passing away silently, as time.

18564

elastic
ELAS'TIC

18565

elastical
ELAS'TICAL, a. [from the Gr. to impel, to drive.] Springing back; having the power of returning ...

18566

elastically
ELAS'TICALLY, adv. In an elastic manner; by an elastic power; with a spring.

18567

elasticity
ELASTIC'ITY, n. The inherent property in bodies by which they recover their former figure or ...

18568

elate
ELA'TE, a. [L. elatus.] Raised; elevated in mind; flushed, as with success. Whence, lofty; ...

18569

elated
ELA'TED, pp. Elevated in mind or spirits; puffed up, as with honor, success or prosperity. We ...

18570

elatedly
ELA'TEDLY, adv. With elation.

18571

elaterium
ELATE'RIUM, n. A substance deposited from the very acrid juice of the Momordica elaterium, wild ...

18572

elatery
EL'ATERY, n. Acting force or elasticity; as the elatery of the air. [Unusual.]

18573

elatin
EL'ATIN, n. The active principle of the elaterium, from which the latter is supposed to derive its ...

18574

elation
ELA'TION, n. An inflation or elevation of mind proceeding from self-approbation; self-esteem, ...

18575

elbow
EL'BOW, n.1. The outer angle made by the bend of the arm.The wings that waft our riches out of ...

18576

elbow-chair
EL'BOW-CHAIR, n. A chair with arms to support the elbows; an arm-chair.

18577

elbow-room
EL'BOW-ROOM, n. Room to extend the elbows on each side; hence, in its usual acceptation, perfect ...

18578

eld
ELD, n. Old age; decrepitude.1. Old people; persons worn out with age.[This word is entirely ...

18579

elder
EL'DER, n. A species of duck.

18580

elder-down
EL'DER-DOWN, n. Down or soft feathers of the eider duck.

18581

elderly
ELD'ERLY, a. Somewhat old; advanced beyond middle age; bordering on old age; as elderly people

18582

eldership
ELD'ERSHIP, n. Seniority; the state of being older.1. The office of an elder.2. Presbytery; ...

18583

eldest
ELD'EST, a. Oldest; most advanced in age; that was born before others; as the eldest son or ...

18584

elding
ELD'ING, n. Fuel. [Local.]

18585

eleatic
ELEAT'IC, a. An epithet given to a certain sect of philosophers, so called from Elea, or Velia, a ...

18586

elecampane
ELECAMPA'NE, n. [L. helenium, from Gr. which signifies this plant and a feast in honor of Helen. ...

18587

elect
ELECT', v.t. [L. electus, from eligo; e or ex and lego; Gr. to choose.]1. Properly, to pick out; ...

18588

elected
ELECT'ED, pp. Chosen; preferred; designated to office by some act of the constituents, as by vote; ...

18589

electing
ELECT'ING, ppr. Choosing; selecting from a number; preferring; designating to office by choice or ...

18590

election
ELEC'TION, n. [L. electio.] The act of choosing; choice; the act of selecting one or more from ...

18591

electioneer
ELECTIONEE'R, v.i. To make interest for a candidate at an election; to use arts for securing the ...

18592

electioneering
ELECTIONEE'RING, ppr. Using influence to procure the election of a person.ELECTIONEE'RING, n. The ...

18593

elective
ELECT'IVE, a. Dependent on choice, as an elective monarchy, in which the king is raised to the ...

18594

electively
ELECT'IVELY, adv. By choice; with preference of one to another.

18595

elector
ELECT'OR, n. One who elects, or one who has the right of choice; a person who has,by law or ...

18596

electoral
ELECT'ORAL, a. Pertaining to election or electors. The electoral college in Germany consisted of ...

18597

electorality
ELECTORAL'ITY, for electorate, is not used.

18598

electorate
ELECT'ORATE, n. The dignity of an elector in the German empire.1. The territory of an elector in ...

18599

electre
ELEC'TRE, n. [L. electrum.] Amber. [Bacon used this word for a compound or mixed metal. But the ...

18600

electress
ELECT'RESS, n. The wife or widow of an elector in the German empire.

18601

electric
ELEC'TRIC, n. Any body or substance capable of exhibiting electricity by means of friction or ...

18602

electrically
ELEC'TRICALLY, adv. In the manner of electricity, or by means of it.

18603

electrician
ELECTRI'CIAN, n. A person who studies electricity, and investigates its properties,by observation ...

18604

electricity
ELECTRIC'ITY, n. The operations of a very subtil fluid, which appears to be diffused through most ...

18605

electrictrical
ELEC'TRIC'TRICAL, a. [Gr. amber.]1. Containing electricity, or capable of exhibiting it when ...

18606

electrifiable
ELEC'TRIFIABLE, a. [from electrify.] Capable of receiving electricity, or of being charged with ...

18607

electrification
ELECTRIFICA'TION, n. The act of electrifying, or state of being charged with electricity.

18608

electrified
ELEC'TRIFIED, ppr. Charged with electricity.

18609

electrify
ELEC'TRIFY, v.t. To communicate electricity to; to charge with electricity.1. To cause ...

18610

electrifying
ELECTRIFYING, ppr. Charging with electricity; affecting with electricity; giving a sudden shock.

18611

electrization
ELECTRIZA'TION, n. The act of electrizing.

18612

electrize
ELEC'TRIZE, v.t. To electrify; a word in popular use.

18613

electro-chimistry
ELECTRO-CHIM'ISTRY, n. That science which treats of the agency of electricity and galvanism in ...

18614

electro-magnetic
ELECTRO-MAGNET'IC, a. Designating what pertains to magnetism, as connected with electricity, or ...

18615

electro-magnetism
ELECTRO-MAG'NETISM, n. That science which treats of the agency ofelectricity and galvanism in ...

18616

electro-motion
ELECTRO-MO'TION, n. The motion of electricity or galvanism, or the passing of it from one metal to ...

18617

electro-motive
ELECTRO-MO'TIVE, a. Producing electro-motion; as electro-motive power.

18618

electro-negative
ELECTRO-NEG'ATIVE, a. Repelled by bodies negatively electrified, and attracted by those positively ...

18619

electro-positive
ELECTRO-POS'ITIVE, a. Attracted by bodies negatively electrified, or by the negative pole of the ...

18620

electrometer
ELECTROM'ETER, n. [L. electrum; Gr. amber, and to measure.]An instrument for measuring the ...

18621

electrometrical
ELECTROMET'RICAL, a. Pertaining to an electrometer; made by an electrometer; as an electrometrical ...

18622

electromotor
ELEC'TROMOTOR, n. [electrum and motor.] A mover of the electric fluid; an instrument or apparatus ...

18623

electron
ELEC'TRON, n. Amber; also, a mixture of gold with a fifth part of silver.

18624

electrophor
ELEC'TROPHOR

18625

electrophorus
ELECTROPH'ORUS, n. [electrum, and to bear.] An instrument for preserving electricity a long time.

18626

electrum
ELEC'TRUM, n. [L. amber.] In mineralogy, an argentiferous gold ore, or native alloy, of a pale ...

18627

electuary
ELEC'TUARY, n. [Low L. electarium, electuarium; Gr. to lick.]In pharmacy, a form of medicine ...

18628

eleemosynary
ELEEMOS'YNARY, a. [Gr. alms, to pity, compassion.]1. Given in charity; given or appropriated to ...

18629

elegance
EL'EGANCE

18630

elegancy
EL'EGANCY, n. [L. elegantia, eligo, to choose, though irregularly formed.]In its primary sense, ...

18631

elegant
EL'EGANT, a. [L. elegans.] Polished; polite; refined; graceful; pleasing to good taste; as ...

18632

elegantly
EL'EGANTLY, adv. In a manner to please; with elegance; with beauty; with pleasing propriety; as a ...

18633

elegiac
ELE'GIAC, a. [Low L. elegiacus. See Elegy.] Belonging to elegy; plaintive; expressing sorrow or ...

18634

elegist
EL'EGIST, n. A writer of elegies.

18635

elegit
ELE'GIT, n. [L. eligo, elegi, to choose.] A writ of execution, by which a defendant's goods are ...

18636

elegy
EL'EGY, n. [L. elegia; Gr. to speak or utter.; L. lugeo. The verbs may have a common origin, for ...

18637

element
EL'EMENT, n. [L. elementus.]1. The first or constituent principle or minutest part or any thing; ...

18638

elemental
ELEMENT'AL, a. Pertaining to elements.1. Produced by some of the four supposed elements; as ...

18639

elementality
ELEMENTAL'ITY, n. Composition of principles or ingredients.

18640

elementally
ELEMENT'ALLY, adv. According to elements; literally; as the words, "Take, eat; this is my body," ...

18641

elementariness
ELEMENT'ARINESS, n. The state of being elementary; the simplicity of nature; uncompounded state.

18642

elementarity
ELEMENTAR'ITY

18643

elementary
ELEMENT'ARY, a. Primary; simple; uncompounded; uncombined; having only one principle or ...

18644

elemi
EL'EMI, n. The gum elemi, so called; but said to be a resinous substance, the produce of the ...

18645

elench
ELENCH', n. [L. elenchus; Gr. to argue, to refute.]1. A vicious or fallacious argument, which is ...

18646

elenchical
ELENCH'ICAL, a. Pertaining to an elench.

18647

elenchically
ELENCH'ICALLY, adv. By means of an elench. [Not in use.]

18648

elenchize
ELENCH'IZE, v.i. To dispute. [Not in use.]

18649

elephant
EL'EPHANT, n. [L. elephas, elephantus; probably from the Heb. a leader or chief, the chief or ...

18650

elephant-beetle
EL'EPHANT-BEETLE, n. A large species of Scarabaeus, or beetle, found in South America. It is of a ...

18651

elephantiasis
ELEPHANTI'ASIS, n. [L.and Gr. from elephant.]A species of leprosy, so called from covering the ...

18652

elephantine
ELEPHANT'INE, a. Pertaining to the elephant; huge; resembling an elephant; or perhaps white, like ...

18653

elephants-foot
ELEPHANT'S-FOOT, n. A plant, the Elephantopus.

18654

eleusinian
ELEUSIN'IAN, a. Relating to Eleusis in Greece; as Eleusinian mysteries or festivals, the festivals ...

18655

elevate
EL'EVATE, v.t. [L. elevo; e and levo, to raise; Eng. to lift. See Lift.]1. To raise, in a ...

18656

elevated
EL'EVATED, pp. Raised; exalted; dignified; elated; excited; made more acute or more loud, as ...

18657

elevating
EL'EVATING, ppr. Raising; exalting; dignifying; elating; cheering.

18658

elevation
ELEVA'TION, n. [L. elevatio.] The act of raising or conveying from a lower or deeper place to a ...

18659

elevator
EL'EVATOR, n. One who raises, lifts or exalts.1. In anatomy, a muscle which serves to raise a ...

18660

elevatory
EL'EVATORY, n. An instrument used in trepanning, for raising a depressed or fractured part of the ...

18661

eleve
ELE'VE, n. One brought up or protected by another.

18662

eleven
ELEV'EN, a. elev'n. Ten and one added; as eleven men.

18663

eleventh
ELEV'ENTH, a. The next in order to the tenth; as the eleventh chapter.

18664

elf
ELF, n. plu. elves.1. A wandering spirit; a fairy; a hobgoblin; an imaginary being which our rude ...

18665

elf-arrow
ELF'-ARROW, n. A name given to flints in the shape of arrow-heads, vulgarly supposed to be shot by ...

18666

elf-lock
ELF'-LOCK, n. A knot of hair twisted by elves.

18667

elfin
ELF'IN, a. Relating or pertaining to elves.ELF'IN, n. A little urchin.

18668

elfish
ELF'ISH, a. Resembling elves; clad in disguise.

18669

elicit
ELIC'IT, v.t. [L. elicio; e or ex and lacio, to allure.]1. To draw out; to bring to light; to ...

18670

elicitation
ELICITA'TION, n. The act of eliciting; the act of drawing out.

18671

elicited
ELIC'ITED, pp. Brought or drawn out; struck out.

18672

eliciting
ELIC'ITING, ppr. Drawing out; bringing to light; striking out.

18673

elide
ELI'DE, v.t. [L. elido; e and loedo.] To break or dash in pieces; to crush. [Not used.]1. To ...

18674

eligibility
ELIGIBIL'ITY, n. [from eligible] Worthiness or fitness to be chosen; the state or quality of a ...

18675

eligible
EL'IGIBLE, a. [L. eligo, to choose or select; e and lego.]1. Fit to be chosen; worthy of choice, ...

18676

eligibleness
EL'IGIBLENESS, n. Fitness to be chosen in preference to another; suitableness; desirableness.

18677

eligibly
EL'IGIBLY, adv. In a manner to be worthy of choice; suitably.

18678

eliminate
ELIM'INATE, v.t. [L. elimino; e or ex and limen, threshhold.]1. To thrust out of doors.2. To ...

18679

eliminated
ELIM'INATED, pp. Expelled; thrown off; discharged.

18680

eliminating
ELIM'INATING, ppr. Expelling; discharging; throwing off.

18681

elimination
ELIMINA'TION, n. The act of expelling or throwing off; the act of discharging,or secreting by the ...

18682

eliquation
ELIQUA'TION, n. [L. eliquo, to melt; e and liquo.]In chimistry, the operation by which a more ...

18683

elision
ELI'SION, n. s as z. [L. elisio, from elido, to strike off; e and loedo.]1. In grammar, the ...

18684

elisor
ELI'SOR, n. s as z. In law, a sheriff's substitute for returning a jury. When the sheriff is not ...

18685

elixate
ELIX'ATE, v.t. [L. elixo.] To extract by boiling.

18686

elixation
ELIXA'TION, n. [L. elixus, from elixio, to boil, to moisten or macerate, from lixo, lix.]1. The ...

18687

elixir
ELIX'IR, n.1. In medicine, a compound tincture, extracted from two or more ingredients. A ...

18688

elk
ELK, n. [L. alce, alces.] A quadruped of the Cervine genus, with palmated horns, and a fleshy ...

18689

elk-nut
ELK-NUT, n. A plant, the Hamiltonia, called also oil-nut.

18690

ell
ELL, n. [L. ulna.] A measure of different lengths in different countries, used chiefly for ...

18691

ellipse
ELLIPSE, n. ellips'. An ellipsis.

18692

ellipsis
ELLIP'SIS, n. [Gr. an omission or defect, to leave or pass by.]1. In geometry, an oval figure ...

18693

ellipsoid
ELLIPS'OID, n. [ellipsis and Gr. form.] In conics, a solid or figure formed by the revolution of ...

18694

ellipsoidal
ELLIPSOID'AL, a. Pertaining to an ellipsoid; having the form of an ellipsoid.

18695

elliptic
ELLIP'TIC

18696

elliptical
ELLIP'TICAL, a. Pertaining to an ellipsis; having the form of an ellipse; oval.The plants move in ...

18697

elliptically
ELLIPTICALLY, adv. According to the figure called an ellipsis.1. Defectively.

18698

elm
ELM, n. [L. ulmus.] A tree of the genus Ulmus. The common elm is one of the largest and most ...

18699

elmy
ELM'Y, a. Abounding with elms.

18700

elocation
ELOCA'TION, n. [L. eloco.] A removal from the usual place of residence.1. Departure from the ...

18701

elocution
ELOCU'TION, n. [L. elocutio, from eloquor; e and loquor, to speak.]1. Pronunciation; the ...

18702

elocutive
ELOCU'TIVE, a. Having the power of eloquent speaking.

18703

elogist
EL'OGIST, n. An eulogist. [Not used.]

18704

elogium
ELO'GIUM, n. [L. elogium. See Eulogy.]The praise bestowed on a person or thing; panegyric. [But ...

18705

elogy
EL'OGY

18706

eloin
ELOIN', v.t.1. To separate and remove to a distance.2. To convey to a distance, and withhold from ...

18707

eloinate
ELOIN'ATE, v.t. To remove.

18708

eloined
ELOIN'ED, pp. Removed to a distance; carried far off.

18709

eloining
ELOIN'ING, ppr. Removing to a distance from another, or to a place unknown.

18710

eloinment
ELOIN'MENT, n. Removal to a distance; distance.

18711

elong
ELONG', v.t. [Low L. elongo.] To put far off; to retard.

18712

elongate
ELON'GATE, v.t. [Low L. elongo, from longus. See Long.]1. To lengthen; to extend.2. To remove ...

18713

elongated
ELON'GATED, pp. Lengthened; removed to a distance.

18714

elongating
ELON'GATING, ppr. Lengthening; extending.1. Receding to a greater distance, particularly as a ...

18715

elongation
ELONGA'TION, n. The act of stretching or lengthening; as the elongation of a fiber.1. The state ...

18716

elope
ELO'PE, v.i. [Eng. to leap.]1. To run away; to depart from one's proper place or station ...

18717

elopement
ELO'PEMENT, n. Private or unlicensed departure from the place or station to which one is assigned ...

18718

eloping
ELO'PING, ppr. Running away; departing privately,or without permission, from a husband, father or ...

18719

elops
E'LOPS, n. A fish, inhabiting the seas of America and the West Indies,with a long body, smooth ...

18720

eloquence
EL'OQUENCE, n. [L. eloquentia, from eloquor, loquor, to speak; Gr. to crack, to sound, to speak. ...

18721

eloquent
EL'OQUENT, a. Having the power of oratory; speaking with fluency, propriety, elegance and ...

18722

eloquently
EL'OQUENTLY, adv. With eloquence; in an eloquent manner; in a manner to please, affect and ...

18723

else
ELSE, a. or pron. els. [L. alius, alias. See Alien.]Other; one or something beside. Who else is ...

18724

elsewhere
ELSEWHERE, adv. In any other place; as, these trees are not to be found elsewhere.1. In some ...

18725

elucidate
ELU'CIDATE, v.t [Low L. elucido, from eluceo,luceo, to shine, or from lucidus, clear, bright. See ...

18726

elucidated
ELU'CIDATED, pp. Explained; made plain, clear or intelligible.

18727

elucidating
ELU'CIDATING, ppr. Explaining; making clear or intelligible.

18728

elucidation
ELUCIDA'TION, n. The act of explaining or throwing light on any obscure subject; explanation; ...

18729

elucidator
ELU'CIDATOR, n. One who explains; an expositor.

18730

elude
ELU'DE, v.t. [L. eludo; e and ludo, to play. The Latinverb forms lusi, lusum; and this may be the ...

18731

eludible
ELU'DIBLE, a. That may be eluded or escaped.

18732

elusion
ELU'SION, n. s as z. [L. elusio. See Elude.] An escape by artifice or deception; evasion.

18733

elusive
ELU'SIVE, a. Practicing elusion; using arts to escape.Elusive of the bridal day, she givesFond ...

18734

elusoriness
ELU'SORINESS, n. The state of being elusory.

18735

elusory
ELU'SORY, a. Tending to elude; tending to deceive; evasive; fraudulent; fallacious; deceitful.

18736

elute
ELU'TE, v.t. [L. eluo, elutum; qu. e and lavo. See Elutriate.] To wash off; to cleanse.

18737

elutriate
ELU'TRIATE, v.t. [L. elutrio.] To purify by washing; to cleanse by separating foul matter,and ...

18738

elutriated
ELU'TRIATED, pp. Cleansed by washing and decantation.

18739

elutriating
ELU'TRIATING, ppr. Purifying by washing and decanting.

18740

elutriation
ELUTRIA'TION, n. The operation of pulverizing a solid substance, mixing it with water, and pouring ...

18741

eluxate
ELUX'ATE, v.t. [L. eluxatus.] To dislocate. [See Luxate.]

18742

eluxation
ELUXA'TION, n. The dislocation of a bone. [See Luxation.]

18743

elvelocks
ELVELOCKS. [See Elf-lock.]

18744

elvers
ELV'ERS, n. Young eels; young congers or sea-eels.

18745

elves
ELVES, plu. of elf.

18746

elvish
ELV'ISH, a. More properly elfish, which see.

18747

elysian
ELYS'IAN, a. elyzh'un. [L. elysius.] Pertaining to elysium or the seat of delight; yielding the ...

18748

elysium
ELYS'IUM, n. elyzh'um. [L. elysium.] In ancient mythology, a place assigned to happy souls after ...

18749

em
'EM, A contraction of them.They took 'em.

18750

emacerate
EMAC'ERATE, v.t. To make lean. [Not in use.]

18751

emaciate
EMA'CIATE, v.i. [L. emacio, from maceo, or macer, lean; Gr. small; Eng. meager, meek.] To lose ...

18752

emaciated
EMA'CIATED, pp. Reduced to leanness by a gradual loss of flesh; thin; lean.

18753

emaciating
EMA'CIATING, ppr. Wasting the flesh gradually; making lean.

18754

emaciation
EMACIA'TION, n. The act of making lean or thin in flesh; or a becoming lean by a gradual waste of ...

18755

emaculate
EMAC'ULATE, v.t. [infra.] To take spots from. [Little used.]

18756

emaculation
EMACULA'TION, n. [L. emaculo, from e and macula, a spot.]The act or operation of freeing from ...

18757

emanant
EM'ANANT, a. [L. emanans. See Emanate.] Issuing or flowing from.

18758

emanate
EM'ANATE, v.i. [L. emanano; e and mano, to flow.1. To issue from a source; to flow from; applied ...

18759

emanating
EM'ANATING, ppr. Issuing or flowing from a fountain.

18760

emanation
EMANA'TION,n. The act of flowing or proceeding from a fountain-head or origin.1. That which ...

18761

emanative
EM'ANATIVE, a. Issuing from another.

18762

emanciipate
EMAN'CIIPATE, a. Set at liberty.

18763

emancipate
EMAN'CIPATE, v.t. [L. emancipo, from e and mancipium, a slave; manus,hand,and capio, to take, as ...

18764

emancipated
EMAN'CIPATED, pp. Set free from bondage,slavery, servitude, subjection, or dependence;liberated.

18765

emancipating
EMAN'CIPATING, ppr. Setting free from bondage, servitude or dependence; liberating.

18766

emancipation
EMANCIPA'TION, n. The act of setting free from slavery, servitude, subjection or dependence; ...

18767

emancipator
EMAN'CIPATOR, n. One who emancipates or liberates from bondage or restraint.

18768

emane
EMA'NE, v.i. [L. emano.] To issue or flow from.But this is not an elegant word. [See Emanate.]

18769

emarginate
EM`ARGINATE

18770

emarginated
EM`ARGINATED, a. [L. margo, whence emargino.]1. In botany, notched at the end; applied to the ...

18771

emarginately
EM`ARGINATELY, adv. In the form of notches.

18772

emasculate
EM`ASCULATE, v.t. [Low L. emasculo, from e and masculus, a male. See Male.]1. To castrate; to ...

18773

emasculated
EM`ASCULATED, pp. Castrated; weakened.

18774

emasculating
EM`ASCULATING, ppr. Castrating; felding; depriving of vigor.

18775

emasculation
EMASCULA'TION, n. The act of depriving a male of the parts which characterize the sex; ...

18776

embale
EMBA'LE, v.t.1. To make up into a bundle, bale or package; to pack.2. To bind; to inclose.

18777

embalm
EMB'ALM, v.t. emb'am.1. To open a dead body, take out the intestines,and fill their place with ...

18778

embalmed
EMB`ALMED, pp. Filled with aromatic plants for preservation; preserved from loss or destruction.

18779

embalmer
EMB`ALMER, n. One who embalms bodies for preservation.

18780

embalming
EMB`ALMING, ppr. Filling a dead body with spices for preservation; preserving with care from loss, ...

18781

embar
EMB`AR, v.t. [en and bar.] To shut, close or fasten with a bar; to make fast.1. To inclose so as ...

18782

embarcation
EMBARCA'TION, n. Embarkation, which see.

18783

embargo
EMB`ARGO, n. In commerce, a restraint on ships, or prohibition of sailing, either out of port, or ...

18784

embargoed
EMB`ARGOED, pp. Stopped; hindered from sailing; hindered by public authority, as ships or ...

18785

embargoing
EMB`ARGOING, ppr. Restraining from sailing by public authority; hindering.

18786

embark
EMB`ARK, v.t. 1. To put or cause to enter on board a ship or other vessel or boat. The general ...

18787

embarkation
EMBARKA'TION, n. The act of putting on board of a ship or other vessel, or the act of going ...

18788

embarked
EMB`ARKED, pp. Put on shipboard; engaged in any affair.

18789

embarking
EMB`ARKING, ppr. Putting on board of a ship or boat; going on shipboard.

18790

embarrass
EMBAR'RASS, v.t.1. To perplex; to render intricate; to entangle. We say, public affairs are ...

18791

embarrassed
EMBAR'RASSED, pp. Perplexed; rendered intricate; confused; confounded.

18792

embarrassing
EMBAR'RASSING, ppr. Perplexing; entangling; confusing; confounding; abashing.

18793

embarrassment
EMBAR'RASSMENT, n. Perplexity; intricacy; entanglement.1. Confusion of mind.2. Perplexity ...

18794

embase
EMBA'SE, v.t. [en and base.] To lower in value; to vitiate; to deprave; to impair.The virtue--of ...

18795

embasement
EMBA'SEMENT, n. Act of depraving; depravation; deterioration.

18796

embassade
EM'BASSADE, n. An embassy.

18797

embassador
EMBAS'SADOR, n. 1. A minister of the highest rank employed by one prince or state, at the court ...

18798

embassadress
EMBAS'SADRESS, n. The consort of an embassador.1. A woman sent on a public message.

18799

embassage
EM'BASSAGE, an embassy,is not used.

18800

embassy
EM'BASSY, n.1. The message or public function of an embassador; the charge or employment of a ...

18801

embattle
EMBAT'TLE, v.t. [en and battle.] To arrange in order of battle; to array troops for battle.On ...

18802

embattled
EMBAT'TLED, pp. Arrayed in order of battle.1. Furnished with battlements; and in heraldry,having ...

18803

embattling
EMBAT'TLING, ppr. Ranging in battle array.

18804

embay
EMBA'Y, v.t. [en, in, and bay.] To inclose in a bay or inlet; to land-lock; to inclose between ...

18805

embayed
EMBA'YED, pp. Inclosed in a bay, or between points of land, as a ship.

18806

embed
EMBED', v.t. [en, in, and bed.] To lay as in a bed; to lay in surrounding matter; as, to embed a ...

18807

embedded
EMBED'DED, pp. Laid as in a bed; deposited or inclosed in surrounding matter; as ore embedded in ...

18808

embedding
EMBED'DING, ppr. Laying, depositing or forming, as in a bed.

18809

embellish
EMBEL'LISH, v.t. [L. bellus, pretty.]1. To adorn; to beautify; to decorate; to make beautiful or ...

18810

embellished
EMBEL'LISHED, pp. Adorned; decorated; beautified.

18811

embellishing
EMBEL'LISHING, ppr. Adorning; decorating; adding grace, ornament or elegance to a person or thing.

18812

embellishment
EMBEL'LISHMENT, n. The act of adorning.1. Ornament; decoration; any thing that adds beauty or ...

18813

ember
EMBER, in ember-days, ember-weeks, is the Saxon emb-ren, or ymb-ryne, a circle, circuit or ...

18814

ember-goose
EM'BER-GOOSE, n. A fowl of the genus Colymbus and order of ansers. It is larger than the common ...

18815

ember-week
EMBER-WEEK, [See Ember, supra.]

18816

embering
EM'BERING, n. The ember-days, supra.

18817

embers
EM'BERS, n. plu.Small coals of fire with ashes; the residuum of wood, coal or other combustibles ...

18818

embezzle
EMBEZ'ZLE, v.t. [Heb. signifies to plunder.]1. To appropriate fraudulently to one's own use what ...

18819

embezzled
EMBEZ'ZLED, pp. Appropriated wrongfully to one's own use.

18820

embezzlement
EMBEZ'ZLEMENT, n. The act of fraudulently appropriating to one's own use, the money or goods ...

18821

embezzler
EMBEZ'ZLER, n. One who embezzles.

18822

embezzling
EMBEZ'ZLING, ppr. Fraudulently applying to one's own use what is entrusted to one's care and ...

18823

emblaze
EMBLA'ZE, v.t.1. To adorn with glittering embellishments.No weeping orphan saw his father's ...

18824

emblazed
EMBLA'ZED, pp. Adorned with shining ornaments, or with figures armorial.

18825

emblazing
EMBLA'ZING, ppr. Embellishing with glittering ornaments, or with figures armorial.

18826

emblazon
EMBLA'ZON, v.t. embla'zn. 1. To adorn with figures of heraldry or ensigns armorial.2. To deck ...

18827

emblazoned
EMBLA'ZONED, pp. Adorned with figures or ensigns armorial; set out pompously.

18828

emblazoner
EMBLA'ZONER, n. A blazoner; one that emblazons; a herald.1. One that publishes and displays with ...

18829

emblazoning
EMBLA'ZONING, ppr. Adorning with ensigns or figures armorial; displaying with pomp.

18830

emblazonment
EMBLA'ZONMENT, n. An emblazoning.

18831

emblazonry
EMBLA'ZONRY, n. Pictures on shields; display of figures.

18832

emblem
EM'BLEM, n. [Gr. to cast in, to insert.]1. Properly, inlay; inlayed or mosaic work; something ...

18833

emblematic
EMBLEMAT'IC

18834

emblematical
EMBLEMAT'ICAL, a. Pertaining to or comprising an emblem.1. Representing by some allusion or ...

18835

emblematically
EMBLEMAT'ICALLY, adv. By way or means of emblems; in the manner of emblems; by way of allusive ...

18836

emblematist
EMBLEM'ATIST, n. A writer or inventor of emblems.

18837

emblement
EM'BLEMENT, n. used mostly in the plural.The produce or fruits of land sown or planted. This word ...

18838

emblemize
EM'BLEMIZE, v.t. To represent by an emblem.

18839

emblemized
EM'BLEMIZED, pp. Represented by an emblem.

18840

emblemizing
EM'BLEMIZING, ppr. Representing by an emblem.

18841

embloom
EMBLOOM', v.t. To cover or enrich with bloom.

18842

embodied
EMBOD'IED, pp. [See Embody.] Collected or formed into a body.

18843

embody
EMBOD'Y, v.t. [en,in, and body.] To form or collect into a body or united mass; to collect into a ...

18844

embodying
EMBOD'YING, ppr. Collecting or forming into a body.

18845

emboguing
EMBO'GUING, n. The mouth of a river or place where its waters are discharged into the sea. [An ...

18846

embolden
EMBOLDEN, v.t. [en and bold.] To give boldness or courage; to encourage. l Cor.8.

18847

emboldened
EMBOLDENED, pp. Encouraged.

18848

emboldening
EMBOLDENING, ppr. Giving courage or boldness.

18849

embolism
EM'BOLISM, n. [Gr. to throw in, to insert.]1. Intercalation; the insertion of days,months or ...

18850

embolismal
EMBOLIS'MAL, a. Pertaining to intercalation; intercalated; inserted.The embolismal months are ...

18851

embolismic
EMBOLIS'MIC, a. Intercalated; inserted.Twelve lunations form a common year; and thirteen, the ...

18852

embolus
EM'BOLUS, n. [Gr. to thrust in.] Something inserted or acting in another; that which thrusts or ...

18853

emborder
EMBOR'DER, v.t. To adorn with a border.

18854

emboss
EMBOSS', v.t. [en, in, and boss.] In architecture and sculpture, to form bosses or protuberances; ...

18855

embossed
EMBOSS'ED, pp. Formed with bosses or raised figures.

18856

embossing
EMBOSS'ING, ppr. Forming with figures in relievo.

18857

embossment
EMBOSS'MENT, n. A prominence, like a boss; a jut.1. Relief; figures in relievo; raised work.

18858

embottle
EMBOT'TLE, v.t. [en, in, and bottle.] To put in a bottle; to bottle; to include or confine in a ...

18859

embottled
EMBOT'TLED, pp. Put in or included in bottles.

18860

embow
EMBOW, v.t. To form like a bow; to arch; to vault.

18861

embowel
EMBOW'EL, v.t. [en, in, and bowel.] To take out the entrails of an animal body; to eviscerate.1. ...

18862

emboweled
EMBOW'ELED, pp. Deprived of intestines; eviscerated; buried.

18863

emboweler
EMBOW'ELER, n. One that takes out the bowels.

18864

emboweling
EMBOW'ELING, ppr. Depriving of entrails; eviscerating; burying.

18865

embower
EMBOW'ER, v.i. [from bower.] To lodge or rest in a bower.

18866

embrace
EMBRA'CE, v.t.1. To take, clasp or inclose in the arms; to press to the bosom, in token of ...

18867

embraced
EMBRA'CED, pp. Inclosed in the arms; clasped to the bosom; seized; laid hold on; received; ...

18868

embracement
EMBRA'CEMENT, n. A clasp in the arms; a hug; embrace.1. Hostile hug; grapple. [Little used.]2. ...

18869

embracer
EMBRA'CER, n. The person who embraces.1. One who attempts to influence a jury corruptly.

18870

embracery
EMBRA'CERY, n. In law, an attempt to influence a jury corruptly to one side,by ...

18871

embracing
EMBRA'CING, ppr. Clasping in the arms; pressing to the bosom; seizing and holding; comprehending; ...

18872

embraid
EMBRA'ID, v.t. To upbraid.

18873

embrasure
EMBRASU'RE, n. s as z.1. An opening in a wall or parapet,through which cannon are pointed and ...

18874

embrave
EMBRA'VE, v.t. [See Brave.] To embellish; to make showy.1. To inspire with bravery; to make ...

18875

embrocate
EM'BROCATE, v.t. [Gr. to moisten, to rain.]In surgery and medicine, to moisten and rub a diseased ...

18876

embrocated
EM'BROCATED, pp. Moistened and rubbed with a wet cloth or spunge.

18877

embrocating
EM'BROCATING, ppr. Moistening and rubbing a diseased part with a wet cloth or spunge.

18878

embrocation
EMBROCA'TION, n. The act of moistening and rubbing a diseased part, with a cloth or spunge, dipped ...

18879

embroider
EMBROID'ER, v.t. To border with ornamental needle-work, or figures; to adorn with raised figures ...

18880

embroidered
EMBROID'ERED, pp. Adorned with figures of needle-work.

18881

embroiderer
EMBROID'ERER, n. One who embroiders.

18882

embroidering
EMBROID'ERING, ppr. Ornamenting with figured needle-work.

18883

embroidery
EMBROID'ERY, n. Work in gold, silver or silk thread, formed by the needle on cloth, stuffs and ...

18884

embroil
EMBROIL', v.t.1. To perplex or entangle; to intermix in confusion.The christian antiquities at ...

18885

embroiled
EMBROIL'ED, pp. Perplexed; entangled; intermixed and confused; involved in trouble.

18886

embroiling
EMBROIL'ING, ppr. Perplexing; entangling; involving in trouble.

18887

embroilment
EMBROIL'MENT, n. Confusion; disturbance.

18888

embrothel
EMBROTH'EL, v.t. [See Brothel.] To inclose in a brothel.

18889

embryo
EM'BRYO

18890

embryon
EM'BRYON, n. [L. embryon; Gr. to shoot, bud, germinate. The Greek word is contracted, and if so, ...

18891

embryotomy
EMBRYOT'OMY, n. [embryo and Gr. a cutting, to cut.]A cutting or forcible separation of the fetus ...

18892

embusy
EMBUSY, v.t. To employ. [Not used.]

18893

emend
EMEND', v.t. To amend. [Not used.]

18894

emendable
EMEND'ABLE, a. [L. emendabilis, from emendo,to correct; e and menda, a spot or blemish.] Capable ...

18895

emendation
EMENDA'TION, n. [L. emendatio.] The act of altering for the better, or correcting what is ...

18896

emendator
EMENDA'TOR, n. A corrector of errors or faults in writings; one who corrects or improves.

18897

emendatory
EMEND'ATORY, a. Contributing to emendation or correction.

18898

emerald
EM'ERALD, n. [L. smaragdus.] A mineral and a precious stone, whose colors are a pure, lively ...

18899

emerge
EMERGE, v.i. emerj'. [L. emergo; e, ex, and mergo, to plunge.]1. To rise out of a fluid or other ...

18900

emergence
EMERG'ENCE

18901

emergency
EMERG'ENCY, n. The act of rising out of a fluid or other covering or surrounding matter.1. The ...

18902

emergent
EMERG'ENT, a. Rising out of a fluid or any thing that covers or surrounds.The mountains huge appear ...

18903

emerited
EMER'ITED, a. [L. emeritus.] Allowed to have done public service.

18904

emerods
EM'ERODS, n. With a plural termination. [Corrupted from hemorrhoids, Gr. to labor under a flowing ...

18905

emersion
EMER'SION, n. [from L. emergo. See Emerge.]1. The act of rising out of a fluid or other covering ...

18906

emery
EM'ERY, n. [Gr. and L. smiris.] A mineral, said to be a compact variety of corundum, being equal ...

18907

emetic
EMET'IC, a. [Gr. to vomit.] Inducing to vomit; exciting the stomach to discharge its contents by ...

18908

emetically
EMET'ICALLY, adv. In such a manner as to excite vomiting.

18909

emetin
EM'ETIN, n. [See Emetic.] A substance obtained from the root of ipecacuana, half a grain of which ...

18910

emew
E'MEW, n. A name of the Cassowary.

18911

emication
EMICA'TION, n. [L. emicatio, emico, from e and mico, to sparkle, that is, to dart.]A sparkling; a ...

18912

emiction
EMIC'TION, n. [L. mingo, mictum.] The discharging of urine; urine; what is voided by the urinary ...

18913

emigrant
EM'IGRANT, a. [See Emigrate.] Removing from one place or country to another distant place with a ...

18914

emigrate
EM'IGRATE, v.i. [L. emigro; e and migro, to migrate.]To quit one country, state or region and ...

18915

emigrating
EM'IGRATING, ppr. Removing from one country or state to another for residence.

18916

emigration
EMIGRA'TION, n. Removal of inhabitants from one country or state to another, for the purpose of ...

18917

eminence
EM'INENCE

18918

eminency
EM'INENCY, n. [L. eminentia, from eminens, emineo, to stand or show itself above; e and minor, to ...

18919

eminent
EM'INENT, a. [L. eminens, from emineo.]1. High; lofty; as an eminent place. Ezek.16.2. Exalted ...

18920

eminently
EM'INENTLY, adv. In a high degree; in a degree to attract observation; in a degree to be ...

18921

emir
E'MIR, n. [Heb. to speak.] A title of dignity among the Turks, denoting a prince; a title at ...

18922

emissary
EM'ISSARY, n. [L. emissarius, from emitto; e and mitto, to send.]A person sent on a mission; a ...

18923

emission
EMIS'SION, n. [L. emissio, from emitto, to send out.] The act of sending or throwing out; as the ...

18924

emit
EMIT', v.t. [L. emitto; e and mitto, to send.]1. To send forth; to throw or give out; as, fire ...

18925

emmenagogue
EMMEN'AGOGUE, n. [Gr. menstruous, in month, and to lead.]A medicine that promotes the menstrual ...

18926

emmet
EM'MET, n. An ant or pismire.

18927

emmew
EMMEW', v.t. [See Mew.] To mew; to coop up; to confine in a coop or cage.

18928

emmove
EMMOVE, v.t. To move; to rouse; to excite. [Not used.]

18929

emollescence
EMOLLES'CENCE, n. [L. emollescens, softening. See Emolliate.]In metallurgy, that degree of ...

18930

emolliate
EMOL'LIATE, v.t. [L. emollio, mollio, to soften; mollis, soft; Eng. mellow, mild.] To soften; to ...

18931

emolliated
EMOL'LIATED, pp. Softened; rendered effeminate.

18932

emolliating
EMOL'LIATING, pr. Softening; rendering effeminate.

18933

emollient
EMOL'LIENT, a. Softening; making supple; relaxing the solids.Barley is emollient.EMOL'LIENT, n. A ...

18934

emollition
EMOLLI'TION, n. The act of softening or relaxing.

18935

emolument
EMOL'UMENT, n. [L. emolumentum, from emolo, molo, to grind. Originally, toll taken for grinding. ...

18936

emolumental
EMOLUMENT'AL, a. Producing profit; useful; profitable; advantageous.Emongst, for among, in ...

18937

emotion
EMO'TION, n. [L. emotio; emoveo, to move from.]1. Literally, a moving of the mind or soul; ...

18938

empair
EMPA'IR, v.t. To impair. [See Impair.]

18939

empale
EMPA'LE, v.t. [L. palus.]1. To fence or fortify with stakes; to set a line of stakes or posts for ...

18940

empaled
EMPA'LED, pp. Fenced or fortified with stakes; inclosed; shut in; fixed on a state.

18941

empalement
EMPA'LEMENT, n. A fencing, fortifying or inclosing with stakes; a putting to death by thrusting a ...

18942

empaling
EMPA'LING, ppr. Fortifying with pales or stakes; inclosing; putting to death on a stake.

18943

empannel
EMPAN'NEL, n. [Eng. pane, a square. See Pane and Pannel.]A list of jurors; a small piece of paper ...

18944

empark
EMP`ARK, v.t. [in and park.] To inclose as with a fence.

18945

emparlance
EMPAR'LANCE, n. [See Imparlance.]

18946

empasm
EMPASM, n. empazm'. [Gr. to sprinkle.] A powder used to prevent the bad scent of the body.

18947

empassion
EMPAS'SION, v.t. To move with passion; to affect strongly. [See Impassion.]

18948

empeach
EMPEACH, [See Impeach.]

18949

empeople
EMPE'OPLE, v.t. empee'pl. To form into a people or community. [Little used.]

18950

emperess
EM'PERESS. [See Empress.]

18951

emperished
EMPER'ISHED, a. [See Perish.] Decayed. [Not in use.]

18952

emperor
EM'PEROR, n. [L. imperator, from impero, to command.]Literally, the commander of an army. In ...

18953

empery
EM'PERY, n. Empire.

18954

emphasis
EM'PHASIS, n. In rhetoric, a particular stress of utterance, or force of voice, given to the words ...

18955

emphasize
EMPHASIZE, v.t. To utter or pronounce with a particular or more forcible stress of voice; as, to ...

18956

emphatic
EMPHAT'IC

18957

emphatical
EMPHAT'ICAL, a. Forcible; strong; impressive; as an emphatic voice, tone or pronunciation; ...

18958

emphatically
EMPHAT'ICALLY, adv. With emphasis; strongly; forcibly; in a striking manner.1. According to ...

18959

emphysem
EM'PHYSEM, n. [Gr. to inflate.] In surgery, a puffy tumor, easily yielding to pressure, but ...

18960

emphysema
EMPHYSE'MA

18961

emphysematous
EMPHYSEM'ATOUS, a. Pertaining to emphysema; swelled,bloated, but yielding easily to pressure.

18962

emphyteutic
EMPHYTEU'TIC, c. [Gr. a planting, to plant.]Taken on hire; that for which rent is to be paid; as ...

18963

empierce
EMPIERCE, v.t. empers' [em, in, and pierce.] To pierce into; to penetrate. [Not used.]

18964

empight
EMPIGHT, a. [from pight, to fix.] Fixed.

18965

empire
EM'PIRE, n. [L. imperium; See Emperor.]1. Supreme power in governing; supreme dominion; ...

18966

empiric
EM'PIRIC, n. [Gr. to attempt; L. empiricus.]Literally, one who makes experiments. Hence its ...

18967

empirical
EMPIR'ICAL, a. Pertaining to experiments or experience.1. Versed in experiments; as an empiric ...

18968

empirically
EMPIR'ICALLY, adv. By experiment; according to experience; without science; in the manner of ...

18969

empiricism
EMPIR'ICISM, n. Dependence of a physician on his experience in practice,without the aid of a ...

18970

emplaster
EMPL`ASTER, n. [Gr. a plaster.] [See Plaster, which is not used.]

18971

emplastic
EMPL`ASTIC, a. [Gr.] See Plaster, Plastic.] Viscous; glutinous; adhesive; fit to be applied as a ...

18972

emplead
EMPLE'AD, v.t. [em and plead.] To charge with a crime; to accuse. but it is now written implead, ...

18973

employ
EMPLOY', v.t. [L. plico.]1. To occupy the time, attention and labor of; to keep busy, or at work; ...

18974

employable
EMPLOY'ABLE, a. That may be employed; capable of being used; fit or proper for use.

18975

employed
EMPLOY'ED, pp. Occupied; fixed or engaged; applied in business; used in agency.

18976

employer
EMPLOY'ER, n. One who employs; one who uses; one who engages or keeps in service.

18977

employing
EMPLOY'ING, ppr. Occupying; using; keeping busy.

18978

employment
EMPLOY'MENT, n. The act of employing or using.1. Occupation; business; that which engages the ...

18979

emplunge
EMPLUNGE, [See Plunge.]

18980

empoison
EMPOIS'ON, v.t. s as z.1. To poison; to administer poison to; to destroy or endanger life by ...

18981

empoisoned
EMPOIS'ONED, pp. Poisoned; tainted with venom; embittered.

18982

empoisoner
EMPOIS'ONER, n. One who poisons; one who administers a deleterious drug; he or that which ...

18983

empoisoning
EMPOIS'ONING, ppr. Poisoning; embittering.

18984

empoisonment
EMPOIS'ONMENT, n. The act of administering poison, or causing it to be taken; the act of ...

18985

emporium
EMPO'RIUM, n. [L. from the Gr. to buy; to pass or go.]1. A place of merchandize; a town or city ...

18986

empoverish
EMPOV'ERISH, [See Impoverish.]

18987

empower
EMPOW'ER, v.t. [from en or in and power.]1. To give legal or moral power or authority to; to ...

18988

empowered
EMPOW'ERED, pp. Authorized; having legal or moral right.

18989

empowering
EMPOW'ERING, ppr. Authorizing; giving power.

18990

empress
EM'PRESS, n. [Contracted from emperess. See Emperor.] The consort or spouse of an emperor.1. A ...

18991

emprise
EMPRI'SE, n. s as z. [Norm; em, en, and prise, from prendre, to take.] An undertaking; an ...

18992

emptier
EMP'TIER, n. One that empties or exhausts.

18993

emptiness
EMP'TINESS, n. [from empty.] A state of being empty; a state of containing nothing except air; ...

18994

emption
EMP'TION, n. [L. emptio, from emo, to buy.] The act of buying; a purchasing. [Not much used.]

18995

empty
EMP'TY, a.1. Containing nothing, or nothing but air; as an empty chest; empty space; an empty ...

18996

emptying
EMP'TYING, ppr. Pouring out the contents; making void.

18997

emptyings
EMP'TYINGS, n. The lees of beer, cider, &c.

18998

empurple
EMPUR'PLE, v.t. [from purple.] To tinge or dye of a purple color; to discolor with purpleThe deep ...

18999

empurpled
EMPUR'PLED, pp. Stained with a purple color.

19000

empurpling
EMPUR'PLING, ppr. Tinging or dyeing of a purple color.

19001

empuse
EMPU'SE, n. A phantom or specter. [Not used.]

19002

empuzzle
EMPUZ'ZLE. [See Puzzle.]

19003

empyreal
EMPYR'EAL, a. [L. empyroeus; from Gr. fire.]1. Formed of pure fire or light; refined beyond ...

19004

empyrean
EMPYRE'AN, a. Empyreal.EMPYRE'AN, n. [See Empyreal.] The highest heaven, where the pure element ...

19005

empyreuma
EMPYREU'MA, n. [Gr. fire.] In chimistry, a disagreeable smell produced from burnt oils, in ...

19006

empyreumatic
EMPYREUMAT'IC

19007

empyreumatical
EMPYREUMAT'ICAL, a. Having the taste or smell of burnt oil, or of burning animal and vegetable ...

19008

empyrical
EMPYR'ICAL, a. Containing the combustible principle of coal.

19009

empyrosis
EMPYRO'SIS, n. [Gr. to burn.] a general fire; a conflagration. [Little used.]

19010

emrods
EMRODS. [See Emerods.]

19011

emu
E'MU, n. A large fowl of S. America, with wings unfit for flight.This name properly belongs to the ...

19012

emulate
EM'ULATE, v.t. [L. oemulor; Gr. strife, contest.]1. To strive to equal or excel, in qualities or ...

19013

emulated
EM'ULATED, pp. Rivaled; imitated.

19014

emulating
EM'ULATING, ppr. Rivaling; attempting to equal or excel; imitating; resembling.

19015

emulation
EMULA'TION, n. The act of attempting to equal or excel in qualities or actions; rivalry; desire of ...

19016

emulative
EM'ULATIVE, a. Inclined to emulation; rivaling; disposed to competition.

19017

emulator
EM'ULATOR, , n. One who emulates; a rival; a competitor.

19018

emulatress
EM'ULATRESS, n. A female who emulates another.

19019

emule
EMU'LE, v.t. To emulate. [Not used.]

19020

emulgent
EMULG'ENT, a. [L. emulgeo; e and mulgeo, to milk out.]Milking or draining out. In anatomy, the ...

19021

emulous
EM'ULOUS, a. [L. oemulus.] Desirous or eager to imitate, equal or excel another; desirous of like ...

19022

emulously
EM'ULOUSLY, adv. With desire of equaling or excelling another.

19023

emulsion
EMUL'SION, n. [L. emulsus, emulgeo, to milk out.]A soft liquid remedy of a color and consistence ...

19024

emulsive
EMUL'SIVE, a. Softening; milk-like.1. Producing or yielding a milk-like substance; as emulsive ...

19025

emunctory
EMUNC'TORY, n. [L. emunctorium, from emunctus, emungo, to wipe, to cleanse.] In anatomy, any part ...

19026

emuscation
EMUSCA'TION, n. [L. emuscor.] A freeing from moss. [Not much used.]

19027

en
EN, a prefix to many English words, chiefly borrowed from the French. In coincides with the Latin, ...

19028

enable
ENABLE, v.t. [Norm. enhabler; en and hable, able. See Able.]1. To make able; to supply with ...

19029

enabled
ENA'BLED, pp. Supplied with sufficient power, physical, moral or legal.

19030

enablement
ENA'BLEMENT, n. The act of enabling; ability.

19031

enabling
ENA'BLING, ppr. Giving power to; supplying with sufficient power, ability or means; authorizing.

19032

enact
ENACT', v.t. [en and act.] To make, as a law; to pass, as a bill into a law; to perform the last ...

19033

enacted
ENACT'ED, pp. Passed into a law; sanctioned as a law, by legislative authority.

19034

enacting
ENACT'ING, ppr. Passing into a law; giving legislative sanction to a bill, and establishing it as ...

19035

enactment
ENACT'MENT, n. The passing of a bill into a law; the act of voting, decreeing and giving validity ...

19036

enactor
ENACT'OR, n. One who enacts or passes a law; one who decrees or establishes, as a law.1. One who ...

19037

enacture
ENAC'TURE, n. Purpose. [Not in use.]

19038

enallage
ENAL'LAGE, n. enal'lajy. [Gr. change.]A figure, in grammar, by which some change is made in the ...

19039

enambush
ENAM'BUSH, v.t. [en and ambush.] To hide in ambush.1. To ambush.

19040

enambushed
ENAM'BUSHED, pp. Concealed in ambush, or with hostile intention; ambushed.

19041

enamel
ENAM'EL, n. 1. In mineralogy, a substance imperfectly vitrified, or matter in which the granular ...

19042

enamelar
ENAM'ELAR, a. Consisting of enamel; resembling enamel; smooth; glossy.

19043

enameled
ENAM'ELED, pp. Overlaid with enamel; adorned with any thing resembling enamel.

19044

enameler
ENAM'ELER, n. One who enamels; one whose occupation is to lay enamels, or inlay colors.

19045

enameling
ENAM'ELING, ppr. Laying enamel.ENAM'ELING, n. The act or art of laying enamels.

19046

enamor
ENAM'OR, v.t. [L. amor, love.] To inflame with love; to charm; to captivate; with of before the ...

19047

enamorado
ENAMORA'DO, n. One deeply in love.

19048

enamored
ENAM'ORED, pp. Inflamed with love; charmed; delighted.

19049

enamoring
ENAM'ORING, ppr. Inflaming with love; charming; captivating.

19050

enarmed
EN`ARMED, a. In heraldry, having arms, that is, horns, hoofs, &c. of a different color from that ...

19051

enarration
ENARRA'TION, n. [L. enarro,narro, to relate.] Recital; relation; account; exposition. [Little ...

19052

enarthrosis
ENARTHRO'SIS, n. [Gr. a joint.] In anatomy, that species of articulation which consists in the ...

19053

enate
ENA'TE, a. [L. enatus.] Growing out.

19054

enaunter
ENAUN'TER, adv. Lest that.

19055

encage
ENCA'GE, v.t. [from cage.] To shut up or confine in a cage; to coop.

19056

encaged
ENCA'GED, pp. Shut up or confined in a cage.

19057

encaging
ENCA'GING, ppr. Cooping; confining in a cage.

19058

encamp
ENCAMP', v.i. [from camp.] To pitch tents or form huts, as an army; to halt on a march, spread ...

19059

encamped
ENCAMP'ED, pp. Settled in tents or huts for lodging or temporary habitation.

19060

encamping
ENCAMP'ING, ppr. Pitching tents or forming huts, for a temporary lodging or rest.

19061

encampment
ENCAMP'MENT, n. The act of pitching tents or forming huts, as an army or traveling company, for ...

19062

encanker
ENCANK'ER, v.t. To corrode; to canker.

19063

encase
ENCA'SE, v.t. To inclose or confine in a case or cover.

19064

encaustic
ENCAUS'TIC, a. [Gr. caustic, to burn.] Pertaining to the art of enameling, and to painting in ...

19065

encave
ENCA'VE, v.t. [from cave.] To hide in a cave or recess.

19066

enceint
ENCE'INT, n. [L. cingo, to gird.] In fortification, inclosure; the wall or rampart which ...

19067

enchafe
ENCHA'FE, v.t. [en and chafe.] To chafe or fret; to provoke; to enrage; to irritate. [See Chafe.]

19068

enchafed
ENCHA'FED, pp. Chafed; irritated; enraged.

19069

enchafing
ENCHA'FING, ppr. Chafing; fretting; enraging.

19070

enchain
ENCHA'IN, v.t.1. To fasten with a chain; to bind or hold in chains; to hold in bondage.2. To hold ...

19071

enchained
ENCHA'INED, pp. Fastened with a chain; held in bondage; held fast; restrained; confined.

19072

enchaining
ENCHA'INING, ppr. Making fast with a chain; binding; holding in chains; confining.

19073

enchant
ENCH`ANT, v.t. [L. incanto; in and canto, to sing. See Chant and Cant.]1. To practice sorcery or ...

19074

enchanted
ENCH`ANTED, pp. Affected by sorcery; fascinated; subdued by charms; delighted beyond measure.1. ...

19075

enchanter
ENCH`ANTER, n. One who enchants; a sorcerer or magician; one who has spirits or demons at his ...

19076

enchanting
ENCH`ANTING, ppr. Affecting with sorcery, charms or spells.1. Delighting highly; ravishing with ...

19077

enchantingly
ENCH`ANTINGLY, adv. With the power of enchantment; in a manner to delight or charm; as, the lady ...

19078

enchantment
ENCH`ANTMENT, n. The act of producing certain wonderful effects by the invocation or aid of ...

19079

enchantress
ENCH`ANTRESS, n. A sorceress; a woman who pretends to effect wonderful things by the aid of demons; ...

19080

encharge
ENCH`ARGE, v.t. To give in charge or trust. [Not in use.]

19081

enchase
ENCHA'SE, v.t. [Eng. a case.]1. To infix or inclose in another body so as to be held fast, but ...

19082

enchased
ENCHA'SED, pp. Enclosed as in a frame or in another body; adorned with embossed work.

19083

enchasing
ENCHA'SING, ppr. Inclosing in another body; adorning with embossed work.

19084

encheason
ENCHE'ASON, n. Cause; occasion.

19085

enchiridion
ENCHIRID'ION, n. [Gr. the hand.] A manual; a book to be carried in the hand. [Not used.]

19086

encindered
ENCIN'DERED, a. Burnt to cinders.

19087

encircle
ENCIR'CLE, v.t. ensur'cl. [from circle.]1. To inclose or surround with a circle or ring, or with ...

19088

encircled
ENCIR'CLED, ppr. Surrounded with a circle; encompassed; environed; embraced.

19089

encirclet
ENCIR'CLET, n. A circle; a ring.

19090

encircling
ENCIR'CLING, ppr. Surrounding with a circle or ring; encompassing; embracing.

19091

enclitic
ENCLIT'IC, a. [Gr. inclined; to incline.]1. Leaning; inclining, or inclined. In grammar, an ...

19092

enclitically
ENCLIT'ICALLY, adv. In an enclitic manner; by throwing the accent back.

19093

enclitics
ENCLIT'ICS, a. In grammar, the art of declining and conjugating words.

19094

enclose
ENCLOSE. [See Inclose.]

19095

enclouded
ENCLOUD'ED, a. [from cloud.] Covered with clouds.

19096

encoach
ENCOACH, v.t. To carry in a coach..

19097

encoffin
ENCOF'FIN, v.t. To put in a coffin.

19098

encoffined
ENCOF'FINED, pp. Inclosed in a coffin.

19099

encomber
ENCOM'BER, [See Encumber.]

19100

encomberment
ENCOM'BERMENT, n. Molestation. [Not used.]

19101

encomiast
ENCO'MIAST, n. One who praises another; a panegyrist; one who utters or writes commendations.

19102

encomiastic
ENCOMIAS'TIC

19103

encomiastical
ENCOMIAS'TICAL, a. Bestowing praise; praising; commending; laudatory; as an encomiastic address or ...

19104

encomium
ENCO'MIUM, n. plu. encomiums. Praise; panegyric; commendation. Men are quite as willing to ...

19105

encompass
ENCOM'PASS, v.t. [from compass.] To encircle; to surround; as, a ring encompasses the finger.1. ...

19106

encompassed
ENCOM'PASSED, pp. Encircled; surrounded; inclosed; shut in.

19107

encompassing
ENCOM'PASSING, ppr. Encircling; surrounding; confining.

19108

encompassment
ENCOM'PASSMENT, n. A surrounding.1. A going round; circumlocution in speaking.

19109

encore
ENCO'RE, a. French word, pronounced nearly ongkore,and signifying, again, once more; used by the ...

19110

encounter
ENCOUNT'ER, n. [L. contra, against,or rather rencontre.]1. A meeting, particularly a sudden or ...

19111

encountered
ENCOUNT'ERED, pp. Met face to face; met in opposition or hostility; opposed.

19112

encounterer
ENCOUNT'ERER, n. One who encounters; an opponent; an antagonist.

19113

encountering
ENCOUNT'ERING, ppr. Meeting; meeting in opposition, or in battle; opposing; resisting.

19114

encourage
ENCOUR'AGE, v.t. enkur'rage. To give courage to; to give or increase confidence of success; to ...

19115

encouraged
ENCOUR'AGED, pp. Emboldened; inspirited; animated; incited.

19116

encouragement
ENCOUR'AGEMENT, n. The act of giving courage, or confidence of success; incitement to action or to ...

19117

encourager
ENCOUR'AGER, n. One who encourages,incites or stimulates to action; one who supplies incitements, ...

19118

encouraging
ENCOUR'AGING, ppr. Inspiring with hope and confidence; exciting courage.1. Furnishing ground to ...

19119

encouragingly
ENCOUR'AGINGLY, adv. In a manner to give courage, or hope of success.

19120

encradle
ENCRA'DLE, v.t. [en and cradle.] To lay in a cradle.

19121

encrimson
ENCRIM'SON, v.t. s as z. To cover with a crimson color.

19122

encrimsoned
ENCRIM'SONED, pp. Covered with a crimson color.

19123

encrinite
EN'CRINITE, n. [Gr. a lily.] Stone-lily; a fossil zoophyte, formed of many joints, all perforated ...

19124

encrisped
ENCRISP'ED, a. [from crisp] Curled; formed in curls.

19125

encroach
ENCROACH, v.i. [Eng. crook.] Primarily, to catch as with a hook. Hence,1. To enter on the ...

19126

encroacher
ENCROACHER, n. One who enters on and takes possession of what is not his own, by gradual steps.1. ...

19127

encroaching
ENCROACHING, ppr. Entering on and taking possession of what belongs to another.ENCROACHING, a. ...

19128

encroachingly
ENCROACHINGLY, adv. By way of encroachment.

19129

encroachment
ENCROACHMENT, n. The entering gradually on the rights or possessions of another, and taking ...

19130

encrust
ENCRUST', v.t. To cover with a crust. It is written also incrust.

19131

encumber
ENCUM'BER, v.t.1. To load; to clog; to impede motion with a load, burden or any thing inconvenient ...

19132

encumbered
ENCUM'BERED, pp. Loaded; impeded in motion or operation, by a burden or difficulties; loaded with ...

19133

encumbering
ENCUM'BERING, ppr. Loading; clogging; rendering motion or operation difficult; loading with debts.

19134

encumbrance
ENCUM'BRANCE, n. A load; any thing that impedes motion, or renders it difficult and laborious; ...

19135

encyclical
ENCYC'LICAL, a. [Gr. a circle.] Circular; sent to many persons or places; intended for many, or ...

19136

encyclopedia
ENCYCLOPE'DIA

19137

encyclopedian
ENCYCLOPE'DIAN, a. Embracing the whole circle of learning.

19138

encyclopedist
ENCYCLOPE'DIST, n. The compiler of an Encyclopedia, or one who assists in such compilation.

19139

encyclopedy
ENCYCLOPE'DY, n. [Gr. in, a circle, and instruction; instruction in a circle, or circle of ...

19140

encysted
ENCYST'ED, a. [from cyst.] Inclosed in a bag, bladder or vesicle; as an encysted tumor.

19141

end
END, n. 1. The extreme point of a line, or of anything that has more length than breadth; as the ...

19142

endamage
ENDAM'AGE, v.t. [from damage.] To bring loss or damage to; to harm; to injure; to mischief; to ...

19143

endamaged
ENDAM'AGED, pp. Harmed; injured.

19144

endamagement
ENDAM'AGEMENT, n. Damage; loss; injury.

19145

endamaging
ENDAM'AGING, ppr. Harming; injuring.

19146

endanger
ENDANGER, v.t. [from danger.] To put in hazard; to bring into danger or peril; to expose to loss ...

19147

endangered
ENDANGERED, pp. Exposed to loss or injury.

19148

endangering
ENDANGERING, ppr. Putting in hazard; exposing to loss or injury.ENDANGERING, n. Injury; damage.

19149

endangerment
ENDANGERMENT, n. Hazard; danger.

19150

endear
ENDE'AR, v.t. [from dear.] To make dear; to make more beloved. The distress of a friend endears ...

19151

endeared
ENDE'ARED, pp. Rendered dear, beloved, or more beloved.

19152

endearing
ENDE'ARING, ppr. Making dear or more beloved.

19153

endearment
ENDE'ARMENT, n. The cause of love; that which excites or increases affection, particularly that ...

19154

endeavor
ENDEAV'OR, n. endev'or. An effort; an essay; an attempt; an exertion of physical strength, or the ...

19155

endeavored
ENDEAV'ORED, pp. Essayed; attempted.

19156

endeavorer
ENDEAV'ORER, n. One who makes an effort or attempt.

19157

endeavoring
ENDEAV'ORING, ppr. Making an effort or efforts; striving; essaying; attempting.

19158

endecagon
ENDEC'AGON, n. A plain figure of eleven sides and angles.

19159

endeictic
ENDEI'CTIC, a. [Gr. to show.] Showing; exhibiting. An endeictic dialogue, in the Platonic ...

19160

endemial
ENDE'MIAL, a. [Gr. people.] Peculiar to a people or nation. An endemic disease, is one to which ...

19161

endemic
ENDEM'IC

19162

endemical
ENDEM'ICAL

19163

endenize
ENDEN'IZE, v.t. To make free; to naturalize; to admit to the privileges of a denizen. [Little ...

19164

endenizen
ENDEN'IZEN, v.t. [from denizen.] To naturalize.

19165

endict
ENDICT,ENDICTMENT. [See Indict, Indictment.]

19166

endictment
ENDICT,ENDICTMENT. [See Indict, Indictment.]

19167

ending
END'ING, ppr. [from end.] Terminating; closing; concluding.END'ING, n. Termination; ...

19168

endite
ENDITE. [See Indite.]

19169

endive
EN'DIVE, n. [L. intybum.] A species of plant, of the genus Cichorium or succory; used as a salad.

19170

endless
END'LESS, a. [See End.] Without end; having no end or conclusion; applied to length, and to ...

19171

endlessly
END'LESSLY, adv. Without end or termination; as, to extend a line endlessly.1. Incessantly; ...

19172

endlessness
END'LESSNESS, n. Extension without end or limit.1. Perpetuity; endless duration.

19173

endlong
END'LONG, adv. In a line; with the end forward. [Little used.]

19174

endoctrine
ENDOC'TRINE, v.t. To teach; to indoctrinate. [See the latter word.]

19175

endorse
ENDORSE, ENDORSEMENT. [See Indorse, Indorsement.]

19176

endorsement
ENDORSE, ENDORSEMENT. [See Indorse, Indorsement.]

19177

endoss
ENDOSS', v.t. To engrave or carve.

19178

endow
ENDOW', v.t. [L. dos, doto, or a different Celtic root.]1. To furnish with a portion of goods or ...

19179

endowed
ENDOW'ED, pp. Furnished with a portion of estate;having dower settled on; supplied with a ...

19180

endowing
ENDOW'ING, ppr. Settling a dower on; furnishing with a permanent fund; inducing.

19181

endowment
ENDOW'MENT, n. The act of settling dower on a woman, or of settling a fund or permanent provision ...

19182

endrudge
ENDRUDGE, v.t. endruj'. To make a drudge or slave. [Not used.]

19183

endue
ENDU'E, v.t. [L. induo.] To indue, which see.

19184

endurable
ENDU'RABLE, a. That can be borne or suffered.

19185

endurance
ENDU'RANCE, n. [See Endure.] Continuance; a state of lasting or duration; lastingness.1. A ...

19186

endure
ENDU'RE, v.t. [L. durus, duro.]1. To last; to continue in the same state without perishing; to ...

19187

endured
ENDU'RED, pp. Borne; suffered; sustained.

19188

endurer
ENDU'RER, n. One who bears, suffers or sustains.1. He or that which continues long.

19189

enduring
ENDU'RING, ppr. Lasting; continuing without perishing; bearing; sustaining; supporting with ...

19190

endwise
END'WISE, adv. On the end; erectly; in an upright position.1. With the end forward.

19191

enecate
EN'ECATE, v.t. [L. eneco.] To kill. [Not in use.]

19192

eneid
E'NEID, n. [L. Eneis.] A heroic poem, written by Virgil, in which Eneas is the hero.

19193

enemy
EN'EMY, n. [L. inimicus.]1. A foe; an adversary. A private enemy is one who hates another and ...

19194

energetic
ENERGET'IC

19195

energetical
ENERGET'ICAL, a. [Gr. work. See Energy.]1. Operating with force, vigor and effect; forcible; ...

19196

energetically
ENERGET'ICALLY, adv. With force and vigor; with energy and effect.

19197

energize
EN'ERGIZE, v.i. [from energy.] To act with force; to operate with vigor; to act in producing an ...

19198

energized
EN'ERGIZED, pp. Invigorated.

19199

energizer
EN'ERGIZER, n. He or that which gives energy; he or that which acts in producing an effect.

19200

energizing
EN'ERGIZING, ppr. Giving energy, force or vigor; acting with force.

19201

energy
EN'ERGY, n. [Gr. work.]1. Internal or inherent power; the power of operating, whether exerted or ...

19202

enervate
ENERV'ATE, a. [infra.] Weakened; weak; without strength or force.1. To deprive of nerve, force or ...

19203

enervated
EN'ERVATED, pp. Weakened; enfeebled; emasculated.

19204

enervating
EN'ERVATING, ppr. Depriving of strength, force or vigor; weakening; enfeebling.

19205

enervation
ENERVA'TION, n. The act of weakening, or reducing strength.1. The state of being weakened; ...

19206

enerve
ENERVE, v.t. everv'. To weaken; the same as enervate.

19207

enfamish
ENFAM'ISH, v.t. To famish. [See Famish.]

19208

enfeeble
ENFEE'BLE, v.t. [from feeble.] To deprive of strength; to reduce the strength or force of; to ...

19209

enfeebled
ENFEE'BLED, pp. Weakened; deprived of strength or vigor.

19210

enfeeblement
ENFEE'BLEMENT, n. The act of weakening; enervation.

19211

enfeebling
ENFEE'BLING, ppr. Weakening; debilitating; enervating.

19212

enfeloned
ENFEL'ONED, a. [See Felon.] Fierce; cruel.

19213

enfeoff
ENFEOFF, v.t. enfeff'. [Law L. feaffo, feoffare, from fief, which see.]1. To give one a feud; ...

19214

enfeoffed
ENFEOFF'ED, pp. Invested with the fee of any corporeal hereditament.

19215

enfeoffing
ENFEOFF'ING, ppr. Giving to one the fee simple of any corporeal hereditament.

19216

enfeoffment
ENFEOFF'MENT, n. The act of giving the fee simple of an estate.1. The instrument or deed by which ...

19217

enfetter
ENFET'TER, v.t. To fetter; to bind in fetters.

19218

enfever
ENFE'VER, v.t. To excite fever in.

19219

enfierce
ENFIERCE, v.t. enfers'. To make fierce. [Not in use.]

19220

enfilade
ENFILA'DE, n. [L. filum.] A line or straight passage; or the situation of a place which may be ...

19221

enfiladed
ENFILA'DED, pp. Pierced or raked in a line.

19222

enfilading
ENFILA'DING, ppr. Piercing or sweeping in a line.

19223

enfire
ENFI'RE, v.t. To inflame; to set on fire. [Not used.]

19224

enforce
ENFO'RCE, v.t.1. To give strength to; to strengthen; to invigorate. [See Def.5.]2. To make or ...

19225

enforceable
ENFO'RCEABLE, a. That may be enforced.

19226

enforced
ENFO'RCED, pp. Strengthened; gained by force; driven; compelled; urged; carried into effect.

19227

enforcedly
ENFO'RCEDLY, adv. By violence; not by choice.

19228

enforcement
ENFO'RCEMENT, n. The act of enforcing; compulsion; force applied.1. That which gives energy or ...

19229

enforcer
ENFO'RCER, n. One who compels, constrains or urges; one who effects by violence; one who carries ...

19230

enforcing
ENFO'RCING, ppr. Giving force or strength; compelling; urging; constraining; putting in execution.

19231

enform
ENFORM', v.t. To form; to fashion. [See Form.]

19232

enfouldered
ENFOUL'DERED, a. Mixed with lightning. [Not in use.]1. To make free of a city, corporation or ...

19233

enfranchised
ENFRAN'CHISED, pp. Set free; released from bondage.1. Admitted to the rights and privileges of ...

19234

enfranchisement
ENFRAN'CHISEMENT, n. Release from slavery or custody.1. The admission of persons to the freedom ...

19235

enfranchiser
ENFRAN'CHISER, n. One who enfranchises.

19236

enfranchising
ENFRAN'CHISING, ppr. Setting free from slavery or custody; admitting to the rights and privileges ...

19237

enfroward
ENFRO'WARD, v.t. To make froward or perverse. [Not used.]

19238

enfrozen
ENFRO'ZEN, a. Frozen; congealed. [Not used.]

19239

engage
ENGA'GE, v.t. 1. To make liable for a debt to a creditor; to bind one's self as surety.2. To ...

19240

engaged
ENGA'GED, pp. or a. Pledged; promised; enlisted; gained and attached; attracted and fixed; ...

19241

engagedly
ENGA'GEDLY, adv. With earnestness; with attachment.

19242

engagedness
ENGA'GEDNESS, n. The state of being seriously and earnestly occupied; zeal; animation.

19243

engagement
ENGA'GEMENT, n. The act of pawning, pledging or making liable for debt.1. Obligation by agreement ...

19244

engager
ENGA'GER, n. One that enters into an engagement or agreement.

19245

engaging
ENGA'GING, ppr. Pawning; making liable for debt; enlisting; bringing into a party or cause; ...

19246

engagingly
ENGA'GINGLY, adv. In a manner to win the affections.

19247

engallant
ENGAL'LANT, v.t. To make a gallant of. [Not used.]

19248

engaol
ENGAOL, v.t. enja'le. To imprison. [not used.]

19249

engarboil
ENG`ARBOIL, v.t. To disorder. [Not in used.]

19250

engarland
ENG`ARLAND, v.t. To encircle with a garland.

19251

engarrison
ENGAR'RISON, v.t. To furnish with a garrison; to defend or protect by a garrison.

19252

engastrimuth
ENGAS'TRIMUTH, n. A ventriloquist.

19253

engender
ENGEN'DER, v.t. [L. gener, genero, geno, gigno. See Generate.]1. To beget between the different ...

19254

engendered
ENGEN'DERED, pp. Begotten; caused; produced.

19255

engenderer
ENGEN'DERER, n. He or that which engenders.

19256

engendering
ENGEN'DERING, ppr. Begetting; causing to be; producing.

19257

engild
ENGILD', v.t. To gild; to brighten.

19258

engine
EN'GINE, n. [L. ingenium.]1. In mechanics, a compound machine, or artificial instrument, composed ...

19259

engineer
ENGINEE'R, n. In the military art, a person skilled in mathematics and mechanics, who forms plans ...

19260

enginery
EN'GINERY, n. en'ginry. The act of managing engines or artillery.1. Engines in general; ...

19261

engird
ENGIRD', v.t. [See Gird.] To surround; to encircle; to encompass.

19262

engirded
ENGIRD'ED

19263

engirding
ENGIRD'ING, ppr. Encircling; surrounding.

19264

engirt
ENGIRT', pp. Surrounded; encompassed.

19265

englad
ENGLAD', v.t. To make glad; to cause to rejoice.

19266

englaimed
ENGLA'IMED, a. Furred; clammy. [Not used.]

19267

england
ENGLAND, n. [See English.]

19268

english
ENGLISH, a. ing'glish. [L. ango, from the sense of pressing, depression, laying, which gives the ...

19269

englished
ENGLISHED, pp. Rendered into English.

19270

englishry
ENGLISHRY, n. The state or privilege of being an Englishman. [Not used.]

19271

englut
ENGLUT', v.t. [L. glutio.]1. To swallow.2. To fill; to glut. [This word is little used. See ...

19272

engore
ENGO'RE, v.t. To pierce; to gore. [See Gore.]

19273

engorge
ENGORGE, v.t. engorj'. To swallow;; to devour; to gorge; properly, to swallow with greediness, or ...

19274

engorged
ENGORG'ED, pp. Swallowed with greediness, or in large draughts.

19275

engorgement
ENGORGEMENT, n. engorj'ment. the act of swallowing greedily; a devouring with voracity.

19276

engorging
ENGORG'ING, ppr. Swallowing with voracity.

19277

engraft
ENGR`AFT, v.t. To ingraft, which see.

19278

engrail
ENGRA'IL, v.t. In heraldry, to variegate; to spot as with hail; to indent or make ragged at the ...

19279

engrailed
ENGRA'ILED, pp. Variegated; spotted.

19280

engrain
ENGRA'IN, v.t. [from grain.] To dye in grain, or in the raw material to dye deep.

19281

engrained
ENGRA'INED, pp. Dyed in the grain; as engrained carpets.

19282

engraining
ENGRA'INING, ppr. Dyeing in the grain.

19283

engrapple
ENGRAP'PLE, v.t. [from grapple. To grapple; to seize and hold; to close in and hold fast. [See ...

19284

engrasp
ENGR`ASP, v.t. [from grasp.] To seize with a clasping hold; to hold fast by inclosing or ...

19285

engrave
ENGRA'VE, v.t. pret. engraved; pp. engraved or engraven.Literally, to scratch or scrape. Hence,1. ...

19286

engraved
ENGRA'VED

19287

engravement
ENGRA'VEMENT, n. Engraved work; act of engraving.

19288

engraven
ENGRA'VEN, pp. Cut or marked,as with a chisel or graver; imprinted; deeply impressed.

19289

engraver
ENGRA'VER, n. One who engraves; a cutter of letters, figures or devices, on stone, metal or wood; ...

19290

engravery
ENGRA'VERY, n. The work of an engraver. [Little used.]

19291

engraving
ENGRA'VING, ppr. Cutting or marking stones or metals, with a chisel or graver; ...

19292

engrieve
ENGRIE'VE, v.t. To grieve; to pain. [See Grieve.]

19293

engross
ENGRO'SS, v.t.1. Primarily, to make thick or gross; to thicken. [Not now used.]2. To make ...

19294

engrossed
ENGRO'SSED, pp. Made thick; taken in the whole; purchased in large quantities for sale; written in ...

19295

engrosser
ENGRO'SSER, n. He or that which takes the whole; a person who purchases the whole or such ...

19296

engrossing
ENGRO'SSING, ppr. Taking the whole; buying commodities in such quantities as to raise the price in ...

19297

engrossment
ENGRO'SSMENT, n. The act of engrossing; the act of taking the whole.1. The appropriation of ...

19298

enguard
ENGU`ARD, v.t. [See Guard.] To guard; to defend.

19299

engulf
ENGULF', v.t. To throw or to absorb in a gulf.

19300

engulfed
ENGULF'ED, pp. Absorbed in a whirlpool, or in a deep abyss or gulf.

19301

engulfment
ENGULF'MENT, n. An absorption in a gulf, or deep cavern, or vortex.

19302

enhance
ENH`ANCE, v.t. enh`ans.1. To raise; to lift; applied to material things by Spenser, but this ...

19303

enhanced
ENH`ANCED, pp. Raised; advanced; highthened; increased.

19304

enhancement
ENH`ANCEMENT, n. Rise; increase; augmentation; as the enhancement of value,price, enjoyment, ...

19305

enhancer
ENH`ANCER, n. One who enhances; he or that which raises price, &c.

19306

enhancing
ENH`ANCING, ppr. Raising; increasing; augmenting; aggravating.

19307

enharbor
ENH`ARBOR, v.i. To dwell in or inhabit.

19308

enharden
ENH`ARDEN, v.t. To harden; to encourage.

19309

enharmonic
ENHARMON'IC, a. [from harmonic, harmony.] In music, an epithet applied to such species of ...

19310

enigma
ENIG'MA, n. [L. oenigma; Gr. to hint.] A dark saying, in which some known thing is concealed ...

19311

enigmatic
ENIGMAT'IC

19312

enigmatical
ENIGMAT'ICAL, a. Relating to or containing a riddle; obscure; darkly expressed; ambiguous.1. ...

19313

enigmatically
ENIGMAT'ICALLY, adv. In an obscure manner; in a sense different from that which the words in ...

19314

enigmatist
ENIG'MATIST, n. A maker or dealer in enigmas and riddles.

19315

enigmatize
ENIG'MATIZE, v.i. To utter or form enigmas; to deal in riddles.

19316

enigmatography
ENIGMATOG'RAPHY

19317

enigmatology
ENIGMATOL'OGY, n. The art of making riddles; or the art of solving them.

19318

enjoin
ENJOIN', v.t. [L. injungo. See Join. We observe that the primary sense of join is to set, extend ...

19319

enjoined
ENJOIN'ED, pp. Ordered; directed; admonished with authority; commanded.

19320

enjoiner
ENJOIN'ER, n. One who enjoins.

19321

enjoining
ENJOIN'ING, ppr. Ordering; directing.

19322

enjoinment
ENJOIN'MENT, n. Direction; command; authoritative admonition.

19323

enjoy
ENJOY', v.t.1. To feel or perceive with pleasure; to take pleasure or satisfaction in the ...

19324

enjoyable
ENJOY'ABLE, a. Capable of being enjoyed.

19325

enjoyed
ENJOY'ED, pp. Perceived with pleasure or satisfaction; possessed or used with pleasure; occupied ...

19326

enjoyer
ENJOY'ER, n. One who enjoys.

19327

enjoying
ENJOY'ING, ppr. Feeling with pleasure; possessing with satisfaction.

19328

enjoyment
ENJOY'MENT, n. Pleasure; satisfaction; agreeable sensations; fruition.1. Possession with ...

19329

enkindle
ENKIN'DLE, v.t. [from kindle.] To kindle; to set on fire; to inflame; as, to enkindle sparks into ...

19330

enkindled
ENKIN'DLED, pp. Set on fire; inflamed; roused into action; excited.

19331

enkindling
ENKIN'DLING, ppr. Setting on fire; inflaming; rousing; exciting.

19332

enlard
ENL`ARD, v.t. To cover with lard or grease; to baste.

19333

enlarge
ENL`ARGE, v.t. enlarj. [from large.] To make greater in quantity or dimensions; to extend in ...

19334

enlarged
ENL`ARGED, pp. Increased in bulk; extended in dimension; expanded; dilated; augmented; released ...

19335

enlargedly
ENL`ARGEDLY, adv. With enlargement.

19336

enlargement
ENL`ARGEMENT, n. Increase of size or bulk, real or apparent; extension of dimensions or limits; ...

19337

enlarger
ENL`ARGER, n. He or that which enlarges, increases, extends or expands; an amplifier.

19338

enlarging
ENL`ARGING, ppr. Increasing in bulk; extending in dimension; expanding; making free or liberal; ...

19339

enlight
ENLI'GHT, v.t. enli'te. To illuminate; to enlighten.[See Enlighten. Enlight is rarely used.]

19340

enlighten
ENLI'GHTEN, v.t. enli'tn. [from light.]1. To make light; to shed light on; to supply with light; ...

19341

enlightened
ENLI'GHTENED, pp. Rendered light; illuminated; instructed; informed; furnished with clear views.

19342

enlightener
ENLI'GHTENER, n. One who illuminates; he or that which communicates light to the eye, or clear ...

19343

enlightening
ENLI'GHTENING, ppr. Illuminating; giving light to; instructing.

19344

enlink
ENLINK', v.t. [from link.] To chain to; to connect.

19345

enlist
ENLIST', v.t. [See List.] To enroll; to register; to enter a name on a list.1. To engage in ...

19346

enlistment
ENLIST'MENT, n. The act of enlisting; the writing by which a soldier is bound.

19347

enliven
ENLI'VEN, v.t. enli'vn. [from life, live.] Literally, to give life. Hence,1. To give action or ...

19348

enlivened
ENLI'VENED, pp. Made more active; excited; animated; made cheerful or gay.

19349

enlivener
ENLI'VENER, n. He or that which enlivens or animates; he or that which invigorates.

19350

enlivening
ENLI'VENING, ppr. Giving life, spirit or animation; inspiriting; invigorating; making vivacious, ...

19351

enlumine
ENLU'MINE, v.t. To illumine; to enlighten. [See the latter words.]

19352

enmarble
ENMAR'BLE, v.t. To make hard as marble; to harden.

19353

enmesh
ENMESH', v.t. [from mesh.] To net; to entangle to entrap.

19354

enmity
EN'MITY, n.1. The quality of being an enemy; the opposite of friendship; ill will; hatred; ...

19355

enneacontahedral
ENNEACONTAHE'DRAL, a. Having ninety faces.

19356

enneagon
EN'NEAGON, n. [Gr. nine, an angle.] In geometry, a polygon or figure with nine sides or nine ...

19357

enneander
ENNEAN'DER, n. [Gr. nine, a male.] In botany, a plant having nine stamens.

19358

enneandrian
ENNEAN'DRIAN, a. Having nine stamens.

19359

enneapetalous
ENNEAPET'ALOUS, a. [Gr. nine, a leaf.] Having nine petals or flower-leaves.

19360

enneatical
ENNEAT'ICAL, a. [Gr. nine.] Enneatical days, are every ninth day of a disease. Enneatical years, ...

19361

ennew
ENNEW' v.t. To make new. [Not in use.]

19362

ennoble
ENNO'BLE, v.t.1. To make noble; to raise to nobility; as, to ennoble a commoner.2. To dignify; to ...

19363

ennobled
ENNO'BLED, pp. Raised to the rank of nobility; dignified; exalted in rank, excellence or value.

19364

ennoblement
ENNO'BLEMENT, n. The act of advancing to nobility.1. Exaltation; elevation in degree or ...

19365

ennobling
ENNO'BLING, ppr. Advancing to the rank of a nobleman; exalting; dignifying.

19366

ennui
ENNUI, n. Weariness; heaviness; lassitude of fastidiousness.

19367

enodation
ENODA'TION, n. [L. enodatio, from enodo, to clear from knots; e and nodus, a knot.]1. The act or ...

19368

enode
ENO'DE, a. [L. enodis; e and nodus, knot.] In botany, destitute of knots or joints; knotless.

19369

enomotarch
ENOM'OTARCH,n. The commander of an enomoty.

19370

enomoty
ENOM'OTY, n. [Gr. to swear.] In Lacedaemon, anciently, a body of soldiers, supposed to be thirty ...

19371

enorm
ENORM', a. [Not used. See Enormous.]

19372

enormity
ENOR'MITY, n. [L. enormitas. See Enormous.]1. Literally, the transgression of a rule, or ...

19373

enormous
ENOR'MOUS, a. [L. enormis; e and norma, a rule.]1. Going beyond the usual measure or ...

19374

enormouseness
ENOR'MOUSENESS, n. The state of being enormous or excessive; greatness beyond measure.

19375

enormously
ENOR'MOUSLY, adv. Excessively; beyond measure; as an opinion enormously absurd.

19376

enough
ENOUGH', a. enuf'. [Heb. to rest, to be quiet or satisfied.]That satisfies desire, or gives ...

19377

enounce
ENOUNCE, v.t. enouns'. [L. enuncio; e and nuncio, to declare.]To utter; to pronounce; to declare. ...

19378

enounced
ENOUN'CED, pp. Uttered; pronounced.

19379

enouncing
ENOUN'CING, ppr. Uttering; pronouncing.

19380

enow
ENOW, the old plural of enough, is nearly obsolete.

19381

enquicken
ENQUICK'EN, v.t. To quicken; to make alive. [Not used.]

19382

enquire
ENQUIRE, usually written inquire, which see and its derivatives.

19383

enrace
ENRA'CE, v.t. To implant. [Not used.]

19384

enrage
ENRA'GE, v.t. To excite rage in; to exasperate; to provoke to fury or madness; to make furious.

19385

enraged
ENRA'GED, pp. Made furious; exasperated; provoked to madness.

19386

enraging
ENRA'GING, ppr. Exasperating; provoking to madness.

19387

enrange
ENRA'NGE, v.t. To put in order; to rove over. [Not in use.]

19388

enrank
ENRANK', v.t. To place in ranks or order.

19389

enrapture
ENRAP'TURE, v.t. [from rapture.] To transport with pleasure; to delight beyond measure. Enrapt, ...

19390

enraptured
ENRAP'TURED, pp. Transported with pleasure; highly delighted.

19391

enrapturing
ENRAP'TURING, ppr. Transporting with pleasure; highly delighting.

19392

enravish
ENRAV'ISH, v.t. [from ravish.] To throw into ecstasy; to transport with delight; to enrapture.

19393

enravished
ENRAV'ISHED, pp. Transported with delight or pleasure; enraptured.

19394

enravishing
ENRAV'ISHING, ppr. Throwing into ecstasy; highly delighting.

19395

enravishment
ENRAV'ISHMENT, n. Ecstasy of delight; rapture.

19396

enregister
ENREG'ISTER, v.t. To register; to enroll or record.

19397

enrheum
ENRHEUM, v.i. To have rheum through cold.

19398

enrich
ENRICH', v.t.1. To make rich, wealthy or opulent; to supply with abundant property. Agriculture, ...

19399

enriched
ENRICH'ED, pp. Made rich or wealthy; fertilized; supplied with that which is desirable, useful or ...

19400

enricher
ENRICH'ER, n. One that enriches.

19401

enriching
ENRICH'ING, ppr. Making opulent; fertilizing; supplying with what is splendid, useful or ...

19402

enrichment
ENRICH'MENT, n. Augmentation of wealth; amplification; improvement; the addition of fertility or ...

19403

enridge
ENRIDGE, v.t. enrij'. To form into ridges.

19404

enring
ENRING', v.t. To encircle; to bind.

19405

enripen
ENRI'PEN, v.t. To ripen; to bring to perfection.

19406

enrive
ENRI'VE, v.t. To rive; to cleave.

19407

enrobe
ENRO'BE, v.t. [from robe.] To clothe with rich attire; to attire; to invest.

19408

enrobed
ENRO'BED, pp. Attired; invested.

19409

enrobing
ENRO'BING, ppr. Investing; attiring.

19410

enroll
ENROLL, v.t.1. To write in a roll or register; to insert a name or enter in a list or catalogue; ...

19411

enrolled
ENROLLED, pp. Inserted in a roll or register; recorded.

19412

enroller
ENROLLER, n. He that enrolls or registers.

19413

enrolling
ENROLLING, ppr. Inserting in a register; recording.

19414

enrollment
ENROLLMENT, n. A register; a record; a writing in which any thing is recorded.1. The act of ...

19415

enroot
ENROOT', v.t. [from root.] To fix by the root; to fix fast; to implant deep.

19416

enrooted
ENROOT'ED, pp. Fixed by the root; planted or fixed deep.

19417

enrooting
ENROOT'ING, ppr. Fixing by the root; planting deep.

19418

enround
ENROUND', v.t. To environ; to surround; to inclose. [Not used.]

19419

ens
ENS, n. [L. ens, part. present of esse, to be.]Entity; being; existence. Among the old chimists, ...

19420

ensample
ENSAM'PLE, n. [ L. exemplum.] An example; a pattern or model for imitation.Being ensamples to the ...

19421

ensanguine
ENSAN'GUINE, v.t. [L. sanguis, blood; Eng. sanguine.]To stain or cover with blood; to smear with ...

19422

ensanguined
ENSAN'GUINED, pp. Suffused or stained with blood.

19423

ensate
EN'SATE, a. [L. ensis, a sword.] Having sword-shaped leaves.

19424

enschedule
ENSCHED'ULE, v.t. To insert in a schedule. [See Schedule.]

19425

ensconce
ENSCONCE, v.t. enscons'. [from sconce.]To cover, or shelter, as with a sconce or fort; to ...

19426

ensconced
ENSCON'CED, pp. Covered, or sheltered, as by a sconce or fort; protected; secured.

19427

ensconcing
ENSCON'CING, ppr. covering, or sheltering, as by a fort.

19428

enseal
ENSE'AL, v.t. [from seal.] To seal; to fix a seal on; to impress.

19429

ensealed
ENSE'ALED, pp. Impressed with a seal.

19430

ensealing
ENSE'ALING, ppr. Sealing; affixing a seal to.ENSE'ALING, n. The act of affixing a seal to.

19431

enseam
ENSE'AM, v.t. [from seam.] To sew up; to inclose by a seam or juncture of needlework.

19432

enseamed
ENSE'AMED, a. Greasy. [Not in use.]

19433

ensear
ENSE'AR, v.t. [from sear.] To sear; to cauterize; to close or stop by burning to hardness.

19434

ensearch
ENSEARCH', v.i. enserch'. To search for; to try to find. [Not used.]

19435

ensemble
ENSEM'BLE, n. One with another; on an average.

19436

enshield
ENSHIE'LD, v.t. [from shield.] To shield; to cover; to protect.

19437

enshrine
ENSHRI'NE, v.t. [from shrine.] To inclose in a shrine or chest; to deposit for safe-keeping in a ...

19438

enshrined
ENSHRI'NED, pp. Inclosed or preserved in a shrine or chest.1. Inclosed; placed as in a shrine.

19439

enshrining
ENSHRI'NING, ppr. Inclosing in a shrine or cabinet.

19440

ensiferous
ENSIF'EROUS, a. [L. ensis, sword, and fero, to bear.]Bearing or carrying a sword.

19441

ensiform
EN'SIFORM, a. [L. ensiformis; ensis, sword, and forma, form.]Having the shape of a sword; as the ...

19442

ensign
EN'SIGN, n. en'sine. [L. insigne, insignia, from signum, a mark impressed, a sign.]1. The flag or ...

19443

ensign-bearer
EN'SIGN-BEARER, n. He that carries the flag; an ensign.

19444

ensigncy
EN'SIGNCY, n. The rank, office or commission of an ensign.

19445

enskied
ENSKI'ED, a. Placed in heaven; made immortal. [Not in use.]

19446

enslave
ENSLA'VE, v.t. [from slave.] To reduce to slavery or bondage; to deprive of liberty and subject ...

19447

enslaved
ENSLA'VED, pp. Reduced to slavery or subjection.

19448

enslavement
ENSLA'VEMENT, n. The state of being enslaved; slavery; bondage;servitude.

19449

enslaver
ENSLA'VER, n. He who reduces another to bondage.

19450

enslaving
ENSLA'VING, ppr. Reducing to bondage; depriving of liberty.

19451

ensnare
ENSNARE, [See Insnare.]

19452

ensober
ENSO'BER, v.t. [from sober.] To make sober.

19453

ensphere
ENSPHE'RE, v.t. [from sphere.] To place in a sphere.1. To make into a sphere.

19454

enstamp
ENSTAMP', v.t. [from stamp.] To impress as with a stamp; to impress deeply.God enstamped his ...

19455

enstamped
ENSTAMP'ED, pp. Impressed deeply.

19456

enstamping
ENSTAMP'ING, ppr. Impressing deeply.

19457

enstyle
ENSTY'LE, v.t. To style; to name; to call. [Little used.]

19458

ensue
ENSU'E, v.t. [L. sequor, to follow. See Seek.]To follow; to pursue.Seek peace,and ensue it. l ...

19459

ensuing
ENSU'ING, ppr. Following as a consequence; succeeding.

19460

ensure
ENSURE, and its derivatives. [See Insure.]

19461

ensweep
ENSWEE'P, v.t To sweep over; to pass over rapidly.

19462

entablature
ENTAB'LATURE

19463

entablement
ENTAB'LEMENT, [L. tabula, a board or table.]In architecture, that part of the order of a column, ...

19464

entackle
ENTACK'LE, v.t. To supply with tackle. [Not used.]

19465

entail
ENTA'IL, n. 1. An estate or fee entailed, or limited indescent to a particular heir or heirs. ...

19466

entailed
ENTA'ILED, pp. Settled on a man and certain heirs specified.1. Settled on a person and his ...

19467

entailing
ENTA'ILING, ppr. Settling the descent of an estate; giving, as lands and tenements, and ...

19468

entailment
ENTA'ILMENT, n. The act of giving, as an estate, and directing the mode of descent, or of limiting ...

19469

entame
ENTA'ME, v.t. [from tame.] To tame; to subdue.

19470

entangle
ENTAN'GLE, v.t. [from tangle.] To twist or interweave in such a manner as not to be easily ...

19471

entangled
ENTAN'GLED, pp. or a. Twisted together; interwoven in a confused manner; intricate; perplexed; ...

19472

entanglement
ENTAN'GLEMENT, n. Involution; a confused or disordered state; intricacy; perplexity.

19473

entangler
ENTAN'GLER, n. One who entangles.

19474

entangling
ENTAN'GLING, ppr. Involving; interweaving or interlocking in confusion; perplexing; insnaring.

19475

entender
ENTEN'DER, v.t. To treat with tenderness or kindness.

19476

enter
EN'TER, v.t. [L. inter, intra, whence intro, to enter. The L. inter seems to be in, with the ...

19477

enterdeal
EN'TERDEAL, n. Mutual dealing. [Not in use.]

19478

entered
EN'TERED, pp. Moved in; come in; pierced; penetrated; admitted; introduced; set down in writing.

19479

entering
EN'TERING, ppr. Coming or going in; flowing in; piercing; penetrating; setting down in writing; ...

19480

enterlace
ENTERLACE, [See Interlace.]

19481

enterocele
EN'TEROCELE, n. [Gr. intestine, and tumor.] In surgery, intestinal hernia; a rupture of the ...

19482

enterology
ENTEROL'OGY, n. [Gr. intestine, and discourse.] A treatise or discourse on the bowels or internal ...

19483

enteromphalos
ENTEROM'PHALOS, n. [Gr. intestine, and navel.] Navel rupture; umbilical rupture.

19484

enterparlance
ENTERP`ARLANCE, n. Parley; mutual talk or conversation; conference.

19485

enterplead
ENTERPLEAD, [See Interplead.]

19486

enterprise
EN'TERPRISE, n. s as z. That which is undertaken, or attempted to be performed; an attempt; a ...

19487

enterprised
EN'TERPRISED, pp. Undertaken; attempted; essayed.

19488

enterpriser
EN'TERPRISER, n. An adventurer; one who undertakes any projected scheme, especially a bold or ...

19489

enterprising
EN'TERPRISING, ppr. Undertaking, especially a bold design.1. Bold or forward to undertake; ...

19490

entertain
ENTERTA'IN, v.t. [L. tenco.]1. To receive into the house and treat with hospitality, either at ...

19491

entertained
ENTERTA'INED, pp. Received with hospitality, as a guest; amused; pleased and engaged; kept in the ...

19492

entertainer
ENTERTA'INER, n. He who entertains; he who received company with hospitality, or for reward.1. He ...

19493

entertaining
ENTERTA'INING, ppr. Receiving with hospitality; receiving and treating with provisions and ...

19494

entertainingly
ENTERTA'ININGLY, adv. In an amusing manner.

19495

entertainment
ENTERTA'INMENT, n. The receiving and accommodating of guests, either with or without reward. The ...

19496

entertissued
ENTERTIS'SUED, a. Interwoven; having various colors intermixed.

19497

entheastic
ENTHEAS'TIC, a. [Gr. god.] Having the energy of God.

19498

entheastically
ENTHEAS'TICALLY, adv. According to deific energy.

19499

entheat
EN'THEAT, a. Enthusiastic. [Not in use.]

19500

enthrall
ENTHRALL', v.t. To enslave. [See Inthrall.]

19501

enthrill
ENTHRILL', v.t. To pierce. [See Thrill.]

19502

enthrone
ENTHRO'NE, v.t. [from throne.] To place on a throne; to exalt to the seat of royalty.Beneath a ...

19503

enthroning
ENTHRO'NING, ppr. Seating on a throne; raising to an exalted seat.

19504

enthunder
ENTHUN'DER, v.i. To make a loud noise, like thunder.

19505

enthusiasm
ENTHU'SIASM, n. enthuziazm. [Gr. to infuse a divine spirit, inspired, divine; God.]1. A belief ...

19506

enthusiast
ENTHU'SIAST, n. enthu'ziast.1. One who imagines he has special or supernatural converse with God, ...

19507

enthusiastic
ENTHUSIAS'TIC

19508

enthusiastical
ENTHUSIAS'TICAL, a. Filled with enthusiasm, or the conceit of special intercourse with God or ...

19509

enthusiastically
ENTHUSIAS'TICALLY, adv. With enthusiasm.

19510

enthymematical
ENTHYMEMAT'ICAL, a. Pertaining to an enthymeme; including an enthymeme.

19511

enthymeme
EN'THYMEME, n. [Gr. to think or conceive; mind.] In rhetoric, an argument consisting of only two ...

19512

entice
ENTI'CE, v.t. [L. titio, a firebrand.]1. To incite or instigate, by exciting hope or desire; ...

19513

enticed
ENTI'CED, pp. Incited; instigated to evil; seduced by promises or persuasions; persuaded; allured.

19514

enticement
ENTI'CEMENT, n. The act or practice of inciting to evil; instigation; as the enticements of evil ...

19515

enticer
ENTI'CER, n. One who entices; one who incites or instigates to evil; one who seduces.

19516

enticing
ENTI'CING, ppr. Inciting to evil; urging to sin by motives, flattery or persuasion; alluring.1. ...

19517

enticingly
ENTI'CINGLY, adv. Charmingly; in a winning manner.She sings most enticingly.

19518

entire
ENTI'RE, a. [L. integer, said to be in neg. and tango, to touch.]1. Whole; undivided; unbroken; ...

19519

entirely
ENTI'RELY, adv. Wholly; completely; fully; as, the money is entirely lost.1. In the whole; ...

19520

entireness
ENTI'RENESS, n. Completeness; fullness; totality; unbroken form or state; as the entireness of an ...

19521

entirety
ENTI'RETY, n. Wholeness; completeness; as entirety of interest.1. The whole.

19522

entitative
EN'TITATIVE, a. [from entity.] considered by itself. [This word, and entitatively, rarely or ...

19523

entitle
ENTI'TLE, v.t. [L. titulus, a title.]1. To give a title to; to give or prefix a name or ...

19524

entitled
ENTI'TLED, pp. Dignified or distinguished by a title; having a claim as, every good man is ...

19525

entitling
ENTI'TLING, ppr. Dignifying or distinguishing by a title; giving a title; giving a claim.

19526

entity
EN'TITY, n. [Low L. entitas.] Being; existence.Fortune is no real entity.1. A real being, or ...

19527

entoil
ENTOIL', v.t. [See Toil.] To take with toils; to ensnare; to entangle.

19528

entomb
ENTOMB, v.t. entoom'. [from tomb.] To deposit in a tomb, as a dead body.1. To bury in a grave; ...

19529

entombed
ENTOMBED, pp. Deposited in a tomb; buried; interred.

19530

entombing
ENTOMBING, ppr. Depositing in a tomb; burying; interring.

19531

entombment
ENTOMBMENT, n. Burial.

19532

entomolite
EN'TOMOLITE, n. [Gr. insect, stone.]A fossil substance bearing the figure of an insect, or a ...

19533

entomological
ENTOMOLOG'ICAL, a. Pertaining to the science of insects.

19534

entomologist
ENTOMOL'OGIST, n. One versed in the science of insects.

19535

entomology
ENTOMOL'OGY, n. [Gr. insect, to cut, discourse.]That part of zoology which treats of insects; the ...

19536

entortilation
ENTORTILA'TION, n. A turning into a circle.

19537

entrail
EN'TRAIL

19538

entrails
EN'TRAILS, n. 1. The internal parts of animal bodies; particularly, the guts or intestines; the ...

19539

entrammeled
ENTRAM'MELED, a. [from trammel.] Curled; frizzed. [Not used.]

19540

entrance
EN'TRANCE, n. [L. intrans, intro.]1. The act of entering into a place; as the entrance of a ...

19541

entranse
ENTR`ANSE, v.t. or i. [L. transeo.]1. To put in a transe; to withdraw the soul, and leave the ...

19542

entransed
ENTR`ANSED, pp. Put in a transe; having the soul withdrawn, and the body left in a state of ...

19543

entransing
ENTR`ANSING, ppr. Carrying away the soul; enrapturing; ravishing.

19544

entrap
ENTRAP', v.t. To catch as in a trap; to insnare; used chiefly or wholly in a figurative sense. To ...

19545

entrapped
ENTRAP'PED, pp. Ensnared; entangled.

19546

entrapping
ENTRAP'PING, ppr. Ensnaring; involving in difficulties.

19547

entreaat
ENTREA'AT, v.t. [L. tracto, to handle, feel,treat, use,manage.]1. To ask earnestly; to beseech; ...

19548

entreat
ENTRE'AT, v.i. To make an earnest petition or request.The Janizaries entreated for them, as ...

19549

entreatance
ENTRE'ATANCE, n. Entreaty; solicitation.

19550

entreated
ENTRE'ATED, pp. Earnestly supplicated, besought or solicited; importuned; urgently requested.1. ...

19551

entreater
ENTRE'ATER, n. One that entreats, or asks earnestly.

19552

entreating
ENTRE'ATING, ppr. Earnestly asking; pressing with request or prayer; importuning.1. Treating; ...

19553

entreative
ENTRE'ATIVE, a. Pleading; treating.

19554

entreaty
ENTRE'ATY, n. Urgent prayer; earnest petition; pressing solicitation; supplication.The poor useth ...

19555

entremets
ENTREMETS, n. [L. intromissum.] Small plates set between the principal dishes at table, or dainty ...

19556

entrepot
ENTREPOT, n. A warehouse, staple or magazine, for the deposit of goods.

19557

entrhoned
ENTRHO'NED, pp. Seated on a throne; exalted to an elevated place.

19558

entrick
ENTRICK, v.t. [from trick.] To trick; to deceive; to entangle.

19559

entrochite
EN'TROCHITE, n. [Gr. a wheel.] A kind of extraneous fossil, usually about an inch in length, and ...

19560

entry
EN'TRY, n. The passage by which persons enter a house or other building.1. The act of entering; ...

19561

entune
ENTU'NE, v.t. [from tune.] To tune.

19562

entwine
ENTWINE, v.t. [from twine.] To twine; to twist round.

19563

entwist
ENTWIST', v.t. [from twist.] To twist or wreath round.

19564

enubilate
ENU'BILATE, v.t. [L. e and nubila,mist, clouds.]To clear from mist, clouds or obscurity. [Not in ...

19565

enubilous
ENU'BILOUS, a. Clear from fog, mist or clouds.

19566

enucleate
ENU'CLEATE, v.t. [L. enucleo; e and nucleus, a kernel.] Properly, to take out the kernel. Hence, ...

19567

enucleated
ENU'CLEATED, pp. Cleared from knots; disclosed; explained.

19568

enucleating
ENU'CLEATING, ppr. Clearing from knots; explaining.

19569

enucleation
ENUCLEA'TION, n. The act of clearing from knots; a disentangling.Neither air, nor water, nor food ...

19570

enumerate
ENU'MERATE, v.t. [L. enumero; e and numero,numerus,number.]To count or tell, number by number; to ...

19571

enumerated
ENU'MERATED, pp. Counted or told, number by number; reckoned or mentioned by distinct particulars.

19572

enumerating
ENU'MERATING, ppr. Counting or reckoning any number, by the particulars which compose it.

19573

enumeration
ENUMERA'TION, n. [L. enumeratio.] The act of counting or telling a number, by naming each ...

19574

enumerative
ENU'MERATIVE, a. Counting; reckoning up.

19575

enunciate
ENUN'CIATE, v.t. [L. enuncio; e and nuncio, to tell.]To utter; to declare; to proclaim; to relate.

19576

enunciated
ENUN'CIATED, pp. Uttered; declared; pronounced; proclaimed.

19577

enunciating
ENUN'CIATING, ppr. Uttering; declaring; pronouncing.

19578

enunciation
ENUNCIA'TION, n. The act of uttering or pronouncing; expression; manner of utterance. In a public ...

19579

enunciative
ENUN'CIATIVE, a. Declarative; expressive.

19580

enunciatively
ENUN'CIATIVELY, adv. Declaratively.

19581

enunciatory
ENUN'CIATORY, a. Containing utterance or sound.

19582

envassal
ENVAS'SAL, v.t. [from vassal.] To reduce to vassalage.1. To make over to another as a slave.

19583

envelop
ENVEL'OP, v.t.1. To cover by wrapping of folding; to inwrap; to invest with a covering. Animal ...

19584

enveloped
ENVEL'OPED, pp. Inwrapped; covered on all sides; surrounded on all sides; inclosed.

19585

enveloping
ENVEL'OPING, ppr. Inwrapping; folding around; covering or surrounding on all sides, as a case or ...

19586

envelopment
ENVEL'OPMENT, n. A wrapping; as inclosing or covering on all sides.

19587

envenom
ENVEN'OM, v.t. [from venom.] To poison; to taint or impregnate with venom, or any substance ...

19588

envenomed
ENVEN'OMED, pp. Tainted or impregnated with venom or poison; embittered; exasperated.

19589

envenoming
ENVEN'OMING, ppr. Tainting with venom; poisoning; embittering; enraging.

19590

envermeil
ENVER'MEIL, v.t. To dye red.

19591

enviable
EN'VIABLE, a. [See Envy.] That may excite envy; capable of awakening ardent desire of possession. ...

19592

envied
EN'VIED, pp. [See Envy, the verb.] Subjected to envy.

19593

envier
EN'VIER, n. One who envies another; one who desires what another possesses, and hates him because ...

19594

envious
EN'VIOUS, a. Feeling or harboring envy; repining or feeling uneasiness, at a view of the ...

19595

enviously
EN'VIOUSLY, adv. With envy; with malignity excited by the excellence or prosperity of another.How ...

19596

environ
ENVI'RON, v.t. [Eng. to veer.]1. To surround; to encompass; to encircle; as a plain environed ...

19597

environed
ENVI'RONED, pp. Surrounded; encompassed; besieged; involved; invested.

19598

environing
ENVI'RONING, ppr. Surrounding; encircling; besieging; inclosing; involving; investing. The ...

19599

environs
ENVI'RONS, n. plu. The parts or places which surround another place, or lie in its neighborhood, ...

19600

envoy
EN'VOY, n. [L. via; Eng. way, contracted from viag, vag, or wag.]1. A person deputed by a prince ...

19601

envoyship
EN'VOYSHIP, n. The office of an envoy.

19602

envy
EN'VY, v.t. [L. invideo, in and video, to see against, that is, to look with enmity.]1. To feel ...

19603

envying
EN'VYING, ppr. Feeling uneasiness at the superior condition and happiness of another.EN'VYING, n. ...

19604

enwallowed
ENWAL'LOWED, a. [from wallow.] Being wallowed or wallowing.

19605

enwheel
ENWHEE'L, v.t. [from wheel.] To encircle.

19606

enwiden
ENWI'DEN, v.t. [from wide.] To make wider. [Not used.]

19607

enwomb
ENWOMB, v.t. enwoom'. [from womb.] To make pregnant. [Not used.]1. To bury; to hide as in a ...

19608

enwombed
ENWOMBED, pp. Impregnated; buried in a deep gulf or cavern.

19609

enwrap
ENWRAP', v.t. enrap'. To envelop. [See Inwrap.]

19610

enwrapment
ENWRAP'MENT, n. A covering; a wrapping or wrapper.

19611

eolian
EO'LIAN

19612

eolic
EOL'IC, a. Pertaining to Aeolia or Aeolis, in Asia Minor, inhabited by Greeks.The Eolic dialect ...

19613

eolipile
EOL'IPILE, n. [Aeolus, the deity of the winds, and pila, a ball.]A hollow ball of metal, with a ...

19614

eon
E'ON, n. [Gr. age, duration.] In the platonic philosophy, a virtue, attribute or perfection. The ...

19615

ep
EP, EPI, [Gr. in composition, usually signifies on.]

19616

epact
E'PACT, n. [Gr. adscititious, to adduce or bring; to drive.]In chronology, the excess of the solar ...

19617

eparch
EP'ARCH, n. [Gr. dominion.] The governor or prefect of a province.

19618

eparchy
EP'ARCHY, n. [Gr. a province; government.] A province, prefecture or territory under the ...

19619

epaulet
EP'AULET, n. A shoulder-piece; an ornamental badge worn on the shoulder by military men. ...

19620

epaulment
EPAUL'MENT, n. In fortification, a side-work or work to cover sidewise, made of gabions, fascines ...

19621

epenetic
EPENET'IC, a. Laudatory; bestowing praise.

19622

epenthesis
EPEN'THESIS

19623

epenthesy
EPEN'THESY, n. [Gr. to put.] The insertion of a letter or syllable in the middle of a word, as ...

19624

epenthetic
EPENTHET'IC, a. Inserted in the middle of a word.

19625

epha
E'PHA, n. [Heb. properly a baking.] A Hebrew measure of three pecks and three pints, or according ...

19626

ephemera
EPHEM'ERA, n. [L. from Gr. daily; a day.] A fever of one day's continuance only.1. The Day-fly; ...

19627

ephemeric
EPHEM'ERIC, a. Diurnal; beginning and ending in a day; continuing or existing one day only.1. ...

19628

ephemeris
EPHEM'ERIS, n. plu. ephemer'ides. [Gr.]1. A journal or account of daily transactions; a ...

19629

ephemerist
EPHEM'ERIST, n. One who studies the daily motions and positions of the planets; an astrologer.

19630

ephemeron-worm
EPHEM'ERON-WORM, n. [See Ephemera.] A worm that lives one day only.

19631

ephereral
EPHER'ERAL

19632

ephesian
EPHE'SIAN, a. s as z. Pertaining to Ephesus, in Asia Minor. As a noun, a native of Ephesus.

19633

ephialtes
EPHIAL'TES, n. [Gr.] The night-mar.

19634

ephipora
EPHIP'ORA, n. [Gr. to bear.] The watery eye; a disease in which the tears, from increased ...

19635

ephod
EPH'OD, n. [Heb. to bind.] In Jewish antiquity, a part of the sacerdotal habit, being a kind of ...

19636

ephor
EPH'OR, n. [Gr. to inspect.]In ancient Sparta, a magistrate chosen by the people. The ephors were ...

19637

ephoralty
EPH'ORALTY, n. The office or term of office of an ephor.

19638

epi
EP, EPI, [Gr. in composition, usually signifies on.]

19639

epic
EP'IC, a. [L. epicus; Gr. a song, or to speak.] Narrative; containing narration; rehearsing. An ...

19640

epicede
EP'ICEDE, n. [Gr.] A funeral song or discourse.

19641

epicedian
EPICE'DIAN, a. Elegiac; mournful.

19642

epicedium
EPICE'DIUM, n. An elegy.

19643

epicene
EP'ICENE, a. [Gr. common.] Common to both sexes; of both kinds.

19644

epictetian
EPICTE'TIAN, a. Pertaining to Epictetus, the Grecian writer.

19645

epicure
EP'ICURE, n. [L. epicurus, a voluptuary, from Epicurus.]Properly, a follower of Epicurus; a man ...

19646

epicurean
EPICU'REAN

19647

epicureanism
EPICU'REANISM, n. Attachment to the doctrines of Epicurus.

19648

epicurism
EP'ICURISM, n. Luxury; sensual enjoyments; indulgence in gross pleasure; voluptuousness.1. The ...

19649

epicurize
EP'ICURIZE, v.i. To feed or indulge like an epicure; to riot; to feast.1. To profess the doctrines ...

19650

epicycle
EP'ICYCLE, n. [Gr. a circle.] A little circle, whose center is in the circumference of a greater ...

19651

epicycloid
EPICYC'LOID, n. [Gr. form.] In geometry, a curve generated by the revolution of the periphery of ...

19652

epicycloidal
EPICYCLOID'AL, a. Pertaining to the epicycloid, or having its properties.

19653

epidemic
EPIDEM'IC

19654

epidemical
EPIDEM'ICAL, a. [Gr. people.] Common to many people. An epidemic disease is one which seizes a ...

19655

epidermic
EPIDERM'IC

19656

epidermidal
EPIDERM'IDAL, a. Pertaining to the cuticle; covering the skin.The epidermic texture.

19657

epidermis
EPIDERM'IS, n. [Gr. skin.] In anatomy, the cuticle or scarf-skin of the body; a thin membrane ...

19658

epidote
EP'IDOTE, n. [From Gr.; so named from the apparent enlargement of the base of the prism in one ...

19659

epigastric
EPIGAS'TRIC, a. [Gr. belly.] Pertaining to the upper part of the abdomen; as the epigastric ...

19660

epigee
EPIGEE or EPIGEUM. [See Perigee.]

19661

epiglot
EP'IGLOT

19662

epiglottis
EPIGLOT'TIS, n. [Gr. the tongue.] In anatomy, one of the cartilages of the larynx, whose use is to ...

19663

epigram
EP'IGRAM, n. [Gr. inscription; a writing.] A short poem treating only of one thing, and ending ...

19664

epigrammatic
EPIGRAMMAT'IC

19665

epigrammatical
EPIGRAMMAT'ICAL, a. Writing epigrams; dealing in epigrams; as an epigrammatic poet.1. Suitable to ...

19666

epigrammatist
EPIGRAM'MATIST, n. One who composes epigrams, or deals in them. Martial was a noted epigrammatist.

19667

epigraph
EP'IGRAPH, n. [Gr. to write.] Among antiquaries, an inscription on a building, pointing out the ...

19668

epilepsy
EP'ILEPSY, n. [Gr. to seize.] The falling sickness, so called because the patient falls suddenly ...

19669

epileptic
EPILEP'TIC, a. Pertaining to the falling sickness; affected with epilepsy; consisting of ...

19670

epilogism
EP'ILOGISM, n. Computation; enumeration.

19671

epilogistic
EPILOGIS'TIC, a. Pertaining to epilogue; of the nature of an epilogue.

19672

epilogize
EP'ILOGIZE , v.i. To pronounce an epilogue.

19673

epilogue
EP'ILOGUE, n. ep'ilog. [L. epilogus, from Gr. conclusion; to conclude; to speak.]1. In oratory, ...

19674

epiloguize
EP'ILOGUIZE

19675

epinicion
EPINI'CION, n. [Gr. to conquer.] A song of triumph. [Not in use.]

19676

epiphany
EPIPH'ANY, n. [Gr. appearance; to appear.] A christian festival celebrated on the sixth day of ...

19677

epiphonem
EPIPH'ONEM

19678

epiphonema
EPIPHONE'MA, [Gr. exclamation, to cry out.] In oratory, an exclamation; an ecphonesis; a vehement ...

19679

epiphyllospermous
EPIPHYLLOSPERM'OUS, a. [Gr. a leaf, and seed.] In botany, bearing their seeds on the back of the ...

19680

epiphysis
EPIPH'YSIS

19681

epiphysy
EPIPH'YSY , n. [Gr. to grow.] Accretion; the growing of one bone to another by simple ...

19682

epiploce
EPIP'LOCE

19683

epiplocele
EPIP'LOCELE, n. [Gr. the caul, and a tumor.] A rupture of the caul or omentum.

19684

epiplocy
EPIP'LOCY, n. [Gr. implication; to fold.] A figure of rhetoric, by which one aggravation, or ...

19685

epiploic
EPIP'LOIC, a. [Gr. the caul.] Pertaining to the caul or omentum.

19686

epiploon
EPIP'LOON, n. [Gr.] The caul or omentum.

19687

episcopacy
EPIS'COPACY, n. [L. episcopatus; Gr. to inspect, to see. See Bishop.]Government of the church by ...

19688

episcopal
EPIS'COPAL, a. Belonging to or vested in bishops or prelates; as episcopal jurisdiction; episcopal ...

19689

episcopalian
EPISCOPA'LIAN, a. Pertaining to bishops or government by bishops; episcopal.EPISCOPA'LIAN, n. One ...

19690

episcopally
EPIS'COPALLY, adv. By episcopal authority; in an episcopal manner.

19691

episcopate
EPIS'COPATE, n. A bishopric; the office and dignity of a bishop.1. The order of ...

19692

episcopy
EPIS'COPY, n. Survey; superintendence; search.

19693

episode
EP'ISODE, n. [From the Gr.] In poetry, a separate incident, story or action, introduced for the ...

19694

episodic
EPISOD'IC

19695

episodical
EPISOD'ICAL, a. Pertaining to an episode; contained in an episode or digression.

19696

episodically
EPISODICALLY, adv. By way of episode.

19697

epispastic
EPISPAS'TIC, a. [Gr. to draw.] In medicine, drawing; attracting the humors to the skin; exciting ...

19698

epistilbite
EPISTIL'BITE, n. A mineral, said to be the same as the heulandite.

19699

epistle
EPIS'TLE, n. epis'l. [L. epistola; Gr. to send to; to send.]A writing, directed or sent, ...

19700

epistler
EPIS'TLER, n. A writer of epistles. [Little used.]1. Formerly, one who attended the communion ...

19701

epistolary
EPIS'TOLARY, a. Pertaining to epistles or letters; suitable to letters and correspondence; ...

19702

epistolic
EPISTOL'IC

19703

epistolical
EPISTOL'ICAL, a. Pertaining to letters or epistles.1. Designating the method of representing ...

19704

epistolize
EPIS'TOLIZE, v.i. To write epistles or letters.

19705

epistolizer
EPIS'TOLIZER, n. A writer of epistles.

19706

epistolographic
EPISTOLOGRAPH'IC, a. Pertaining to the writing of letters.

19707

epistolography
EPISTOLOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a letter, to write.] The art or practice of writing letters.

19708

epistrophe
EPIS'TROPHE

19709

epistrophy
EPIS'TROPHY, n. [Gr. a return.] A figure, in rhetoric, in which several successive sentences end ...

19710

epistyle
EP'ISTYLE, n. [Gr. a column.]In ancient architecture, a term used by the Greeks for what is now ...

19711

epitaph
EP'ITAPH, n. [Gr. a sepulcher.]1. An inscription on a monument, in honor or memory of the ...

19712

epitaphian
EPITAPH'IAN, a. Pertaining to an epitaph.

19713

epithalamium
EPITHALA'MIUM

19714

epithalamy
EPITHAL'AMY , n. [Gr. a bed-chamber.] A nuptial song or poem, in praise of the bride and ...

19715

epithem
EP'ITHEM, n. [Gr. to place.] In pharmacy, a kind of fomentation or poultice, to be applied ...

19716

epithet
EP'ITHET, n. [Gr. a name added; to place.] An adjective expressing some real quality of the thing ...

19717

epithetic
EPITHET'IC, a. Pertaining to an epithet or epithets.1. Abounding with epithets. A style or ...

19718

epithumetic
EPITHUMET'IC

19719

epithumetical
EPITHUMET'ICAL, a. [Gr.] Inclined to lust; pertaining to the animal passion.

19720

epitome
EPIT'OME

19721

epitomist
EPIT'OMIST, n. An epitomizer.

19722

epitomize
EPIT'OMIZE, v.t. To shorten or abridge, as a writing or discourse; to abstract, in a summary, the ...

19723

epitomized
EPIT'OMIZED, pp. Abridged; shortened; contracted into a smaller compass, as a book or writing.

19724

epitomizer
EPIT'OMIZER, n. One who abridges; a writer of an epitome.

19725

epitomizing
EPIT'OMIZING, ppr. Abridging; shortening; making a summary.

19726

epitomy
EPIT'OMY, n. [Gr. to cut, a cutting, a section.] An abridgment; a brief summary or abstract of ...

19727

epitrite
EP'ITRITE, n. [Gr. third.] In prosody, a foot consisting of three long syllables and one short ...

19728

epitrope
EPIT'ROPE

19729

epitropy
EPIT'ROPY, n. [Gr. to permit.] In rhetoric, concession; a figure by which one thing is granted, ...

19730

epizootic
EPIZOOT'IC, a. [Gr. animal.] In geology, an epithet given to such mountains as contain animal ...

19731

epizooty
EPIZO'OTY, n. [supra.] A murrain or pestilence among irrational animals.

19732

epoch
E'POCH, n. [L. epocha; Gr. retention, delay, stop, to inhibit; to hold.]1. In chronology, a fixed ...

19733

epode
EP'ODE, n. [Gr. ode.] In lyric poetry, the third or last part of the ode; that which follows the ...

19734

epopee
EPOPEE', n. [Gr. a song, to make.] An epic poem. More properly, the history, action or fable, ...

19735

epos
E'POS, n. [Gr.] An epic poem, or its fable or subject.Epsom salt, the sulphate of magnesia, a ...

19736

epulary
EP'ULARY, a. [L. epularis, from epulum, a feast.] Pertaining to a feast or banquet.

19737

epulation
EPULA'TION, a. [L. eppulatio, from epulor, to feast.] A feasting or feast.

19738

epulotic
EPULOT'IC, a. [Gr. to heal, to cicatrize; a cicatrix, to be sound, whole.] Healing; ...

19739

equability
EQUABIL'ITY, n. [See Equable.] Equality in motion; continued equality, at all times, in velocity ...

19740

equable
E'QUABLE, a. [L. oequabilis, from oequus, equal, even, oeguo, to equal, to level.]1. Equal and ...

19741

equably
E'QUABLY, adv. With an equal or uniform motion; with continued uniformity; evenly; as, bodies ...

19742

equal
E'QUAL, a. [L. oegualis, from oequus, equal, even, oeguo, to equal, perhaps Gr. similar.]1. ...

19743

equality
EQUAL'ITY, n. [L. oequalitas.] An agreement of things in dimensions, quantity or quality; ...

19744

equalization
EQUALIZA'TION, n. The act of equalizing, or state of being equalized.

19745

equalize
E'QUALIZE, v.t. To make equal; as, to equalize accounts; to equalize burdens or taxes.

19746

equalized
E'QUALIZED, pp. Made equal; reduced to equality.

19747

equalizing
E'QUALIZING, ppr. Making equal.

19748

equally
E'QUALLY, adv. In the same degree with another; alike; as, to be equally taxed; to be equally ...

19749

equalness
E'QUALNESS, n. Equality; a state of being equal.1. Evenness; uniformity; as the equalness of a ...

19750

equangular
EQUAN'GULAR, a. [L. oequus and angulus.] Consisting of equal angles. [See Equiangular, which is ...

19751

equanimity
EQUANIM'ITY, n. [L. oequanimitas; oequus and animus, an equal mind.] Evenness of mind; that calm ...

19752

equanimous
EQUAN'IMOUS, a. Of an even, composed frame of mind; of a steady temper; not easily elated or ...

19753

equation
EQUA'TION, n. [L. oequatio, from oequo, to make equal or level.]1. Literally, a making equal, or ...

19754

equator
EQUA'TOR, n. [L. from oequo, to make equal.] In astronomy and geography, a great circle of the ...

19755

equatorial
EQUATO'RIAL, a. Pertaining to the equator; as equatorial climates. The equatorial diameter of the ...

19756

equery
E'QUERY, n. [Low L. scutarius, from scutum, a shield. See Esquire.]1. An officer of princes, who ...

19757

equestrian
EQUES'TRIAN, a. [L. equester, equestris, from eques, a horseman, from eqnus, a horse.]1. ...

19758

equiangular
EQUIAN'GULAR, a. [L. oequus, equal, and angulus, an angle.]In geometry, consisting of or having ...

19759

equibalance
EQUIBAL'ANCE, n. [L. oequus and bilanx.] Equal weight.EQUIBAL'ANCE, v.t. To have equal weight ...

19760

equicrural
EQUICRU'RAL, a. [L. oequus, equal and crus, a leg.] Having legs of equal length.1. Having equal ...

19761

equidifferent
EQUIDIF'FERENT, a. Having equal differences; arithmetically proportional.In crystalography, having ...

19762

equidistance
EQUIDIS'TANCE, n. Equal distance.

19763

equidistant
EQUIDIS'TANT, a. [L. oequus, equal, and distans, distant.]Being at an equal distance from some ...

19764

equidistantly
EQUIDIS'TANTLY, adv. At the same or an equal distance.

19765

equiformity
EQUIFORM'ITY, n. [L. oequus, equal, and forma, form.] Uniform equality.

19766

equilateral
EQUILAT'ERAL, a. [L. oequus, equal, and lateralis, from latus, side.]Having all the sides equal; ...

19767

equilibrate
EQUILI'BRATE, v.t. [L. oequus and libro, to poise.]To balance equally two scales, sides or ends; ...

19768

equilibrated
EQUILI'BRATED, pp. Balanced equally on both sides or ends.

19769

equilibrating
EQUILI'BRATING, ppr. Balancing equally on both sides or ends.

19770

equilibration
EQUILIBRA'TION, n. Equipoise; the act of keeping the balance even, or the state of being equally ...

19771

equilibrious
EQUILIB'RIOUS, a. Equally poised.

19772

equilibriously
EQUILIB'RIOUSLY, adv. In equal poise.

19773

equilibrist
EQUIL'IBRIST, n. One that balances equally.

19774

equilibrity
EQUILIB'RITY, n. [L. oequilibritas.] The state of being equally balanced; equal balance on both ...

19775

equilibrium
EQUILIB'RIUM, n. [L.] In mechanics, equipose; equality of weight; the state of the two ends of a ...

19776

equimultiple
EQUIMUL'TIPLE, a. [L. oequus and multiplico or multiplex.]Multiplied by the same number or ...

19777

equine
E'QUINE, a. [L. equinus, from equus, a horse.] Pertaining to a horse or to the genus.The ...

19778

equinecessary
EQUINEC'ESSARY, a. [L. oequus and necessary.]Necessary or needful in the same degree.

19779

equinoctial
EQUINOC'TIAL, a. [L. oequus, equal, and nox, night.]1. Pertaining to the equinoxes; designating ...

19780

equinoctially
EQUINOC'TIALLY, adv. In the direction of the equinox.

19781

equinox
E'QUINOX, n. [L. oequus, equal, and nox, night.]The precise time when the sun enters one of the ...

19782

equinumerant
EQUINU'MERANT, a. [L. oequus, equal, and numerus, number.]Having or consisting of the same number. ...

19783

equip
EQUIP', v.t. 1. Properly, to dress; to habit. Hence, to furnish with arms, or a complete suit of ...

19784

equipage
EQ'UIPAGE, n. The furniture of a military man, particularly arms and their appendages.1. The ...

19785

equipaged
EQ'UIPAGED, a. Furnished with equipage; attended with a splendid retinue.

19786

equipendency
EQUIPEN'DENCY, n. [L. oequus, equal, and pendeo, to hang.]The act of hanging in equipoise; a being ...

19787

equipment
EQUIP'MENT, n. The act of equipping, or fitting for a voyage or expedition.1. Any thing that is ...

19788

equipoise
E'QUIPOISE, n. s as z. [L. oequus, equal.] Equality of weight or force; hence, equilibrium; a ...

19789

equipollence
EQUIPOL'LENCE

19790

equipollency
EQUIPOL'LENCY, n. [L. oequus and pollentia, power, polleo, to be able.]1. Equality of power or ...

19791

equipollent
EQUIPOL'LENT, a. [supra.] Having equal power or force; equivalent. In logic, having equivalent ...

19792

equiponderance
EQUIPON'DERANCE, n. [L. oequus, equal, and pondus, weight.]Equality of weight; equipoise.

19793

equiponderant
EQUIPON'DERANT, a. [supra.] Being of the same weight.

19794

equiponderate
EQUIPON'DERATE, v.i. [L. oequus, equal, and pondero, to weigh.]To be equal in weight; to weigh as ...

19795

equipondious
EQUIPON'DIOUS, a. Having equal weight on both sides.

19796

equipped
EQUIP'PED, pp. Furnished with habiliments, arms, and whatever is necessary for a military ...

19797

equipping
EQUIP'PING, ppr. Furnishing with habiliments or warlike apparatus; supplying with things necessary ...

19798

equisonance
EQUISO'NANCE, n. An equal sounding; a name by which the Greeks distinguished the consonances of ...

19799

equitable
EQ'UITABLE, n. [L. oequitas, from oequus, equal.]1. Equal in regard to the rights of persons; ...

19800

equitableness
EQ'UITABLENESS, n. The quality of being just and impartial; as the equitableness of a judge.1. ...

19801

equitably
EQ'UITABLY, adv. In an equitable manner; justly; impartially. The laws should be equitably ...

19802

equitant
EQ'UITANT, a. [L. equitans, equito, to ride, from eques, a horseman, or equus, a horse.]In botany, ...

19803

equitation
EQUITA'TION, n. A riding on horseback.

19804

equity
EQ'UITY, n. [L. oequitas, from oequus, equal, even, level.]1. Justice; right. In practice, ...

19805

equivalence
EQUIV'ALENCE, n. [L. oequus, equal, and valens, from valeo, to be worth.]1. Equality of value; ...

19806

equivalent
EQUIV'ALENT, a. Equal in value or worth. In barter, the goods given are supposed to be equivalent ...

19807

equivalently
EQUIV'ALENTLY, adv. In an equal manner.

19808

equivocacy
EQUIV'OCACY, n. Equivocalness. [Not used.]

19809

equivocal
EQUIV'OCAL, a. [Low L. oequivocus; oequus, equal, and vox, a word. See Vocal.]1. Being of ...

19810

equivocally
EQUIV'OCALLY, adv. Ambiguously; in a doubtful sense; in terms susceptible of different senses. He ...

19811

equivocalness
EQUIV'OCALNESS, n. Ambiguity; double meaning.

19812

equivocate
EQUIV'OCATE, v.i. To use words of a doubtful signification; to express one's opinions in terms ...

19813

equivocating
EQUIV'OCATING, ppr. Using ambiguous words or phrases.

19814

equivocation
EQUIVOCA'TION, n. Ambiguity of speech; the use of words or expressions that are susceptible of a ...

19815

equivocator
EQUIV'OCATOR, n. One who equivocates; one who uses language which is ambiguous and may be ...

19816

equivoke
E'QUIVOKE, n. An ambiguous term; a word susceptible of different significations.1. Equivocation.

19817

equivorous
EQUIV'OROUS, a. [L. equus, horse, and voro, to eat.]Feeding or subsisting on horse ...

19818

er
ER, the termination of many English words, is the Teutonic form of the Latin or; the one contracted ...

19819

er-seller
FEATH'ER-SELLER,'ER-SELLER, n. One who sells fethers for beds.

19820

era
E'RA, n. [L. oera. The origin of the term is not obvious.]1. In chronology, a fixed point of ...

19821

eradiate
ERA'DIATE, v.i. [L. e and radio, to beam.]To shoot as rays of light; to beam.

19822

eradiation
ERADIA'TION, n. Emission of rays or beams of light; emission of light or splendor.

19823

eradicate
ERAD'ICATE, v.t. [L. eradico, from radix, root.]1. To pull up the roots, or by the roots. Hence, ...

19824

eradicated
ERAD'ICATED, pp. Plucked up by the roots; extirpated; destroyed.

19825

eradicating
ERAD'ICATING, ppr. Pulling up the roots of any thing; extirpating.

19826

eradication
ERADICA'TION, n. The act of plucking up by the roots; extirpation; excision; total destruction.1. ...

19827

eradicative
ERAD'ICATIVE, a. That extirpates; that cures or destroys thoroughly.ERAD'ICATIVE, n. A medicine ...

19828

erasable
ERA'SABLE, a. That may or can be erased.

19829

erase
ERA'SE, v.t. [L. erado, erasi; e and rado, to scrape; Heb. a graving tool.]1. To rub or scrape ...

19830

erased
ERA'SED, pp. Rubbed or scratched out; obliterated; effaced.

19831

erasement
ERA'SEMENT, n. The act of erasing; a rubbing out; expunction; obliteration; destruction.

19832

erasing
ERA'SING, ppr. Rubbing or scraping out; obliterating; destroying.

19833

erasion
ERA'SION, n. s as z. The act of erasing; a rubbing out; obliteration.

19834

erastian
ERAS'TIAN, n. A follower of one Erastus, the leader of a religious sect, who denied the power of ...

19835

erastianism
ERAS'TIANISM, n. The principles of the Erastians.

19836

erasure
ERA'SURE, n. era'zhur. The act of erasing; a scratching out; obliteration.1. The place where a ...

19837

ere
ERE, adv. Before; sooner than.Ere sails were spread new oceans to explore.The nobleman saith to ...

19838

erebus
ER'EBUS, n. [L. erebus.] In mythology, darkness; hence, the region of the dead; a deep and gloomy ...

19839

erect
ERECT', a. [L. erectus, from erigo, to set upright; e and rego, to stretch or make straight, ...

19840

erectable
ERECT'ABLE, a. That can be erected; as an erectable feather.

19841

erected
ERECT'ED, pp. Set in a straight and perpendicular direction; set upright; raised; built; ...

19842

erecter
ERECT'ER, n. One that erects; one that raises or builds.

19843

erecting
ERECT'ING, ppr. Raising and setting upright; building; founding; establishing; elevating; ...

19844

erection
EREC'TION, n. The act of raising and setting perpendicular to the plane of the horizon; a setting ...

19845

erective
ERECT'IVE, a. Setting upright; raising.

19846

erectly
ERECT'LY, adv. In an erect posture.

19847

erectness
ERECT'NESS, n. Uprightness of posture or form.

19848

erector
ERECT'OR, n. A muscle that erects; one that raises.

19849

erelong
E'RELONG, adv. [ere and long.] Before a long time had elapsed.He mounted the horse, and following ...

19850

eremitage
ER'EMITAGE, n. [See Hermitage.]

19851

eremite
ER'EMITE, n. [L. eremita; Gr.a desert.] One who lives in a wilderness, or in retirement, secluded ...

19852

eremitical
EREMIT'ICAL, a. Living in solitude, or in seclusion from the world.

19853

erenow
E'RENOW, adv. [ere and now.] Before this time.

19854

ereption
EREP'TION, n. [L. ereptio.] A taking or snatching away by force.

19855

erewhile
E'REWHILE

19856

erewhiles
E'REWHILES, adv. [ere and while. Some time ago; before a little while.I am as fair now as I was ...

19857

ergat
ER'GAT, v.i. [L. ergo.] To infer; to draw conclusions. [Not used.]

19858

ergo
ER'GO, adv. [L.] Therefore.

19859

ergot
ERGOT, n. In farriery, a stub, like a piece of soft horn, about the bigness of a chestnut, ...

19860

ergotism
ER'GOTISM, n. [L. ergo.] A logical inference; a conclusion.

19861

eriach
ER'IACH, n. A pecuniary fine.

19862

erigible
ER'IGIBLE, a. That may be erected. [Ill formed and not used.]

19863

eringo
ERINGO. [See Eryngo.]

19864

eristic
ERIST'IC

19865

eristical
ERIST'ICAL, a. [Gr. contention; contentious.] Pertaining to disputes; controversial. [Not in ...

19866

erke
ERKE, n. Idle; slothful. [Not in use.]

19867

ermelin
ERMELIN. [See Ermin.]

19868

ermin
ER'MIN

19869

ermine
ER'MINE, n.1. An animal of the genus Mustela, an inhabitant of northern climates, in Europe and ...

19870

ermined
ER'MINED, a. Clothed with ermin; adorned with the fur of the ermin; as ermined pride; ermined ...

19871

erne
ERNE, or AERNE, a Saxon word, signifying a place or receptacle, forms the termination of some ...

19872

erode
ERO'DE, v.t. [L. erodo; e and rodo, to gnaw.] To eat in or away; to corrode; as, canker erodes ...

19873

eroded
ERO'DED, pp. Eaten; gnawed; corroded.

19874

eroding
ERO'DING, ppr. Eating into; eating away; corroding.

19875

erogate
ER'OGATE, v.t. [L. erogo.] To lay out; to give; to bestow upon. [Not used.]

19876

erogation
EROGA'TION, n. The act of conferring. [Not used.]

19877

erose
ERO'SE, a. [L. erosus.] In botany, an erose leaf has small sinuses in the margin, as if gnawed.

19878

erosion
ERO'SION, n. s as z. [L. erosio.] The act or operation of eating away.1. The state of being ...

19879

erotic
EROT'IC

19880

erotical
EROT'ICAL, a. [Gr. love.] Pertaining to love; treating of love.

19881

erpetologist
ERPETOL'OGIST, n. [Gr. reptile, discourse.] One who writes on the subject of reptiles, or is ...

19882

erpetology
ERPETOL'OGY,n. [supra.] That part of natural history which treats of reptiles.

19883

err
ERR, v.i. [L. erro.]1. To wander from the right way; to deviate from the true course or ...

19884

errable
ER'RABLE, a. Liable to mistake; fallible. [Little used.]

19885

errableness
ER'RABLENESS, n. Liableness to mistake or error.We may infer from the errableness of our nature, ...

19886

errand
ER'RAND, n.1. A verbal message; a mandate or order; something to be told or done; a communication ...

19887

errant
ER'RANT, a. [L. errans,from erro, to err.]1. Wandering; roving; rambling; applied particularly to ...

19888

errantry
ER'RANTRY, n. A wandering; a roving or rambling about.1. The employment of a knight errant.

19889

erratic
ERRAT'IC, a. [L. erraticus, from erro, to wander.] Wandering; having no certain course; roving ...

19890

erratically
ERRAT'ICALLY, adv. Without rule, order or established method; irregularly.

19891

erration
ERRA'TION, n. A wandering. [Not used.]

19892

erratum
ERRA'TUM, n. plu. errata. [See Err.] An error or mistake in writing or printing. A list of the ...

19893

errhine
ER'RHINE, a. er'rine. [Gr. the nose.] Affecting the nose, or to be snuffed into the nose; ...

19894

erring
ER'RING, ppr. Wandering from the truth or the right way; mistaking; irregular.

19895

erroneous
ERRO'NEOUS, a. [L. erroneus, from erro, to err.]1. Wandering; roving; unsettled.They ...

19896

erroneously
ERRO'NEOUSLY, adv. By mistake; not rightly; falsely.

19897

erroneousness
ERRO'NEOUSNESS, n. The state of being erroneous, wrong or false; deviation from right; ...

19898

error
ER'ROR, n. [L. error, from erro, to wander.] A wandering or deviation from the truth; a mistake ...

19899

erse
ERSE, n. The language of the descendants of the Gaels or Celts, in the highlands of Scotland.

19900

erst
ERST, adv. [See Ere.]1. First; at first; at the beginning.2. Once; formerly; long ago.3. Before; ...

19901

erstwhile
ERSTWHILE, adv. Till then or now; formerly.

19902

erubescence
ERUBES'CENCE, n. [L. erubescens, erubesco, from rubeo, to be red.]A becoming red; redness of the ...

19903

erubescent
ERUBES'CENT, a. Red, or reddish; blushing.

19904

eruct
ERUCT'

19905

eructate
ERUCT'ATE, v.t. [L. eructo, ructor, coinciding in elements with Heb. to spit.]To belch; to eject ...

19906

eructation
ERUCTA'TION, n. [L. eructatio.] The act of belching wind from the stomach; a belch.1. A violent ...

19907

erudite
ER'UDITE, a. [L. eruditus, from erudio, to instruct.Instructed; taught; learned.

19908

erudition
ERUDI'TION, n. Learning; knowledge gained by study, or from books and instruction; particularly, ...

19909

eruginous
ERU'GINOUS, a. [L. aeruginosus, from aerugo, rust.]Partaking of the substance or nature of copper ...

19910

erupt
ERUPT', v.i. To burst forth. [Not used.]

19911

eruption
ERUP'TION, n. [L. eruptio, from erumpo, erupi; e and rumpo, for rupo.1. The act of breaking or ...

19912

eruptive
ERUP'TIVE, a. Bursting forth.The sudden glanceAppears far south eruptive through the cloud.1. ...

19913

eryngo
ERYN'GO, n. [Gr.] The sea-holly, Eryngium, a genus of plants of several species. The flowers are ...

19914

erysipelas
ERYSIP'ELAS, n. [Gr.] A disease called St.Anthony's fire; a diffused inflammation with fever of ...

19915

erysipelatous
ERYSIPEL'ATOUS, a. Eruptive; resembling erysipelas, or partaking of its nature.

19916

escalade
ESCALA'DE, n. [L. scala, a ladder. See Scale.] In the military art, a furious attack made by ...

19917

escalop
ESCAL'OP, n. skal'lup. A family of bivalvular shell-fish, whose shell is regularly indented. In ...

19918

escapade
ESCAPA'DE, n. The fling of a horse. In Spanish, flight, escape.

19919

escape
ESCA'PE, v.t. [L. capio, with a negative prefix, or from a word of the same family.]1. To flee ...

19920

escapement
ESCA'PEMENT, n. That part of a clock or watch, which regulates its movements, and prevents their ...

19921

escaping
ESCA'PING, ppr. Fleeing from and avoiding danger or evil; being passed unobserved or unhurt; ...

19922

escargatoire
ESC`ARGATOIRE, n. A nursery of snails.

19923

escarp
ESC`ARP, v.t. To slope; to form a slope; a military term.

19924

escarpment
ESC`ARPMENT, n. A slope; a steep descent or declivity.

19925

eschalot
ESCHALOT, n. shallo'te. A species of small onion or garlic, belonging to the genus Allium; the ...

19926

eschar
ES'CHAR, n. [Gr.] In surgery, the crust or scab occasioned by burns or caustic applications.1. A ...

19927

escharotic
ESCHAROT'IC, a. Caustic; having the power of searing or destroying the flesh.ESCHAROT'IC, n. A ...

19928

escheat
ESCHE'AT, n. [L. cado, cadere.]1. Any land or tenements which casually fall or revert to the lord ...

19929

escheatable
ESCHE'ATABLE, a. Liable to escheat.

19930

escheatage
ESCHE'ATAGE, n. The right of succeeding to an escheat.

19931

escheated
ESCHE'ATED, pp. Having fallen to the lord through want of heirs, or to the state for want of an ...

19932

escheating
ESCHE'ATING, ppr. Reverting to the lord through failure of heirs, or to the state for want of an ...

19933

escheator
ESCHE'ATOR, n. An officer who observes the escheats of the king in the county whereof he is ...

19934

eschew
ESCHEW', v.t. To flee from; to shun; to avoid.He who obeys, destruction shall eschew.Job--feared ...

19935

eschewed
ESCHEW'ED, pp. Shunned; avoided.

19936

eschewing
ESCHEW'ING, ppr. Shunning; avoiding. [This word is nearly obsolete, or at least little used.]

19937

escocheon
ESCO'CHEON, n. The shield of the family.

19938

escort
ES'CORT, n. A guard; a body of armed men which attends an officer, or baggage; provisions or ...

19939

escorted
ESCORT'ED, pp. Attended and guarded by land.

19940

escorting
ESCORT'ING, ppr. Attending and guarding by land.

19941

escot
ESCOT. [See Scot.]

19942

escouade
ESCOUADE. [See Squad.]

19943

escout
ESCOUT. [See Scout.]

19944

escritoir
ESCRITO'IR, n. [L. scribo; Eng. to scrape.] A box with instruments and conveniences for writing; ...

19945

escrow
ES'CROW, n. In law, a deed of lands or tenements delivered to a third person, to hold till some ...

19946

escuage
ES'CUAGE, n. [L. scutum, a shield.] In feudal law, service of the shield, called also scutage; a ...

19947

esculapian
ESCULA'PIAN, a. [from Aesculapius, the physician.]Medical; pertaining to the healing art.

19948

esculent
ES'CULENT, a. [L. esculentus, from esca, food.] Eatable; that is or may be used by man for food; ...

19949

escurial
ESCU'RIAL, n. The palace or residence of the King of Spain, about 15 miles North West of Madrid. ...

19950

escutcheon
ESCUTCH'EON, n. [L. scutum, a shield.] The shield on which a coat of arms is represented; the ...

19951

escutcheoned
ESCUTCH'EONED, a. Having a coat of arms or ensign.

19952

esloin
ESLOIN', v.t. To remove. [Not in use.]

19953

esophagotomy
ESOPHAGOT'OMY, n. [esophagus and a cutting.] In surgery, the operation of making an incision into ...

19954

esophagus
ESOPH'AGUS, n. [Gr.] The gullet; the canal through which food and drink pass to the stomach.

19955

esopian
ESO'PIAN, a. [from Aesop.] Pertaining to AEsop; composed by him or in his manner.

19956

esoteric
ESOT'ERIC, a. [Gr. interior, from within.] Private; an epithet applied to the private instructions ...

19957

esotery
ESOT'ERY, n. Mystery; secrecy. [Little used.]

19958

espalier
ESPAL'IER, n. [L. palus, a stake or pole.] A row of trees planted about a garden or in hedges, so ...

19959

espand
ESPAND', v.i. To open; to spread. Flowers expand in spring.1. To dilate; to extend in bulk or ...

19960

esparcet
ESPAR'CET, n. A kind of sainfoin.

19961

especial
ESPE'CIAL, a. [L. specialis, from specio, to see, species, kind.]Principal; chief; particular; as, ...

19962

especially
ESPE'CIALLY, adv. Principally; chiefly; particularly; in an uncommon degree; in reference to one ...

19963

especialness
ESPE'CIALNESS, n. The state of being especial.

19964

esperance
ES'PERANCE, n. [L. spero, to hope.] Hope. [Not English.]

19965

espial
ESPI'AL, n. [See Spy.] A spy; the act of espying.

19966

espinel
ES'PINEL, n. A kind or ruby. [See Spinel.]

19967

espionage
ES'PIONAGE, n. The practice or employment of spies; the practice of watching the words and conduct ...

19968

esplanade
ESPLANA'DE, n. [L. planus, plain.]1. In fortification, the glacis of the counter scarp, or the ...

19969

espousal
ESPOUS'AL, a. espouz'al. [See Espouse.] Used in or relating to the act of espousing or ...

19970

espousals
ESPOUS'ALS, n. plu. The act of contracting or affiancing a man and woman to each other; a ...

19971

espouse
ESPOUSE, v.t. espouz'. [L. spondeo, sponsus, the letter n, in the latter, must be casual, or the ...

19972

espoused
ESPOUS'ED, pp. Betrothed; affianced; promised in marriage by contract; married; united intimately; ...

19973

espouser
ESPOUS'ER,n. One who espouses; one who defends the cause of another.

19974

espousing
ESPOUS'ING, ppr. Betrothing; promising in marriage by covenant; marrying; uniting indissolubly; ...

19975

espy
ESPY',v.t. [L. specio.]1. To see at a distance; to have the first sight of a thing remove. ...

19976

esquire
ESQUI'RE, n. [L. scutum, a shield; Gr. a hide, of which shields were anciently made.], a ...

19977

essay
ESSA'Y, v.t. [L. sequor. See Seek. The radical sense is to press, drive, urge, strain, strive.]1. ...

19978

essayed
ESSA'YED, pp. Attempted; tried.

19979

essayer
ESSA'YER, n. One who writes essays.

19980

essaying
ESSA'YING, ppr. Trying; making an effort; attempting.

19981

essayist
ESSA'YIST, n. A writer of an essay, or of essays.

19982

essence
ES'SENCE, n. [L. essentia, esse, to be.]1. That which constitutes the particular nature of a ...

19983

essenced
ES'SENCED, pp. Perfumed; as essenced fops.

19984

essenes
ESSE'NES, n. Among the Jews, a sect remarkable for their strictness and abstinence.

19985

essential
ESSEN'TIAL, a. [L. essentialis.] Necessary to the constitution or existence of a thing. Piety ...

19986

essentiality
ESSENTIAL'ITY, n. The quality of being essential; first or constituent principles.

19987

essentially
ESSEN'TIALLY, adv. By the constitution of nature; in essence; as, minerals and plants are ...

19988

essentiate
ESSEN'TIATE, v.i. To become of the same essence.ESSEN'TIATE, v.t. To form or constitute the ...

19989

essoin
ESSOIN',n. [Law L. exonia, sonium.]1. An excuse; the alleging of an excuse for him who is summoned ...

19990

essoiner
ESSOIN'ER, n. An attorney who sufficiently excuses the absence of another.

19991

establish
ESTAB'LISH, v.t. [L. stabilio; Heb. to set, fix, establish.]1. To set and fix firmly or ...

19992

established
ESTAB'LISHED, pp. Set; fixed firmly; founded; ordained; enacted; ratified; confirmed.

19993

establisher
ESTAB'LISHER, n. He who establishes, ordains or confirms.

19994

establishing
ESTAB'LISHING, ppr. Fixing; settling permanently; founding; ratifying; confirming; ordaining.