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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

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ID Word Definition

21096

f
F, the sixth letter of the English Alphabet., is a labial articulation, formed by placing the upper ...

21097

fabaceous
FABACEOUS, a. [Low L., a bean.] Having the nature of a bean; like a bean. [Little used.]

21098

fabian
FABIAN, a. Delaying; dilatory; avoiding battle, in imitation of Q. Fabius Maximus, a Roman general ...

21099

fable
FABLE, n. [L., Gr. The radical sense is that which is spoken or told.]1. A feigned story or tale, ...

21100

fabled
FABLED, pp. 1. Feigned; invented, as stories.2. a. Told or celebrated in fables.Hail, fabled ...

21101

fabler
FABLER, n. A writer of fables or fictions; a dealer in feigned stories.

21102

fabling
FABLING, ppr. Feigning; devising, as stories; writing or uttering false stories.

21103

fabric
FABRIC, n. [L., a frame, a workman.]1. The structure of any thing; the manner in which the parts of ...

21104

fabricate
FABRICATE, v.t. [L., to frame, supra.]1. To frame; to build; to construct; to form a whole by ...

21105

fabricated
FABRICATED, pp. Framed; constructed; built; manufactured; invented; devised falsely; forged.

21106

fabricating
FABRICATING, ppr. Framing; constructing; manufacturing; devising falsely; forging.

21107

fabrication
FABRICATION, n. 1. The act of framing or constructing construction; as the fabrication of a bridge ...

21108

fabricator
FABRICATOR, n. One that constructs or makes.

21109

fabrile
FABRILE, a. [L.] Pertaining to handicrafts. [Not used.]

21110

fabulist
FABULIST, n. [from fable.] The inventor or writer of fables.

21111

fabulize
FABULIZE, v.t. To invent, compose or relate fables.

21112

fabulosity
FABULOSITY, n. Fabulousness; fullness of fables. [Little used.]

21113

fabulous
FABULOUS, a. 1. Feigned, as a story; devised; fictitious; as a fabulous story; a fabulous ...

21114

fabulously
FABULOUSLY, adv. In a fable or fiction; in a fabulous manner.

21115

fabulousness
FABULOUSNESS, n. The quality of being fabulous or feigned.

21116

facade
FACADE, n. Front.

21117

face
FACE, n. [L., to make.] 1. In a general sense, the surface of a thing, or the side which presents ...

21118

facecloth
FA'CECLOTH, n. [face and cloth.] A cloth laid over the face of a corpse.

21119

faced
FA'CED, pp. Covered in front. In composition, denoting the kind of face; as full-faced.

21120

faceless
FA'CELESS, a. Without a face.

21121

facepainter
FA'CEPAINTER, n. A painter of portraits; one who draws the likeness of the face.

21122

facepainting
FA'CEPAINTING, n. The act or art of painting portraits.

21123

facet
FAC'ET, n.A little face; a small surface; as the facets of a diamond.

21124

facete
FACE'TE, a. [L. facetus.] Gay; cheerful. [Not in use.]

21125

faceteness
FACE'TENESS, n. Wit; pleasant representation. [Not used.]

21126

facetious
FACE'TIOUS, a. [L. facetus; facetia, or plu.]1. Merry; sportive; jocular; sprightly with wit and ...

21127

facetiously
FACE'TIOUSLY, adv. Merrily; gaily; wittily; with pleasantry.

21128

facetiousness
FACE'TIOUSNESS, n. Sportive humor; pleasantry; the quality of exciting laughter or good humor.

21129

facial
FA'CIAL, a. [L. facies, face.] Pertaining to the face; as the facial artery, vein or nerve.Facial ...

21130

facile
FAC'ILE, a. [L. facilis, from facio, to make.]1. Properly, easy to be done or performed; easy; ...

21131

facilely
FAC'ILELY, adv. Easily. [Little used.]

21132

facileness
FAC'ILENESS, n. Easiness to be persuaded.

21133

facilitate
FACIL'ITATE, v.t. [L. facilitas, from facilis, easy.]To make easy or less difficult; to free from ...

21134

facilitated
FACIL'ITATED, pp. Made easy or easier.

21135

facilitating
FACIL'ITATING, ppr. Rendering easy or easier.

21136

facilitation
FACILITA'TION, n. The act of making easy.

21137

facilities
FACIL'ITIES, n. plu. The means by which the performance of anything is rendered easy; convenient ...

21138

facility
FACIL'ITY, n. [L. facilitas, from facilis, easy.]1. Easiness to be performed; freedom from ...

21139

facing
FA'CING, ppr. [from face.] 1. Fronting; having the face towards; opposite.2. Covering the fore ...

21140

facinorous
FACIN'OROUS, a. [L. facinus.] Atrociously wicked. [Little used.]

21141

facinorousness
FACIN'OROUSNESS, n. Extreme or astrocious wickedness.

21142

facsimile
FACSIM'ILE, n. [L. facio, to make, and similis, like. See Simile.]An exact copy or likeness, as ...

21143

fact
FACT, n. [L. factum, from facio, to make or do.]1. Any thing done, or that comes to pass; an act; ...

21144

faction
FAC'TION, n. [L. factio, from facio, to make or do.]1. A party, in political society, combined or ...

21145

factionary
FAC'TIONARY, n. A party man; one of a faction. [Little used.]

21146

factioner
FAC'TIONER, n. One of a faction. [Not in use.]

21147

factionist
FAC'TIONIST, n. One who promotes faction.

21148

factious
FAC'TIOUS, a. [L. factiosus.]1. Given to faction; addicted to form parties and raise dissensions, ...

21149

factiously
FAC'TIOUSLY, adv. In a factious manner; by means of faction; in a turbulent or disorderly manner.

21150

factiousness
FAC'TIOUSNESS, n. Inclination to form parties in opposition to the government, or to the public ...

21151

factitious
FACTI'TIOUS, a. [L. factitius, from facio.]Made by art, in distinction from what is produced by ...

21152

factive
FAC'TIVE, a. Making; having power to make. [Not used.]

21153

factor
FAC'TOR, n. [L. factor; facio.]1. In commerce, an agent employed by merchants, residing in other ...

21154

factorage
FAC'TORAGE, n. the allowance given to a factor by his employer, as a compensation for his ...

21155

factorship
FAC'TORSHIP, n. a factory; or the business of a factor.

21156

factory
FAC'TORY, n.1. A house or place where factors reside, to transact business for their employers. ...

21157

factotum
FACTO'TUM, n. [L. do every thing.] a servant employed to do all kinds of work.

21158

facture
FAC'TURE, n. The art or manner of making.

21159

faculty
FAC'ULTY, n. [L. facultas, from facio, to make.]1. That power of the mind or intellect which ...

21160

facund
FAC'UND, a. [L. facundus, supposed to be from the root of for, fari, to speak. If so the original ...

21161

facundity
FACUND'ITY, n. [L. facunditas.] Eloquence; readiness of speech.

21162

faddle
FAD'DLE, v.i. To trifle; to toy; to play. [A low word.]

21163

fade
FADE, a. Weak; slight; faint. [Not in use.]FADE, v.i.1. To lose color; to tend from a stronger ...

21164

faded
FA'DED, pp. Become less vivid, as color; withered; decayed; vanished.

21165

fadge
FADGE, v.i. [L. pango, pegi, pepegi, figo; Gr.]1. To suit; to fit; to come close, as the parts ...

21166

fading
FA'DING, ppr. [See Fade.]1. Losing color; becoming less vivid; decaying; declining; withering.2. ...

21167

fadingness
FA'DINGNESS, n. Decay; liableness to decay.

21168

fady
FA'DY, a. Wearing away; losing color or strength.

21169

faecal
FAECAL, a. [See Fecal.]

21170

faeces
FAE'CES, n. [L.] Excrement; also, settlings; sediment after infusion or distillation.

21171

faffel
FAF'FEL, v.i. To stammer. [Not in use.]

21172

fag
FAG, v.t. To beat. [Not in use.]FAG, n. A slave; one who works hard. [Not in use.]FAG, v.i. ...

21173

fagend
FAGEND', n. [fag and end. See Fag, v.i. supra.]1. The end of a web of cloth, generally of ...

21174

fagot
FAG'OT, n. [Gr. See Fadge. The sense is a bundle or collection, like pack.]1. A bundle of ...

21175

fahlerz
F'AHLERZ, n. Gray copper, or gray copper ore, called by Jameson tetrahedral copper pyrite. This ...

21176

fahlunite
F'AHLUNITE, n.Automalite, a subspecies of octahedral corundum.

21177

fail
FAIL, v.i. [L. fallo; Gr. whence; Eng. felony. It seems to be allied to fall, fallow, pale, and ...

21178

failance
FA'ILANCE, n. fault; failure. Obs.

21179

failing
FA'ILING, ppr. Becoming deficient or insufficient; becoming weaker; decaying; declining; omitting; ...

21180

failure
FA'ILURE, n. fa'ilyur.1. A failing; deficience; cessation of supply, or total defect; as the ...

21181

fain
FAIN, a.1. Glad; pleased; rejoiced. but the appropriate sense of the word is, glad or pleased to ...

21182

faining
FA'INING, ppr. wishing; desiring fondly. In his faining eye.

21183

faint
FAINT, a. [L. vanus, whence to vanish. Eng. to wane.]1. weak; languid; inclined to swoon; as, to ...

21184

fainthearted
FAINTHEARTED, a. Cowardly; timorous; dejected; easily depressed, or yielding to fear.Fear not, ...

21185

faintheartedly
FAINTHEARTEDLY, adv. In a cowardly manner.

21186

faintheartedness
FAINTHEARTEDNESS, n. Cowardice; timorousness; want of courage.

21187

fainting
FA'INTING, ppr. Falling into a swoon; failing; losing strength or courage; becoming feeble or ...

21188

faintish
FA'INTISH, a. Slightly faint.

21189

faintishness
FA'INTISHNESS, n. A slight degree of faintness.

21190

faintling
FA'INTLING, a. Timorous; feeble-minded. [Not used.]

21191

faintly
FA'INTLY, adv.1. In a feeble, languid manner; without vigor or activity; as, to attack or defend ...

21192

faintness
FA'INTNESS, n.1. The state of being faint; loss of strength, color and respiration.2. Feebleness; ...

21193

faints
FAINTS, n. plu. the gross fetid oil remaining after distillation, or a weak spirituous liquor ...

21194

fainty
FA'INTY, a. weak; feeble; languid.

21195

fair
FAIR, a.1. Clear; free from spots; free from a dark hue; white; as a fair skin; a fair complexion. ...

21196

fair-hand
FA'IR-HAND a. Having a fair appearance.

21197

fair-spoken
FA'IR-SPOKEN, a. Using fair speech; bland; civil; courteous; plausible.Arius, a fair-spoken man.

21198

fairing
FA'IRING, n. A present given at a fair.

21199

fairly
FA'IRLY, adv.1. Beautifully; handsomely. [Little used.]2. Commodiously; conveniently; as a town ...

21200

fairness
FA'IRNESS, n. 1. Clearness; freedom from spots or blemishes; whiteness; as the fairness of skin or ...

21201

fairy
FA'IRY, n. [The origin of this word is not obvious, and the radical letters are uncertain. the ...

21202

fairylike
FA'IRYLIKE, a. Imitating the manner of fairies.

21203

fairystone
FA'IRYSTONE, n. A stone found in gravel pits.The fossil echinite, abundant in chalk pits.

21204

faith
FAITH, n. [L. fides, fido, to trust; Gr. to persuade, to draw towards any thing, to conciliate; to ...

21205

faith-breach
FA'ITH-BREACH, n. Breach of fidelity; disloyalty; perfidy.

21206

faithed
FA'ITHED, a. Honest; sincere. [Not used.]

21207

faithful
FA'ITHFUL, a.1. Firm in adherence to the truth and to the duties of religion.Be thou faithful unto ...

21208

faithfully
FA'ITHFULLY, adv. 1. In a faithful manner; with good faith.2. With strict adherence to allegiance ...

21209

faithfulness
FA'ITHFULNESS, n. 1. Fidelity; loyalty; firm adherence to allegiance and duty; as the ...

21210

faithless
FA'ITHLESS, a.1. Without belief in the revealed truths of religion; unbelieving.O faithless ...

21211

faithlessness
FA'ITHLESSNESS, n.1. Unbelief, as to revealed religion.2. Perfidy; treachery; disloyalty; as in ...

21212

faitour
FA'ITOUR, n. [L. factor.] An evildoer; a scoundrel; a mean fellow. Obs.

21213

fake
FAKE, n.One of the circles or windings of a cable or hawser, as it lies in a coil; a single turn.

21214

fakir
F'AKIR,

21215

falcade
FALCA'DE, n. [L. falx, a sickle or sythe.]A horse is said to make a falcade, when he throws ...

21216

falcate
FALC'ATE,

21217

falcated
FALC'ATED, a. [L. falcatus, from faix, a sickly, sythe or reaping hook.]Hooked; bent like a sickle ...

21218

falcation
FALCA'TION, n. Crookedness; a bending in the form of a sickle.

21219

falchion
FAL'CHION, n. fal'chun. a is pronounced as in fall. [L. falx, a reaping hook.]A short crooked ...

21220

falciform
FAL'CIFORM a. [L. falx, a reaping hook, and form.]In the shape of a sickle; resembling a reaping ...

21221

falcon
FAL'CON, n. Sometimes pron. fawcon. [L. falco, a hawk. The falcon is probably so named from its ...

21222

falconer
FAL'CONER, n. A person who breeds and trains hawks for taking wild fowls; one who follows the ...

21223

falconet
FAL'CONET, n. A small cannon or piece of ordinance, whose diameter at the bore is four inches and ...

21224

falconry
FAL'CONRY, n. [L. falco, a hawk.]1. The art of training hawks to the exercise of hawking.2. The ...

21225

faldage
FALD'AGE, n. a as in all. [Low L. faldagium.]In England, a privilege which anciently several lords ...

21226

faldfee
FALD'FEE, n. A fee or composition paid anciently by tenants for the privilege of faldage.

21227

falding
FALD'ING, n. A kind of course cloth. Obs.

21228

faldstool
FALD'STOOL, n. [fald or fold and stool.]1. A kind of stool placed at the south side of the altar, ...

21229

fall
FALL, v.i. pret. fell; pp. fallen. [L. fallo, to fail, to deceive, Gr.; Heb. to fall. Fail ...

21230

fallacious
FALLA'CIOUS, a. [L. fallax, from fallo, to deceive. See Fail.]1. Deceptive; deceiving; ...

21231

fallaciously
FALLA'CIOUSLY, adv. In a fallacious manner; deceitfully; sophistical; with purpose or in a manner ...

21232

fallaciousness
FALLA'CIOUSNESS, n. Tendency to deceive or mislead; inconclusiveness; as the fallaciousness of an ...

21233

fallacy
FAL'LACY, n. [L. fallacia.] 1. Deceptive or false appearance; deceitfulness; that which misleads ...

21234

fallen
FALL'EN, pp. or a. Dropped; descended; degraded; decreased; ruined.

21235

fallency
FAL'LENCY, n. Mistake. Obs.

21236

faller
FALL'ER, n. One that falls.

21237

fallibility
FALLIBIL'ITY, n. [See Fallible.]1. Liableness to deceive; the quality of being fallible; ...

21238

fallible
FAL'LIBLE, a. [L. fallo, to deceive.]1. Liable to fail or mistake; that may err or be deceived in ...

21239

falling
FALL'ING, ppr. Descending; dropping; disemboguing; apostatizing; declining; decreasing; sinking; ...

21240

falling-sickness
FALL'ING-SICKNESS, n. The epilepsy; a disease in which the patient suddenly loses his senses and ...

21241

falling-star
FALL'ING-STAR, n. A luminous meteor, suddenly appearing and darting through the air.

21242

falling-stone
FALL'ING-STONE, n. A stone falling from the atmosphere; a meteorite; an aerolite.

21243

fallingin
FALL'INGIN, n. An indenting or hollow; opposed to rising or prominence.Falling away, ...

21244

fallow
FAL'LOW, a. [L. fulvus; qu. helvus, for felvus. This word may be from the root of fail, fallo; so ...

21245

fallow-crop
FAL'LOW-CROP, n. The crop taken from fallowed ground.

21246

fallow-finch
FAL'LOW-FINCH, n. A small bird, the oenanthe or wheat-ear.

21247

fallowed
FAL'LOWED, pp. Plowed and harrowed for a season, without being sown.

21248

fallowing
FAL'LOWING, ppr. Plowing and harrowing land without sowing it.FAL'LOWING, n. The operation of ...

21249

fallowist
FAL'LOWIST, n. One who favors the practice of fallowing land.On this subject, a controversy has ...

21250

fallowness
FAL'LOWNESS, n. A fallow state; barrenness; exemption from bearing fruit.

21251

falsary
FALS'ARY, n. [See False.] A falsifier of evidence. [Not in use.]

21252

false
FALSE, a. [L. falsus, from fallo, to deceive. See Fall and Fail.]1. Not true; not conformable to ...

21253

false-heart
FALSE-HEART,

21254

false-hearted
FALSE-HEARTED, a. Hollow; treacherous; deceitful; perfidious. [The former is not used.]

21255

false-heartedness
FALSE-HEARTEDNESS, n. Perfidiousness; treachery.

21256

falsehood
FALSEHOOD, n. fols'hood. [false and hood.]1. Contrariety or inconformity to fact or truth; as ...

21257

falsely
FALSELY, adv. fols'ly.1. In a manner contrary to truth and fact; not truly; as, to speak or swear ...

21258

falseness
FALSENESS, n. fols'ness.1. Want of integrity and veracity, either in principle or in act; as the ...

21259

falser
FALS'ER, n. A deceiver.

21260

falsetto
FALSET'TO, n. A feigned voice.

21261

falsifiable
FALS'IFIABLE, a. [from falsify.] That may be falsified, counterfeited or corrupted.

21262

falsification
FALSIFICA'TION, n. 1. The act of making false; a counterfeiting; the giving to a thing an ...

21263

falsificator
FALSIFICA'TOR, n. A falsifier.

21264

falsified
FALS'IFIED, pp. Counterfeited.

21265

falsifier
FALS'IFIER, n.1. One who counterfeits, or gives to a thing a deceptive appearance; or one who ...

21266

falsify
FALS'IFY, v.t.1. To counterfeit; to forge; to make something false, or in imitation of that which ...

21267

falsifying
FALS'IFYING, ppr. Counterfeiting; forging; lying; proving to be false; violating.

21268

falsity
FALS'ITY, n. [L. falsitas.] 1. Contrariety or inconformity to truth; the quality of being ...

21269

falter
FAL'TER, v.i. [L. fallo, the primary sense of which is to fall short, or to err, to miss, to ...

21270

faltering
FAL'TERING, ppr. Hesitating; speaking with a feeble, broken, trembling utterance; ...

21271

falteringly
FAL'TERINGLY, adv. With hesitation; with a trembling, broken voice; with difficulty or feebleness.

21272

fame
FAME, n. [L. fama; Gr. from to speak.]1. Public report or rumor.The fame thereof was heard in ...

21273

fame-giving
FA'ME-GIVING, a. Bestowing fame.

21274

famed
FA'MED, a. Much talked of; renowned; celebrated; distinguished and exalted by favorable reports. ...

21275

fameless
FA'MELESS, a. Without renown.

21276

familiar
FAMIL'IAR, a. famil'yar. [L. familiaris, familia, family, which see.]1. Pertaining to a family; ...

21277

familiarity
FAMILIAR'ITY, n.1. Intimate and frequent converse, or association in company. The gentlemen lived ...

21278

familiarize
FAMIL'IARIZE, v.t.1. To make familiar or intimate; to habituate; to accustom; to make well known, ...

21279

familiarized
FAMIL'IARIZED, pp. Accustomed; habituated; made easy by practice, custom or use.

21280

familiarizing
FAMIL'IARIZING, ppr. Accustoming; rendering easy by practice, custom or use.

21281

familiarly
FAMIL'IARLY, adv.1. In a familiar manner; unceremoniously; without constraint; without ...

21282

familism
FAM'ILISM, n. The tenets of the familists.

21283

familist
FAM'ILIST, n. [from family.] One of the religious sect called the family of love.

21284

family
FAM'ILY, n. [L. familia.]1. The collective body of persons who live in one house and under one ...

21285

famine
FAM'INE, n. [L. fames.]1. Scarcity of food; dearth; a general want of provisions sufficient for ...

21286

famish
FAM'ISH, v.t. [L. fames.]1. To starve; to kill or destroy with hunger.2. To exhaust the strength ...

21287

famished
FAM'ISHED, pp. Starved; exhausted by want of sustenance.

21288

famishing
FAM'ISHING, ppr. Starving; killing; perishing by want of food.

21289

famishment
FAM'ISHMENT, n. The pain of extreme hunger or thirst; extreme want of sustenance.

21290

famous
FA'MOUS, a. [L. famosus. See Fame.]1. Celebrated in fame or public report; renowned; much talked ...

21291

famoused
FA'MOUSED, a. Renowned. [An ill formed word.]

21292

famously
FA'MOUSLY, adv. With great renown or celebration.Then this land was famously enriched with politic ...

21293

famousness
FA'MOUSNESS, n. Renown; great fame; celebrity.

21294

fan
FAN, n. [L. vannus.]1. An instrument used by ladies to agitate the air and cool the face in warm ...

21295

fan-light
FAN-LIGHT, n. A window in form of an open fan.

21296

fanatic
FANAT'IC,

21297

fanatical
FANAT'ICAL, a. [L. fanaticus, phanaticus.]Wild and extravagant in opinions, particularly in ...

21298

fanatically
FANAT'ICALLY, adv. With wild enthusiasm.

21299

fanaticalness
FANAT'ICALNESS, n. Fanaticism.

21300

fanaticism
FANAT'ICISM, n. Excessive enthusiasm; wild and extravagant notions of religion; religious frenzy.

21301

fanaticize
FANAT'ICIZE, v.t. To make fanatic.

21302

fancied
FAN'CIED, pp. [See Fancy.] Imagined; conceived; liked.

21303

fanciful
FAN'CIFUL, a. [See Fancy.]1. Guided by the imagination, rather than by reason and experience; ...

21304

fancifully
FAN'CIFULLY, adv. 1. In a fanciful manner; wildly; whimsically.2. According to fancy.

21305

fancifulness
FAN'CIFULNESS, n. 1. The quality of being fanciful, or influenced by the imagination, rather than ...

21306

fancy
FAN'CY, n. [contracted from fantasy, L. phantasia. Gr. from to cause to appear, to seem, to ...

21307

fancyframed
FAN'CYFRAMED, a. Created by the fancy.

21308

fancyfree
FAN'CYFREE, a. Free from the power of love.

21309

fancying
FAN'CYING, ppr. Imagining; conceiving; liking.

21310

fancymonger
FAN'CYMONGER, n. One who deals in tricks of imagination.

21311

fancysick
FAN'CYSICK, a. One whose imagination is unsound, or whose distemper is in his own mind.

21312

fand
FAND, old pret. of find. Obs.

21313

fandango
FANDAN'GO, n. A lively dance.

21314

fane
FANE, n. [L. fanum.] a temple; a place consecrated to religion; a church; used in poetry.From men ...

21315

fanfare
FAN'FARE, n. A coming into the lists with sound of trumpets; a flourish of trumpets.

21316

fanfaron
FAN'FARON, n. A bully; a hector; a swaggerer; an empty boaster; a vain pretender.

21317

fanfaronade
FANFARONA'DE, n. A swaggering; vain boasting; ostentation; a bluster.

21318

fang
FANG, v.t. [See Finger.]To catch; to seize; to lay hold; to gripe; to clutch. Obs.FANG, n.1. The ...

21319

fanged
FANG'ED, a. Furnished with fangs, tusks, or something long and pointed; as a fanged adder.Chariots ...

21320

fangle
FAN'GLE, n. fang'gl.A new attempt; a trifling scheme. [Not used.]

21321

fangled
FAN'GLED, a. Properly, begun, new made; hence, gaudy; showy; vainly decorated. [Seldom used, ...

21322

fangless
FANG'LESS, a. Having no fangs or tusks; toothless; as a fangless lion.

21323

fangot
FAN'GOT, n. A quantity of wares, as raw silk, &c., from one to two hundred weight and three ...

21324

fanion
FAN'ION, n. fan'yon. [L. pannus.]In armies, a small flag carried with the baggage.

21325

fanned
FAN'NED, pp. Blown with a fan; winnowed; ventilated.

21326

fannel
FAN'NEL,

21327

fanner
FAN'NER, n. One who fans.

21328

fanning
FAN'NING, ppr. Blowing; ventilating.

21329

fanon
FAN'ON, n. A sort of ornament like a scarf, worn about the left arm of a mass-priest, when he ...

21330

fantasied
FAN'TASIED, a. [from fantasy, fancy.] Filled with fancies or imaginations; whimsical. [Not ...

21331

fantasm
FAN'TASM, n. [Gr. from to appear. Usually written phantasm.]That which appears to the ...

21332

fantastic
FANTAS'TIC,

21333

fantastical
FANTAS'TICAL, a. [Gr. vision, fancy, from to appear.]1. Fanciful; produced or existing only in ...

21334

fantastically
FANTAS'TICALLY, adv.1. By the power of imagination.2. In a fantastic manner; capriciously; ...

21335

fantasticalness
FANTAS'TICALNESS, n. Compliance with fancy; humorousness; whimsicalness; unreasonableness; ...

21336

fantasy
FAN'TASY, n. Now written fancy, which see.Is not this something more than fantasy?

21337

fantom
FAN'TOM, n. [L. phantasma, from the Greek. See Fancy.]Something that appears to the imagination; ...

21338

fap
FAP, a. Fuddled. [Not in use.]

21339

faquir
FAQUIR, [See Fakir.]

21340

far
F'AR, a. [L. porro; Gr. connected with, a way, a passing, to pass or go. See Fare.]1. Distant, ...

21341

far-about
FAR-ABOUT', n. A going out of the way. [Not in use.]

21342

far-famed
F'AR-FAMED, a. Widely celebrated.

21343

far-fetch
F'AR-FETCH, n. A deep laid stratagem. [Little used.]

21344

far-fetched
F'AR-FETCHED, a.1. Brought from a remote place.Whose pains have earned the far-fetched spoil.2. ...

21345

far-piercing
FAR-PIER'CING, a. Striking or penetrating a great way; as a far-piercing eye.

21346

far-shooting
FAR-SHOOT'ING, a. Shooting to a great distance.Great love, he said, and the far-shooting god.

21347

farce
F'ARCE, v.t. [L. farcio.]1. To stuff; to fill with mingled ingredients. [Little used.]The first ...

21348

farcical
F'ARCICAL, a. 1. Belonging to a farce; appropriated to farce.They deny the characters to be ...

21349

farcically
F'ARCICALLY, adv. In a manner suited to farce; hence, ludicrously.

21350

farcilite
F'ARCILITE, n. [from farce.] Pudding-stone. The calcarious farcilite, called amenla, is formed ...

21351

farcin
F'ARCIN,

21352

farcing
F'ARCING, n. Stuffing composed of mixed ingredients.

21353

farctate
F'ARCTATE, a. [L. farctus, stuffed, from farcio.]In botany, stuffed; crammed, or full; without ...

21354

farcy
F'ARCY, n. A disease of horses, sometimes of oxen, of the nature of a scabies or mange.

21355

fard
F'ARD, v.t. To paint. [Not used.]

21356

fardel
F'ARDEL, n. [Probably from the root of L. fero, to bear, or of farcio, to stuff.] A bundle or ...

21357

fare
FARE, v.i. [This word may be connected in origin with the Heb. to go, to pass.]1. To go; to pass; ...

21358

farewell
FA'REWELL, a compound of fare, in the imperative, and well. Go well; originally applied to a ...

21359

farin
FAR'IN,

21360

farina
FARI'NA, n. [L. farina, meal.]1. In botany, the pollen, fine dust or powder, contained in the ...

21361

farinaceous
FARINA'CEOUS, a. [from L. farina, meal.]1. Consisting or made of meal or flour; as a farinaceous ...

21362

farm
F'ARM, n. 1. A tract of land leased on rent reserved; ground let to a tenant on condition of his ...

21363

farm-office
F'ARM-OFFICE, n. Farm-offices, are the out buildings pertaining to a farm.

21364

farmable
F'ARMABLE, a. That may be farmed.

21365

farmed
F'ARMED, pp. Leased on rent; let out at a certain rate or price.

21366

farmer
F'ARMER, n.1. In Great Britain, a tenant; a lessee; one who hires and cultivates a farm; a ...

21367

farmhouse
F'ARMHOUSE, n. A house attached to a farm, and for the residence of a farmer.

21368

farming
F'ARMING, ppr. 1. Letting or leasing land on rent reserved, or duties and imposts at a certain ...

21369

farmost
F'ARMOST, a. [far and most.] Most distant or remote.

21370

farmyard
F'ARMYARD, n. The yard or inclosure attached to a barn; or the inclosure surrounded by the farm ...

21371

farness
F'ARNESS, n. [from far.] Distance; remoteness.

21372

farraginous
FARRAG'INOUS, a. [L. farrago, a mixture, from far, meal.]Formed of various materials; mixed; as a ...

21373

farrago
FARRA'GO, n. [L. from far, meal.] A mass composed of various materials confusedly mixed; a ...

21374

farreation
FARREATION. [See Confarreation.]

21375

farrier
FAR'RIER, n. [L. ferrarius, from ferrum, iron.]1. A shoer of horses; a smith who shoes horses.2. ...

21376

farriery
FAR'RIERY, n. The art of preventing, curing or mitigating the diseases of horses.

21377

farrow
FAR'ROW, n. A litter of pigs.FAR'ROW, v.t. To bring forth pigs. [Used of swine only.]FAR'ROW, ...

21378

farther
F'ARTHER, a. comp.1. More remote; more distant than something else.Let me add a farther truth.2. ...

21379

fartherance
F'ARTHERANCE, n. A helping forward; promotion. [Not used.]

21380

farthermore
F'ARTHERMORE, adv. Besides; moreover. [Little used.]

21381

farthest
F'ARTHEST, a. superl. [See Furthest.]Most distant or remote; as the farthest degree.F'ARTHEST, ...

21382

farthing
F'ARTHING, n.1. The fourth of a penny; a small copper coin of Great Britain, being the fourth of a ...

21383

farthingale
F'ARTHINGALE, n. [This is a compound word, but it is not easy to analyze it.]A hoop petticoat; or ...

21384

farthingsworth
F'ARTHINGSWORTH, n. As much as is sold for a farthing.

21385

fasces
FAS'CES, n. plu. [L. fascis.]In Roman antiquity, an ax tied with a bundle of rods, and borne ...

21386

fascia
FAS'CIA, n. fash'ia. [L. a band or sash.]1. A band, sash or fillet. In architecture, any flat ...

21387

fascial
FAS'CIAL, a fash'ial. Belonging to the fasces.

21388

fasciated
FAS'CIATED, a. fash'iated. Bound with a fillet, sash or bandage.

21389

fasciation
FASCIA'TION, n. fashia'tion. The act or manner of binding up diseased parts; bandage.

21390

fascicle
FAS'CICLE, n. [L. fasciculus, from fascis, a bundle.]In botany, a bundle, or little bundle; a ...

21391

fascicled
FAS'CICLED, a. [from fasciculus, supra.]Growing in bundles or bunches from the same point, as the ...

21392

fascicular
FASCIC'ULAR, a. [L. fascicularis.] United in a bundle; as a fascicular root, a root of the ...

21393

fascicularly
FASCIC'ULARLY, adv. In the form of bundles.

21394

fasciculate
FASCIC'ULATE,

21395

fasciculated
FASCIC'ULATED,

21396

fasciculite
FASCIC'ULITE, n. [supra.] A variety of fibrous hornblend, of a fascicular structure.

21397

fascinate
FAS'CINATE, v.t. [L. fascino; Gr.]1. To bewitch; to enchant; to operate on by some powerful or ...

21398

fascinated
FAS'CINATED, pp. Bewitched; enchanted; charmed.

21399

fascinating
FAS'CINATING, ppr. Bewitching; enchanting; charming; captivating.

21400

fascination
FASCINA'TION, n. The act of bewitching or enchanting; enchantment; witchcraft; a powerful or ...

21401

fascine
FAS'CINE, n. [L. fascis, a bundle.] In fortification, a fagot, a bundle of rods or small sticks ...

21402

fascinous
FAS'CINOUS, a. Caused or acting by witchcraft. [Not used.]

21403

fashion
FASH'ION, n. fash'on. [L. facio, facies.]1. The make or form of any thing; the state of any ...

21404

fashion-monger
FASH'ION-MONGER, n. One who studies the fashion; a fop.Fashion-pieces, in ships, the hindmost ...

21405

fashionable
FASH'IONABLE, a.1. Made according to the prevailing form or mode; as a fashionable dress.2. ...

21406

fashionableness
FASH'IONABLENESS, n. The state of being fashionable; modish elegance; such appearance as is ...

21407

fashionably
FASH'IONABLY, adv. In a manner according to fashion, custom or prevailing practice; with modish ...

21408

fashioned
FASH'IONED, pp. Made; formed; shaped; fitted; adapted.

21409

fashioner
FASH'IONER, n. One who forms or gives shape to.

21410

fashioning
FASH'IONING, ppr. Forming; giving shape to; fitting; adapting.

21411

fassaite
FAS'SAITE, n. A mineral, a variety of augite, found in the valley of Fassa, in the Tyrol.

21412

fast
F'AST, a. 1. Literally, set, stopped, fixed, or pressed close. Hence, close; tight; as, make ...

21413

fast-day
F'AST-DAY, n. The day on which fasting is observed.

21414

fast-handed
F'AST-HANDED, a. Closehanded; covetous; closefisted; avaricious.

21415

fasten
F'ASTEN, v.t. f'asn.1. To fix firmly; to make fast or close; as, to fasten a chain to the feet, ...

21416

fastened
F'ASTENED, pp. Made firm or fast; fixed firmly; impressed.

21417

fastener
F'ASTENER, n. One that makes fast or firm.

21418

fastening
F'ASTENING, ppr. Making fast.F'ASTENING, n. Any thing that binds and makes fast; or that which is ...

21419

faster
F'ASTER, n. One who abstains from food.

21420

fastidiosity
FASTIDIOS'ITY, n. Fastidiousness. [Not used.]

21421

fastidious
FASTID'IOUS, a. [L. fastidiousus, from fastidio, to disdain from fastus, haughtiness. See Heb.]1. ...

21422

fastidiously
FASTID'IOUSLY, adv. Disdainfully; squeamishly; contemptuously. they look fastidiously and speak ...

21423

fastidiousness
FASTID'IOUSNESS, n. Disdainfulness; contemptuousness; squeamishness of mind, taste or appetite.

21424

fastigiate
FASTIG'IATE,

21425

fastigiated
FASTIG'IATED, a. [L. fastigiatus, pointed, from fastigio, to point, fastigium, a top or peak.]1. ...

21426

fasting
F'ASTING, ppr. Abstaining from food.F'ASTING, n. The act of abstaining from food.

21427

fasting-day
F'ASTING-DAY, n. A day of fasting; a fast-day; a day of religious mortification and humiliation.

21428

fastness
F'ASTNESS, n.1. The state of being fast and firm; firm adherence.2. Strength; security.The places ...

21429

fastuous
FAS'TUOUS, a. [L. fastuosus, from fastus, haughtiness.]Proud; haughty; disdainful.

21430

fat
FAT, a. 1. Fleshy; plump; corpulent; abounding with an oily concrete substance, as an animal ...

21431

fatal
FA'TAL, a. [L. fatalis. See Fate.] 1. Proceeding from fate or destiny; necessary; ...

21432

fatalism
FA'TALISM, n. The doctrine that all things are subject to fate, or that they take place by ...

21433

fatalist
FA'TALIST, n. One who maintains that all things happen by inevitable necessity.

21434

fatality
FATAL'ITY, n.1. A fixed unalterable course of things, independent of God or any controlling cause; ...

21435

fatally
FA'TALLY, adv. 1. By a decree of fate or destiny; by inevitable necessity or determination.2. ...

21436

fatalness
FA'TALNESS, n. Invincible necessity.

21437

fatbrained
FAT'BRAINED, a. Dull of apprehension.

21438

fate
FATE, n. [L. fatum, from for, fari, to speak, whence fatus.]1. Primarily, a decree or word ...

21439

fated
FA'TED, a.1. Decreed by fate; doomed; destined. He was fated to rule over a factious people.2. ...

21440

fateful
FA'TEFUL, a. Bearing fatal power; producing fatal events.The fateful steel.

21441

fates
FATES, n. plu. In mythology, the destinies or parcae; goddesses supposed to preside over the birth ...

21442

father
F'ATHER, n. [L. pater. The primary sense is obvious.]1. He who begets a child; in L. genitor or ...

21443

father-in-law
F'ATHER-IN-LAW, n. The father of one's husband or wife; and a man who marries a woman who has ...

21444

fathered
F'ATHERED, pp.1. Adopted; taken as one's own; ascribed to one as the author.2. Having had a ...

21445

fatherhood
F'ATHERHOOD, n. The state of being a father, or the character or authority of a father.We might ...

21446

fathering
F'ATHERING, ppr. Adopting; taking or acknowledging as one's own; ascribing to the father or ...

21447

fatherlasher
F'ATHERLASHER, n. A fish of the genus Cottus or bull-head, called scorpius or scolping. The head ...

21448

fatherless
F'ATHERLESS, a.1. Destitute of a living father; as a fatherless child.3. Without a known author.

21449

fatherlessness
F'ATHERLESSNESS, n. The state of being without a father.

21450

fatherliness
F'ATHERLINESS, n. [See Fatherly.] The qualities of a father; parental kindness, care and ...

21451

fatherly
F'ATHERLY, a. [father and like.] 1. Like a father in affection and care; tender; paternal; ...

21452

fathom
FATH'OM, n. 1. A measure of length containing six feet, the space to which a man may extend his ...

21453

fathomed
FATH'OMED, pp. Encompassed with the arms; reached; comprehended.

21454

fathomer
FATH'OMER, n. One who fathoms.

21455

fathoming
FATH'OMING, ppr. Encompassing with the arms; reaching; comprehending; sounding; penetrating.

21456

fathomless
FATH'OMLESS, a. 1. That of which no bottom can be found; bottomless.2. That cannot be embraced, ...

21457

fatidical
FATID'ICAL, a. [L. fatidicus; fatum and dico.] Having power to foretell future events; prophetic.

21458

fatiferous
FATIF'EROUS, a. [L. fatifer; futum and fero. Deadly; mortal, destructive.

21459

fatigable
FAT'IGABLE, a. [See Fatigue.] That may be wearied; easily tired.

21460

fatigate
FAT'IGATE, v.t. [L. fatigo.] To weary; to tire. [Little used.]FAT'IGATE, a. Wearied; tired. ...

21461

fatigation
FATIGA'TION n. Weariness

21462

fatigue
FATIGUE, n. fatee'g. [L. fatigo. it seems to be allied to fatisco; if so, the sense is a ...

21463

fatigued
FATIGUED, pp. fatee'ged. Wearied; tired; harassed.

21464

fatiguing
FATIGUING, ppr. fatee'ging. 1. Tiring; wearying; harassing.2. a. Inducing weariness or ...

21465

fatiscence
FATIS'CENCE, n. [L. fatisco, to open, to gape. A gaping or opining; a state of being chinky.

21466

fatkidneyed
FATKID'NEYED, n. [fat and kidney.] Fat; gross; a word used in contempt.

21467

fatling
FAT'LING, n. [from fat.] A lamb, kid or other young animal fattened for slaughter; a fat animal; ...

21468

fatly
FAT'LY, adv. Grossly; greasily.

21469

fatner
FAT'NER, n. That which fattens; that which gives fatness or richness and fertility.

21470

fatness
FAT'NESS, n. [from fat.]1. The quality of being fat, plump, or full fed; corpulency; fullness of ...

21471

fatten
FAT'TEN, v.t. fat'n. 1. To make fat; to feed for slaughter; to make fleshy, or plump with fat.2. ...

21472

fattened
FAT'TENED, pp. fat'nd. Made fat, plump or fleshy.

21473

fattener
FAT'TENER, n. [See Fatner.]

21474

fattening
FAT'TENING, ppr. fat'ning. Making fat; growing fat; making or growing rich and fruitful.

21475

fattiness
FAT'TINESS, n. [from fatty.] The state of being fat; grossness; greasiness.

21476

fattish
FAT'TISH, a. Somewhat fat.

21477

fatty
FAT'TY, a. Having the qualities of fat; greasy; as a fatty substance.

21478

fatuity
FATU'ITY, n. [L. fatuitas.] Weakness or imbecility of mind; feebleness of intellect; foolishness.

21479

fatuous
FAT'UOUS, a. [L. fatuus.]1. Feeble in mind; weak; silly; stupid; foolish.2. Impotent; without ...

21480

fatwitted
FAT'WITTED, a. [fat and wit.] Heavy; dull; stupid.

21481

faucet
FAU'CET, n. A pipe to be inserted in a cask for drawing liquor, and stopped with a peg or spigot. ...

21482

fauchion
FAUCHION. [See Falchion.]

21483

faufel
FAU'FEL, n. [said to be Sanscrit.] The fruit of a species of the palm tree.

21484

fault
FAULT, n. [See Fail.]1. Properly, an erring or missing; a failing; hence, an error or mistake; a ...

21485

faulted
FAULT'ED, pp. Charged with a fault; accused.

21486

faulter
FAULT'ER, n. An offender; one who commits a fault.

21487

faultful
FAULT'FUL, a. Full of faults or sins.

21488

faultily
FAULT'ILY, adv. [from faulty.] Defectively; erroneously; imperfectly; improperly; wrongly.

21489

faultiness
FAULT'INESS, n. [from faulty.] 1. The state of being faulty, defective or erroneous; defect.2. ...

21490

faulting
FAULT'ING, ppr. Accusing.

21491

faultless
FAULT'LESS, a. 1. Without fault; not defective or imperfect; free from blemish; free from ...

21492

faultlessness
FAULT'LESSNESS, n. Freedom from faults or defects.

21493

faulty
FAULT'Y, a. 1. Containing faults, blemishes or defects; defective; imperfect; as a faulty ...

21494

faun
FAUN, n. [L. faunus.] Among the Romans, a kind of demigod, or rural deity, called also sylvan, ...

21495

faunist
FAUN'IST, n. One who attends to rural disquisitions; a naturalist.

21496

fausen
FAU'SEN, n. A large eel.

21497

fautor
FAU'TOR, n. [L. See Favor.] A favorer; a patron; one who gives countenance or support. [Little ...

21498

fautress
FAU'TRESS, n. A female favorer; a patroness.

21499

favillous
FAVIL'LOUS, a. [L. favilla, ashes.]1. Consisting of or pertaining to ashes.2. Resembling ashes.

21500

favor
FA'VOR, n. [L. favor, faveo.]1. Kind regard; kindness; countenance; propitious aspect; friendly ...

21501

favorable
FA'VORABLE, a. [L. favorabilis.]1. Kind; propitious; friendly; affectionate.Lend favorable ear to ...

21502

favorableness
FA'VORABLENESS, n. 1. Kindness; kind disposition or regard.2. Convenience; suitableness; that ...

21503

favorably
FA'VORABLY, adv. Kindly; with friendly dispositions; with regard or affection; with an inclination ...

21504

favored
FA'VORED, pp. 1. Countenanced; supported; aided; supplied with advantages; eased; spared.2. a. ...

21505

favoredness
FA'VOREDNESS, n. Appearance.

21506

favorer
FA'VORER, n. One who favors; one who regards with kindness or friendship; a wellwisher; one who ...

21507

favoring
FA'VORING, ppr. Regarding with friendly dispositions; countenancing; wishing well to; contributing ...

21508

favorite
FA'VORITE, n. A person or thing regarded with peculiar favor, preference and affection; one ...

21509

favoritism
FA'VORITISM, n. 1. The act or practice of favoring, or giving a preference to one over another.2. ...

21510

favorless
FA'VORLESS, a. 1. Unfavored; not regarded with favor; having no patronage or countenance.2. Not ...

21511

favosite
FAV'OSITE, n. [L. favus, a honey-comb.] A genus of fossil zoophytes.

21512

fawn
FAWN, n. A young deer; a buck or doe of the first year.FAWN, v.i. To bring forth a fawn.FAWN, ...

21513

fawner
FAWN'ER, n. One who fawns; one who cringes and flatters meanly.

21514

fawning
FAWN'ING, ppr. Courting servilely; flattering by cringing and meanness; bringing forth a ...

21515

fawningly
FAWN'INGLY, adv. In a cringing servile way; with mean flattery.

21516

faxed
FAX'ED, a. Hairy. [Not in use.]

21517

fay
FAY, n. A fairy; an elf.FAY, v.i. [See Fadge.]To fit; to suit; to unite closely with. [This is a ...

21518

feague
FEAGUE, v.t. feeg. To beat or whip. [Not in use.]

21519

feal
FE'AL, a. Faithful. [Infra.]

21520

fealty
FE'ALTY, n. [L. fidelis.]Fidelity to a lord; faithful adherence of a tenant or vassal to the ...

21521

fear
FEAR, n. [See the Verb.] 1. A painful emotion or passion excited by an expectation of evil, or ...

21522

feared
FE'ARED, pp. Apprehended or expected with painful solicitude; reverenced.

21523

fearful
FE'ARFUL, a.1. Affected by fear; feeling pain in expectation of evil; apprehensive with ...

21524

fearfully
FE'ARFULLY, adv. 1. Timorously; in fear.In such a night did Thisbe fearfully o'ertrip the dew.2. ...

21525

fearfulness
FE'ARFULNESS, n. 1. Timorousness; timidity.2. State of being afraid; awe; dread.A thing that ...

21526

fearless
FE'ARLESS, a.1. Free from fear; as fearless of death; fearless of consequences.2. Bold; ...

21527

fearlessly
FE'ARLESSLY, adv. Without fear; in a bold or courageous manner; intrepidly. Brave men fearlessly ...

21528

fearlessness
FE'ARLESSNESS, n. Freedom from fear; courage; boldness; intrepidity.He gave instances of an ...

21529

feasibility
FEASIBIL'ITY, n. s as z. [See Feasible.] The quality of being capable of execution; ...

21530

feasible
FE'ASIBLE, a. s as z. [L. facere.]1. That may be done, performed, executed or effected; ...

21531

feasibleness
FE'ASIBLENESS, n. Feasibility; practicability.

21532

feasibly
FE'ASIBLY, adv. Practicably.

21533

feast
FEAST, n. [L. festum.]1. A sumptuous repast or entertainment, of which a number of guests ...

21534

feasted
FE'ASTED, pp. Entertained sumptuously; delighted.

21535

feaster
FE'ASTER, n.1. One who fares deliciously.2. One who entertains magnificently.

21536

feastful
FE'ASTFUL, a.1. Festive; joyful; as a feastful day or friend.2. Sumptuous, luxurious; as feastful ...

21537

feasting
FE'ASTING, ppr. 1. Eating luxuriously; faring sumptuously.2. Delighting; gratifying.3. ...

21538

feastrite
FE'ASTRITE, n. Custom observed in entertainments.

21539

feat
FEAT, n. [L. factum, from facio, to perform.]1. An act; a deed; an exploit; as a bold feat; a ...

21540

feateous
FE'ATEOUS, a. Neat; dextrous.

21541

feateously
FE'ATEOUSLY, adv. Neatly; dextrously. Obs.

21542

feather
FEATH'ER,

21543

feather-bed
FEATH'ER-BED

21544

feather-driver
FEATH'ER-DRIVER,

21545

feather-few
FEATH'ER-FEW, A corruption of feverfew.

21546

feather-grass
FEATH'ER-GRASS,

21547

feather-seller
FEATH'ER-SELLER,'ER-SELLER, n. One who sells fethers for beds.

21548

feathered
FEATH'ERED,

21549

featheredge
FEATH'EREDGE,

21550

featheredged
FEATH'EREDGED,

21551

featherless
FEATH'ERLESS,

21552

featherly
FEATH'ERLY,

21553

feathery
FEATH'ERY,

21554

featly
FE'ATLY, adv. [from feat.] Neatly; dextrously; adroitly. [Little used.]

21555

featness
FE'ATNESS, n. [from feat.] Dexterity; adroitness; skillfulness. [Little used.]

21556

feature
FE'ATURE, n. [L. factura, a making, from facio, to make.]1. The make, form or cast of any part of ...

21557

featured
FE'ATURED, a. Having features or good features; resembling in features.

21558

feaze
FEAZE, v.t. To untwist the end of a rope.

21559

feberary
FEB'ERARY,

21560

febrifacient
FEB'RIFACIENT, a. [L. febris, a fever, and facio, to make.] Causing fever.FEB'RIFACIENT, n. That ...

21561

febrific
FEBRIF'IC, a. [L. febris, fever, and facio, to make.] Producing fever; feverish.

21562

febrifuge
FEB'RIFUGE, n. [L. febris, fever, and fugo, to drive away.]Any medicine that mitigates or removes ...

21563

febrile
FE'BRILE, a. [L. febrilis, from febris, fever.]Pertaining to fever; indicating fever, or derived ...

21564

february
FEB'RUARY, n. [L. Februarius. The Latin word is said to be named from februo, to purify by ...

21565

februation
FEBRUA'TION, n. Purification. [See February.]

21566

fecal
FE'CAL, a. [See Faces.] Containing or consisting of dregs, lees, sediment or excrement.

21567

feces
FE'CES, n. plu. [L. faces.] 1. Dregs; lees; sediment; the matter which subsides in casks of ...

21568

fecial
FE'CIAL, a. [L. fecialis.] Pertaining to heralds and the denunciation of war to an enemy; as ...

21569

fecula
FEC'ULA, n.1. The green matter of plants; chlorophyll.2. Starch or farina; called also amylaceous ...

21570

feculence
FEC'ULENCE,

21571

feculency
FEC'ULENCY, n. [L. faeculentia, from facula, faces, fax, dregs.]1. Muddiness; foulness; the ...

21572

feculent
FEC'ULENT, a. Foul with extraneous or impure substances; muddy; thick; turbid; abounding with ...

21573

feculum
FEC'ULUM, n. [from faces, supra.] A dry, dusty, tasteless substance obtained from plants. [This ...

21574

fecund
FE'CUND, a. [L. facundus, from the root of faetus.] Fruitful in children; prolific.

21575

fecundate
FE'CUNDATE, v.t.1. To make fruitful or prolific.2. To impregnate; as, the pollen of flowers ...

21576

fecundated
FE'CUNDATED, pp. Rendered prolific or fruitful; impregnated.

21577

fecundating
FE'CUNDATING, ppr. Rendering fruitful; impregnating.

21578

fecundation
FECUNDA'TION, n. The act of making fruitful or prolific; impregnation.

21579

fecundify
FECUND'IFY, v.t. To make fruitful; to fecundate. [Little used.]

21580

fecundity
FECUND'ITY, n. [L. faecunditas.]1. Fruitfulness; the quality of producing fruit; particularly, ...

21581

fed
FED, pret. and pp. of feed, which see.

21582

fedary
FED'ARY, n. A partner; a confederate; an accomplice. [Not used.]

21583

federal
FED'ERAL, a. [from L. faedus, a league, allied perhaps to Eng. wed. L. vas, vadis, vador, ...

21584

federalist
FED'ERALIST, n. an appellation in America, given to the friends of the constitution of the United ...

21585

federate
FED'ERATE, a. [L. faederatus.] Leagued; united by compact, as sovereignties, states or nations; ...

21586

federation
FEDERA'TION, n.1. The act of uniting in a league.2. A league; a confederacy.

21587

federative
FED'ERATIVE, a. uniting; joining in a league; forming a confederacy.

21588

fedity
FE'DITY, n. [L. faditas.] Turpitude; vileness. [Not in use.]

21589

fee
FEE, n. [L. pecu, pecus. From the use of cattle in transferring property, or from barter and ...

21590

fee-tail
FEE'-TAIL, n. An estate entailed; a conditional fee.

21591

feeble
FEE'BLE, a. [I know not the origin of the first syllable.]1. Weak; destitute of much physical ...

21592

feeble-minded
FEE'BLE-MINDED, a. Weak in mind; wanting firmness or constancy; irresolute. Comfort the ...

21593

feebleness
FEE'BLENESS, n.1. Weakness of body or mind, from any cause; imbecility; infirmity; want of ...

21594

feebly
FEE'BLY, adv. Weakly; without strength; as, to move feebly.Thy gentle numbers feebly creep.

21595

feed
FEED, v.t. pret. and pp. [See Father.]1. To give food to; as, to feed an infant; to feed horses ...

21596

feeder
FEE'DER, n.1. One that gives food, or supplies nourishment.2. One who furnishes incentives; an ...

21597

feeding
FEE'DING, ppr. Giving food or nutriment; furnishing provisions; eating; taking food or ...

21598

feel
FEEL, v.t. pret. and pp. felt. [L. palpo. the primary sense is to touch, to pat, to strike ...

21599

feeler
FEE'LER, n. 1. One who feels.2. One of the palpi of insects. The feelers of insects are usually ...

21600

feeling
FEE'LING, ppr. 1. Perceiving by the touch; having perception.2. a. Expressive of great ...

21601

feelingly
FEE'LINGLY, adv.1. With expression of great sensibility; tenderly; as, to speak feelingly.2. So ...

21602

feese
FEESE, n. A race. [Not in use.]

21603

feet
FEET, n. plu of foot. [See Foot.]

21604

feetless
FEE'TLESS, a. Destitute of feet; as feetless birds.

21605

feign
FEIGN, v.t. fane. [L. fingo. The Latin forms fictum, fictus, whence figura, figure, also ...

21606

feigned
FEIGNED, pp. Invented; devised; imagined; assumed.

21607

feignedly
FEIGNEDLY, adv. In fiction; in pretense; not really.

21608

feignedness
FEIGNEDNESS, n. Fiction; pretense; deceit.

21609

feigner
FEIGNER, n. One who feigns; an inventor; a deviser of fiction.

21610

feigning
FEIGNING, ppr. Imagining; inventing; pretending; making a false show.FEIGNING, n. A false ...

21611

feigningly
FEIGNINGLY, adv. With false appearance.

21612

feint
FEINT, n. 1. An assumed or false appearance; a pretense of doing something not intended to be ...

21613

felanders
FE'LANDERS, n. [See Filanders.]

21614

feldspar
FELD'SPAR,

21615

feldspath
FELD'SPATH,

21616

feldspathic
FELDSPATH'IC, a. Pertaining to feldspar, or consisting of it.

21617

felicitate
FELIC'ITATE, v.t. [L. felicito, from felix, happy.]1. To make very happy.What a glorious ...

21618

felicitated
FELIC'ITATED, pp. Made very happy; congratulated.

21619

felicitating
FELIC'ITATING, ppr. Making very happy; congratulating.

21620

felicitation
FELICITA'TION, n. Congratulation.

21621

felicitous
FELIC'ITOUS, a. Very happy; prosperous; delightful.

21622

felicitously
FELIC'ITOUSLY, adv. Happily.

21623

felicity
FELIC'ITY, n. [L. felicitas, from felix, happy.]1. Happiness, or rather great happiness; ...

21624

feline
FE'LINE, a. [L. felinus, from felis, a cat.]Pertaining to cats, or to their species; like a cat; ...

21625

fell
FELL, pret. of fall.FELL, a.1. Cruel; barbarous; inhuman.It seemed fury, discord, madness fell.2. ...

21626

felled
FELL'ED, pp. Knocked or cut down.

21627

feller
FELL'ER, n. One who hews or knocks down. Is. 14.

21628

fellifluous
FELLIF'LUOUS, a. [L. fel, gall, and fluo, to flow.] Flowing with gall.

21629

felling
FELL'ING, ppr. Cutting or beating to the ground.

21630

fellmonger
FELL'MONGER, n. [fell and monger.] A dealer in hides.

21631

fellness
FELL'NESS, n. [See Fell, cruel.] Cruelty; fierce barbarity; rage.

21632

felloe
FELL'OE, [See Felly.]

21633

fellow
FEL'LOW, n. [Heb. to tie or connect, to be joined or associated.]1. A companion; an associate.In ...

21634

fellow-citizen
FELLOW-CIT'IZEN, n. A citizen of the same state or nation. Eph. 2.

21635

fellow-commoner
FELLOW-COM'MONER, n. 1. One who has the same right of common.2. In Cambridge, England, one who ...

21636

fellow-counselor
FELLOW-COUN'SELOR, n. An associate in council.

21637

fellow-creature
FELLOW-CRE'ATURE, n. One of the same race or kind. Thus men are all called fellow-creatures. ...

21638

fellow-feeling
FELLOW-FEE'LING, n. 1. Sympathy; a like feeling.2. Joint interest. [Not in use.]

21639

fellow-heir
FELLOW-HEIR, n. A co-heir, or joint-heir; one entitled to a share of the same inheritance.That the ...

21640

fellow-helper
FELLOW-HELP'ER, n. A co-adjutor; one who concurs or aids in the same business. 3John 8.

21641

fellow-laborer
FELLOW-LA'BORER, n. One who labors in the same business or design.

21642

fellow-maiden
FELLOW-MA'IDEN, n. A maiden who is an associate.

21643

fellow-member
FELLOW-MEM'BER, n. A member of the same body.

21644

fellow-minister
FELLOW-MIN'ISTER, n. One who officiates in the same ministry or calling.

21645

fellow-peer
FELLOW-PEE'R, n. One who has the like privileges of nobility.

21646

fellow-prisoner
FELLOW-PRIS'ONER, n. One imprisoned in the same place. Rom. 16.

21647

fellow-rake
FELLOW-RA'KE, n. An associate in vice and profligacy.

21648

fellow-scholar
FELLOW-SCHOL'AR, n. An associate in studies.

21649

fellow-servant
FELLOW-SERV'ANT, n. One who has the same master.

21650

fellow-soldier
FELLOW-SO'LDIER, n. One who fights under the same commander, or is engaged in the same service. ...

21651

fellow-stream
FELLOW-STRE'AM, n. A stream in the vicinity.

21652

fellow-student
FELLOW-STU'DENT, n. One who studies in the same company or class with another, or who belongs to ...

21653

fellow-subject
FELLOW-SUB'JECT, n. One who is subject to the same government with another.

21654

fellow-sufferer
FELLOW-SUF'FERER, n. One who shares in the same evil, or partakes of the same sufferings with ...

21655

fellow-traveler
FELLOW-TRAV'ELER, n. One who travels in company with another.

21656

fellow-worker
FELLOW-WORK'ER, n. One employed in the same occupation.

21657

fellow-writer
FELLOW-WRI'TER, n. One who writes at the same time.

21658

fellowlike
FEL'LOWLIKE, a. Like a companion; companionable; on equal terms.

21659

fellowship
FEL'LOWSHIP, n.1. Companionship; society; consort; mutual association of persons on equal and ...

21660

felly
FEL'LY, adv. [See Fell, cruel.] Cruelly; fiercely; barbarously.FEL'LY, n. The exterior part or ...

21661

felon
FEL'ON, n. [Low L. felo.]1. In law, a person who has committed felony. [See Felony.]2. A ...

21662

felon-wort
FEL'ON-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Solanum.

21663

felonious
FELO'NIOUS, a.1. Malignant; malicious; indicating or proceeding from a depraved heart or evil ...

21664

felonniously
FELON'NIOUSLY, adv. In a felonious manner; with the deliberate intention to commit a crime. ...

21665

felony
FEL'ONY, n. [See Felon.] In common law, any crime which incurs the forfeiture of lands or goods. ...

21666

felsite
FEL'SITE, n. [See Feldspar.] A species of compact feldspar, of an azure blue or green color, ...

21667

felspar
FEL'SPAR,

21668

felspath
FEL'SPATH, n. A mineral widely distributed and usually of a foliated structure. When in crystals ...

21669

felt
FELT, pret. of feel.FELT, n. [L. pellis, Eng. fell, a skin from plucking or stripping, L. vello, ...

21670

felter
FELT'ER, v.t. To clot or meet together like felt.

21671

feltmaker
FELT'MAKER, n. One whose occupation is to make felt.

21672

felucca
FELUC'CA, n. A boat or vessel, with oars and lateen sails, used in the Mediterranean. It has this ...

21673

felwort
FEL'WORT, n. A plant, a species of Gentian.

21674

female
FE'MALE, n. [L. femella. See Feminine.]1. Among animals, one of that sex which conceives and ...

21675

female-flower
FEMALE-FLOWER, n. In botany, a flower which is furnished with the pistil, pointal, or female ...

21676

female-plant
FEMALE-PLANT, n. A plant which produces female flowers.

21677

female-screw
FEMALE-SCREW, n. A screw with grooves or channels.

21678

feme-covert
FEME-COVERT,

21679

feme-sole
FEME-SOLE,

21680

feminality
FEMINAL'ITY, n. The female nature.

21681

feminate
FEM'INATE, a. Feminine. [Not in use.]

21682

feminine
FEM'ININE, a. [L. femininus, from femina, woman. The first syllable may be and probably is from ...

21683

feminity
FEMIN'ITY, n. The quality of the female sex. [Not used.]

21684

feminize
FEM'INIZE, v.t. To make womanish. [Not used.]

21685

femme-covert
FEMME-COVERT, n. A married woman, who is under covert of her baron or husband.

21686

femme-sole
FEMME-SOLE, n. An unmarried woman.Femme-sole merchant, a woman who uses a trade alone, or without ...

21687

femoral
FEM'ORAL, a. [L. femoralis, from femur, the thigh.]Belonging to the thigh; as the femoral artery.

21688

fen
FEN, n. [L. fons, Eng. fountain.]Low land overflowed, or covered wholly or partially with water, ...

21689

fen-sucked
FEN'-SUCKED, a. Sucked out of marshes; as fen-sucked fogs.

21690

fence
FENCE, n. fens. [See Fend.]1. A wall, hedge, ditch, bank, or line of posts and rails, or of ...

21691

fence-month
FENCE-MONTH, n. The month in which hunting in any forest is prohibited.

21692

fenced
FEN'CED, pp. Inclosed with a fence; guarded; fortified.

21693

fenceful
FENCEFUL, a. fens'ful. Affording defense.

21694

fenceless
FENCELESS, a. fens'less. 1. Without a fence; uninclosed; unguarded.2. Open; not inclosed; as the ...

21695

fencer
FEN'CER, n. One who fences; one who teaches or practices the art of fencing with sword or foil.

21696

fencible
FEN'CIBLE, a.1. Capable of defense.2. n. A soldier for defense of the country; as a regiment of ...

21697

fencing
FEN'CING, ppr. Inclosing with fence; guarding; fortifying.FEN'CING, n. 1. The art of using ...

21698

fencing-master
FEN'CING-MASTER, n. One who teaches the art of attack and defense with sword or foil.

21699

fencing-school
FEN'CING-SCHOOL, n. A school in which the art of fencing is taught.

21700

fend
FEND, v.t. [The root of defend and offend. The primary sense is to fall on, or to strike, to ...

21701

fended
FEND'ED, pp. Kept off; warded off; shut out.

21702

fender
FEND'ER, n.1. That which defends; an utensil employed to hinder coals of fire from rolling forward ...

21703

fending
FEND'ING, ppr. Keeping or warding off.

21704

fenerate
FEN'ERATE, v.i. [L. fenero.] To put to use; to lend on interest. [Not used.]

21705

feneration
FENERA'TION, n. The act of lending on use; or the interest or gain of that which is lent.

21706

fenestral
FENES'TRAL, a. [L. fenestralis, from fenestra, a window.] Pertaining to a window.

21707

fennel
FEN'NEL, n. [L. faeiculum, from faenum, hay.]A fragrant plant of the genus Anethum, cultivated in ...

21708

fennel-flower
FEN'NEL-FLOWER, n. A plant of the genus Nigella.

21709

fennel-giant
FEN'NEL-GIANT, n. A plant of the genus Ferula.

21710

fenny
FEN'NY, a. [from fen.]1. Boggy; marshy; moorish.2. Growing in fens; as fenny brake.3. ...

21711

fennystones
FENNYSTONES, n. A plant.

21712

fenowed
FEN'OWED, a. Corrupted; decayed. [Not in use.]

21713

fenugreek
FEN'UGREEK, n. [L. faenum graecum.] A plant of the genus Trigonella.

21714

feod
FE'OD, n. A feud. So written by Blackstone and other authors; but more generally, feud, which ...

21715

feodal
FE'ODAL, a. Feudal, which see.

21716

feodality
FEODAL'ITY, n. Feudal tenures; the feudal system.

21717

feodary
FE'ODARY, n. One who holds lands of a superior, on condition of suit and service. [Little used. ...

21718

feodatory
FEODATORY. [See Feudatory.]

21719

feoff
FEOFF, v.t. feff.To invest with a fee or feud; to give or grant to one any corporeal hereditament. ...

21720

feoffee
FEOFFEE, n. feffee'. A person who is infeoffed, that is, invested with a fee or corporeal ...

21721

feoffer
FEOFFER,

21722

feoffment
FEOFFMENT, n. feff'ment. [Law L. feoffamentum.] The gift or grant of a fee or corporeal ...

21723

feoffor
FEOFFOR, n. feff'er. One who infeoff's or grants a fee.

21724

feracious
FERA'CIOUS, a. [L. ferax, from fero, to bear.] Fruitful; producing abundantly.

21725

feracity
FERAC'ITY, n. [L. feracitas.] Fruitfulness. [Little used.]

21726

feral
FE'RAL, a. [L. feralis.] Funeral; pertaining to funerals; mournful.

21727

ferciously
FER'CIOUSLY, adv. Fiercely; with savage cruelty.

21728

fere
FERE, n. A fellow; a mate; a peer. Obs.

21729

feretory
FER'ETORY, n. [L. feretrum, a bier.] A place in a church for a bier.

21730

ferial
FE'RIAL, a. [L. ferialis.] Pertaining to holidays, or to common days.

21731

feriation
FERIA'TION, n. [L. feriatio, from feriae, vacant days, holidays.]The act of keeping holiday; ...

21732

ferine
FE'RINE, a. [L. ferinus, from ferus, wild.]Wild; untamed; savage. Lions, tigers, wolves and bears ...

21733

ferineness
FE'RINENESS, n. Wildness; savageness.

21734

ferity
FER'ITY, n. [L. feritas, from ferus, wild.]Wildness, savageness; cruelty.

21735

ferm
FERM, n. A farm or rent; a lodging-house. Obs. [See Farm.]

21736

ferment
FER'MENT, n. [L. fermentum, from fervo, to boil. See Fervent.]1. A gentle boiling; or the ...

21737

fermentable
FERMENT'ABLE, a. Capable of fermentation; thus, cider, beer of all kinds, wine, and other ...

21738

fermentation
FERMENTA'TION, n. [L. fermentatio.] The sensible internal motion of the constituent particles of ...

21739

fermentative
FERMENT'ATIVE, a. 1. Causing or having power to cause fermentation; as fermentative heat.2. ...

21740

fermentativeness
FERMENT'ATIVENESS, n. The state of being fermentative.

21741

fermented
FERMENT'ED, pp. Worked; having undergone the process of fermentation.

21742

fermenting
FERMENT'ING, ppr. Working; effervesing.

21743

fern
FERN, n. A plant of several species constituting the tribe or family of Filices, which have their ...

21744

fern-owl
FERN-OWL, n. The goatsucker.

21745

ferny
FERN'Y, a Abounding or overgrown with fern.

21746

ferocious
FERO'CIOUS, a. [L. ferox; allied to ferus, wild, fera, a wild animal.]1. Fierce; savage; wild; ...

21747

ferociousness
FERO'CIOUSNESS, n. Savage fierceness; cruelty; ferocity.

21748

ferocity
FEROC'ITY, n. [L. ferocitas.] 1. Savage wildness or fierceness; fury; cruelty; as the ferocity ...

21749

ferreous
FER'REOUS, a. [L. ferreus, from ferrum, iron.]Partaking of iron; pertaining to iron; like iron; ...

21750

ferret
FER'RET, n. 1. An animal of the genus Mustela, or Weasel kind, about 14 inches in length, of a ...

21751

ferreted
FER'RETED, pp. Driven from a burrow or lurking place.

21752

ferreter
FER'RETER, n. One that hunts another in his private retreat.

21753

ferreting
FER'RETING, ppr. Driving from a lurking place.

21754

ferri-calcite
FERRI-CAL'CITE, n. [L. ferrum, iron, and calx, lime.]A species of calcarious earth or limestone ...

21755

ferriage
FER'RIAGE, n. [See Ferry.] The price or fare to be paid at a ferry; the compensation established ...

21756

ferric
FER'RIC, a. Pertaining to or extracted from iron. Ferric acid is the acid of iron saturated with ...

21757

ferriferous
FERRIF'EROUS, a. [L. ferrum and fer.] Producing or yielding iron.

21758

ferrilite
FER'RILITE, n. [L. ferrum, iron and Gr. a stone.]Rowley ragg; a variety of trap, containing iron ...

21759

ferro-cyanate
FERRO-CY'ANATE, n. A compound of the ferro-cyanic acid with a base.

21760

ferro-cyanic
FERRO-CYAN'IC, a. [L. ferrum, iron and cyanic, which see.] The same as ferroprussic.

21761

ferro-prussiate
FERRO-PRUS'SIATE, n. A compound of the ferro-silicic acid with a base, forming a substance ...

21762

ferro-prussic
FERRO-PRUS'SIC, a. [L. ferrum, iron, and prussic.] Designating a peculiar acid, formed of prussic ...

21763

ferro-silicate
FERRO-SIL'ICATE, n. A compound of ferro-silicic acid with a base, forming a substance analogous to ...

21764

ferro-silicic
FERRO-SILIC'IC, a. [L. ferrum, iron, and silex.] Designating a compound of iron and silex.

21765

ferruginated
FERRU'GINATED, a. [infra.] Having the color or properties of the rust of iron.

21766

ferruginous
FERRU'GINOUS, a. [L. ferrugo, rust of iron, from ferrum, iron.]1. Partaking of iron; containing ...

21767

ferrule
FER'RULE, n. A ring of metal put round a cane or other thing to strengthen it.

21768

ferry
FER'RY, v.t. [L. fero; allied to bear.]To carry or transport over a river, strait or other water, ...

21769

ferryboat
FER'RYBOAT, n. A boat for conveying passengers over streams and other narrow waters.

21770

ferryman
FER'RYMAN, n. One who keeps a ferry, and transports passengers over a river.

21771

fertile
FER'TILE, a. [L. fertilis, from fero, to bear.]1. Fruitful; rich; producing fruit in abundance; ...

21772

fertileness
FER'TILENESS, n. [See Fertility.]

21773

fertility
FERTIL'ITY, n. [L. fertilitas.] 1. Fruitfulness; the quality of producing fruit in abundance; as ...

21774

fertilize
FER'TILIZE, v.t. To enrich; to supply with the pabulum of plants; to make fruitful or productive; ...

21775

fertilized
FER'TILIZED, pp. Enriched; rendered fruitful.

21776

fertilizing
FER'TILIZING, ppr.1. Enriching; making fruitful or productive. The Connecticut overflows the ...

21777

ferulaceous
FERULA'CEOUS, a. [L. ferula.] Pertaining to reeds or canes; having a stalk like a reed; or ...

21778

ferule
FER'ULE, n. [L. ferula, from ferio, to strike, or from the use of stalks of the Ferula.]1. A ...

21779

fervency
FERV'ENCY, n. [See fervent.]1. Heat of mind; ardor; eagerness.2. Pious ardor; animated zeal; ...

21780

fervent
FERV'ENT, a. [L. fervens, from ferveo, to be hot, to boil, to glow.]1. Hot; boiling; as a fervent ...

21781

fervently
FERV'ENTLY, adv.1. Earnestly; eagerly; vehemently; with great warmth.2. With pious ardor; with ...

21782

fervid
FERV'ID, a. [L. fervidus.] 1. Very hot; burning; boiling; as fervid heat.2. Very warm in zeal; ...

21783

fervidly
FERV'IDLY, adv. Very hotly; with glowing warmth.

21784

fervidness
FERV'IDNESS, n. Glowing heat; ardor of mind; warm zeal.

21785

fervor
FERV'OR, n. [L. fervor.]1. Heat or warmth; as the fervor of a summer's day.2. Heat of mind; ...

21786

fescennine
FES'CENNINE, a. Pertaining to Fescennium in Italy; licentious.FES'CENNINE, n. A nuptial song, or ...

21787

fescue
FES'CUE, n. [L. festuca, a shoot or stalk of a tree, a rod.]A small wire used to point out letters ...

21788

fescue-grass
FES'CUE-GRASS, n. The Festuca, a genus of grasses.

21789

fesels
FE'SELS, n. A kind of base grain.

21790

fesse
FESSE, n. fess. [L. fascia, a band.] In heraldry, a bank or girdle, possessing the third part of ...

21791

fesse-point
FESSE-POINT, n. The exact center of the escutcheon.

21792

festal
FES'TAL, a. [L. festus, festive. See Feast.]Pertaining to a feast; joyous; gay; mirthful.

21793

fester
FES'TER, v.i. [L. pestis, pus, or pustula.]To rankle; to corrupt; to grow virulent. We say of a ...

21794

festering
FES'TERING, ppr. Rankling; growing virulent.

21795

festinate
FES'TINATE, a. [L. festino, festinatus.] Hasty; hurried. [Not in use.]

21796

festination
FESTINA'TION, n. Haste. [Not used.]

21797

festival
FES'TIVAL, a. [L. festivus, from festus, or festum or fasti. See Feast.]Pertaining to a feast; ...

21798

festive
FES'TIVE, a. [L. festivus.] Pertaining to or becoming a feast; joyous; gay; mirthful.The glad ...

21799

festivity
FESTIV'ITY, n. [L. festivitas.] 1. Primarily, the mirth of a feast; hence, joyfulness; gaiety; ...

21800

festoon
FESTOON', n. Something in imitation of a garland or wreath. In architecture and sculpture, an ...

21801

festucine
FES'TUCINE, a. [l. festuca.] Being of a straw-color.

21802

festucous
FES'TUCOUS, a. Formed of straw.

21803

fet
FET, n. A piece. [Not used.]FET, v.t. or i. To fetch; to come to. [Not used.]

21804

fetal
FE'TAL, a. [from fetus.] Pertaining to a fetus.

21805

fetch
FETCH, v.t.1. To go and bring, or simply to bring, that is, to bear a thing towards or to a ...

21806

fetcher
FETCH'ER, n. One that brings.

21807

fetching
FETCH'ING, ppr. Bringing; going and bringing; deriving; drawing; making; reaching; obtaining as ...

21808

fether
FETH'ER, n.1. A plume; a general name of the covering of fowls. The smaller fethers are used for ...

21809

fether-bed
FETH'ER-BED, n. A bed filled with fethers; a soft bed.

21810

fether-driver
FETH'ER-DRIVER, n. One who beats fethers to make them light or loose.

21811

fether-grass
FETH'ER-GRASS, n. A plant, gramen plumosum.

21812

fethered
FETH'ERED, pp.1. Covered with fethers; enriched.2. a. Clothed or covered with fethers. A fowl or ...

21813

fetheredge
FETH'EREDGE, n. An edge like a fether.A board that has one edge thinner than the other, is called ...

21814

fetheredged
FETH'EREDGED, a. Having a thin edge.

21815

fetherless
FETH'ERLESS, a. Destitute of fethers; unfledged.

21816

fetherly
FETH'ERLY, a. Resembling fethers. [Not used.]

21817

fethery
FETH'ERY, a. 1. Clothed or covered with fethers.2. Resembling fethers.

21818

fetichism
FET'ICHISM,

21819

feticism
FET'ICISM, n. The worship of idols among the negroes of Africa, among whom fetch is an idol, any ...

21820

fetid
FET'ID, a. [L. faetidus, from faetco, to have an ill scent.]Having an offensive smell; having a ...

21821

fetidness
FET'IDNESS, n. The quality of smelling offensively; a fetid quality.

21822

fetiferous
FETIF'EROUS, a. [L. faetifer; faetus and fero, to bear.] Producing young, as animals.

21823

fetlock
FET'LOCK, n. [foot or feet and lock.] A tuft of hair growing behind the pastern joint of many ...

21824

fetor
FE'TOR, n. [L. faetor.] Any strong offensive smell; stench.

21825

fetter
FET'TER, n.1. A chain for the feet; a chain by which an animal is confined by the foot, either ...

21826

fettered
FET'TERED, pp. Bound or confined by fetters; enchained.

21827

fettering
FET'TERING, ppr. Binding or fastening by the feet with a chain; confining; restraining motion.

21828

fetterless
FET'TERLESS, a. Free from fetters or restraint.

21829

fettstein
FETT'STEIN, n. A mineral of a greenish or bluish gray color or flesh red, called also elaolite.

21830

fetus
FE'TUS, n. plu. fetuses. [L. faetus.] The young of viviparous animals in the womb, and of ...

21831

feud
FEUD, n. 1. Primarily, a deadly quarrel; hatred and contention that was to be terminated only by ...

21832

feudal
FEU'DAL, a. 1. Pertaining to feuds, fiefs or fees; as feudal rights or services; feudal ...

21833

feudalism
FEU'DALISM, n. The feudal system; the principles and constitution of feuds, or lands held by ...

21834

feudality
FEUDAL'ITY, n. The state or quality of being feudal; feudal form or constitution.

21835

feudary
FEU'DARY, a. Holding land of a superior.

21836

feudatary
FEU'DATARY, n. A feudatory, which see.

21837

feudatory
FEU'DATORY, n.A tenant or vassal who holds his lands of a superior, on condition of military ...

21838

feudist
FEU'DIST, n. A writer on feuds.

21839

feuillage
FEUILLAGE, n. A bunch or row of leaves.

21840

feuillemort
FEUILLEMORT, The color of a faded leaf.

21841

feuter
FEU'TER, v.t. To make ready. [Not in use.]

21842

feuterer
FEU'TERER, n. A dog keeper. [Not used.]

21843

fever
FE'VER, n. [L. febris, supposed to be so written by transposition for ferbis, or fervis, from ...

21844

fever-cooling
FE'VER-COOLING, a. Allaying febrile heat.

21845

fever-root
FE'VER-ROOT, n. A plant of the genus Triosteum.

21846

fever-sick
FE'VER-SICK, a. Diseased with fever.

21847

fever-weakened
FE'VER-WEAKENED, a. Debilitated by fever.

21848

fever-weed
FE'VER-WEED, n. A plant of the genus Eryngium.

21849

fever-wort
FE'VER-WORT, n. [See Fever-root.]

21850

feveret
FE'VERET, n. A slight fever. [Not used.]

21851

feverfew
FE'VERFEW, n. [L. febris and fugo.]A plant, or rather a genus of plants, the Matricaria, so named ...

21852

feverish
FE'VERISH, a.1. Having a slight fever; as the patient is feverish.2. Diseased with fever or heat; ...

21853

feverishness
FE'VERISHNESS, n. The state of being feverish; a slight febrile affection.

21854

feverous
FE'VEROUS, a.1. Affected with fever or ague.2. Having the nature of fever.All feverous kinds.3. ...

21855

fevery
FE'VERY, a. Affected with fever.

21856

few
FEW, a. [L. pauci. The senses of few and small are often united.]Not many; small in number. ...

21857

fewel
FEW'EL, n. Combustible matter. [See fuel.]

21858

fewness
FEW'NESS, n.1. Smallness of number; paucity.2. Paucity of words; brevity. [Not used.]

21859

fiance
FI'ANCE, v.t. To betroth. [See Affiance.]

21860

fiat
FI'AT. [L. from fio.] Let it be done; a decree; a command to do something.

21861

fib
FIB, n. [See Fable.] A lie or falsehood; a word used among children and the vulgar, as a softer ...

21862

fibber
FIB'BER, n. One who tells lies or fibs.

21863

fibbing
FIB'BING, ppr. Telling fibs; as a noun, the telling of fibs.

21864

fiber
FI'BER, n. [L. fibra.]1. A thread; a fine, slender body which constitutes a part of the frame of ...

21865

fibril
FI'BRIL, n. A small fiber; the branch of a fiber; a very slender thread.

21866

fibrin
FI'BRIN, n. [See Fiber.] A peculiar organic compound substance found in animals and vegetables. ...

21867

fibrolite
FIB'ROLITE, n. [from L. fibra, and Gr.]A mineral that occurs with corundum, of a white or gray ...

21868

fibrous
FI'BROUS, a.1. Composed or consisting of fibers; as a fibrous body or substance.2. Containing ...

21869

fibula
FIB'ULA, n. [L.] 1. The outer and lesser bone of the leg, much smaller than the tibia.2. A ...

21870

fickle
FICK'LE, a. [L. vacillo; Gr.; Heb. to stagger.]1. Wavering; inconstant; unstable; of a changeable ...

21871

fickleness
FICK'LENESS, n. 1. A wavering; wavering disposition; inconstancy; instability; unsteadiness in ...

21872

fickly
FICK'LY, adv. Without firmness or steadiness.

21873

fico
FI'CO, n. An act of contempt done with the fingers, expressing a fig for you.

21874

fictile
FIC'TILE, a. [L. fictilis, from fictus, fingo, to feign.]Molded into form by art; manufactured by ...

21875

fiction
FIC'TION, n. [L. fictio, from fingo, to feign.]1. The act of feigning, inventing or imagining; ...

21876

fictious
FICTIOUS, for fictitious, not used.

21877

fictitious
FICTI'TIOUS, a. [L. fictifius, from fingo, to feign.]1. Feigned; imaginary; not real.The human ...

21878

fictitiously
FICTI'TIOUSLY, adv. By fiction; falsely; counterfeitly.

21879

fictitiousness
FICTI'TIOUSNESS, n. Feigned representation.

21880

fictive
FIC'TIVE, a. Feigned. [Not used.]

21881

fid
FID, n.1. A square bar of wood or iron, with a shoulder at one end, used to support the top-mast, ...

21882

fiddle
FID'DLE, n. [L. fides, fidicula.] A stringed instrument of music; a violin.FID'DLE, v.i. 1. To ...

21883

fiddle-faddle
FID'DLE-FADDLE, n. Trifles. [A low cant word.]FID'DLE-FADDLE, a. Trifling; making a bustle about ...

21884

fiddle-stick
FID'DLE-STICK, n. The bow and string with which a fiddler plays on a violin.

21885

fiddle-string
FID'DLE-STRING, n. The string of a fiddle, fastened at the ends and elevated in the middle by a ...

21886

fiddle-wood
FID'DLE-WOOD, n. A plant of the genus Citharexylon.

21887

fiddler
FID'DLER, n. One who plays on a fiddle or violin.

21888

fiddling
FID'DLING, ppr. Playing on a fiddle.FID'DLING, n. The act of playing on a fiddle.

21889

fidejussor
FI'DEJUSSOR, n. [L.] A surety; one bound for another.

21890

fidelity
FIDEL'ITY, n. [L. fidelitas, from fides, faith, fido, to trust. See Faith.]1. Faithfulness; ...

21891

fidge
FIDGE,

21892

fidget
FIDG'ET, v.i. [allied probably to fickle.] To move one way and the other; to move irregularly or ...

21893

fidgety
FIDG'ETY, a. Restless; uneasy. [Vulgar.]

21894

fiducial
FIDU'CIAL, a. [from L. fiducia, from fido, to trust.]1. Confident; undoubting; firm; as a ...

21895

fiducially
FIDU'CIALLY, adv. With confidence.

21896

fiduciary
FIDU'CIARY, a. [L. fiduciarius, from fido, to trust.]1. Confident; steady; undoubting; ...

21897

fie
FIE, pronounced fi, an exclamation denoting comtempt or dislike.

21898

fief
FIEF, n. [See Fee, Feoff and Feud.]A fee; a feud; an estate held of a superior on condition of ...

21899

field
FIELD, n.1. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; any part of a farm, except the garden ...

21900

field-basil
FIE'LD-BASIL, n. A plant of several kinds.

21901

field-bed
FIE'LD-BED, n. A bed for the field.

21902

field-book
FIE'LD-BOOK, n. A book used in surveying, in which are set down the angles, stations, distances, ...

21903

field-colors
FIE'LD-COLORS, n. plu. In war, small flags of about a foot and half square, carried along with the ...

21904

field-duck
FIE'LD-DUCK, n. A species of bustard, nearly as large as a pheasant; found chiefly in France.

21905

field-marshal
FIELD-M'ARSHAL, n. The commander of an army; a military officer of high rank in France and ...

21906

field-officer
FIE'LD-OFFICER, n. A military officer above the rank of captain, as a major or colonel.

21907

field-piece
FIE'LD-PIECE, n. A small cannon which is carried along with armies, and used in the field of ...

21908

field-preacher
FIE'LD-PREACHER, n. One who preaches in the open air.

21909

field-preaching
FIE'LD-PREACHING, n. A preaching in the field or open air.

21910

field-sports
FIE'LD-SPORTS, n. plu. Diversions of the field, as shooting and hunting.

21911

field-staff
FIE'LD-STAFF, n. A weapon carried by gunners, about the length of a halbert, with a spear at the ...

21912

field-works
FIE'LD-WORKS, n. In the military art, works thrown up by an army in besieging a fortress, or by ...

21913

fielded
FIE'LDED, a. Being in the field of battle; encamped.

21914

fieldfare
FIE'LDFARE, n. [field and fare, wandering in the field.]A bird of the genus Turdus or thrush, ...

21915

fieldmouse
FIE'LDMOUSE, n. A species of mouse that lives in the field, burrowing in banks, &c.

21916

fieldroom
FIE'LDROOM, n. Open space. [Not in use.]

21917

fieldy
FIE'LDY, a. Open like a field. [Not in use.]

21918

fiend
FIEND, n. [See Feud, contention.]An enemy in the worst sense; an implacable or malicious foe; the ...

21919

fiendful
FIE'NDFUL, a. Full of evil or malignant practices.

21920

fiendlike
FIE'NDLIKE, a. Resembling a field; maliciously wicked; diabolical.

21921

fierce
FIERCE, n. fers. [L. ferus, ferox, the primary sense of which is wild, running, rushing.]1. ...

21922

fierce-minded
FIERCE-MINDED, a. Vehement; of a furious temper.

21923

fiercely
FIERCELY, adv. fers'ly. 1. Violently; furiously; with rage; as, both sides fiercely fought.2. ...

21924

fierceness
FIERCENESS, n. fers'ness. 1. Ferocity; savageness.The defect of heat which gives fierceness to ...

21925

fieriness
FI'ERINESS, n. [See Fiery, Fire.] 1. The quality of being fiery; hear; acrimony; the quality of ...

21926

fiery
FI'ERY, a. [from fire.]1. Consisting of fire; as the fiery gulf of Etna.And fiery billows roll ...

21927

fife
FIFE, n. [L. pipio, to pip or peep, as a chicken. The word may have received its name from a ...

21928

fifer
FI'FER, n. One who plays on a fife.

21929

fifteen
FIFTEE'N, a. Five and ten.

21930

fifteenth
FIFTEE'NTH, a. 1. The ordinal of fifteen; the fifth after the tenth.2. Containing one part in ...

21931

fifth
FIFTH, a. [See Five.] 1. The ordinal of five; the next to the fourth.2. Elliptically, a fifth ...

21932

fifthly
FIFTH'LY, adv. In the fifth place.

21933

fiftieth
FIF'TIETH, a. The ordinal of fifty; as the fiftieth part of a foot. This may be used ...

21934

fifty
FIF'TY, a.Five tens; five times ten; as fifty men. It may be used as a noun in the plural.And they ...

21935

fig
FIG, n. [L. ficus; Heb.]1. The fruit of the fig tree, which is of a round or oblong shape, and a ...

21936

fig-marigold
FIG-MAR'IGOLD, n. The Mesembryanthemum, a succulent plant, resembling houseleek; the leaves grow ...

21937

fig-pecker
FIG'-PECKER, n. [L. ficedula.] A bird.

21938

fig-tree
FIG'-TREE, n. A tree of the genus Ficus, growing in warm climates. The receptacle is common, ...

21939

fight
FIGHT, v.i.1. To strive or contend for victory, in battle or in single combat; to attempt to ...

21940

fighter
FIGHTER, n. One that fights; a combatant; a warrior.

21941

fighting
FIGHTING, ppr.1. Contending in battle; striving for victory or conquest.2. a. Qualified for war; ...

21942

figment
FIG'MENT, n. [L. figmentum, from fingo, to feign.]An invention; a fiction; something feigned or ...

21943

figulate
FIG'ULATE, a. [L. figulo, to fashion, from fingo, or rather figo, which appears to be the root of ...

21944

figurability
FIGURABIL'ITY, n. The quality of being capable of a certain fixed or stable form.

21945

figurable
FIG'URABLE, a. [from figure.] Capable of being brought to a certain fixed form or shape. Thus ...

21946

figural
FIG'URAL, a. Represented by figure or delineation; as figural resemblances.Figural numbers, in ...

21947

figurate
FIG'URATE, a. [L. figuratus.] 1. Of a certain determinate form.Plants are all figurate and ...

21948

figurated
FIG'URATED, a. Having a determinate form.

21949

figuration
FIGURA'TION, n.1. The act of giving figure or determinate form.2. Determination to a certain ...

21950

figurative
FIG'URATIVE, a.1. Representing something else; representing by resemblance; typical.This they will ...

21951

figuratively
FIG'URATIVELY, adv. By a figure; in a manner to exhibit ideas by resemblance; in a sense different ...

21952

figure
FIG'URE, n. fig'ur. [L. figura, from figo, to fix or set. See Feign.]1. The form of any thing as ...

21953

figure-caster
FIG'URE-CASTER,

21954

figure-flinger
FIG'URE-FLINGER, n. A pretender to astrology.

21955

figure-stone
FIG'URE-STONE, n. A name of the agalmatolite, or bildstein.

21956

figured
FIG'URED, pp. 1. Represented by resemblance; adorned with figures; formed into a determinate ...

21957

figuring
FIG'URING, ppr. Forming into determinate shape; representing by types or resemblances; adorning ...

21958

filaceous
FILA'CEOUS, a. [L. filum, a thread.] Composed or consisting of threads.

21959

filacer
FIL'ACER, n. An officer in the English Court of Common Pleas, so called from filing the writs on ...

21960

filament
FIL'AMENT, n. [L. filamenta, threads, from filum.]A thread; a fiber. In anatomy and natural ...

21961

filamentous
FILAMENT'OUS, a. Like a thread; consisting of fine filaments.

21962

filanders
FIL'ANDERS, n.A disease in hawks, consisting of filaments of coagulated blood; also, small worms ...

21963

filatory
FIL'ATORY, n. [from L. filum, a thread.] A machine which forms or spins threads.This manufactory ...

21964

filbert
FIL'BERT, n. [L. avellana, with which the first syllable corresponds; fil, vel.]The fruit of the ...

21965

filch
FILCH, v.t. [This word, like pilfer, is probably from the root of file, or peel, to strip or rub ...

21966

filched
FILCH'ED, pp. Stolen; taken wrongfully from another; pillaged; pilfered.

21967

filcher
FILCH'ER, n. A thief; one who is guilty of petty theft.

21968

filching
FILCH'ING, ppr. Stealing; taking from another wrongfully; pilfering.

21969

filchingly
FILCH'INGLY, adv. By pilfering; in a thievish manner.

21970

file
FILE, n. [L. filum. The primary sense is probably to draw out or extend, or to twist.]1. A ...

21971

file-cutter
FI'LE-CUTTER, n. A maker of files.

21972

file-leader
FILE-LE'ADER, n. The soldier placed in the front of a file.

21973

filed
FI'LED, pp. Placed on a line or wire; placed in a bundle and indorsed; smoothed or polished with a ...

21974

filemot
FI'LEMOT, n. A yellowish brown color; the color of a faded leaf.

21975

filer
FI'LER, n. One who uses a file in smoothing and polishing.

21976

filial
FIL'IAL, a. [L. filius, a son, flia, a daughter.]1. Pertaining to a son or daughter; becoming a ...

21977

filiation
FILIA'TION, n. [L. filius, a son.]1. The relation of a son or child to a father; correlative to ...

21978

filiform
FIL'IFORM, n. [L. filum, a thread, and form.]Having the form of a thread or filament; of equal ...

21979

filigrane
FIL'IGRANE, n. sometimes written filigree. [L. filum, a thread, and granum, a grain.]A kind of ...

21980

filigraned
FIL'IGRANED, or FIL'IGREED, a. Ornamented with filigrane.

21981

filigreed
FIL'IGRANED, or FIL'IGREED, a. Ornamented with filigrane.

21982

filing
FI'LING, ppr. Placing on a string or wire, or in a bundle of papers; presenting for trial; ...

21983

filings
FI'LINGS, n. plu. Fragments or particles rubbed off by the act of filing; as filings of iron.

21984

fill
FILL, v.t. [Gr. allied perhaps to fold and felt; to stuff; L. pilus, pileus. We are told that the ...

21985

fillagree
FILLAGREE. [See Filigrane.]

21986

filled
FILL'ED, pp. Made full; supplied with abundance.

21987

filler
FILL'ER, n. 1. One who fills; one whose employment is to fill vessels.They have six diggers to ...

21988

fillet
FIL'LET, n. [L. filum.]1. A little band to tie about the hair of the head.A belt her waist, a ...

21989

fillibeg
FIL'LIBEG, n. A little plaid; a dress reaching only to the knees, worn in the highlands of ...

21990

filling
FILL'ING, ppr. Making full; supplying abundantly; growing full.FILL'ING, n.1. A making full; ...

21991

fillip
FIL'LIP, v.t. [probably from the root of L. pello, like pelt. See Filly.]To strike with the nail ...

21992

filly
FIL'LY, n. [L. filia, Eng. foal, a shoot, issue.]1. A female or mare colt; a young mare.2. A ...

21993

film
FILM, n. [L. velamen, or from L. pellis.]A thin skin; a pellicle, as on the eye. In plants, it ...

21994

filmy
FILM'Y, a. Composed of thin membranes or pellicles.Whose filmy cord should bind the struggling ...

21995

filter
FIL'TER, n.A strainer; a piece of woolen cloth, paper or other substance, through which liquors are ...

21996

filtered
FIL'TERED, pp. Strained; defecated by a filter.

21997

filtering
FIL'TERING, ppr. Straining; defecating.

21998

filth
FILTH, n. [See Foul and Defile.]1. Dirt; any foul matter; any thing that soils or defiles; waste ...

21999

filthily
FILTH'ILY, adv. In a filthy manner; foully; grossly.

22000

filthiness
FILTH'INESS, n.1. The state of being filthy.2. Foulness; dirtiness; filth; nastiness.Carry forth ...

22001

filthy
FILTH'Y, a.1. Dirty; foul; unclean; nasty.2. Polluted; defiled by sinful practices; morally ...

22002

filtrate
FIL'TRATE, v.t. [See Filter.]To filter; to defecate, as liquor, by straining or percolation.

22003

filtration
FILTRA'TION, n. The act or process of filtering; defecation by passing liquors through woolen ...

22004

fimble-hemp
FIMBLE-HEMP, n. [Female-hemp.] Light summer hemp that bears no seed.

22005

fimbriate
FIM'BRIATE, a. [L. fimbria, a border or fringe.]In botany, fringed; having the edge surrounded by ...

22006

fimbriated
FIM'BRIATED, a. In heraldry, ornamented, as an ordinary, with a narrow border or hem of another ...

22007

fin
FIN, n. [L. pinna or penna. The sense is probably a shoot, or it is from diminishing. See ...

22008

finable
FI'NABLE, a. [See Fine.] 1. That admits a fine.2. Subject to a fine or penalty; as a finable ...

22009

final
FI'NAL, a. [L. finalis. See fine.]1. Pertaining to the end or conclusion; last ultimate; as the ...

22010

finally
FI'NALLY, adv.1. At the end or conclusion; ultimately; lastly. The cause is expensive, but we ...

22011

finance
FINANCE, n. finans'. [See Fine.]Revenue; income of a king or state.The United States, near the ...

22012

finances
FINAN'CES, n. plu. 1. Revenue; funds in the public treasury, or accruing to it; public resources ...

22013

financial
FINAN'CIAL, a. Pertaining to public revenue; as financial concerns or operations.

22014

financially
FINAN'CIALLY, adv. In relation to finances or public revenue; in a manner to produce revenue.We ...

22015

financier
FINANCIE'R, n. 1. An officer who receives and manages the public revenues; a treasurer.2. One ...

22016

finary
FI'NARY, n. [from fine, refine.] In iron works, the second forge at the iron mill. [See Finery.]

22017

finch
FINCH, n. A bird. But finch is used chiefly in composition; as chaffinch, goldfinch. These ...

22018

find
FIND, v.t. pret. and pp. found. [L. venio; but in sense, with invenio. The primary sense is to ...

22019

finder
FINDER, n. One who meets or falls on any thing; one that discovers what is lost or is unknown; one ...

22020

findfault
FINDFAULT, n. A censurer; a caviller.

22021

findfaulting
FINDFAULT'ING, a. Apt to censure; captious.

22022

finding
FINDING, ppr. Discovering.FINDING, n.1. Discovery; the act of discovering.2. In law, the return ...

22023

findy
FIN'DY, a. Full; heavy; or firm, solid, substantial. Obs.A cold May and a windy,Makes the barn ...

22024

fine
FINE, a. 1. Small; thin; slender; minute; of very small diameter; as a fine thread; fine silk; a ...

22025

fined
FI'NED, pp. 1. Refined; purified; defecated.2. Subjected to a pecuniary penalty.

22026

fineddrawing
FI'NEDDRAWING, n. Rentering; a dextrous or nice sewing up the rents of cloths or stuffs.

22027

finedraw
FI'NEDRAW, v.t. [find and draw.] To sew up a rent with so much nicety that it is not perceived.

22028

finedrawer
FI'NEDRAWER, n. One who finedraws.

22029

finefingered
FI'NEFINGERED, a. Nice in workmanship; dextrous at fine work.

22030

fineless
FI'NELESS, a. Endless; boundless. [Not used.]

22031

finely
FI'NELY, adv.1. In minute parts; as a substance finely pulverized.2. To a thin or sharp edge; as ...

22032

fineness
FI'NENESS, n. 1. Thinness; smallness; slenderness; as the finances of a thread or silk. Hence.2. ...

22033

finer
FI'NER, n. 1. One who refines or purifies. Prov. 25:4.2. a. Comparative of fine.

22034

finery
FI'NERY, n. 1. Show; splendor; gaiety of colors or appearance; as the finery of a dress.2. Showy ...

22035

finespun
FI'NESPUN, a. Drawn to a fine thread; minute; subtle.

22036

finess
FINESS',

22037

finesse
FINESSE, n. Artifice; stratagem; subtilty of contrivance to gain a point.

22038

finessing
FINESS'ING, ppr. Practicing artifice to accomplish a purpose.

22039

finestill
FI'NESTILL, v.t. To distill spirit from molasses,treacle or some preparation of saccharine matter.

22040

finestiller
FI'NESTILLER, n. One who distills spirit from treacle or molasses.

22041

finestilling
FI'NESTILLING, n. The operation of distilling spirit from molasses or treacle.

22042

finfish
FIN'FISH, n. A species of slender whale.

22043

finfooted
FIN'FOOTED, a. Having palmated feet, or feet with toes connected by a membrane.

22044

finger
FIN'GER, n. fing'ger.1. One of the extreme parts of the hand, a small member shooting to a point. ...

22045

finger-board
FIN'GER-BOARD, n. The board at the neck of a violin, guitar or the like, where the fingers act on ...

22046

finger-fern
FIN'GER-FERN, n. A plant, asplenium.

22047

finger-shell
FIN'GER-SHELL, n. A marine shell resembling a finger.

22048

finger-stone
FIN'GER-STONE, n. A fossil resembling an arrow.

22049

fingered
FIN'GERED, pp.1. Played on; handled; touched.2. a. Having fingers. In botany, digitate; having ...

22050

fingering
FIN'GERING, ppr. Handling; touching lightly.FIN'GERING, n.1. The act of touching lightly or ...

22051

fingle-fangle
FIN'GLE-FANGLE, n. A trifle. [Vulgar.]

22052

fingrigo
FIN'GRIGO, n. A plant, of the genus Pisonia. The fruit is a kind of berry or plum.

22053

finical
FIN'ICAL, a. [from fine.]1. Nice; spruce; foppish; pretending to a great nicety or superfluous ...

22054

finically
FIN'ICALLY, adv. With great nicety or spruceness; foppishly.

22055

finicalness
FIN'ICALNESS, n. Extreme nicety in dress or manners; foppishness.

22056

fining
FI'NING, ppr. [See Fine, the verb.]1. Clarifying; refining; purifying; defecating; separating ...

22057

fining-pot
FIN'ING-POT, n. A vessel in which metals are refined.

22058

finis
FI'NIS, n. [L.] An end; conclusion.

22059

finish
FIN'ISH, v.t. [L. finio, from finis, an end.]1. To arrive at the end of, in performance; to ...

22060

finished
FIN'ISHED, pp.1. Completed; ended; done; perfected.2. a. Complete; perfect; polished to the ...

22061

finisher
FIN'ISHER, n. 1. One who finishes; one who completely performs.2. One who puts an end to.3. One ...

22062

finishing
FIN'ISHING, ppr. Completing; perfecting; bringing to an end.

22063

finite
FI'NITE, a. [L. finitus, from finio, to finish, from finis, limit.]Having a limit; limited; ...

22064

finitely
FI'NITELY, adv. Within limits; to a certain degree only.

22065

finiteness
FI'NITENESS, n. Limitation; confinement within certain boundaries; as the finiteness of our ...

22066

finitude
FIN'ITUDE, n. Limitation. [Not used.]

22067

finless
FIN'LESS, a. [from fin.] Destitute of fins; as finless fish.

22068

finlike
FIN'LIKE, a. Resembling a fin; as a finlike oar.

22069

finn
FINN, n. A native of Finland, in Europe.

22070

finned
FIN'NED, a. Having broad edges on either side; applied to a plow.

22071

finnikin
FIN'NIKIN, n. A sort of pigeon, with a crest somewhat resembling the mane of a horse.

22072

finny
FIN'NY, a. Furnished with fins; as finny fish; finny tribes; finny prey.

22073

finochio
FINO'CHIO, n. A variety of fennel.

22074

finscale
FIN'SCALE, n. A river fish, called the rudd.

22075

fipple
FIP'PLE, n. [L. fibula.] A stopper. [Not in use.]

22076

fir
FIR, n.The name of several species of the genus Pinus; as the Scotch fir, the silver fir, spruce ...

22077

fir-tree
FIR-TREE. [See fir.]

22078

fire
FIRE, n. [The radical sense of fire is usually, to rush, to rage, to be violently agitated; and if ...

22079

fire-arrow
FI'RE-ARROW, n. A small iron dart, furnished with a match impregnated with powder and sulphur, ...

22080

fire-company
FI'RE-COMPANY, n. A company of men for managing an engine to extinguish fires.

22081

fire-engine
FI'RE-ENGINE, n. An engine for throwing water to extinguish fire and save buildings.

22082

fire-escape
FIRE-ESCA'PE, n. A machine for escaping from windows, when houses are on fire.

22083

fire-office
FI'RE-OFFICE, n. An office for making insurance against fire.

22084

fire-ordeal
FIRE-ORDEAL, n. [See Ordeal.]

22085

firearms
FI'REARMS, n. plu. Arms or weapons which expel their charge by the combustion of powder, as ...

22086

fireball
FI'REBALL, n.1. A grenade; a ball filled with powder or other combustibles, intended to be thrown ...

22087

firebare
FI'REBARE, n. In old writers, a beacon.

22088

firebarrel
FI'REBARREL, n. A hollow cylinder used in fireships, to convey the fire to the shrouds.

22089

firebavin
FI'REBAVIN, n. A bundle of brush-wood, used in fireships.

22090

fireblast
FI'REBL'AST, n. A disease in hops, chiefly towards the later periods of their growth.

22091

firebote
FI'REBOTE, n. Allowance of fuel, to which a tenant is entitled.

22092

firebrand
FI'REBRAND, n. 1. A piece of wood kindled or on fire.2. An incendiary; one who inflames ...

22093

firebrick
FI'REBRICK, n. A brick that will sustain intense heat without fusion.

22094

firebrush
FI'REBRUSH, n. A brush used to sweep the hearth.

22095

firebucket
FI'REBUCKET, n. A bucket to convey water to engines for extinguishing fire.

22096

fireclay
FI'RECLAY, n. A kind of clay that will sustain intense heat, used in making firebricks.

22097

firecock
FI'RECOCK, n. A cock or spout to let out water for extinguishing fire.

22098

firecross
FI'RECROSS, n. Something used in Scotland as a signal to take arms; the ends being burnt black, ...

22099

fired
FI'RED, pp. Set on fire; inflamed; kindled; animated; irritated.

22100

firedamp
FI'REDAMP. [See Damp.]

22101

firedrake
FI'REDRAKE, n.1. A fiery serpent.2. An ignis fatuus.

22102

fireflair
FI'REFLAIR, n. A species of ray-fish or Raja.

22103

firefly
FI'REFLY, n. A species of fly which has on its belly a spot which shines; and another species ...

22104

firehook
FI'REHOOK, n. A large hook for pulling down building in conflagrations.

22105

firelock
FI'RELOCK, n. A musket, or other gun, with a lock, which is discharged by striking fire with flint ...

22106

fireman
FI'REMAN, n.1. A man whose business is to extinguish fires in towns.2. A man of violent passions. ...

22107

firemaster
FI'REM'ASTER, n. An officer of artillery who superintends the composition of fireworks.

22108

firenew
FI'RENEW, a. Fresh from the forge; bright.

22109

firepan
FI'REPAN, n. A pan for holding or conveying fire. Ex. 28.

22110

fireplace
FI'REPLACE, n. The part of a chimney appropriated to the fire; a hearth.

22111

fireplug
FI'REPLUG, n. A plug for drawing water from a pipe to extinguish fire.

22112

firepot
FI'REPOT, n. A small earthen pot filled with combustibles, used in military operations.

22113

firer
FI'RER, n. One who sets fire to any thing; an incendiary.

22114

fireship
FI'RESHIP, n. A vessel filled with combustibles and furnished with grappling irons to hook and set ...

22115

fireshovel
FI'RESHOVEL, n. A shovel or instrument for taking up or removing coals of fire.

22116

fireside
FIRESIDE, n. A place near the fire or hearth; home; domestic life or retirement.

22117

firestick
FI'RESTICK, n. A lighted stick or brand.

22118

firestone
FI'RESTONE, n.1. A fossil, the pyrite. [See Pyrite.]2. A kind of freestone which bears a high ...

22119

fireward
FIREWARD,

22120

firewarden
FIREWARDEN, n. An officer who has authority to direct others in the extinguishing of fires.

22121

firewood
FI'REWOOD, n. Wood for fuel.

22122

firework
FI'REWORK, n. Usually in the plural, fireworks.Preparations of gun-powder, sulphur and other ...

22123

fireworker
FI'REWORKER, n. An officer of artillery subordinate to the firemaster.

22124

firing
FI'RING, ppr. Setting fire to; kindling; animating; exciting; inflaming; discharging ...

22125

firing-iron
FI'RING-IRON, n. An instrument used in farriery to discuss swellings and knots.

22126

firk
FIRK, v.t. To beat; to whip; to chastise. [Not used.]

22127

firkin
FIRKIN, n. fur'kin.A measure of capacity, being the fourth part of a barrel. It is nine gallons ...

22128

firlot
FIR'LOT, n. A dry measure used in Scotland. The oat firlot contains 21 1/4 pints of that country; ...

22129

firm
FIRM, a. ferm. [L. firmus. This is the root of L. ferrum, iron.]1. Properly, fixed; hence, ...

22130

firmament
FIRMAMENT, n. ferm'ament. [L. firmamentum, from firmus, firmo.]The region of the air; the sky or ...

22131

firmamental
FIRMAMENT'AL, a. Pertaining to the firmament; celestial; being of the upper regions.

22132

firman
FIR'MAN, n. An Asiatic word, denoting a passport, permit, license, or grant of privileges.

22133

firmed
FIRMED, pp. ferm'ed. Established; confirmed.

22134

firming
FIRMING, ppr. ferm'ing, Settling; making firm and stable.

22135

firmitude
FIRMITUDE, n. ferm'itude. Strength; solidity. [Not in use.]

22136

firmity
FIRMITY, n. ferm'ity. Strength; firmness. [Not used.]

22137

firmless
FIRMLESS, a. ferm'less. Detached from substance. Does passion still the firmless mind control.

22138

firmly
FIRMLY, ad. ferm'ly.1. Solidly; compactly; closely; as particles of matter firmly cohering.2. ...

22139

firmness
FIRM'NESS, n. ferm'ness.1. Closeness or denseness of texture or structure; compactness; hardness; ...

22140

first
FIRST, a. furst. [See fare and for.]1. Advanced before or further than any other in progression; ...

22141

first-begotten
FIRST-BEGOT'TEN, a. First produced; the eldest of children.

22142

first-born
FIRST'-BORN, a.1. First brought forth; first in the order of nativity; eldest; as the first-born ...

22143

first-created
FIRST-CREA'TED, a. Created before any other.

22144

first-fruit
FIRST-FRUIT,

22145

first-fruits
FIRST-FRUITS, n.1. The fruit or produce first matured and collected in any season. Of these the ...

22146

first-rate
FIRST'-RATE, a. 1. Of the highest excellence; preeminent; as a first-rate scholar or painter.2. ...

22147

firstling
FIRST'LING, a. First produced; as firstling males. Deut. 15.FIRST'LING, n. 1. The first produce ...

22148

fisc
FISC, n. [L. fiscus. Fiscus, signifies a basket or hanaper, probably from the twigs which ...

22149

fiscal
FISC'AL, a. Pertaining to the public treasury or revenue.The fiscal arrangement of ...

22150

fish
FISH, n. [L. piscis.]1. An animal that lives in water. Fish is a general name for a class of ...

22151

fisher
FISH'ER, n1. One who is employed in catching fish.2. A species of weasel.

22152

fisherboat
FISH'ERBOAT, n. A boat employed in catching fish.

22153

fisherman
FISH'ERMAN, n.1. One whose occupation is to catch fish.2. A ship or vessel employed in the ...

22154

fishertown
FISH'ERTOWN, n. A town inhabited by fishermen.

22155

fishery
FISH'ERY, n.1. The business of catching fish.2. A place for catching fish with nets or hooks, as ...

22156

fishful
FISH'FUL, a. Abounding with fish; as a fishful pond.

22157

fishgig
FISH'GIG,

22158

fishhook
FISH'HOOK, n. A hook for catching fish.

22159

fishing
FISH'ING, ppr. Attempting to catch fish; searching; seeking to draw forth by artifice or ...

22160

fishing-frog
FISH'ING-FROG, n. The toad-fish, or Lophius, whose head is larger than the body.

22161

fishing-place
FISH'ING-PLACE, n. A place where fishes are caught with seines; a convenient place for fishing; a ...

22162

fishkettle
FISH'KETTLE, n. A kettle made long for boiling fish whole.

22163

fishlike
FISH'LIKE, a. Resembling fish.

22164

fishmarket
FISH'MARKET, n. A place where fish are exposed for sale.

22165

fishmeal
FISH'MEAL, n. A meal of fish; diet on fish; abstemious diet.

22166

fishmonger
FISH'MONGER, n. A seller of fish; a dealer in fish.

22167

fishpond
FISH'POND, n. A pond in which fishes are bred and kept.

22168

fishroom
FISH'ROOM, n. An apartment in a ship between the after-hold and the spirit room.

22169

fishspear
FISH'SPEAR, n. A spear for taking fish by stabbing them.

22170

fishwife
FISH'WIFE, n. A woman that cries fish for sale.

22171

fishwoman
FISH'WOMAN, n. A woman who sells fish.

22172

fishy
FISH'Y, a.1. Consisting of fish.2. Inhabited by fish; as the fishy flood.3. Having the qualities ...

22173

fissile
FIS'SILE, a. [L. fissilis, from fissus, divided, from findo, to split.]That may be split, cleft or ...

22174

fissility
FISSIL'ITY, n. The quality of admitting to be cleft.

22175

fissiped
FIS'SIPED, a. [L. fissus, divided, and pes, foot.] Having separate toes.FIS'SIPED, n. An animal ...

22176

fissure
FIS'SURE, n. fish'ure. [L. fissura, from findo, to split.]1. A cleft; a narrow chasm made by the ...

22177

fissured
FIS'SURED, pp. Cleft; divided; cracked.

22178

fist
FIST, n. The hand clinched; the hand with the fingers doubled into the palm.FIST, v.t.1. To ...

22179

fisticuffs
FIST'ICUFFS, n. [fist and cuff.] Blows or a combat with the fist; a boxing.

22180

fistula
FIS'TULA, n. [L.; Eng. whistle.]1. Properly, a pipe; a wind instrument of music, originally a ...

22181

fistular
FIS'TULAR, a. Hollow, like a pipe or reed.

22182

fistulate
FIS'TULATE, v.i. To become a pipe or fistula.

22183

fistuliform
FIS'TULIFORM, a. [fistula and form.] Being in round hollow columns, as a mineral.Stalactite often ...

22184

fistulous
FIS'TULOUS, a. Having the form or nature of a fistula; as a fistulous ulcer.

22185

fit
FIT, n. [L. peto, impeto, to assult, or to Eng. pet, and primarily to denote a rushing on or ...

22186

fitch
FITCH, n. A chick-pea.

22187

fitchet
FITCH'ET,

22188

fitchew
FITCH'EW, n. A polecat; a foumart.

22189

fitful
FIT'FUL, a. Varied by paroxysms; full of fits.

22190

fitly
FIT'LY, adv. 1. Suitably; properly; with propriety. A maxim fitly applied.2. Commodiously; ...

22191

fitment
FIT'MENT, n. Something adapted to a purpose. [Not used.]

22192

fitness
FIT'NESS, n.1. Suitableness; adaptedness; adaptation; as the fitness of things to their use.2. ...

22193

fitted
FIT'TED, pp. Made suitable; adapted; prepared; qualified.

22194

fitter
FIT'TER, n. One who makes fit or suitable; one who adapts; one who prepares.

22195

fitting
FIT'TING, ppr. Making suitable; adapting; preparing; qualifying; providing with.

22196

fittingly
FIT'TINGLY, adv. Suitably.

22197

fitz
FITZ, Norm. fites, fuz or fiz, a son, is used in names, as in Fitzherbert, Fitzroy, Carlovitz.

22198

five
FIVE, a.Four and one added; the half of ten; as five men; five loaves. Like other adjectives, it ...

22199

fivebar
FI'VEBAR,

22200

fivebarred
FI'VEBARRED, a. Having five bars; as a fivebarred gate.

22201

fivecleft
FI'VECLEFT, a. Quinquefid; divided into five segments.

22202

fivefold
FI'VEFOLD, a. In fives; consisting of five in one; five-double; five times repeated.

22203

fiveleaf
FI'VELEAF, n. Cinquefoil.

22204

fiveleafed
FI'VELEAFED, a. Having five leaves; as fiveleafed clover, or cinquefoil.

22205

fivelobed
FI'VELOBED, a. Consisting of five lobes.

22206

fiveparted
FI'VEPARTED, a. Divided into five parts.

22207

fives
FIVES, n. A kind of play with a ball.

22208

fivetoothed
FI'VETOOTHED, a. Having five teeth.

22209

fivevalved
FI'VEVALVED, a. Having five valves.

22210

fix
FIX, v.t. [L. firus, figo.]1. To make stable; to set or establish immovably. The universe is ...

22211

fixable
FIX'ABLE, a. That may be fixed, established, or rendered firm.

22212

fixation
FIXA'TION, n. 1. The act of fixing.2. Stability; firmness; steadiness; a state of being ...

22213

fixed
FIX'ED, pp. Settled; established; firm; fast; stable.Fixed air, an invisible and permanently ...

22214

fixedly
FIX'EDLY, adv. Firmly; in a settled or established manner; steadfastly.

22215

fixedness
FIX'EDNESS, n. 1. A state of being fixed; stability; firmness; steadfastness; as a fixedness in ...

22216

fixidity
FIXID'ITY, n. Fixedness. [Not used.]

22217

fixity
FIX'ITY, n. Fixedness; coherence of parts; that property of bodies by which they resist ...

22218

fixture
FIX'TURE, n.1. Position.2. Fixedness; firm pressure; as the fixture of the foot.3. Firmness; ...

22219

fixure
FIX'URE, n. Position; stable pressure; firmness. [Little used.]

22220

fizgig
FIZ'GIG, n. An instrument used for striking fish at sea, consisting of a staff with barbed prongs, ...

22221

fizz
FIZZ,

22222

fizzle
FIZ'ZLE, v.i. To make a hissing sound.

22223

flabbiness
FLAB'BINESS, n. [See Flabby.] A soft, flexible state of a substance, which renders it easily ...

22224

flabby
FLAB'BY, a.Soft; yielding to the touch and easily moved or shaken; easily bent; hanging loose by ...

22225

flaccid
FLAC'CID, a. [L. flaccidus, from flacceo, to hand down, to flag.]Soft and weak; limber; lax; ...

22226

flaccidity
FLACCID'ITY, n. Laxity; limberness: want of firmness or stiffness.

22227

flaccidness
FLAC'CIDNESS,

22228

flag
FLAG, v.i. [L. flacceo. See Flaccid. The sense is primarily to bend, or rather to recede, to ...

22229

flagbroom
FLAG'BROOM, n. A broom for sweeping flags.

22230

flagelet
FLAG'ELET, n. [L. flatus, by corruption or Gr. oblique, and a flute.]A small flute; a small wind ...

22231

flagellant
FLAG'ELLANT, n. [L. flagellans, from flagello, to flog.]One who whips himself in religious ...

22232

flagellate
FLAG'ELLATE, v.t. To whip; to scourge.

22233

flagellation
FLAGELLA'TION, n. [L. flagello, to beat or whip, to flog, from flagellum, a whip, scourge or ...

22234

flagged
FLAG'GED, pp. Laid with flat stones.

22235

flagginess
FLAG'GINESS, n. Laxity; limberness; want of tension.

22236

flagging
FLAG'GING, ppr. Growing weak; drooping; laying with flat stones.

22237

flaggy
FLAG'GY, a.1. Weak; flexible; limber; not stiff.2. Weak in taste; insipid; as a flaggy apple.3. ...

22238

flagitious
FLAGI'TIOUS, a. [L. flagitium, a scandalous crime, probably from the root of flagrant.]1. Deeply ...

22239

flagitiously
FLAGI'TIOUSLY, adv. With extreme wickedness.

22240

flagitiousness
FLAGI'TIOUSNESS, n. Extreme wickedness; villainy.

22241

flagon
FLAG'ON, n. [L. lagena; Gr.]A vessel with a narrow mouth, used for holding and conveying ...

22242

flagrancy
FLA'GRANCY, n. [See Flagrant.] 1. A burning; great heat; inflammation. Obs.Lust causeth a ...

22243

flagrant
FLA'GRANT, a. [L. flagrans, from flagro, to burn; Gr.]1. Burning; ardent; eager; as flagrant ...

22244

flagrantly
FLA'GRANTLY, adv. Ardently; notoriously.

22245

flagrate
FLA'GRATE, v.t. To burn. [Little used.]

22246

flagration
FLAGRA'TION, n. A burning. [Little used.]

22247

flagstone
FLAG'STONE, n. A flat stone for pavement.

22248

flagworm
FLAG'WORM, n. A worm or grub found among flags and sedge.

22249

flail
FLA'IL, n. [L. flagellum. We retain the original verb in flog, to strike, to lay on, L. fligo, ...

22250

flake
FLAKE, n. [L. floccus; Gr. Flake and flock are doubtless the same word, varied in orthography, ...

22251

flake-white
FLAKE-WHITE, n. Oxyd of bismuth.

22252

flaky
FLA'KY, a.1. Consisting of flakes or locks; consisting of small loose masses.2. Lying in flakes; ...

22253

flam
FLAM, n. A freak or whim; also, a falsehood; a lie; an illusory pretext; deception; delusion.Lies ...

22254

flambeau
FLAM'BEAU, n. flam'bo. [L. flamma, flame.]A light or luminary made of thick wicks covered with ...

22255

flame
FLAME, n. [L. flamma.]1. A blaze; burning vapor; vapor in combustion; or according to modern ...

22256

flamecolor
FLA'MECOLOR, n. Bright color, as that of flame.

22257

flamecolored
FLA'MECOLORED, a. Of the color of flame; of a bright yellow color.

22258

flameeyed
FLA'MEEYED, a. Having eyes like a flame.

22259

flameless
FLA'MELESS, a. Destitute of flame; without incense.

22260

flamen
FLA'MEN, n. [L.] 1. In ancient Rome, a priest. Originally there were three priests so called; ...

22261

flaming
FLA'MING, ppr. 1. Burning in flame.2. a. Bright; red. Also, violent; vehement; as a flaming ...

22262

flamingly
FLA'MINGLY, adv. Most brightly; with great show or vehemence.

22263

flamingo
FLAMIN'GO, n.A fowl constituting the genus Phoenicopterus, of the grallic order. The beak is ...

22264

flaminical
FLAMIN'ICAL, a. Pertaining to a Roman flamen.

22265

flammability
FLAMMABIL'ITY, n. The quality of admitting to be set on fire, or enkindled into a flame or blaze; ...

22266

flammable
FLAM'MABLE, a. Capable of being enkindled into flame.

22267

flammation
FLAMMA'TION, n. The act of setting on flame.The three last words are little used. Instead of them ...

22268

flammeous
FLAM'MEOUS, a. Consisting of flame; like flame.

22269

flammiferous
FLAMMIF'EROUS, a. [L. flamma and fero, to bring.] Producing flame.

22270

flammivomous
FLAMMIV'OMOUS, a. [L. flamma and vomo, to vomit.] Vomiting flames, as a volcano.

22271

flamy
FLA'MY, a. [from flame.]1. Blazing; burning; as flamy breath.2. Having the nature of flame; as ...

22272

flank
FLANK, n. [Eng. flag. Gr. probably connected with lank, and so called from its laxity, or from ...

22273

flanked
FLANK'ED, pp. Attacked on the side; covered or commanded on the flank.

22274

flanker
FLANK'ER, n. A fortification projecting so as to command the side of an assailing body.FLANK'ER, ...

22275

flannel
FLAN'NEL, n. [L. lana.]A soft nappy woolen cloth of loose texture.

22276

flap
FLAP, n. [L. alapa, a slap. It seems difficult to separate flap from clap, slap, flabby, lap, ...

22277

flapdragon
FLAP'DRAGON, n. 1. A play in which they catch raisins out of burning brandy, and extinguishing ...

22278

flapeared
FLAP'EARED, a. Having broad loose ears.

22279

flapjack
FLAP'JACK, n. An apple-puff.

22280

flapmouthed
FLAP'MOUTHED, a. Having loose hanging lips.

22281

flapped
FLAP'PED, pp. Struck with something broad, let down; having the brim fallen, as a flapped hat.

22282

flapper
FLAP'PER, n. One who flaps another.

22283

flapping
FLAP'PING, ppr. Striking; beating; moving something broad; as flapping wings. The ducks run ...

22284

flare
FLARE, v.i. [If this word is not contracted, it may be allied to clear, glare, glory, L. floreo, ...

22285

flaring
FLA'RING, ppr. or a.1. Burning with a wavering light; fluttering; glittering; showy.2. Opening; ...

22286

flash
FLASH, n. 1. A sudden burst of light; a flood of light instantaneously appearing and ...

22287

flasher
FLASH'ER, n.1. A man of more appearance of wit than reality.2. A rower. [Not in use.]

22288

flashily
FLASH'ILY, adv. With empty show; with a sudden glare; without solidity of wit or thought.

22289

flashing
FLASH'ING, ppr. Bursting forth as a flood of light, or of flame and light, or as wit, mirth or ...

22290

flashy
FLASH'Y, a.1. Showy, but empty; dazzling for a moment, but not solid; as flashy wit.2. Showy; ...

22291

flask
FL'ASK, n.1. A kind of bottle; as a flask of wine or oil.2. A vessel for powder.3. A bed in a ...

22292

flasket
FL'ASKET, n. 1. A vessel in which viands are served up.2. A long shallow basket.

22293

flat
FLAT, a. [L. latus, broad; Gr.; Eng. blade.]1. Having an even surface, without risings or ...

22294

flat-bottomed
FLAT'-BOTTOMED, a. Having a flat bottom, as a boat, or a moat in fortification.

22295

flative
FLA'TIVE, a. [L. flatus, from flo, to blow.] Producing wind; flatulent. [Not in use.]

22296

flatlong
FLAT'LONG, adv. With the flat side downward; not edgewise.

22297

flatly
FLAT'LY, adv.1. Horizontally; without inclination.2. Evenly; without elevations and ...

22298

flatness
FLAT'NESS, n.1. Evenness of surface; levelness; equality of surface.2. Want of relief or ...

22299

flatted
FLAT'TED, pp. Made flat; rendered even on the surface; also, rendered vapid or insipid.

22300

flatten
FLAT'TEN, v.t. flat'n.1. To make flat; to reduce to an equal or even surface; to level.2. To ...

22301

flattening
FLAT'TENING, ppr. Making flat.

22302

flatter
FLAT'TER, n. The person or thing by which any thing is flattened.FLAT'TER, v.t. [Flatter may be ...

22303

flattered
FLAT'TERED, pp. Soothed by praise; pleased by commendation; gratified with hopes, false or well ...

22304

flatterer
FLAT'TERER, n. One who flatters; a fawner; a wheedler; one who praises another, with a view to ...

22305

flattering
FLAT'TERING, ppr.1. Gratifying with praise; pleasing by applause; wheedling; coaxing.2. a. ...

22306

flatteringly
FLAT'TERINGLY, adv.1. In a flattering manner; in a manner to flatter.2. In a manner to favor; ...

22307

flattery
FLAT'TERY, n. 1. False praise; commendation bestowed for the purpose of gaining favor and ...

22308

flattish
FLAT'TISH, a. [from flat.] Somewhat flat; approaching to flatness.

22309

flatulence
FLAT'ULENCE,

22310

flatulency
FLAT'ULENCY, n. [See Flatulent.]1. Windiness in the stomach; air generated in a weak stomach and ...

22311

flatulent
FLAT'ULENT, a. [L. flatulentus, flatus, from flo, to blow.]1. Windy; affected with air generated ...

22312

flatuosity
FLATUOS'ITY, n. Windiness; fullness of air; flatulence. [Not used.]

22313

flatuous
FLAT'UOUS, a. [L. flatuosus.] Windy; generating wind. [Not used.]

22314

flatus
FLA'TUS, n. [L. from flo, to blow.]1. A breath; a puff of wind.2. Wind generated in the stomach ...

22315

flatwise
FLAT'WISE, a. or adv. [from flat.] With the flat side downward or next to another object; not ...

22316

flaunt
FL'AUNT, v.i. [I know not whence we have this word. From the root L. bearing the sense of ...

22317

flaunting
FL'AUNTING, ppr. Making an ostentatious display.

22318

flavor
FLA'VOR, n.The quality of a substance which affects the taste or smell, in any manner. We say, the ...

22319

flavored
FLA'VORED, a. Having a quality that affects the sense of tasting or smelling; as high-flavored ...

22320

flavorless
FLA'VORLESS, a. Without flavor; tasteless; having no smell or taste.

22321

flavorous
FLA'VOROUS, a. Pleasant to the taste or smell

22322

flavous
FLA'VOUS, a. [L. flavus.] Yellow. [Not used.]

22323

flaw
FLAW, n. [Gr. seems to be contracted .1. A breach; a crack; a defect made by breaking or ...

22324

flawed
FLAW'ED, pp. Broken; cracked.

22325

flawing
FLAW'ING, ppr. Breaking; cracking.

22326

flawless
FLAW'LESS, a. Without cracks; without defect.

22327

flawn
FLAWN, n. A sort of custard or pie. [Obs.]

22328

flawter
FLAW'TER, v.t. To scrape or pare a skin. [Not used.]

22329

flawy
FLAW'Y,1. Full of flaws or cracks; broken; defective; faulty.2. Subject to sudden gusts of wind.

22330

flax
FLAX, n.1. A plant of the genus Linum, consisting of a single slender stalk, the skin or herl of ...

22331

flaxcomb
FLAX'COMB, n. An instrument with teeth through which flax is drawn for separating from it the tow ...

22332

flaxdresser
FLAX'DRESSER, n. One who breaks and swingles flax.

22333

flaxen
FLAX'EN, a.1. Made of flax; as flaxen thread.2. Resembling flax; of the color of flax; fair, ...

22334

flaxplant
FLAX'PLANT, n. The Phormium, a plant in New Zealand that serves the inhabitants for flax.

22335

flaxraiser
FLAX'RAISER, n. One who raises flax.

22336

flaxseed
FLAX'SEED, n. The seed of flax.

22337

flaxy
FLAX'Y, a. Like flax; being of a light color; fair.

22338

flay
FLAY, v.t. [Gr. whence bark, rind; probably a contracted word.]1. To skin; to strip off the skin ...

22339

flayed
FLA'YED, pp. Skinned; stripped of the skin.

22340

flayer
FLA'YER, n. One who strips off the skin.

22341

flaying
FLA'YING, ppr. Stripping off the skin.

22342

flea
FLEA, n. [See Flee and Fly.]An insect of the genus Pulex. It has two eyes and six feet; the ...

22343

fleabane
FLE'ABANE, n. A plant of the genus Conyza.

22344

fleabite
FLE'ABITE,

22345

fleabiting
FLE'ABITING, n. 1. The bite of a flea, or the red spot caused by the bite.2. A trifling wound or ...

22346

fleabitten
FLE'ABITTEN, a. 1. Bitten or stung by a flea.2. Mean; worthless; of low birth or station.

22347

fleak
FLEAK, A lock. [See Flake.]

22348

fleam
FLEAM, n.In surgery and farriery, a sharp instrument used for opening veins for letting blood.

22349

fleawort
FLE'AWORT, n. A plant.

22350

fleck
FLECK,

22351

flecker
FLECK'ER, v.t.To spot; to streak or stripe; to variegate; to dapple.Both flecked with white, the ...

22352

flection
FLEC'TION, n. [L. flectio.] The act of bending, or state of being bent.

22353

flector
FLEC'TOR, n. A flexor, which see.

22354

fled
FLED, pret. and pp. of flee; as, truth has fled.

22355

fledge
FLEDGE, a. flej.Feathered; furnished with fethers or wings; able to fly.His locks behind, ...

22356

fledged
FLEDG'ED, pp. Furnished with fethers for flight; covered with fethers.

22357

fledging
FLEDG'ING, ppr. Furnishing with fethers for flight.

22358

flee
FLEE, v.i.1. To run with rapidity, as from danger; to attempt to escape; to hasten from danger or ...

22359

fleece
FLEECE, n. flees. [L. vellus, from vello, to pluck or tear off.]The coat of wool shorn from a ...

22360

fleeced
FLEE'CED, pp. Stripped by severe exactions.FLEE'CED, a. Furnished with a fleece or with fleeces; ...

22361

fleecer
FLEE'CER, n. One who strips or takes by severe exactions.

22362

fleecing
FLEE'CING, ppr. Stripping of money or property by severe demands of fees, taxes or contributions.

22363

fleecy
FLEE'CY, a.1. Covered with wool; woolly; as a fleecy flock.2. Resembling wool or a fleece; soft; ...

22364

fleer
FLEER, v.i. 1. To deride; to sneer; to mock; to gibe; to make a wry face in contempt, or to grin ...

22365

fleerer
FLEE'RER, n. a mocker; a fawner.

22366

fleering
FLEE'RING, ppr. Deriding; mocking; counterfeiting an air of civility.

22367

fleet
FLEET, in English names, denotes a flood, a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, or a river; as in ...

22368

fleetfoot
FLEE'TFOOT, a. Swift of foot; running or able to run with rapidity.

22369

fleeting
FLEE'TING, ppr.1. Passing rapidly; flying with velocity.2. a. Transient; not durable; as the ...

22370

fleeting-dish
FLEE'TING-DISH, n. A skimming bowl. [Local.]

22371

fleetly
FLEE'TLY, adv. Rapidly; lightly and nimbly; swiftly.

22372

fleetness
FLEE'TNESS, n. Swiftness; rapidity; velocity; celerity; speed; as the fleetness of a horse or a ...

22373

fleming
FLEM'ING, n. A native of Flanders, or the Low Countries in Europe.

22374

flemish
FLEM'ISH, a. Pertaining to Flanders.

22375

flesh
FLESH, n. [I know not the primary sense; it may be soft.]1. A compound substance forming a large ...

22376

fleshbroth
FLESH'BROTH, n. Broth made by boiling flesh in water.

22377

fleshbrush
FLESH'BRUSH, n. A brush for exciting action in the skin by friction.

22378

fleshcolor
FLESH'COLOR, n. The color of flesh; carnation.

22379

fleshcolored
FLESH'COLORED, a. Being of the color of flesh.

22380

fleshdiet
FLESH'DIET, n. Food consisting of flesh.

22381

fleshed
FLESH'ED, pp. 1. Initiated; accustomed; glutted.2. Fat; fleshy.

22382

fleshfly
FLESH'FLY, n. A fly that feeds on flesh, and deposits her eggs in it.

22383

fleshhook
FLESH'HOOK, n. A hook to draw flesh from a pot or caldron. 1Sam. 2.

22384

fleshiness
FLESH'INESS, n. [from fleshy.] Abundance of flesh or fat in animals; plumpness; corpulence; ...

22385

fleshing
FLESH'ING, ppr. Initiating; making familiar; glutting.

22386

fleshless
FLESH'LESS, a. Destitute of flesh; lean.

22387

fleshliness
FLESH'LINESS, n. Carnal passions and appetites.

22388

fleshly
FLESH'LY, a.1. Pertaining to the flesh; corporeal.2. Carnal; worldly; lascivious.Abstain from ...

22389

fleshmeat
FLESH'MEAT, n. Animal food; the flesh of animals prepared or used for food.

22390

fleshment
FLESH'MENT, n. Eagerness gained by a successful initiation.

22391

fleshmonger
FLESH'MONGER, n. One who deals in flesh; a procurer; a pimp. [Little used.]

22392

fleshpot
FLESH'POT, A vessel in which flesh is cooked; hence, plenty of provisions. Ex. 16.

22393

fleshquake
FLESH'QUAKE, n. A trembling of the flesh. [Not used.]

22394

fleshy
FLESH'Y, a.1. Full of flesh; plump; musculous.The sole of his foot is fleshy.2. Fat; gross; ...

22395

flet
FLET, pp. of fleet. Skimmed. [Not used.]

22396

fletch
FLETCH, v.t. To fether an arrow.

22397

fletcher
FLETCH'ER, n. An arrow-maker; a manufacturer of bows and arrows. hence the name of Fletcher. But ...

22398

fletz
FLETZ, a. In geology, the fletz formations, so called, consist of rocks which lie immediately over ...

22399

flew
FLEW, pret. of fly.The people flew upon the spoil. 1Sam. 14.

22400

flewed
FLEW'ED, a. Chapped; mouthed; deep-mouthed.

22401

flexanimous
FLEXAN'IMOUS, a. [from L.] Having power to change the mind. [Not used.]

22402

flexibility
FLEXIBIL'ITY, n. [See Flexible.]1. The quality of admitting to be bent; pliancy; flexibleness; as ...

22403

flexible
FLEX'IBLE, a. [L. flexibilis, from flecto, flexi, to bend, plico.]1. That may be bent; capable of ...

22404

flexibleness
FLEX'IBLENESS, n. 1. Possibility to be bent or turned from a straight line or form without ...

22405

flexile
FLEX'ILE, a. [L. flexilis.] Pliant; pliable; easily bent; yielding to power, impulse or moral ...

22406

flexion
FLEX'ION, n. [L. flexio.] 1. The act of bending.2. A bending; a part bent; a fold.3. A turn; a ...

22407

flexor
FLEX'OR, n. In anatomy, a muscle whose office is to bend the part to which it belongs, in ...

22408

flexuous
FLEX'UOUS, a. [L. flexuosus.]1. Winding; having turns or windings; as a flexuous rivulet.2. ...

22409

flexure
FLEX'URE, n. [L. flexura.] 1. A winding or bending; the form of bending; as the flexure of a ...

22410

flicker
FLICK'ER, v.i.1. To flutter; to flap the wings without flying; to strike rapidly with the ...

22411

flickering
FLICK'ERING, ppr. 1. Fluttering; flapping the wings without flight.2. a. With amorous motions of ...

22412

flickermouse
FLICK'ERMOUSE, n. The bat.

22413

flier
FLI'ER, n. [See Fly. It ought to be flyer.]1. One that flies or flees.2. A runaway; a ...

22414

flight
FLIGHT, n. [See Fly.]1. The act of fleeing; the act of running away, to escape danger or expected ...

22415

flight-shot
FLIGHT-SHOT, n. The distance which an arrow flies.

22416

flightness
FLIGHTNESS, n. The state of being flighty; wildness; slight delirium.

22417

flighty
FLIGHTY, a.1. Fleeting; swift.The flighty purpose never is o'ertook.2. Wild; indulging the ...

22418

flimflam
FLIM'FLAM, n. A freak; a trick.

22419

flimsiness
FLIM'SINESS, n. State or quality of being flimsy; thin, weak texture; weakness; want of substance ...

22420

flimsy
FLIM'SY, a. s as z. [The word is retained by the common people in New England in limsy, weak, ...

22421

flinch
FLINCH, v.i. [I have not found this word in any other language; but the sense of it occurs in ...

22422

flincher
FLINCH'ER, n. One who flinches or fails.

22423

flinching
FLINCH'ING, ppr. Failing to undertake, perform or proceed; shrinking; withdrawing.

22424

flinder
FLIN'DER, n. A small piece or splinter; a fragment.[This seems to be splinter, without the ...

22425

fling
FLING, v.t. pret. and pp. flung. [L. lego legare.]1. To cast, send or throw from the hand; to ...

22426

flinger
FLING'ER, n. One who flings; one who jeers.

22427

flinging
FLING'ING, ppr. Throwing; casting; jeering.

22428

flint
FLINT, n.1. In natural history, a sub-species of quartz, of a yellowish or bluish gray, or grayish ...

22429

flintheart
FLINT'HEART,

22430

flinthearted
FLINT'HEARTED, a. Having a hard, unfeeling heart.

22431

flinty
FLINT'Y, a. 1. Consisting of flint; as a flinty rock.2. Like flint; very hard, not impressible; ...

22432

flip
FLIP, n. A mixed liquor consisting of beer and spirit sweetened.

22433

flipdog
FLIP'DOG, n. An iron used, when heated, to warm flip.

22434

flippancy
FLIP'PANCY, n. [See Flippant.] Smoothness and rapidity of speech; volubility of tongue; fluency ...

22435

flippant
FLIP'PANT, a. [L. labor, to slide or slip, and to liber, free.]1. Of smoother, fluent and rapid ...

22436

flippantly
FLIP'PANTLY, adv. Fluently; with ease and volubility of speech.

22437

flippantness
FLIP'PANTNESS, n. fluency of speech; volubility of tongue; flippancy.[This is not a low, vulgar ...

22438

flirt
FLIRT, v.t. flurt. [This word evidently belongs to the root of L. floreo, or ploro, signifying to ...

22439

flirtation
FLIRTA'TION, n. 1. A flirting; a quick sprightly motion.2. Desire of attracting notice. [A cant ...

22440

flirted
FLIRT'ED, pp. Thrown with a sudden jerk.

22441

flirting
FLIRT'ING, ppr. Throwing; jerking; tossing; darting about; rambling and changing place hastily.

22442

flit
FLIT, v.i. [Heb. It is undoubtedly from the same root as fleet, which see.]1. To fly away with a ...

22443

flitch
FLITCH, n.The side of a hog salted and cured.

22444

flitter
FLIT'TER, v.i. To flutter, which see.FLIT'TER, n. A rag; a tatter. [See Fritter.]

22445

flittermouse
FLIT'TERMOUSE, n. [Flit, flitter and mouse.]A bat; an animal that has the fur of a mouse, and ...

22446

flittiness
FLIT'TINESS, n. [from flit.] Unsteadiness; levity; lightness.

22447

flitting
FLIT'TING, ppr. Flying rapidly; fluttering; moving swiftly.FLIT'TING, n. A flying with lightness ...

22448

flitty
FLIT'TY, a. Unstable; fluttering.

22449

flix
FLIX, n. Down; fur. [Not used.]

22450

flixweed
FLIX'WEED, n. The Sisymbrium sophia, a species of water-cresses, growing on walls and waste ...

22451

flo
FLO, n. An arrow. [Not in use.]

22452

float
FLOAT, n.1. That which swims or is borne on water; as a float of weeds and rushes. But ...

22453

float-board
FLO'AT-BOARD, n. A board of the water-wheel of undershot mills, which receives the impulse of the ...

22454

floatage
FLO'ATAGE, n. Any thing that floats on the water.

22455

floated
FLO'ATED, pp.1. Flooded; overflowed.2. Borne on water.

22456

floater
FLO'ATER, n. One that floats or swims.

22457

floating
FLO'ATING, ppr. 1. Swimming; conveying on water; overflowing.2. Lying flat on the surface of the ...

22458

floating-bridge
FLOAT'ING-BRIDGE, n.1. In the United States, a bridge, consisting of logs or timber with a floor ...

22459

floatstone
FLO'ATSTONE, n. Swimming flint, spungiform quartz, a mineral of a spungy texture, of a whitish ...

22460

floaty
FLO'ATY, a. Buoyant; swimming on the surface; light.

22461

flocculence
FLOC'CULENCE, n. [L. flocculus, floccus. See Flock.]The state of being in locks or flocks; ...

22462

flocculent
FLOC'CULENT, a. Coalescing and adhering in locks or flakes.I say the liquor is broken to ...

22463

flock
FLOCK, n. [L. floccus. It is the same radically as flake, and applied to wool or hair, we write ...

22464

flocking
FLOCK'ING, ppr. Collecting or running together in a crowd.

22465

flog
FLOG, v.t. [L. figo, to strike, that is, to lay on; L. flagrum, flagellum, Eng. flail; Gr.; L. ...

22466

flogged
FLOG'GED, pp. Whipped or scourged for punishment; chastised.

22467

flogging
FLOG'GING, ppr. Whipping for punishment; chastising.FLOG'GING, n. A whipping for punishment.

22468

flood
FLOOD, n. flud.1. A great flow of water; a body of moving water; particularly, a body of water, ...

22469

flooded
FLOOD'ED, pp. Overflowed inundated.

22470

floodgate
FLOOD'GATE, n. 1. A gate to be opened for letter water flow through, or to be shut to prevent ...

22471

flooding
FLOOD'ING, ppr. Overflowing; inundating.FLOOD'ING, n. Any preternatural discharge of blood from ...

22472

flook
FLOOK. See Fluke, the usual orthography.]

22473

flooking
FLOOK'ING, n. In mining, an interruption or shifting of a load of ore, by a cross vein or fissure.

22474

floor
FLOOR, n. flore. [In early ages, the inhabitants of Europe had no floor in their huts, but the ...

22475

floor-timbers
FLOOR-TIMBERS, n. The timbers on which a floor is laid.

22476

floored
FLOOR'ED, Covered with boards, plank or pavement; furnished with a floor.

22477

flooring
FLOOR'ING, ppr. Laying a floor; furnishing with a floor.FLOOR'ING, n. 1. A platform; the bottom ...

22478

flop
FLOP, v.t. [A different spelling of flap.]1. To clap or strike the wings.2. To let down the brim ...

22479

flora
FLO'RA, n. [See Floral.]1. In antiquity, the goddess of flowers.2. In modern usage, a catalogue ...

22480

floral
FLO'RAL, a. [L. floralis, from flos, a flower, which see.]1. Containing the flower, as a floral ...

22481

floren
FLOR'EN

22482

florence
FLOR'ENCE, n. An ancient gold coin of Edward III of six shillings sterling value, about 134 ...

22483

florentine
FLOR'ENTINE, n.1. A native of Florence.2. A kind of silk cloth, so called.

22484

florescence
FLORES'CENCE, n. [L. florescens, floresco. See flower.]In botany, the season when plants expand ...

22485

floret
FLO'RET, n. A little flower; the partial or separate little flower of an aggregate flower.

22486

florid
FLOR'ID, a. [L. floridus, from floreo, to flower.]1. Literally, flowery; covered or abounding ...

22487

floridity
FLORID'ITY, n. Freshness or brightness of color; floridness.

22488

floridness
FLOR'IDNESS, n. 1. Brightness or freshness of color or complexion.2. Vigor; spirit. ...

22489

floriferous
FLORIF'EROUS, a. [L. florifer, from flos, a flower, and fero, to bear.] Producing flowers.

22490

florification
FLORIFICA'TION, n. The act, process or time of flowering.

22491

florin
FLOR'IN, n. A coin, originally made at Florence. The name is given to different coins of gold or ...

22492

florist
FLO'RIST, n.1. A cultivator of flowers; one skilled in flowers.2. One who writes a flora, or an ...

22493

florulent
FLOR'ULENT, a. Flowery; blossoming. [Not in use.]

22494

floscular
FLOS'CULAR,

22495

floscule
FLOS'CULE, n. [L. flosculus.] In botany, a partial or lesser floret of an aggregate flower.

22496

flosculous
FLOS'CULOUS, a. [infra.] In botany, a flosculous flower is a compound flower, composed entirely of ...

22497

floss
FLOSS, n. [L. flos.] A downy or silky substance in the husks of certain plants.

22498

flossification
FLOSSIFICA'TION, n. A flowering; expansion of flowers. [Novel.]

22499

flota
FLO'TA, n. [See Fleet.] A fleet; but appropriately a fleet of Spanish ships which formerly sailed ...

22500

flotage
FLO'TAGE, n. That which floats on the sea, or on rivers. [Little used.]

22501

flote
FLOTE, v.t. To skim. [Not used or local.]

22502

flotilla
FLOTIL'LA, n. [dim. of flota.] A little fleet, or fleet of small vessels.

22503

flotsam
FLOT'SAM,

22504

flotson
FLOT'SON, n. [from float.] Goods lost by shipwreck, and floating on the sea. When such goods are ...

22505

flotten
FLOT'TEN, pp. Skimmed. [Not in use.]

22506

flounce
FLOUNCE, v.i. flouns. [See Flounder.]1. To throw the limbs and body one way and the other; to ...

22507

flounder
FLOUN'DER, n. A flat fish of the genus Pleuronectes.FLOUN'DER, v.i. [This seems to be allied to ...

22508

floundering
FLOUN'DERING, ppr. Making irregular motions; struggling with violence.

22509

flour
FLOUR, n. [originally flower; L. flos, floris, from floreo, to flourish.]The edible part of corn; ...

22510

floured
FLOUR'ED, pp. Converted into flour; sprinkled with flour.

22511

flouring
FLOUR'ING, ppr. Converting into flour; sprinkling with flour.

22512

flourish
FLOURISH, v.i. flur'ish. [L. floresco, from floreo. The primary sense is to open, expand, ...

22513

flourished
FLOURISHED, pp. flur'ished. Embellished; adorned with bold and irregular figures or lines; ...

22514

flourisher
FLOURISHER, n. flur'isher. 1. One who flourishes; one who thrives or prospers.2. One who ...

22515

flourishing
FLOURISHING, ppr. or a. flur'ishing. Thriving; prosperous; increasing; making a show.

22516

flourishingly
FLOURISHINGLY, adv. flur'ishingly. With flourishes; ostentatiously.

22517

flout
FLOUT, v.t. To mock or insult; to treat with contempt.Phillida flouts me.He flouted us ...

22518

flouted
FLOUT'ED, pp. Mocked; treated with contempt.

22519

flouter
FLOUT'ER, n. One who flouts and flings; a mocker.

22520

flouting
FLOUT'ING, ppr. Mocking; insulting; fleering.

22521

floutingly
FLOUT'INGLY, adv. With flouting; insultingly.

22522

flow
FLOW, v.i. [L. fluo, contracted from fugo, for it forms fluri, fuctum. In one case, the word ...

22523

flowed
FLOWED, pp. Overflowed; inundated.

22524

flower
FLOW'ER, n. [L. flos, floris, a flower; floreo, to blossom. See Flourish.]1. In botany, that ...

22525

flower-de-lis
FLOW'ER-DE-LIS, n.1. In heraldry, a bearing representing a lily, the hieroglyphic of royal ...

22526

flower-fence
FLOW'ER-FENCE, n. The name of certain plants. The flower-fence of Barbados is of the genus ...

22527

flower-garden
FLOW'ER-G'ARDEN, n. A garden in which flowers are chiefly cultivated.

22528

flower-gentle
FLOW'ER-GENTLE, n. A plant, the amaranth.

22529

flower-inwoven
FLOWER-INWO'VEN, a. Adorned with flowers.

22530

flower-kirtled
FLOW'ER-KIRTLED, a. Dressed with garlands of flowers.

22531

flower-stalk
FLOW'ER-STALK, n. In botany, the peduncle of a plant, or the stem that supports the flower or ...

22532

flowered
FLOW'ERED, pp. Embellished with figures of flowers.

22533

floweret
FLOW'ERET, n. A small flower; a floret.[In botany, floret is solely used.]

22534

floweriness
FLOW'ERINESS, n. [from flowery.]1. The state of being flowery, or of abounding with flowers.2. ...

22535

flowering
FLOW'ERING, ppr.1. Blossoming; blooming; expanding the petals, as plants.2. Adorning with ...

22536

flowerless
FLOW'ERLESS, a. Having no flower.

22537

flowery
FLOW'ERY, a.1. Full of flowers; abounding with blossoms; as a flowery field.2. Adorned with ...

22538

flowing
FLOWING, ppr. Moving as a fluid; issuing; proceeding; abounding; smooth, as style; ...

22539

flowingly
FLOWINGLY, adv. With volubility; with abundance.

22540

flowingness
FLOWINGNESS, n. Smoothness of diction; stream of diction.

22541

flowk
FLOWK,

22542

flown
FLOWN, had fled, in the following phrases, is not good English.Was reason flown.Sons of Belial, ...

22543

fluate
FLU'ATE, n. [from fluro, which see.] In chimistry, a salt formed by the fluoric acid combined ...

22544

fluctuant
FLUC'TUANT, a. [L. fluctuans. See Fluctuate.] Moving like a wave; wavering; unsteady.

22545

fluctuate
FLUC'TUATE, v.i. [L. fluctuo, from fluctus, a wave, from fluo, to flow.]1. To move as a wave; to ...

22546

fluctuating
FLUC'TUATING, ppr.1. Wavering; rolling as a wave; moving in this and that direction; rising and ...

22547

fluctuation
FLUCTUA'TION, n. [L. fluctuatio.]1. A motion like that of waves; a moving in this and that ...

22548

fludder
FLUD'DER, n. An aquatic fowl of the diver kind, nearly as large as a goose.

22549

fluder
FLUD'ER,

22550

flue
FLUE, n. [probably contracted from flume, L. flumen, from fluo.]A passage for smoke in a chimney, ...

22551

fluellen
FLUEL'LEN, n. The female speedwell, a plant of the genus Antirrhinum, or snapdragon.

22552

fluence
FLUENCE, for fluency, is not used.

22553

fluency
FLU'ENCY, n. [L. fluens, from flue, to flow.]1. The quality of flowing, applied to speech or ...

22554

fluent
FLU'ENT, a. [See Fluency. 1. Liquid; flowing.2. Flowing; passing.Motion being a fluent thing.3. ...

22555

fluently
FLU'ENTLY, adv. With ready flow; volubly; without hesitation or obstruction; as, to speak ...

22556

flugelman
FLU'GELMAN, n. In German, the leader of a file. But with us, a soldier who stands on the wing of ...

22557

fluid
FLU'ID, a. [L. fluidus, from fluo, to flow.] Having parts which easily move and change their ...

22558

fluidity
FLUID'ITY, n. The quality of being capable of flowing; that quality of bodies which renders them ...

22559

fluidness
FLU'IDNESS, n. The state of being fluid; fluidity, which see.

22560

fluke
FLUKE, n. A flounder.

22561

fluke-worm
FLU'KE-WORM, n. The guard-worm, a species of Fasciola.

22562

flume
FLUME, n. [L. flumen, from fluo, to flow.]Literally, a flowing; hence, the passage or channel for ...

22563

fluminating
FLU'MINATING, ppr.1. Thundering; crackling; exploding; detonating.2. Hurling papal denunciations, ...

22564

flummery
FLUM'MERY, n. [See Lumber.]1. A sort of jelly made of flour or meal; pap.Milk and flummery are ...

22565

flung
FLUNG, pret. and pp. of fling.Several statues the Romans themselves flung into the river.

22566

fluoborate
FLUOBO'RATE, n. A compound of fluoboric acid with a base.

22567

fluoboric
FLUOBO'RIC, a. The fluoboric acid or gas is a compound of fluorine and boron.

22568

fluor
FLU'OR, n. [Low L. from fluo, to flow.]1. A fluid state.2. Menstrual flux. [Little used in ...

22569

fluor-acid
FLU'OR-ACID, n. The acid of fluor.

22570

fluorated
FLU'ORATED, a. Combined with fluoric acid.

22571

fluoric
FLUOR'IC, a. Pertaining to fluor; obtained from fluor; as fluoric acid.

22572

fluorin
FLU'ORIN,

22573

fluorine
FLU'ORINE, n. The supposed basis of fluoric acid.

22574

fluorous
FLU'OROUS, a. The fluorous acid is the acid of fluor in its first degree of oxygenation.

22575

fluosilicate
FLUOSIL'ICATE, n. [fluor and silex or silica.]In chiminstry, a compound of fluoric acid, ...

22576

fluosilicic
FLUOSILIC'IC, a. Composed of or containing fluoric acid with silex.

22577

flurry
FLUR'RY, n.1. A sudden blast or gust, or a light temporary breeze; as a flurry of wind. It is ...

22578

flush
FLUSH, v.i.1. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush; as, blood flushes into the face.2. To come in ...

22579

flushed
FLUSH'ED, pp. 1. Overspread or tinged with a red color from the flowing of blood to the face. We ...

22580

flusher
FLUSH'ER, n. The lesser butcher-bird.

22581

flushing
FLUSH'ING, ppr. Overspreading with red; glowing.FLUSH'ING, n. A glow of red in the face.

22582

fluster
FLUS'TER, v.t. To make hot and rosy, as with drinking; to heat; to hurry; to agitate; to ...

22583

flustered
FLUS'TERED, pp. Heated with liquor; agitated; confused.

22584

flute
FLUTE, n. [L. flo, flatus, to blow, or L. fluta, a lamprey, with the same number of holes.]1. A ...

22585

fluted
FLU'TED, pp. or a. 1. Channeled; furrowed; as a column.2. In music, thin; fine; flutelike; as ...

22586

fluting
FLU'TING, ppr. Channeling; cutting furrows; as in a column.FLU'TING, n. A channel or furrow in a ...

22587

flutist
FLU'TIST, n. A performer on the flute.

22588

flutter
FLUT'TER, v.i.1. To move or flap the wings rapidly, without flying, or with short flights; to ...

22589

fluttered
FLUT'TERED, pp. Agitated; confused; disordered.

22590

fluttering
FLUT'TERING, ppr. Flapping the wings without flight or with short flights; hovering; fluctuating; ...

22591

fluvial
FLU'VIAL, a. [L. fluviaticus, from fluvius, a river; fluo, to flow.]Belonging to rivers; growing ...

22592

fluviatic
FLUVIAT'IC,

22593

fluviatile
FLU'VIATILE, a. [L. fluviatilis.] Belonging to rivers.[Fluviatic is the preferable word.]

22594

flux
FLUX, n. [L. fluxus, fluo, fluxi.]1. The act of flowing; the motion or passing of a fluid.2. The ...

22595

fluxation
FLUXA'TION, n. A flowing or passing away, and giving place to others.

22596

fluxed
FLUX'ED, pp. Melted; fused; reduced to a flowing state.

22597

fluxibility
FLUXIBIL'ITY, n. The quality of admitting fusion.

22598

fluxible
FLUX'IBLE, a. [from Low L.] Capable of being melted or fused, as a mineral.

22599

fluxility
FLUXIL'ITY, n. [Low L. fluxilis.] The quality of admitting fusion; possibility of being fused or ...

22600

fluxion
FLUX'ION n. [L. fluxio, from fluo, to flow.]1. The act of flowing.2. The matter that flows.3. ...

22601

fluxionary
FLUX'IONARY, a. Pertaining to mathematical fluxions.

22602

fluxionist
FLUX'IONIST, n. One skilled in fluxions.

22603

fluxive
FLUX'IVE, a. Flowing; wanting solidity. [Not used.]

22604

fluxure
FLUX'URE, n. A flowing or fluid matter. [Not used.]

22605

fly
FLY, v.i.1. To move through air by the aid of wings, as fowls.2. To pass or move in air, by the ...

22606

fly-honeysuckle
FLY-HONEYSUCKLE, n. A plant, the Lonicera. The African fly-honeysuckle is the Halleria.

22607

flybane
FLY'BANE, n. A plant called catch-fly, of the genus Silene.

22608

flybitten
FLYBITTEN, a. Marked by the bite of flies.

22609

flyblow
FLYBLOW, v.t. To deposit an egg in any thing, as a fly; to taint with the eggs which produce ...

22610

flyboat
FLYBOAT, n. A large flat-bottomed Dutch vessel, whose burden is from 600 to 1200 tons, with a ...

22611

flycatcher
FLYCATCHER, n.1. One that hunts flies.2. In zoology, a genus of birds, the Muscicapa, with a bill ...

22612

flyer
FLYER, n.1. One that flies or flees; usually written flier.2. One that uses wings.3. The fly of ...

22613

flyfish
FLYFISH, v.i. To angle with flies for bait.

22614

flyfishing
FLYFISHING, n. Angling; the art or practice of angling for fish with flies, natural or artificial, ...

22615

flyflap
FLYFLAP, n. Something to drive away flies.

22616

flying
FLYING, ppr. 1. Moving in air by means of wings; passing rapidly; springing; bursting; ...

22617

flying-bridge
FLYING-BRIDGE, n. A bridge of pontoons; also, a bridge composed of two boats.

22618

flying-fish
FLYING-FISH, n. A small fish which flies by means of its pectoral fins. It is of the genus ...

22619

flying-party
FLYING-PARTY, n. In military affairs, a detachment of men employed to hover about an enemy.

22620

flying-pinion
FLYING-PINION, n. The part of a clock, having a fly or fan, by which it fathers air, and checks ...

22621

flytrap
FLYTRAP, n. In botany, a species of sensitive plant, called Venus' Fly-trap, the Dionaea ...

22622

flytree
FLYTREE, n. A tree whose leaves are said to produce flies, from a little bag on the surface.

22623

fnespoken
F'NESPOKEN, a. Using fine phrases.

22624

foal
FOAL, n. [L. pullus; Gr. The primary sense of the verb is to shoot, to cast or throw, to fall. ...

22625

foalbit
FOALBIT, n. A plant.

22626

foalfoot
FOALFOOT, n. The colt's-foot, Tussilago.

22627

foam
FOAM, n. [L. fumo, to smoke, to foam.]Froth; spume; the substance which is formed on the surface ...

22628

foaming
FOAMING, ppr. Frothing; fuming.

22629

foamingly
FOAMINGLY, adv. Frothily.

22630

foamy
FOAMY, a. Covered with foam; frothy.Behold how high the foamy billows ride!

22631

fob
FOB, n. A little pocket for a watch.FOB, v.t. To cheat; to trick; to impose on.To fob off, to ...

22632

fobbed
FOB'BED, pp. Cheated; imposed on.

22633

fobbing
FOB'BING, ppr. Cheating; imposing on.

22634

focal
FO'CAL, a. [from L. focus.] Belonging to a focus; as a focal point; focal distance.

22635

focil
FO'CIL, n. The greater focil is the ulna or tibia, the greater bone of the fore-arm or leg. The ...

22636

focus
FO'CUS, n. plu. focuses, or foci. [L. focus, a fire, the hearth.]1. In optics, a point in which ...

22637

fodder
FOD'DER, n.1. Food or dry food for cattle, horses and sheep, as hay, straw and other kinds of ...

22638

foddered
FOD'DERED, pp. Fed with dry food, or cut grass, &c.; as, to fodder cows.

22639

fodderer
FOD'DERER, n. He who fodders cattle.

22640

foddering
FOD'DERING, ppr. Feeding with dry food, &c.

22641

fodient
FO'DIENT, a. [L. fodio, to dig.] Digging; throwing up with a spade. [Little used.]

22642

foe
FOE, n. fo. [See Fiend.]1. An enemy; one who entertains personal enmity, hatred, grudge or malice ...

22643

foehood
FOEHOOD, n. Enmity. [Not in use.]

22644

foelike
FOELIKE, a. Like an enemy.

22645

foeman
FOEMAN, n. An enemy in war. Obs.

22646

foetus
FOETUS. [See Fetus.]

22647

fog
FOG, n. 1. A dense watery vapor, exhaled from the earth, or from rivers and lakes, or generated ...

22648

fogbank
FOG'BANK, n. At sea, an appearance in hazy weather sometimes resembling land at a distance, but ...

22649

foggage
FOG'GAGE, n. Rank grass not consumed or mowed in summer.

22650

fogginess
FOG'GINESS, n. [from foggy.] The state of being foggy; a state of the air filled with watery ...

22651

foggy
FOG'GY, a. [from fog.]1. Filled or abounding with fog or watery exhalations; as a foggy ...

22652

foh
FOH, an exclamation of abhorrence or contempt, the same as poh and fy.

22653

foible
FOI'BLE, a. Weak. [Not used.]FOI'BLE, n. [See Feeble.] A particular moral weakness; a failing. ...

22654

foil
FOIL, v.t. 1. To frustrate; to defeat; to render vain or nugatory, as an effort or attempt. The ...

22655

foiled
FOIL'ED, pp. Frustrated; defeated.

22656

foiler
FOIL'ER, n. One who frustrates another, and gains an advantage himself.

22657

foiling
FOIL'ING, ppr. Defeating; frustrating; disappointing of success.FOIL'ING, n. Among hunters, the ...

22658

foin
FOIN, v.t. [L. pungo. The sense is to push, thrust, shoot.]1. To push in fencing.2. To prick; ...

22659

foining
FOIN'ING, ppr. Pushing; thrusting.

22660

foiningly
FOIN'INGLY, adv. In a pushing manner.

22661

foison
FOIS'ON, n. [L. fusio.] Plenty; abundance. [Not used.]

22662

foist
FOIST, v.t. To insert surreptitiously, wrongfully, or without warrant.Lest negligence or partiality ...

22663

foisted
FOIST'ED, pp. Inserted wrongfully.

22664

foister
FOIST'ER, n. One who inserts without authority.

22665

foistied
FOIST'IED, a Mustied. [See Fusty.]

22666

foistiness
FOIST'INESS, n. Fustiness, which see.

22667

foisting
FOIST'ING, ppr. Inserting surreptitiously or without authority.

22668

foisty
FOIST'Y, a Fusty, which see.

22669

fold
FOLD, n. [See the verb, to fold.]1. A pen or inclosure for sheep; a place where a flock of sheep ...

22670

foldage
FOLDAGE, n. The right of folding sheep.

22671

folded
FOLDED, pp. Doubled; laid in plaits; complicated; kept in a fold.

22672

folder
FOLDER, n. 1. An instrument used in folding paper.2. One that folds.

22673

folding
FOLDING, ppr.1. Doubling; laying in plaits; keeping in a fold.2. a. Doubling; that may close ...

22674

foliaceous
FOLIA'CEOUS, a. [L. foliaceus, from folium, a leaf. See Foil.]1. Leafy; having leaves intermixed ...

22675

foliage
FO'LIAGE, n. [L. folium, a leaf. See Foil.]1. Leaves in general; as a tree of beautiful ...

22676

foliaged
FO'LIAGED, a. Furnished with foliage.

22677

foliate
FO'LIATE, v.t. [L. foliatus, from folium, a leaf. Gr.]1. To beat into a leaf, or thin plate or ...

22678

foliated
FO'LIATED, pp.1. Spread or covered with a thin plate or foil.2. In mineralogy, consisting of ...

22679

foliating
FO'LIATING, ppr. Covering with a leaf or foil.

22680

foliation
FOLIA'TION, n. [L. foliatio.]1. In botany, the leafing of plants; vernation; the disposition of ...

22681

foliature
FO'LIATURE, n. The state of being beaten into foil.

22682

folier
FO'LIER, n. Goldsmith's foil.

22683

foliferous
FOLIF'EROUS, a. [L. folium, leaf, and fero, to bear.] Producing leaves.

22684

folio
FO'LIO, n. [L. folium, a leaf, in folio.]1. A book of the largest size, formed by once doubling a ...

22685

foliole
FO'LIOLE, n. [from L. folium, a leaf.] A leaflet; one of the single leaves, which together ...

22686

foliomort
FO'LIOMORT, a. [L. folium mortuum.] Of a dark yellow color, or that of a faded leaf; filemot.

22687

folious
FO'LIOUS, a. 1. Leafy; thin; unsubstantial.2. In botany, having leaves intermixed with the ...

22688

folk
FOLK, n. foke. [L. vulgus. The sense is a crowd, from collecting or pressing, not from following, ...

22689

folkland
FOLKLAND, n. In English law, copyhold land; land held by the common people, at the will of the ...

22690

folkmote
FOLKMOTE, n.An assembly of the people, or of bishops, thanes, aldermen and freemen, to consult ...

22691

follicle
FOL'LICLE, n. [L. folliculus, from follis, a bag or bellows.]1. In botany, a univalvular ...

22692

folliculous
FOLLIC'ULOUS, a. Having or producing follicles.

22693

folliful
FOL'LIFUL, a. Full of folly. [Not used.]

22694

follow
FOL'LOW, v.t.1. To go after or behind; to walk, ride or move behind, but in the same direction. ...

22695

followed
FOL'LOWED, pp. Pursued; succeeded; accompanied; attended; imitated; obeyed; observed; practiced; ...

22696

follower
FOL'LOWER, n.1. One who comes, goes or moves after another, in the same course.2. One that takes ...

22697

following
FOL'LOWING, ppr. Coming or going after or behind; pursuing; attending; imitating; succeeding in ...

22698

folly
FOL'LY, n. [See Fool.]1. Weakness of intellect; imbecility of mind. want of understanding.A fool ...

22699

fomahant
FO'MAHANT, n. A star of the first magnitude, in the constellation Aquarius.

22700

foment
FOMENT', v.t. [L. fomento, from foveo, to warm.]1. To apply warm lotions to; to bathe with warm ...

22701

fomentation
FOMENTA'TION, n.1. The act of applying warm liquors to a part of the body, by means of flannels ...

22702

fomented
FOMENT'ED, pp. Bathed with warm lotions; encouraged.

22703

fomenter
FOMENT'ER, n. One who foments; one who encourages or instigates; as a fomenter of sedition.

22704

fomenting
FOMENT'ING, ppr. 1. Applying warm lotions.2. Encouraging; abetting; promoting.

22705

fon
FON, n. A fool; an idiot. Obs.

22706

fond
FOND, a. 1. Foolish; silly; weak; indiscreet; imprudent; Grant I may never prove so fondTo trust ...

22707

fondle
FOND'LE, v.t. To treat with tenderness; to caress; as, a nurse fondles a child.

22708

fondled
FOND'LED, pp. Treated with affection; caressed.

22709

fondler
FOND'LER, n. One who fondles.

22710

fondling
FOND'LING, ppr. Caressing; treating with tenderness.FOND'LING, n. A person or thing fondled or ...

22711

fondly
FOND'LY, adv. 1. Foolishly; weakly; imprudently; with indiscreet affection.Fondly we think we ...

22712

fondness
FOND'NESS, n.1. Foolishness; weakness; want of sense or judgment. Obs.2. Foolish tenderness.3. ...

22713

font
FONT, n. [L. fundo, to pour out.]A large basin or stone vessel in which water is contained for ...

22714

fontal
FONT'AL, a. Pertaining to a fount, fountain, source or origin.

22715

fontanel
FONT'ANEL, n.1. An issue for the discharge of humors from the body.2. A vacancy in the infant ...

22716

fontange
FONTANGE, n. fontanj'.A knot of ribbons on the top of a head-dress.

22717

food
FOOD, n. [See Feed.]1. In a general sense, whatever is eaten by animals for nourishment, and ...

22718

foodful
FOOD'FUL, a. Supplying food; full of food.

22719

foodless
FOOD'LESS, a. Without food; destitute of provisions; barren.

22720

foody
FOOD'Y, a. Eatable; fit for food. [Not used.]

22721

fool
FOOL, n. [Heb.]1. One who is destitute of reason, or the common powers of understanding; an ...

22722

foolborn
FOOL'BORN a. Foolish from the birth.

22723

fooled
FOOL'ED, pp. Disappointed; defeated; deceived; imposed on.

22724

foolery
FOOL'ERY, n. 1. The practice of folly; habitual folly; attention to trifles.2. An act of folly ...

22725

foolhappy
FOOL'HAPPY, a. Lucky without judgment or contrivance.

22726

foolhardiness
FOOLH'ARDINESS, n. Courage without sense or judgment; mad rashness.

22727

foolhardise
FOOLH'ARDISE, n. Foolhardiness. [Not in use.]

22728

foolhardy
FOOLH'ARDY, a. [fool and hardy.] Daring without judgment; madly rash and adventurous; foolishly ...

22729

fooling
FOOL'ING, ppr. Defeating; disappointing; deceiving.

22730

foolish
FOOL'ISH, a. 1. Void of understanding or sound judgment; weak in intellect; applied to general ...

22731

foolishly
FOOL'ISHLY, adv.1. Weakly; without understanding or judgment; unwisely; indiscreetly.2. Wickedly; ...

22732

foolishness
FOOL'ISHNESS, n. 1. Folly; want of understanding.2. Foolish practice; want of wisdom or good ...

22733

fools-parsley
FOOL'S-P'ARSLEY, n. A plant, of the genus Aethusa.

22734

foolscap
FOOLS'CAP, n. [L. scapus, or folio and shape.] A kind of paper of small size.

22735

foolstones
FOOL'STONES, n. A plant, the Orchis.

22736

fooltrap
FOOL'TRAP, n. A trap to catch fools; as a fly trap.

22737

foot
FOOT, n. plu. feet. [L. pes, pedis. Probably this word is allied to the Gr. to walk, to tread. ...

22738

football
FOOT'BALL, n. 1. A ball consisting of an inflated bladder, cased in leather, to be driven by the ...

22739

footband
FOOT'BAND, n. A band of infantry.

22740

footboy
FOOT'BOY, n. A menial; an attendant in livery.

22741

footbreadth
FOOT'BREADTH, n. The breadth of the foot. Deut. 2.

22742

footbridge
FOOT'BRIDGE, n. A narrow bridge for foot passengers.

22743

footcloth
FOOT'CLOTH, n. A sumpter cloth.

22744

footed
FOOT'ED, pp. Kicked; trod; summed up; furnished with a foot, as a stocking.FOOT'ED, a. Shaped in ...

22745

footfall
FOOT'FALL, n. A trip or stumble.

22746

footfight
FOOT'FIGHT, n. A conflict by persons on foot, in opposition to a fight on horseback.

22747

footguards
FOOT'GU'ARDS, n. plu. Guards of infantry.

22748

foothalt
FOOT'HALT, n. A disease incident to sheep, and said to proceed from a worm, which enters between ...

22749

foothold
FOOT'HOLD, n. That which sustains the feet firmly and prevents them from slipping of moving; that ...

22750

foothot
FOOT'HOT, adv. Immediately; a word borrowed from hunting.

22751

footing
FOOT'ING, ppr. Dancing; treading; settling; adding a new foot.FOOT'ING, n. 1. Ground for the ...

22752

footlicker
FOOT'LICKER, n. A mean flatterer; a sycophant; a fawner.

22753

footman
FOOT'MAN, n. 1. A soldier who marches and fights on foot.2. A menial servant; a runner; a ...

22754

footmanship
FOOT'MANSHIP, n. The art or faculty of a runner.

22755

footmantle
FOOT'MANTLE, n. A garment to keep the gown clean in riding.

22756

footpace
FOOT'PACE, n. A slow step, as in walking; a broad stair.

22757

footpad
FOOT'PAD, n. A highwayman or robber on foot.

22758

footpath
FOOT'P'ATH, n. A narrow path or way for foot passengers only.

22759

footplow
FOOT'PLOW, n. A kind of swing-plow.

22760

footpost
FOOT'POST, n. A post or messenger that travels on foot.

22761

footrope
FOOT'ROPE, n. The lower boltrope, to which the lower edge of a sail is sewed. Also, a horse or ...

22762

footrot
FOOT'ROT, n. An ulcer in the feet of sheep.

22763

footsoldier
FOOT'SOLDIER, n. A soldier that serves on foot.

22764

footstalk
FOOTSTALK, n. [foot and stalk.] In botany, a petiole; a partial stem supporting the leaf, or ...

22765

footstall
FOOT'STALL, n. A woman's stirrup.

22766

footstep
FOOT'STEP, n.1. A track; the mark or impression of the foot.2. Token; mark; visible sign of a ...

22767

footstool
FOOT'STOOL, n. A stool for the feet; that which supports the feet of one when sitting.To make ...

22768

footwaling
FOOT'WALING, n. The whole inside planks or lining of a ship.

22769

fop
FOP, n. [The Latin voppa, a senseless fellow, is evidently from the same root, with the sense of ...

22770

fopdoodle
FOP'DOODLE, n. An insignificant fellow. [Vulgar and not used.]

22771

fopling
FOP'LING, n. A petty fop.

22772

foppery
FOP'PERY, n. 1. Affectation of show or importance; showy folly; as the foppery of dress or of ...

22773

foppish
FOP'PISH, a.1. Vain of dress; making an ostentatious display of gay clothing; dressing in the ...

22774

foppishly
FOP'PISHLY, adv. With vain ostentation of dress; in a trifling or affected manner.

22775

foppishness
FOP'PISHNESS, n. Vanity and extravagance in dress; showy vanity.

22776

for
FOR, prep. [L. per.; The English, for; to forbid. For corresponds in sense with the L. pro, as ...

22777

forage
FOR'AGE, n. [L. voro.]1. Food of any kind for horses and cattle, as grass; pasture, hay, corn and ...

22778

forager
FOR'AGER, n. One that goes in search of food for horses or cattle.

22779

foraging
FOR'AGING, ppr. or a. Collecting provisions for horses and cattle, or wandering in search of food; ...

22780

foraminous
FORAM'INOUS, a. [L. foramen, a hole, from foro, to bore.]Full of holes; perforated in many places; ...

22781

forbad
FORBAD', pret. of forbid.

22782

forbathe
FORBA'THE, v.t. To bathe. [Not in use.]

22783

forbear
FORBEAR, v.i. pret. forbore; pp. forborne.1. To stop; to cease; to hold from proceeding; as, ...

22784

forbearance
FORBEARANCE, n.1. The act of avoiding, shunning or omitting; either the cessation or intermission ...

22785

forbearer
FORBEARER, n. One that intermits or intercepts.

22786

forbearing
FORBEARING, ppr. 1. Ceasing; pausing; withholding from action; exercising patience and ...

22787

forbid
FORBID', v.t. pret. forbad; pp. forbid, forbidden. Literally, to bid or command against. Hence,1. ...

22788

forbiddance
FORBID'DANCE, n. Prohibition; command or edict against a thing. [Little used.]

22789

forbiddenly
FORBID'DENLY, adv. In an unlawful manner.

22790

forbiddenness
FORBID'DENNESS, n. A state of being prohibited. [Not used.]

22791

forbidder
FORBID'DER, n. He or that which forbids or enacts a prohibition.

22792

forbidding
FORBID'DING, ppr. 1. Prohibiting; hindering.2. a. Repelling approach; repulsive; raising ...

22793

forbore
FORBO'RE, pret. of forebear.

22794

forborne
FORBORNE, pp. of forbear.Few ever repented of having forborne to speak.

22795

force
FORCE, n. [L. fortis. All words denoting force, power, strength, are from verbs which express ...

22796

forced
FORCED, pp.1. Compelled; impelled; driven by violence; urged; stormed; ravished.2. a. Affected; ...

22797

forcedly
FORCEDLY, adv. Violently; constrainedly; unnaturally. [Little used.]

22798

forcedness
FORCEDNESS, n. The state of being forced; distortion.

22799

forceful
FORCEFUL, a. 1. Impelled by violence; driven with force; acting with power.Against the steed he ...

22800

forcefully
FORCEFULLY, adv. Violently; impetuously.

22801

forceless
FORCELESS, a. Having little or not force; feeble; impotent.

22802

forcemeat
FORCEMEAT, n. A kind of stuffing in cookery.

22803

forceps
FOR'CEPS, n. [L.] Literally, a pair of pinchers or tongs.In surgery, an instrument for extracting ...

22804

forcer
FORCER, n.1. He or that which forces, drives or constrains.2. The embolus of a pump; the ...

22805

forcible
FORCIBLE, a.1. Powerful; strong; mighty; as a punishment forcible to bridle sin.2. Violent; ...

22806

forcibleness
FORCIBLENESS, n. Force; violence.

22807

forcibly
FORCIBLY, adv.1. By violence or force.2. Strongly; powerfully; with power or energy; ...

22808

forcing
FORCING, ppr.1. Compelling; impelling; driving; storming; ravishing.2. Causing to ripen before ...

22809

forcipated
FOR'CIPATED, a. [from forceps.] Formed like a pair of pinchers to open and inclose; as a ...

22810

ford
FORD, n.1. A place in a river or other water, where it may be passed by man or beast on foot, or ...

22811

fordable
FORDABLE, a. That may be waded or passed through on foot, as water.

22812

forded
FORDED, pp. Passed through on foot; waded.

22813

fording
FORDING, ppr. Wading; passing through on foot as water.

22814

fordo
FORDO', v.t. To destroy; to undo; to ruin; to weary. [Not in use.]

22815

fore
FORE, a. 1. Properly, advanced, or being in advance of something in motion or progression; as the ...

22816

fore-end
FORE-END', n. The end which precedes; the anterior part.

22817

fore-imagine
FORE-IMAG'INE, v.t. To conceive or fancy before proof, or beforehand.

22818

foreadmonish
FOREADMON'ISH, v.t. To admonish beforehand, or before the act or event.

22819

foreadvise
FOREADVI'SE, v.t. s as z To advise or counsel before the time of action or before the event; to ...

22820

forealledge
FOREALLEDGE, v.t. foreallej'. To alledge or cite before.

22821

foreappoint
FOREAPPOINT', v.t. To set, order or appoint beforehand.

22822

foreappointment
FOREAPPOINT'MENT, n. Previous appointment; preordination.

22823

forearm
FORE'ARM, v.t. To arm or prepare for attack or resistance before the time of need.

22824

forebode
FOREBO'DE, v.t.1. To foretell; to prognosticate.2. To foreknow; to be prescient of; to feel a ...

22825

forebodement
FOREBO'DEMENT, n. A presaging; presagement.

22826

foreboder
FOREBO'DER, n. 1. One who forebodes; a prognosticator; a soothsayer.2. A foreknower.

22827

foreboding
FOREBO'DING, ppr. Prognosticating; foretelling; foreknowing.FOREBO'DING, n. Prognostication.

22828

forebrace
FOREBRACE, n. A rope applied to the fore yard-arm to change the position of the foresail.

22829

foreby
FOREBY', prep. [fore and by.] Near; hard by; fast by. Obs.

22830

forecast
FOREC'AST, v.t.1. To foresee; to provide against.It is wisdom to forecast consequences.2. To ...

22831

forecaster
FOREC'ASTER, n. One who foresees or contrives beforehand.

22832

forecasting
FOREC'ASTING, ppr. Contriving previously.

22833

forecastle
FO'RECASTLE, n. A short deck in the forepart of a ship above the upper deck usually terminated in ...

22834

forechosen
FORECHO'SEN, a. forcho'zn. Preelected; chosen beforehand.

22835

forecited
FORECITED, a. Cited or quoted before or above.

22836

foreclose
FORECLO'SE, v.t. s as z. To shut up; to preclude; to stop; to prevent.The embargo with Spain ...

22837

foreclosure
FORECLO'SURE, n. s as z.1. Prevention.2. The act of foreclosing, or depriving a mortgager of the ...

22838

foreconceive
FORECONCEI'VE, v.t. To preconceive.

22839

foredate
FOREDA'TE, v.t. To date before the true time.

22840

foredated
FOREDA'TED, pp. Dated before the true time.

22841

foredeck
FO'REDECK, n. The forepart of a deck, or of a ship.

22842

foredesign
FOREDESI'GN, v.t. To plan beforehand; to intend previously.

22843

foredetermine
FORE'DETERM'INE, v.t. To decree beforehand.

22844

foredoom
FOREDOOM', v.t. To doom beforehand; to predestinate.Thou art foredoomed to view the Stygian ...

22845

foredoor
FOREDOOR, n. The door in the front of a house.

22846

forefather
FOREF'ATHER, n. An ancestor; one who precedes another in the line of genealogy, in any degree; ...

22847

forefend
FOREFEND', v.t. 1. To hinder; to fend off; to avert; to prevent approach; to forbid or ...

22848

forefinger
FOREFIN'GER, n. The finger next to the thumb; the index; called by our Saxon ancestors, the ...

22849

foreflow
FOREFLOW, v.t. To flow before.

22850

forefoot
FOREFOOT, n.1. One of the anterior feet of a quadruped or multiped.2. A hand, in contempt.3. In ...

22851

forefront
FOREFRONT', n. The foremost part. The forefront of the battle, is the part where the contest is ...

22852

foregame
FO'REGAME, n. A first game; first plan.

22853

forego
FOREGO', v.t. [See Go.]1. To forbear to possess or enjoy; voluntarily to avoid the enjoyment of ...

22854

foregoer
FOREGO'ER, n.1. An ancestor; a progenitor. [Not used.]2. One who goes before another.3. One who ...

22855

foregoing
FOREGO'ING, ppr. 1. Forbearing to have, possess or enjoy.2. a. Preceding; going before, in time ...

22856

foregone
FOREGONE, pp. foregawn'.1. Forborne to be possessed or enjoyed.2. Gone before; past. Obs.

22857

foreground
FO'REGROUND, n. The part of the field or expanse of a picture which seems to lie before the ...

22858

foreguess
FOREGUESS', v.t. To conjecture. [Bad.]

22859

forehand
FO'REHAND, n.1. The part of a horse which is before the rider.2. The chief part.FO'REHAND, a. ...

22860

forehanded
FO'REHANDED, a.1. Early; timely; seasonable; as a forehanded care.2. In America, in good ...

22861

forehead
FOREHEAD, n. for'hed, or rather for'ed.1. The part of the face which extends from the hair on the ...

22862

forehear
FOREHE'AR, v.i. To be informed before.

22863

forehend
FOREHEND', v.t. To seize. [Not in use.]

22864

forehew
FOREHEW', v.t. To hew or cut in front.

22865

foreholding
FOREHOLDING, n. Predictions; ominous forebodings; superstitious prognostications. [Not used.]

22866

forehook
FO'REHOOK, n. In ships, a breast-hook; a piece of timber placed across the stem to unite the bows ...

22867

forehorse
FO'REHORSE, n. The horse in a team which goes foremost.

22868

foreign
FOREIGN, a. for'an. [L. foris, foras.]1. Belonging to another nation or country; alien; not of ...

22869

foreigner
FOR'EIGNER, n. for'aner. A person born in a foreign country, or without the country or ...

22870

foreignness
FOR'EIGNNESS, n. for'anness. Remoteness; want of relation; as the foreignness of a subject from ...

22871

forejudge
FOREJUDGE, v.t. forjuj'. 1. To prejudge; to judge beforehand, or before hearing the facts and ...

22872

forejudgment
FOREJUDG'MENT, n. Judgment previously formed.

22873

foreknow
FOREKNOW, v.t [See Know.] To have previous knowledge of; to foresee.Who would the miseries of man ...

22874

foreknowable
FOREKNOWABLE, a. That may be foreknown.

22875

foreknower
FOREKNOWER, n. One that foreknows.

22876

foreknowledge
FOREKNOWL'EDGE, n. Knowledge of a thing before it happens; prescience.If I foreknew, foreknowledge ...

22877

forel
FOR'EL, n. A kind of parchment for the cover of books.

22878

foreland
FO'RELAND, n. A promontory or cape; a point of land extending into the sea some distance from the ...

22879

forelay
FORELA'Y, v.t. 1. To lay wait for; to entrap by ambush.2. To contrive antecedently.

22880

foreleader
FORELE'ADER, n. One who leads others by his example.

22881

forelend
FORELEND', v.t. To lend or give beforehand.

22882

forelock
FO'RELOCK, n.1. The lock or hair that grows from the forepart of the head.Take time by the ...

22883

forelook
FORELOOK', v.t. To look beforehand or forward.

22884

foreman
FO'REMAN, n.1. The first or chief man; particularly, the chief man of a jury, who acts as their ...

22885

foremast
FO'REMAST, n. The mast of a ship or other vessel which is placed in the forepart or forecastle, ...

22886

foremeant
FOREMEANT', a. forement'. Intended beforehand.

22887

foremembered
FOREMEM'BERED, a. Called to mind previously.

22888

forementioned
FOREMEN'TIONED, a. Mentioned before; recited or written in a former part of the same writing or ...

22889

foremost
FO'REMOST, a.1. First in place; most advanced; as the foremost troops of an army.2. First in ...

22890

foremother
FO'REMOTHER, n. A female ancestor.

22891

forenamed
FO'RENAMED, a. 1. Named or nominated before.2. Mentioned before in the same writing or ...

22892

forenoon
FO'RENOON, n. The former part of the day, from the morning to meridian or noon. We usually call ...

22893

forenotice
FORENO'TICE, n. Notice or information of an event before it happens.

22894

forensic
FOREN'SIC, a. [from L. forensis, from forum, a court.]Belonging to courts of judicature; used in ...

22895

foreordain
FOREORDA'IN, v.t To ordain or appoint before; to preordain; to predestinate; to predetermine.

22896

foreordination
FOREORDINA'TION, n. Previous ordination or appointment; predetermination; predestination.

22897

forepart
FO'REPART, n.1. The part first in time; as the forepart of the day or week.2. The part most ...

22898

forepast
FO'REPAST, a. Past before a certain time; as forepast sins. [Little used.]

22899

forepossessed
FORE'POSSESS'ED, a. Holding formerly in possession; also, preoccupied; prepossessed; preengaged.

22900

foreprize
FOREPRI'ZE, v.t. To prize or rate beforehand.

22901

forepromised
FOREPROM'ISED, a. Promised beforehand; preengaged.

22902

forequoted
FOREQUO'TED, a. Cited before; quoted in a foregoing part of the work.

22903

forerank
FO'RERANK, n. The first rank; the front.

22904

forereach
FORERE'ACH, upon, v.t. In navigation, to gain or advance upon in progression or motion.

22905

foreread
FORERE'AD, v.t. To signify by tokens. Obs.