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Saturday - August 27, 2016

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comBROWSING [D]

Please click on the word of the partial definition to see the complete definition

ID Word Definition

14114

dab
DAB, v.t.1. To strike gently with the hand; to slap; to box.2. To strike gently with some soft or ...

14115

dabble
DAB'BLE, v.t. [Heb. tabal, or from the root of dip. See dip.] Literally, to dip a little or ...

14116

dabbler
DAB'BLER, n.1. One who plays in water or mud.2. One who dips slightly into any thing; one who ...

14117

dabbling
DAB'BLING, ppr. Dipping superficially or often; playing in water, or in mud; meddling.

14118

dabchick
DAB'CHICK, n. [dab or dip and chick.] A small water-fowl.

14119

dabster
DABSTER, n. One who is skilled; one who is expert; a master of his business.

14120

dace
DACE, n. A fish, the Cyprinus leuciscus; a small river fish, resembling the roach.

14121

dactyl
DACTYL, n. [Gr. A finger; L. probably a shoot.] A poetical foot consisting of three syllables, ...

14122

dactylar
DACTYLAR, a. Pertaining to a dactyl; reducing from three to two syllables.

14123

dactylet
DACTYLET, n. A dactyl.

14124

dactylic
DAC'TYLIC, a. Pertaining to or consisting of dactyls; as dactylic verses; a dactylic flute, a ...

14125

dactylist
DAC'TYLIST, n. One who writes flowing verse.

14126

dactylology
DACTYLOL'OGY, n. The act or the art of communicating ideas or thoughts by the fingers. Deaf and ...

14127

dad
DAD

14128

daddle
DAD'DLE, v.i. To walk with tottering, like a child or an old man.

14129

daddy
DADDY, n. Father; a word used by infants, from whom it is taken. The first articulations of ...

14130

dade
DADE, v.t. To hold up by leading strings.

14131

dado
D'ADO, n. The plain part of a column between the base and the cornice; the die; a cubical base of ...

14132

daedal
DAE'DAL, a. [Gr., an ingenious artist.] 1. Various; variegated.2. Skilful.

14133

daedalian
DAEDALIAN, [See Dedalian]

14134

daff
DAFF, or DAFFE, A stupid blockish fellow.DAFF, v.t. To daunt.DAFF, v.t. To toss aside; to put ...

14135

daffodil
DAF'FODIL, n. A plant of the genus Narcissus, of several species. These have a bulbous root, and ...

14136

dag
DAG, n. A dagger; a hand-gun; a pistol.DAG, n. Dew.DAG, n.1. a loose end, as of locks of wool; ...

14137

dagger
DAG'GER, n. 1. A short sword; a poniard.2. In fencing schools, a blunt blade of iron with a ...

14138

daggers-drawing
DAG'GERS-DRAWING, n. The act of drawing daggers; approach to open attack or to violence; a ...

14139

daggle
DAG'GLE, v.t. To trail in mud or wet grass; to befoul; to dirty, as the lower end of a ...

14140

daggle-tail
DAG'GLE-TAIL, a. Having the lower ends of garments defiled with mud.

14141

daggled
DAG'GLED, pp. Dipped or trailed in mud or foul water; befouled.

14142

daggling
DAG'GLING, ppr. Drawing along in mud or foul water.

14143

daily
DA'ILY, a. Happening or being every day; done day by day; bestowed or enjoyed every day; as daily ...

14144

daintily
DA'INTILY, adv. 1. Nicely; elegantly; as a hat daintily made.2. Nicely; fastidiously; with nice ...

14145

daintiness
DA'INTINESS, n. 1. Delicacy; softness; elegance; nicety; as the daintiness of the limbs.2. ...

14146

dainty
DA'INTY, a. 1. Nice; pleasing to the palate; of exquisite taste; delicious; as dainty food.2. ...

14147

dairy
DA'IRY, n. 1. Milk, and all that concerns it, on a farm; or the business of managing milk, and of ...

14148

dairyhouse
DA'IRYHOUSE, or DAIRYROOM, n. A house or room appropriated to the management of milk.

14149

dairymaid
DA'IRYMAID, n. A female servant whose business is to manage milk.

14150

daisied
DA'ISIED, a. Full of daisies; adorned with daisies.

14151

daisy
DA'ISY, n. A plant of the genus Bellis, of several varieties. The blue daisy belongs to the genus ...

14152

daker-hen
DA'KER-HEN, n. A fowl of the gallinaceous kind, somewhat like a patridge or quail. The corn-crake ...

14153

dakir
DA'KIR, n. In English statutes, ten hides, or the twentieth part of a last of hides.

14154

dale
DALE, n. A low place between hills; a vale or valley.

14155

dalliance
DAL'LIANCE, n. 1. Literally, delay; a lingering; appropriately, acts of fondness; interchange of ...

14156

dallier
DAL'LIER, n. One who fondles; a trifler; as a dallier with pleasant words.

14157

dalling
DAL'LING, ppr. Delaying; procrastinating; trifling; wasting time in idle amusement; toying; ...

14158

dally
DAL'LY, v.i.1. Literally, to delay; to linger; to wait. Hence.2. To trifle; to lose time in ...

14159

dam
DAM, n.1. A female parent; used of beasts, particularly of quadrupeds.2. A human mother, in ...

14160

damage
DAM'AGE, n.[This word seems to be allied to the Greek, a fine or mulet.]1. Any hurt, injury or ...

14161

damage-feasant
DAMAGE-FEASANT, a. Doing injury; trespassing, as cattle.

14162

damageable
DAM'AGEABLE, a.1. That may be injured or impaired; susceptible of damage; as damageable goods.2. ...

14163

damaged
DAM'AGED, pp. Hurt; impaired; injured.

14164

damaging
DAM'AGING, ppr. Injuring; impairing.

14165

damascene
DAM'ASCENE, n.1. A particular kind of plum, now pronounced damson, which see.2. It may be locally ...

14166

damask
DAM'ASK, n.1. A silk stuff, having some parts raised above the ground, representing flowers and ...

14167

damask-plum
DAM'ASK-PLUM, n. A small black plum.

14168

damask-rose
DAM'ASK-ROSE, n. A species of rose which is red, and another which is white.

14169

damaskeened
DAMASKEE'NED, pp. Carved into figures and inlaid with gold or silver wire.

14170

damaskeening
DAMASKEE'NING, ppr. Engraving and adorning with gold or silver wire inlaid.DAMASKEE'NING, n. The ...

14171

damasken
DAM'ASKEN or DAM'ASKEEN, v.t. To make incisions in iron, steel, &c., and fill them with gold or ...

14172

damaskin
DAM'ASKIN, n. A saber, so called from the manufacture of Damascus.

14173

dame
DAME, n. [Gr., to subdue] Literally, a mistress; hence, a lady; a title of honor to a woman. It ...

14174

dames-violet
DAME'S-VIOLET or DAME-WORT, n. A plant of the genus Hesperis; called also queen's gilliflower, or ...

14175

damianists
DA'MIANISTS, in church history, a sect who denied any distinction in the Godhead; believing in one ...

14176

damn
DAMN, v.t.1. To sentence to eternal torments in a future state; to punish in hell.2. To condemn; ...

14177

damnable
DAM'NABLE, a. 1. That may be damned or condemned; deserving damnation; worthy of eternal ...

14178

damnableness
DAM'NABLENESS, n. The state or quality of deserving damnation.

14179

damnably
DAM'NABLY, adv. 1. In a manner to incur eternal punishment, or so as to exclude mercy.2. In a low ...

14180

damnation
DAMNA'TION, n. 1. Sentence or condemnation to everlasting punishment in the future state; or the ...

14181

damnatory
DAM'NATORY, a. Containing a sentence of condemnation.

14182

damned
DAM'NED, pp.1. Sentenced to everlasting punishment in a future state; condemned.2. a. Hateful; ...

14183

damnific
DAMNIF'IC, a. Procuring loss; mischievous.

14184

damnified
DAM'NIFIED, pp. Injured; endamaged.

14185

damnify
DAM'NIFY, v.t.1. To cause loss or damage to; to hurt in estate or interest; to injure; to ...

14186

damnifying
DAM'NIFYING, ppr. Hurting; injuring; impairing.

14187

damning
DAM'NING, ppr.1. Dooming to endless punishment; condemning.2. a. That condemns or exposes to ...

14188

damningness
DAM'NINGNESS, n. Tendency to bring damnation.

14189

damp
DAMP, a.1. Moist; humid; being in a state between dry and wet; as a damp cloth; damp air; ...

14190

damped
DAMP'ED, pp. Chilled; depressed; abated; weakened; checked; discouraged.

14191

damper
DAMP'ER, n. 1. That which damps or checks; a valve or sliding plate in a furnace to stop or lessen ...

14192

damping
DAMP'ING, ppr. Chilling; deadening; dejecting; abating; checking; weakening.

14193

dampish
DAMP'ISH, a. Moderately damp, or moist.

14194

dampishness
DAMP'ISHNESS, n. A moderate degree of dampness, or moistness; slight humidity.

14195

dampness
DAMP'NESS, n. Moisture; fogginess; moistness; moderate humidity; as the dampness of the air, of ...

14196

damps
DAMPS, n. [See Damp]

14197

dampy
DAMP'Y, a. Dejected; gloomy.

14198

damsel
DAM'SEL, n. A young woman. Formerly, a young man or woman of noble or genteel extraction; as ...

14199

damson
DAM'SON, n. The fruit of a variety of the Prunus domestica; a small black plum.

14200

dan
DAN, n. A title of honor equivalent to master; used by Shakspeare, Prior, &c., but now obsolete.

14201

dance
D'ANCE, v.i.1. Primarily, to leap or spring; hence, to leap or move with measured steps, regulated ...

14202

dancer
D'ANCER, n. One who practices dancing, or is skilful in the performance.

14203

dancing
D'ANCING, ppr. Leaping and stepping to the sound of the voice or of an instrument; moving in ...

14204

dancing-master
D'ANCING-MASTER, n. One who teaches the art of dancing.

14205

dancing-school
D'ANCING-SCHOOL, n. A school in which the art of dancing is taught.

14206

dandelion
DAN'DELION, n. A well known plant of the genus Leontodon, having a naked stalk, with one large ...

14207

dandiprat
DAN'DIPRAT, n. A fellow; an urchin; a word of fondness or contempt.

14208

dandled
DAN'DLED, pp. Danced on the knee, or in the arms; fondled; amused by trifles or play.

14209

dandler
DAN'DLER, n. One who dandles or fondles children.

14210

dandling
DAN'DLING, ppr. Shaking and jolting on the knee; moving about in play or for amusement, as an ...

14211

dandruff
DANDRUFF, n. A scurf which forms on the head, and comes off in small scales or particles.

14212

dandy
DAN'DY, n. In modern usage, a male of the human species, who dresses himself like a doll and who ...

14213

dandyism
DAN'DYISM, n. The manners and dress of a dandy.

14214

dane
DANE, n. A native of Denmark.

14215

danegelt
DA'NEGELT, n. In England, an annual tax formerly laid on the English nation, for maintaining ...

14216

danewort
DA'NEWORT, n. A plant of the genus Sambucus; a species of elder, called dwarf-elder or wall-wort.

14217

danger
DANGER, n. Peril; risk; hazard; exposure to injury, loss, pain or other evil.Our craft is in ...

14218

dangerless
DANGERLESS, a. Free from danger; without risk.

14219

dangerous
DANGEROUS, a. 1. Perilous; hazardous; exposing to loss; unsafe; full of risk; as a dangerous ...

14220

dangerousness
DANGEROUSNESS, n. Danger; hazard; peril; a state of being exposed to evil; as the dangerousness of ...

14221

dangle
DAN'GLE, v.i.1. To hang loose, flowing, shaking or waving; to hang and swing.He'd rather on a ...

14222

dangler
DAN'GLER, n. One who dangles or hangs about.

14223

dangling
DAN'GLING, ppr. Hanging loosely; busily or officiously adhering to.

14224

danish
DA'NISH, n. The language of the Danes.

14225

dank
DANK, a. Damp; moist; humid; wet.DANK, n. Moisture; humidity.

14226

dankish
DANK'ISH, a. Somewhat damp.

14227

dankishness
DANK'ISHNESS, n. Dampness; humidity.

14228

daourite
DA'OURITE, n. A mineral, called rubellite, resembling shorl, but differing from it in chimical ...

14229

dap
DAP, v.i. To drop or let fall into the water; a word used by anglers.

14230

daphnate
DAPH'NATE, n. A compound of the bitter principle of the Daphne Alpina with a base.

14231

daphnin
DAPH'NIN, n. The bitter principle of the Daphne Alpina, discovered by Vauquelin. It is obtained ...

14232

dapifer
DAP'IFER, n. One who brings meat to the table. Formerly, the title or office of the grand-master ...

14233

dapper
DAP'PER, a. Active; nimble; brisk; or little and active; neat; tight; as a dapper fellow; a dapper ...

14234

dapperling
DAP'PERLING, n. A dwarf; a dandiprat.

14235

dapple
DAP'PLE, a. Marked with spots; spotted; variegated with spots of different colors or shades of ...

14236

dappled
DAP'PLED, pp. Spotted; variegated with spots of different colors or shades of color.

14237

dappling
DAP'PLING, ppr. Variegating with spot.

14238

dar
DAR or DART, n. A fish found in the Severn.

14239

dare
DARE, v.i. pret. durst. To have courage to any purpose; to have strength of mind or hardihood to ...

14240

dared
DA'RED, pp. Challenged; defied.

14241

dareful
DA'REFUL, a. Full of defiance.

14242

darer
DA'RER, n. One who dares or defies.

14243

daric
DAR'IC, n. A gold coin of Darius the Mede, value about 556 cents.

14244

daring
DA'RING, ppr.1. Having courage sufficient for a purpose; challenging; defying. 2. a. Bold; ...

14245

daringly
DA'RINGLY, adv. Boldly; courageously; fearlessly; impudently.The principles of our holy religion ...

14246

daringness
DA'RINGNESS, n. Boldness; courageousness; audaciousness.

14247

dark
D'ARK, a.1. Destitute of light; obscure. A dark atmosphere is one which prevents vision.2. ...

14248

dark-house
D'ARK-HOUSE, n. An old word for a madhouse.

14249

dark-working
D'ARK-WORKING, a. Working in darkness or in secrecy.

14250

darken
D'ARKEN, v.i. To grow dark or darker; also, to grow less white or clear.

14251

darkened
D'ARKENED, pp. Deprived of light; obscured; rendered dim; made black; made ignorant.

14252

darkening
D'ARKENING, ppr. Depriving of light; obscuring; making black or less white or clear; clouding.

14253

darkish
D'ARKISH, a. Dusky; somewhat dark.

14254

darkling
D'ARKLING, a. Being in the dark, or without light; a poetical word.

14255

darkly
D'ARKLY, adv. Obscurely; dimly; blindly; uncertainly; with imperfect light, clearness or ...

14256

darkness
D'ARKNESS, n.1. Absence of light.And darkness was on the face of the deep. Gen. i.2. Obscurity; ...

14257

darksome
D'ARKSOME, a. Dark; gloomy; obscure; as a darksome house; a darksome cloud.

14258

darling
D'ARLING, a. Dearly beloved; favorite; regarded with great kindness and tenderness; as a darling ...

14259

darn
D'ARN, v.t. To mend a rent or hole, by imitating the texture of the cloth or stuff with yarn or ...

14260

darnel
D'ARNEL, n. A plant of the genus Lolium, a kind of grass; the most remarkable species are the red ...

14261

darner
D'ARNER, n. One who mends by darning.

14262

darning
D'ARNING, ppr. Mending in imitation of the original texture; sewing together; as a torn stocking, ...

14263

darrain
DAR'RAIN, v.t. To prepare, or to order; or to try; to endeavor; to prove; to apply to the ...

14264

dart
D'ART, n. [Gr., a spear or lance.] 1. A pointed missile weapon to be thrown by the hand; a short ...

14265

darted
D'ARTED, pp. Thrown or hurled as a pointed instrument; sent with velocity.

14266

darter
D'ARTER, n. One who throws a dart.

14267

darting
D'ARTING, ppr. Throwing, as a dart; hurling darts; flying rapidly.

14268

dash
DASH, v.t.1. To strike suddenly or violently, whether throwing or falling; as, to dash one stone ...

14269

dashed
DASH'ED, pp. Struck violently; driven against; bruised, broken or scattered by collision; ...

14270

dashing
DASH'ING, ppr.1. Driving and striking against; striking suddenly or violently; breaking or ...

14271

dastard
DAS'TARD, n. A coward; a poltroon; one who meanly shrinks from danger.DAS'TARD, a. Cowardly; ...

14272

dastardize
DAS'TARDIZE, v.t. To make cowardly.

14273

dastardliness
DAS'TARDLINESS, n. Cowardliness.

14274

dastardly
DAS'TARDLY, Cowardly; meanly timid; base; sneaking.

14275

dastardness
DAS'TARDNESS, n. Cowardliness; mean timorousness.

14276

dastardy
DAS'TARDY, n. Cowardliness; base timidity.

14277

data
DA'TA, n. plu. Things given, or admitted; quantities, principles or facts given, known, or ...

14278

datary
DA'TARY, n.1. An officer of the chancery of Rome, who affixes the datum Roma to the pope's ...

14279

date
DATE, n.1. That addition to a writing which specifies the year, month and day when it was given or ...

14280

date-tree
DA'TE-TREE, n. The tree that bears dates; the great palm-tree.

14281

dated
DA'TED, pp. Having the time of writing or execution specified; having the time of happening ...

14282

dateless
DA'TELESS, a. Having no date; having no fixed term.DA'TER, n. One that dates.DA'TING, ppr. ...

14283

dater
DA'TER, n. One that dates.DA'TING, ppr. Expressing the time of writing or of executing a paper or ...

14284

dating
DA'TING, ppr. Expressing the time of writing or of executing a paper or instrument; noting the ...

14285

dative
DA'TIVE, a. In grammar, the epithet of the case of nouns, which usually follows verbs that express ...

14286

datolite
DAT'OLITE or DATH'OLITE, n. The siliceous borate of lime, a mineral of two subspecies, the common ...

14287

datum
DA'TUM, n. Something given or admitted.DATU'RA, n. A vegeto-alkali obtained from Datura ...

14288

datura
DATU'RA, n. A vegeto-alkali obtained from Datura stramonium.DAUB, v.t.

14289

daub
DAUB, v.t.

14290

daubed
DAUB'ED, pp. Smeared with soft adhesive matter; plastered; painted coarsely; disguised; loaded ...

14291

dauber
DAUB'ER, n. One who daubs; a coarse painter; a low and gross flatterer. DAUB'ING, ppr. ...

14292

daubing
DAUB'ING, ppr. Plastering; painting coarsely; disguising clumsily; decking ostentatiously; ...

14293

daubry
DAUB'RY or DAUB'ERY, n, A daubing; any thing artful.DAUB'Y, a. Viscous; glutinous; slimy; ...

14294

dauby
DAUB'Y, a. Viscous; glutinous; slimy; adhesive.DAUGHTER, n,

14295

daughter
DAUGHTER, n,

14296

daughterliness
DAUGH'TERLINESS, n.

14297

daughterly
DAUGH'TERLY, a. Becoming a daughter; dutiful.D'AUNT, v.t. To repress or subdue courage; to ...

14298

daunt
D'AUNT, v.t. To repress or subdue courage; to intimidate; to dishearten; to check by fear of ...

14299

daunted
D'AUNTED, pp. Checked by fear; intimidated.D'AUNTING, ppr. Repressing courage; intimidating; ...

14300

daunting
D'AUNTING, ppr. Repressing courage; intimidating; disheartening.D'AUNTLESS, a. Bold; fearless; ...

14301

dauntless
D'AUNTLESS, a. Bold; fearless; intrepid; not timid; not discouraged; as a dauntless hero; a ...

14302

dauntlessness
D'AUNTLESSNESS, n. Fearlessness; intrepidity.DAU'PHIN, n. The eldest son of the king of France, ...

14303

dauphin
DAU'PHIN, n. The eldest son of the king of France, and presumptive heir of the crown.DAU'PHINESS, ...

14304

dauphiness
DAU'PHINESS, n. The wife or lady of the dauphin.DAVINA, n. A new Vesuvian mineral of a hexahedral ...

14305

davina
DAVINA, n. A new Vesuvian mineral of a hexahedral form and laminar texture; so called in honor of ...

14306

davit
DAV'IT, n. A beam used on board of ships, as a crane to hoist the flukes of the anchor to the top ...

14307

daw
DAW, v.i. To dawn.DAW'DLE, v.i. To waste time; to trifle.DAW'DLER, n. A trifler.DAWK, v.t. To ...

14308

dawdle
DAW'DLE, v.i. To waste time; to trifle.DAW'DLER, n. A trifler.DAWK, v.t. To cut or mark with an ...

14309

dawdler
DAW'DLER, n. A trifler.DAWK, v.t. To cut or mark with an incision.DAWN, v.i.

14310

dawk
DAWK, v.t. To cut or mark with an incision.DAWN, v.i.

14311

dawn
DAWN, v.i.

14312

dawning
DAWN'ING, ppr. 1. Growing light; first appearing luminous; opening; as the dawning day.

14313

day
DAY, n.

14314

daybed
DA'YBED, n. A bed used for idleness, indulgence, or rest during the day.DA'YBOOK, n. A journal of ...

14315

daybook
DA'YBOOK, n. A journal of accounts; a book in which are recorded the debts and credits or accounts ...

14316

daybreak
DA'YBREAK, n. The dawn or first appearance of light in the morning.DA'YCOAL, n. A name given by ...

14317

daycoal
DA'YCOAL, n. A name given by miners to the upper stratum of coal.DA'YDREAM, n. A vision to the ...

14318

daydream
DA'YDREAM, n. A vision to the waking senses.DA'YFLOWER, n. A genus of plants, the ...

14319

dayflower
DA'YFLOWER, n. A genus of plants, the Commelina.DA'YFLY, n. A genus of insects that live one day ...

14320

dayfly
DA'YFLY, n. A genus of insects that live one day only, or a very short time called Ephemera. The ...

14321

daylabor
DA'YLABOR, n. Labor hired or performed by the day.DAYLABORER, n. One who works by the ...

14322

daylaborer
DAYLABORER, n. One who works by the day.DAY'LIGHT, n. The light of the day; the light of the sun, ...

14323

daylight
DAY'LIGHT, n. The light of the day; the light of the sun, as opposed to that of the moon or of a ...

14324

daylily
DA'YLILY, n. The same with asphodel. A species of Hemerocallis.DA'YLY, a. The more regular ...

14325

dayly
DA'YLY, a. The more regular orthography of daily.DA'YSMAN, n. An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.

14326

daysman
DA'YSMAN, n. An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.

14327

dayspring
DA'YSPRING, n. The dawn; the beginning of the day, or first appearance of light.

14328

daystar
DA'YSTAR, n. The morning star, Lucifer, Venus; the star which precedes the morning light.DA'YTIME, ...

14329

dayswork
DA'Y'SWORK, n. The work of one day. Among seamen, the account or reckoning of a ship's course for ...

14330

daytime
DA'YTIME, n. The time of the sun's light on the earth; as opposed to night.DA'YWEARIED, a. ...

14331

daywearied
DA'YWEARIED, a. Wearied with the labor of the day.DA'YWORK, Work by the day; daylabor. DA'Y'SWORK, ...

14332

daywork
DA'YWORK, Work by the day; daylabor. DA'Y'SWORK, n. The work of one day. Among seamen, the ...

14333

daze
DAZE, v.t. To overpower with light; to dim or blind by too strong a light, or to render the sight ...

14334

dazzle
DAZ'ZLE, v.t.

14335

dazzled
DAZ'ZLED, pp. Made wavering, as the sight; overpowered or dimmed by a too strong ...

14336

dazzlement
DAZ'ZLEMENT, n. The act or power of dazzling.DAZ'ZLING, ppr. Rendering unsteady or wavering as ...

14337

dazzling
DAZ'ZLING, ppr. Rendering unsteady or wavering as the sight; overpowering by a strong light; ...

14338

dazzlingly
DAZ'ZLINGLY, adv. In a dazzling manner.DE, a Latin prefix, denotes a moving from, separation; as ...

14339

de
DE, a Latin prefix, denotes a moving from, separation; as in debark, decline, decease, deduct, ...

14340

deacon
DE'ACON, n. [Gr., a minister or servant.]

14341

deaconess
DE'ACONESS, n. A female deacon in the primitive church.DE'ACONRY or DE'ACONSHIP, n. The office, ...

14342

deaconry
DE'ACONRY or DE'ACONSHIP, n. The office, dignity or ministry of a deacon or deaconess.DEAD,

14343

dead
DEAD,

14344

dead-drunk
DEAD-DRUNK, a. So drunk as to be incapable of helping one's self.DEAD'EN, v.t. ded'n.

14345

dead-heartedness
DEAD-HEARTEDNESS, n. Having a dull, faint heart.DEAD'-LIFT, n. A heavy weight; a hopeless ...

14346

dead-reckoning
DEAD-RECKONING, n. In navigation, the judgment or estimation of the place of a ship, without any ...

14347

deaden
DEAD'EN, v.t. ded'n.

14348

deadlihood
DEAD'LIHOOD, n. The state of the dead.DEAD'LINESS, n. ded'liness. The quality of being ...

14349

deadliness
DEAD'LINESS, n. ded'liness. The quality of being deadly.DEAD'LY, a. ded'ly.

14350

deadly
DEAD'LY, a. ded'ly.

14351

deadly-carrot
DEADLY-CARROT, n. A plant of the genus Thapsia.DEADLY-NIGHTSHADE, n. A plant of the genus ...

14352

deadly-nightshade
DEADLY-NIGHTSHADE, n. A plant of the genus Atropa.DEAD'NESS, n. ded'ness.

14353

deadness
DEAD'NESS, n. ded'ness.

14354

deadnettle
DEAD'NETTLE, n. A plant of the genus Lamium, and another of the genus Galeopsis.DEAD'PLEDGE, n. ...

14355

deadpledge
DEAD'PLEDGE, n. A mortgage or pawning of things, or thing pawned.DEAD-RECKONING, n. In ...

14356

deadwater
DEAD'WATER, n. The eddy water closing in with a ship's stern, as she passes through the ...

14357

deadwood
DEAD'WOOD, n. Blocks of timber laid on the keel of a ship, particularly at the ...

14358

deadworks
DEAD'WORKS, n. The parts of a ship which are above the surface of the water, when she is balanced ...

14359

deaf
DEAF, n. deef.

14360

deafen
DE'AFEN, v.t. dee'fn.

14361

deafly
DE'AFLY, adv. dee'fly. Without sense of sounds; obscurely heard.DE'AFNESS, n, dee'fness.

14362

deafness
DE'AFNESS, n, dee'fness.

14363

deal
DEAL, v.t. pret. and pp. dealt, pron. delt.

14364

dealbate
DEAL'BATE, n.t. To whiten.DEALBA'TION, n. The act of bleaching; a whitening.DE'ALER, n.

14365

dealbation
DEALBA'TION, n. The act of bleaching; a whitening.DE'ALER, n.

14366

dealer
DE'ALER, n.

14367

dealing
DE'ALING, ppr.

14368

deambulation
DEAMBULA'TION, n. The act of walking abroad.DEAM'BULATORY, a. Pertaining to walks.DEAM'BULATORY, ...

14369

deambulatory
DEAM'BULATORY, a. Pertaining to walks.DEAM'BULATORY, n. A place to walk in.DEAN, n.

14370

dean
DEAN, n.

14371

deanery
DE'ANERY, n.

14372

deanship
DEAN'SHIP, n. The office of a dean.DEAR, a.

14373

dear
DEAR, a.

14374

dearbought
DE'ARBOUGHT, a. Purchased at a high price; as dearbought experience; dearbought ...

14375

dearling
DE'ARLING, (See Darling)DE'ARLOVED, a. Greatly beloved.DE'ARLY, adv.

14376

dearloved
DE'ARLOVED, a. Greatly beloved.DE'ARLY, adv.

14377

dearly
DE'ARLY, adv.

14378

dearn
DEARN, a. Lonely; solitary; melancholy.DE'ARNESS, n.

14379

dearness
DE'ARNESS, n.

14380

dearnly
DEARNLY, adv. Secretly; privately.DEARTH, n. derth.

14381

dearth
DEARTH, n. derth.

14382

dearticulate
DEARTIC'ULATE, v.t. To disjoint.DEATH, n. deth.

14383

death
DEATH, n. deth.

14384

death-bed
DEATH-BED, n. deth'-bed. The bed on which a person dies or is confined in his last ...

14385

death-darting
DEATH-DARTING, a. Darting or inflicting death.DEATH'S-DOOR, n. A near approach to death; the ...

14386

death-watch
DEATH'-WATCH, n. A small insect whose ticking is weakly supposed, by superstitious and ignorant ...

14387

deathful
DEATH'FUL, a. Full of slaughter; murderous; destructive.

14388

deathfulness
DEATH'FULNESS, n. Appearance of death.DEATH'LESS, a. Immortal; not subject to death, destruction ...

14389

deathless
DEATH'LESS, a. Immortal; not subject to death, destruction or extinction; as deathless beings; ...

14390

deathlike
DEATH'LIKE, a.

14391

deaths-door
DEATH'S-DOOR, n. A near approach to death; the gates of death.DEATH'FUL, a. Full of slaughter; ...

14392

deaths-man
DEATH'S-MAN, n. An executioner; a hangman.DEATH'-SHADOWED, a. Surrounded by the shades of death.

14393

deathward
DEATH'WARD, adv. Toward death.DEATH'-WATCH, n. A small insect whose ticking is weakly supposed, ...

14394

deaurate
DEAU'RATE, v.t. To gild.DEAU'RATE, a. Gilded.DEBAC'LE, n. A breaking or bursting forth.

14395

debacle
DEBAC'LE, n. A breaking or bursting forth.

14396

debar
DEB'AR, v.t. To cut off from entrance; to preclude; to hinder from approach, entry or enjoyment; ...

14397

debark
DEB'ARK, v.t. To land from a ship or boat; to remove from on board any water-craft, and place on ...

14398

debarkation
DEBARKA'TION, n. The act of disembarking.DEB'ARKED, pp. Removed to land from on board a ship or ...

14399

debarked
DEB'ARKED, pp. Removed to land from on board a ship or boat.DEB'ARKING, ppr. Removing from a ship ...

14400

debarking
DEB'ARKING, ppr. Removing from a ship to the land; going from on board a vessel.DEB'ARRED, pp. ...

14401

debarred
DEB'ARRED, pp. Hindered from approach, entrance or possession.DEB'ARRING, ppr. Preventing from ...

14402

debarring
DEB'ARRING, ppr. Preventing from approach, entrance or enjoyment.DEBA'SE, v.t.

14403

debase
DEBA'SE, v.t.

14404

debased
DEBA'SED, pp. Reduced in estimated rank; lowered in estimation; reduced in purity, fineness, ...

14405

debasement
DEBA'SEMENT, n. The act of debasing; degradation; reduction of purity, fineness, quality or value; ...

14406

debaser
DEBA'SER, n. One who debases or lowers in estimation, or in value; one who degrades or renders ...

14407

debasing
DEBA'SING, ppr.

14408

debatable
DEBA'TABLE, a. That may be debated; disputable; subject to controversy or contention; as a ...

14409

debate
DEBATE, n.

14410

debated
DEBA'TED, pp. Disputed; argued; discussed.DEBA'TEFUL, a.

14411

debateful
DEBA'TEFUL, a.

14412

debatefully
DEBA'TEFULLY, adv. With contention.DEBA'TEMENT, n. Controversy; deliberation.DEBA'TER, n. One ...

14413

debatement
DEBA'TEMENT, n. Controversy; deliberation.DEBA'TER, n. One who debates; a disputant; a ...

14414

debater
DEBA'TER, n. One who debates; a disputant; a controvertist.DEBA'TING, ppr. Disputing; discussing; ...

14415

debating
DEBA'TING, ppr. Disputing; discussing; contending by arguments.DEBAUCH', v.t. [The general sense ...

14416

debauch
DEBAUCH', v.t. [The general sense of debauch, in English, is to lead astray, like seduce.]

14417

debauched
DEBAUCH'ED, pp. Corrupted; vitiated in morals or purity of character.DEBAUCH'EDLY, adv. In a ...

14418

debauchedly
DEBAUCH'EDLY, adv. In a profligate manner.DEBAUCH'EDNESS, n. Intemperance.DEBAUCHEE', n. A man ...

14419

debauchedness
DEBAUCH'EDNESS, n. Intemperance.DEBAUCHEE', n. A man given to intemperance, or bacchanalian ...

14420

debauchee
DEBAUCHEE', n. A man given to intemperance, or bacchanalian excesses. But chiefly, a man ...

14421

debaucher
DEBAUCH'ER, n. One who debauches or corrupts others; a seducer to lewdness, or to any dereliction ...

14422

debauchery
DEBAUCH'ERY, n.

14423

debauchment
DEBAUCH'MENT, n. The act of debauching or corrupting; the act of seducing from virtue or duty.

14424

debellation
DEBELLA'TION, n. The act of conquering or subduing.DEBEN'TURE, n. [Fr. from L. debeo, to owe.]

14425

debenture
DEBEN'TURE, n. [Fr. from L. debeo, to owe.]

14426

debentured
DEBEN'TURED, a. Debentured goods are those for which a debenture has been given, as being entitled ...

14427

debile
DEB'ILE, a. Relaxed; weak; feeble; languid; faint; without strength.DEBIL'ITATE, v.t. To weaken; ...

14428

debilitate
DEBIL'ITATE, v.t. To weaken; to impair the strength of; to enfeeble; to make faint or languid. ...

14429

debilitated
DEBIL'ITATED, pp. Weakened; enfeebled; relaxed.DEBIL'ITATING, ppr. Weakening; enfeebling; ...

14430

debilitating
DEBIL'ITATING, ppr. Weakening; enfeebling; impairing strength.DEBILITA'TION, n. The act of ...

14431

debilitation
DEBILITA'TION, n. The act of weakening; relaxation.DEBIL'ITY, n. Relaxation of the solids; ...

14432

debility
DEBIL'ITY, n. Relaxation of the solids; weakness; feebleness; languor of body; faintness; ...

14433

debit
DEB'IT, n. [L. debitum, from debeo, to owe.] Debt. It is usually written debt. But it is used ...

14434

debited
DEB'ITED, pp.

14435

debiting
DEB'ITING, ppr.

14436

debitor
DEB'ITOR, n. A debtor.DEBOISE,DEBOISH, for debauch.DEBONNA'IR, a. Civil; wellbred; complaisant; ...

14437

deboise
DEBOISE,DEBOISH, for debauch.DEBONNA'IR, a. Civil; wellbred; complaisant; elegant.DEBOUCH, v.i. ...

14438

deboish
DEBOISH, for debauch.DEBONNA'IR, a. Civil; wellbred; complaisant; elegant.DEBOUCH, v.i. To issue ...

14439

debonnair
DEBONNA'IR, a. Civil; wellbred; complaisant; elegant.DEBOUCH, v.i. To issue or march out of a ...

14440

debouch
DEBOUCH, v.i. To issue or march out of a narrow place, or from defiles, as troops.DEBRIS, n. ...

14441

debris
DEBRIS, n. debree'. Fragments; rubbish; ruins; applied particularly to the fragments of ...

14442

debt
DEBT, n. det. [L. debitum, contracted.]

14443

debted
DEBT'ED, pp. det'ted. Indebted; obliged to.DEBTEE', n. dettee'. A creditor; one to whom a debt ...

14444

debtee
DEBTEE', n. dettee'. A creditor; one to whom a debt is due.DEBT'LESS, a. det'less. Free from ...

14445

debtless
DEBT'LESS, a. det'less. Free from debt.DEBT'OR, n. det'tor.

14446

debtor
DEBT'OR, n. det'tor.

14447

decachord
DEC'ACHORD,DECACHORD'ON, n. [Gr. ten or string]

14448

decachordon
DECACHORD'ON, n. [Gr. ten or string]

14449

decadal
DEC'ADAL, a. Pertaining to ten; consisting of tens.DEC'ADE, n. [Gr., ten.] The sum or number of ...

14450

decade
DEC'ADE, n. [Gr., ten.] The sum or number of ten; an aggregate consisting of ten; as a decade of ...

14451

decadence
DECA'DENCE,DECA'DENCY, n. Decay. DEC'AGON, n. [Gr., ten and corner.] In geometry, a plane figure ...

14452

decadency
DECA'DENCY, n. Decay. DEC'AGON, n. [Gr., ten and corner.] In geometry, a plane figure having ten ...

14453

decagon
DEC'AGON, n. [Gr., ten and corner.] In geometry, a plane figure having ten sides and ten ...

14454

decagram
DEC'AGRAM, n. [Gr., ten and a weight.] A French weight of ten grams, or 154 grains, 44 decimals, ...

14455

decagyn
DEC'AGYN, n. [Gr., ten and female.] In botany, a plant having ten pistils.DECAGYN'IAN, a. Having ...

14456

decagynian
DECAGYN'IAN, a. Having ten pistils.DECAHE'DRAL, a. Having ten sides.DECAHE'DRON, n. [Gr., ten ...

14457

decahedral
DECAHE'DRAL, a. Having ten sides.DECAHE'DRON, n. [Gr., ten and a base.] In geometry, a figure or ...

14458

decahedron
DECAHE'DRON, n. [Gr., ten and a base.] In geometry, a figure or body having ten sides.DEC'ALITER, ...

14459

decaliter
DEC'ALITER, n. [Gr., ten and liter.] A French measure of capacity, containing ten liters, or ...

14460

decalogist
DECAL'OGIST, n. One who explains the decalogue.DEC'ALOGUE, n. dec'alog. [Gr., ten and speech.] ...

14461

decalogue
DEC'ALOGUE, n. dec'alog. [Gr., ten and speech.] The ten commandments or precepts given by God to ...

14462

decameter
DECAM'ETER, n. [Gr., ten and measure.] A French measure of length, consisting of ten meters, and ...

14463

decamp
DECAMP', v.i. To remove or depart from a camp; to march off; as, the army decamped at six ...

14464

decampment
DECAMP'MENT, n. Departure from a camp; a marching off.DEC'ANAL, a. Pertaining to a ...

14465

decanal
DEC'ANAL, a. Pertaining to a deanery.DECAN'DER, n. [Gr., ten and a male.] In botany, a plant ...

14466

decander
DECAN'DER, n. [Gr., ten and a male.] In botany, a plant having ten stamens.

14467

decangular
DECAN'GULAR, a. [Gr., ten and angular.] Having ten angles.DECANT', v.t. [L., to sing; literally, ...

14468

decant
DECANT', v.t. [L., to sing; literally, to throw.] To pour off gently, as liquor from its ...

14469

decantation
DECANTA'TION, n. The act of pouring liquor gently from its lees or sediment, or from one vessel ...

14470

decanted
DECANT'ED, pp. Poured off, or from one vessel into another.DECANT'ER, n.

14471

decanter
DECANT'ER, n.

14472

decanting
DECANT'ING, ppr. Pouring off, as liquor from its lees, or from one vessel to another.DECAP'ITATE, ...

14473

decaphyllous
DECAPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. ten and a leaf.] Having ten leaves.DEC'ARBONIZE, v.t. To deprive of ...

14474

decapitate
DECAP'ITATE, v.t. [L., head.] To behead; to cut off the head.DECAPITA'TION, n. The act of ...

14475

decapitation
DECAPITA'TION, n. The act of beheading.DECAPH'YLLOUS, a. [Gr. ten and a leaf.] Having ten ...

14476

decarbonize
DEC'ARBONIZE, v.t. To deprive of carbon; as, to decarbonize steel.DEC'ARBONIZED, pp. Deprived of ...

14477

decarbonized
DEC'ARBONIZED, pp. Deprived of carbon.DEC'ARBONIZING, ppr. Depriving of carbon.DEC'ASTICH, n. ...

14478

decarbonizing
DEC'ARBONIZING, ppr. Depriving of carbon.DEC'ASTICH, n. [Gr. ten and a verse.] A poem consisting ...

14479

decastich
DEC'ASTICH, n. [Gr. ten and a verse.] A poem consisting of ten lines.DEC'ASTYLE, n. [Gr. ten ...

14480

decastyle
DEC'ASTYLE, n. [Gr. ten and a column.] A building with an ordnance of ten columns in ...

14481

decay
DECA'Y, v.i. [Fr. dechoir, from L. de and cado, to fall, or decedo.]

14482

decayed
DECA'YED, pp. Having fallen from a good or sound state; impaired; weakened; ...

14483

decayedness
DECA'YEDNESS, n. A state of being impaired; decayed state.DECA'YER, n. That which causes ...

14484

decayer
DECA'YER, n. That which causes decay.DECA'YING, ppr. Failing; declining; passing from a good, ...

14485

decaying
DECA'YING, ppr. Failing; declining; passing from a good, prosperous or sound state, to a worse ...

14486

decease
DECE'ASE, n. [L. to depart or to withdraw.] Literally, departure; hence, departure from this ...

14487

deceased
DECE'ASED, pp. or a. Departed from life. This is used as a passive participle. He is deceased, ...

14488

deceasing
DECE'ASING, ppr. Departing from life; dying. DECE'DENT, n. A deceased person.DECE'IT,

14489

decedent
DECE'DENT, n. A deceased person.DECE'IT,

14490

deceit
DECE'IT,

14491

deceitful
DECE'ITFUL, a.

14492

deceitfully
DECE'ITFULLY, adv. In a deceitful manner; fraudulently; with deceit; in a manner or with a view to ...

14493

deceitfulness
DECE'ITFULNESS, n.

14494

deceitless
DECE'ITLESS, a. Free from deceit.DECE'IVABLE, a.

14495

deceivable
DECE'IVABLE, a.

14496

deceivableness
DECE'IVABLENESS, n.

14497

deceive
DECE'IVE, v.t. [L to take asid, to ensnare.]

14498

deceived
DECE'IVED, pp. Misled; led into error; beguiled; cheated; deluded.DECE'IVER, n. One who deceives; ...

14499

deceiver
DECE'IVER, n. One who deceives; one who leads into error; a cheat; an impostor.

14500

deceiving
DECE'IVING, ppr. Misleading; ensnaring; beguiling; cheating.DECEM'BER, n. [L. december, from ...

14501

december
DECEM'BER, n. [L. december, from decem, ten; this being the tenth month among the early Romans, ...

14502

decemdentate
DECEMDEN'TATE, a. [L. decem, ten, and dentatus, toothed.] Having ten points or teeth.DEC'EMFID, ...

14503

decemfid
DEC'EMFID, a. [L. decem, ten, and fido, to divide.]

14504

decemlocular
DECEMLOC'ULAR, a. [L. decem, ten, and loculus, a little bag or cell.] Having ten cells for ...

14505

decempedal
DEC'EMPEDAL, a. [L. decem, ten, and pes, a foot.] Ten feet in length.DEC'EMVIR, n. [L. decem, ...

14506

decemvir
DEC'EMVIR, n. [L. decem, ten, and vir, a man.] One of ten magistrates, who had absolute ...

14507

decemviral
DECEM'VIRAL, a. Pertaining to the decemvirs in Rome.DECEM'VIRATE, n.

14508

decemvirate
DECEM'VIRATE, n.

14509

decency
DE'CENCY, n. [L. to be fit or becoming; Gr. to be good, or fit for.]

14510

decennary
DEC'ENNARY, n. [L. from decem, ten, and annus, a year.]

14511

decennial
DECEN'NIAL, a. [L. as above.] Continuing for ten years; consisting of ten years; or happening ...

14512

decennoval
DEC'ENNOVAL,DECEN'NOVARY, a. [L. decem, ten, and novem, nine.] Pertaining to the number ...

14513

decennovary
DECEN'NOVARY, a. [L. decem, ten, and novem, nine.] Pertaining to the number nineteen; ...

14514

decent
DE'CENT, a. [L. decens; Fr. decent.]

14515

decentness
DE'CENTNESS, n. Decency.DECEPTIBIL'ITY, n. The quality or state of being capable or liable to be ...

14516

deceptibility
DECEPTIBIL'ITY, n. The quality or state of being capable or liable to be deceived.DECEP'TIBLE, a. ...

14517

deceptible
DECEP'TIBLE, a. That may be deceived.DECEP'TION, n.

14518

deception
DECEP'TION, n.

14519

deceptious
DECEP'TIOUS, a. Tending to deceive; deceitful.DECEP'TIVE, a. Tending to deceive; having power to ...

14520

deceptive
DECEP'TIVE, a. Tending to deceive; having power to mislead, or impress false opinions; as a ...

14521

deceptory
DECEP'TORY, a. Tending to deceive; containing qualities or means adapted to mislead.DECERPT, a. ...

14522

decerpt
DECERPT, a. Cropped.DECERP'TION, n. [L. to pluck off.] A pulling or plucking off; a ...

14523

decerption
DECERP'TION, n. [L. to pluck off.] A pulling or plucking off; a cropping.DECERTA'TION, n. [L. ...

14524

decertation
DECERTA'TION, n. [L. To strive.] Strife; contest for mastery.DECES'SION, n. [L. to pass.] ...

14525

decession
DECES'SION, n. [L. to pass.] Departure.DECH'ARM, v.t. To remove a spell or enchantment; to ...

14526

decharm
DECH'ARM, v.t. To remove a spell or enchantment; to disenchant.DECH'ARMED, pp. ...

14527

decharmed
DECH'ARMED, pp. Disenchanted.DECH'ARMING, ppr. Removing a spell.DECHRIS'TIANIZE, v.t. To turn ...

14528

decharming
DECH'ARMING, ppr. Removing a spell.DECHRIS'TIANIZE, v.t. To turn from christianity; to banish ...

14529

dechristianize
DECHRIS'TIANIZE, v.t. To turn from christianity; to banish christian belief and principles ...

14530

decidable
DECI'DABLE, a. That may be decided.

14531

decide
DECI'DE, v.i. To determine; to form a definite opinion; to come to a conclusion.

14532

decided
DECI'DED, pp. Determined; ended; concluded.DECI'DED, a. That implies decision; clear; ...

14533

decidedly
DECI'DEDLY, adv. In a decided or determined manner; clearly; indisputable; in a manner to preclude ...

14534

decidence
DECI'DENCE, n. A falling off.DECI'DER, n. One who determines a cause or contest.DECI'DING, ppr. ...

14535

decider
DECI'DER, n. One who determines a cause or contest.DECI'DING, ppr. Determing; ending; ...

14536

deciding
DECI'DING, ppr. Determing; ending; concluding.DECID'UOUS, a. [L. to fall.] Falling; not ...

14537

deciduous
DECID'UOUS, a. [L. to fall.] Falling; not perennial or permanent. In botany, a deciduous leaf ...

14538

deciduousness
DECID'UOUSNESS, n. The quality of falling once a year.DEC'IGRAM, n. A French weight of one tenth ...

14539

decigram
DEC'IGRAM, n. A French weight of one tenth of a gram.DE'CIL, n. An aspect or position of two ...

14540

decil
DE'CIL, n. An aspect or position of two planets, when they are distant from each other a tenth ...

14541

deciliter
DEC'ILITER, n. A French measure of capacity equal to one tenth of a liter.

14542

decimally
DEC'IMALLY, adv. By tens; by means of decimals.DEC'IMATE, v.t. [L. decimo, from decem, ten.]

14543

decimate
DEC'IMATE, v.t. [L. decimo, from decem, ten.]

14544

decimation
DECIMA'TION, n.

14545

decimator
DEC'IMATOR, n. One who selects every tenth man, in a company or regiment, &c.DECIM'ETER, n. A ...

14546

decimeter
DECIM'ETER, n. A French measure of length equal to the tenth part of a meter, or 3 inches and ...

14547

decimo-sexto
DECIMO-SEXTO, n. A book is in decimo-sexto, when a sheet is folded into sixteen leaves.DECI'PHER, ...

14548

decipher
DECI'PHER, v.t.

14549

deciphered
DECI'PHERED, pp. Explained; unraveled; marked.DECI'PHERER, n. One who explains what is written in ...

14550

decipherer
DECI'PHERER, n. One who explains what is written in ciphers.DECI'PHERING, ppr. Explaining; ...

14551

deciphering
DECI'PHERING, ppr. Explaining; detecting the letters represented by ciphers; unfolding; ...

14552

decision
DECIS'ION, n.

14553

decisive
DECI'SIVE, a.

14554

decisively
DECI'SIVELY, adv. In a conclusive manner; in a manner to end deliberation, controversy, doubt or ...

14555

decisiveness
DECI'SIVENESS, n.

14556

decisory
DECI'SORY, a. Able to decide or determine.DECK, v.t.

14557

deck
DECK, v.t.

14558

decked
DECK'ED, pp. Covered; adorned; furnished with a deck.DECK'ER, n.

14559

decker
DECK'ER, n.

14560

decking
DECK'ING, ppr. Covering; arraying; adorning.

14561

declaim
DECLA'IM, v.i. [L. to cry out.]

14562

declaimant
DECLA'IMANT or DECLA'IMER, n.

14563

declaiming
DECLA'IMING, ppr. Speaking rhetorically; haranguing.DECLA'IMING, n. A harangue.DECLAMA'TION, n.

14564

declamation
DECLAMA'TION, n.

14565

declamator
DECLAMA'TOR, n. A declaimer.DECLAM'ATORY, a.

14566

declamatory
DECLAM'ATORY, a.

14567

declaration
DECLARA'TION, n.

14568

declarative
DECLAR'ATIVE, a.

14569

declaratorily
DECLAR'ATORILY, adv. By declaration, or exhibition.DECLAR'ATORY, a. Making declaration, clear ...

14570

declaratory
DECLAR'ATORY, a. Making declaration, clear manifestation, or exhibition; expressive; as, this ...

14571

declare
DECLA'RE, v.t. [L. to make clear.]

14572

declared
DECLA'RED, pp. Made known; told explicitly; avowed; exhibited; manifested; published; proclaimed; ...

14573

declaredly
DECLA'REDLY, adv. Avowedly; explicitly.DECLA'RER, n. One who makes known or publishes; that which ...

14574

declarer
DECLA'RER, n. One who makes known or publishes; that which exhibits.DECLA'RING, ppr. Making known ...

14575

declaring
DECLA'RING, ppr. Making known by words or by other means; manifesting; publishing; affirming; ...

14576

declatable
DECLA'TABLE, a. That may be declared, or proved.DECLARA'TION, n.

14577

declension
DECLEN'SION, n.

14578

declinable
DECLI'NABLE, a. That may be declined; changing its termination in the oblique cases; as a ...

14579

declinate
DEC'LINATE, a. In botany, bending or bent downwards, in a curve; declining.DECLINA'TION, n.

14580

declination
DECLINA'TION, n.

14581

declinator
DECLINA'TOR,DECLIN'ATORY, n. An instrument for taking the declination, or inclination of a plane; ...

14582

declinatory
DECLIN'ATORY, n. An instrument for taking the declination, or inclination of a plane; an ...

14583

decline
DECLI'NE, v.i. [L. to lean.]

14584

declined
DECLI'NED, pp. Bent downward or from; inflected.DECLI'NING, ppr. Leaning; deviating; falling; ...

14585

declining
DECLI'NING, ppr. Leaning; deviating; falling; failing; decaying; tending to a worse state; ...

14586

declivitous
DECLIV'ITOUS, a. Gradually descending; not precipitous; sloping.DECOCT', v.t. [L. to boil.]

14587

declivity
DECLIV'ITY, n. [L. sloping.] Declination from a horizontal line; descent of land; inclination ...

14588

declivous
DECLI'VOUS,DECLIV'ITOUS, a. Gradually descending; not precipitous; sloping.DECOCT', v.t. [L. to ...

14589

decoct
DECOCT', v.t. [L. to boil.]

14590

decoctible
DECOCT'IBLE, a. That may be boiled or digested.DECOC'TION, n.

14591

decoction
DECOC'TION, n.

14592

decoctive
DECOCT'IVE, a. That may be easily decocted.DECOCT'URE, n. A substance drawn by ...

14593

decocture
DECOCT'URE, n. A substance drawn by decoction.DE'COLLATE, v.t. To behead.DE'COLLATED, pp. ...

14594

decollate
DE'COLLATE, v.t. To behead.DE'COLLATED, pp. Beheaded.DECOLLA'TION, n. [L. to behead; the neck.] ...

14595

decollated
DE'COLLATED, pp. Beheaded.DECOLLA'TION, n. [L. to behead; the neck.] The act of beheading; the ...

14596

decollation
DECOLLA'TION, n. [L. to behead; the neck.] The act of beheading; the act of cutting off the neck ...

14597

decoloration
DECOLORA'TION, n. Absence of color.DE'COMPLEX, a. Compounded of complex ideas.DECOMPO'SABLE, a. ...

14598

decomplex
DE'COMPLEX, a. Compounded of complex ideas.DECOMPO'SABLE, a. That may be decomposed; capable of ...

14599

decomposable
DECOMPO'SABLE, a. That may be decomposed; capable of being resolved into its constituent ...

14600

decompose
DECOMPO'SE, v.t. To separate the constituent parts of a body or substance; to disunite elementary ...

14601

decomposed
DECOMPO'SED, pp. Separated or resolved into the constituent parts.DECOMPO'SING, ppr. Separating ...

14602

decomposing
DECOMPO'SING, ppr. Separating into constituent parts.DECOMPOS'ITE, a. Compounded a second time; ...

14603

decomposite
DECOMPOS'ITE, a. Compounded a second time; compounded with things already ...

14604

decomposition
DECOMPOSI'TION, n.

14605

decompound
DECOMPOUND', v.t.

14606

decompoundable
DECOMPOUND'ABLE, a. That may be decompounded.DECOMPOUND'ED, pp. Compounded a second time; ...

14607

decompounded
DECOMPOUND'ED, pp. Compounded a second time; composed of things already compounded.DECOMPOUND'ING, ...

14608

decompounding
DECOMPOUND'ING, ppr. Compounding a second time.DEC'ORATE, v.t. [L. comeliness, grace.]

14609

decorate
DEC'ORATE, v.t. [L. comeliness, grace.]

14610

decorated
DEC'ORATED, pp. Adorned; beautified; embellished.DEC'ORATING, ppr. Adorning; embellishing; ...

14611

decorating
DEC'ORATING, ppr. Adorning; embellishing; rendering beautiful to the eye, or lovely to the ...

14612

decoration
DECORA'TION, n.

14613

decorator
DEC'ORATOR, n. One who adorns or embellishes.DEC'OROUS, a. Decent; suitable to a character, or to ...

14614

decorous
DEC'OROUS, a. Decent; suitable to a character, or to the time, place and occasion; becoming; ...

14615

decorously
DEC'OROUSLY, adv. In a becoming manner.DECOR'TICATE, v.t. [L. bark.] To strip off bark; to ...

14616

decorticate
DECOR'TICATE, v.t. [L. bark.] To strip off bark; to peel; to husk; to take off the exterior ...

14617

decorticated
DECOR'TICATED, pp. Stripped of bark; peeled; husked.DECOR'TICATING, ppr. Stripping off bark or ...

14618

decorticating
DECOR'TICATING, ppr. Stripping off bark or the external coat; peeling. DECORTICA'TION, n. The act ...

14619

decortication
DECORTICA'TION, n. The act of stripping off bark or husk.DECO'RUM, n. [L. to become.]

14620

decorum
DECO'RUM, n. [L. to become.]

14621

decoy
DECOY, n. 1. Any thing intended to lead into a snare; any lure or allurement that deceives and ...

14622

decoy-duck
DECOY-DUCK, n. A duck employed to draw others into a net or situation to be taken.

14623

decoy-man
DECOY-MAN, n. A man employed in decoying and catching fowls.

14624

decoyed
DECOYED, pp. Lured or drawn into a snare or net; allured into danger by deception.

14625

decoying
DECOYING, ppr. Luring into a snare or net by deception; leading into evil or danger.

14626

decrease
DECREASE, v.i. [L. To grow.] To become less; to be diminished gradually, in extent, bulk, ...

14627

decreased
DECREASED, pp. Lessened; diminished.

14628

decreasing
DECREASING, ppr. Becoming less; diminishing; waning.

14629

decree
DECREE, n. [L. To judge; to divide.]1. Judicial decision, or determination of a litigated cause; ...

14630

decreed
DECREED, pp. Determined judicially; resolved; appointed; established in purpose.

14631

decreeing
DECREEING, ppr. Determining; resolving; appointing; ordering.

14632

decrement
DECREMENT, n.1. Decrease; waste; the state of becoming less gradually.Rocks and mountains suffer a ...

14633

decrepit
DECREPIT, a. [L. to break.] Broken down with age; wasted or worn by the infirmities of old age; ...

14634

decrepitate
DECREPITATE, v.t. [L. To break or burst, to crackle.] To roast or calcine in a strong heat, with a ...

14635

decrepitated
DECREPITATED, pp. Roasted with a crackling noise.

14636

decrepitating
DECREPITATING, ppr. Crackling; roasting with a crackling noise; suddenly bursting when exposed to ...

14637

decrepitation
DECREPITATION, n. The act of roasting with a continual crackling; or the separation of parts with ...

14638

decrepitness
DECREPITNESS,

14639

decrepitude
DECREPITUDE, n. The broken, crazy state of the body, produced by decay and the infirmities of age.

14640

decrescent
DECRESCENT, a. Decreasing; becoming less by gradual diminution; as a decrescent moon.

14641

decretal
DECRETAL, n.1. A letter of the pope, determining some point or question in ecclesiastical law. ...

14642

decretion
DECRETION, n. A decreasing.

14643

decretist
DECRETIST, n. One who studies or professes the knowledge of the decretals.

14644

decretorily
DECRETORILY, adv. In a definitive manner.

14645

decretory
DECRETORY, a.1. Judicial; definitive; established by a decree.The decretory rigors of a condemning ...

14646

decrew
DECREW, v.i. To decrease.

14647

decrial
DECRIAL, n. A crying down; a clamorous censure; condemnation by censure.

14648

decried
DECRIED, pp. Cried down; descredited; brought into disrepute.

14649

decrier
DECRIER, n. One who decries.

14650

decrown
DECROWN, v.t. To deprive of a crown.

14651

decry
DECRY, v.t. 1. To cry down; to censure as faulty, mean or worthless; to clamor against; to ...

14652

decubation
DECUBATION, n. The act of lying down.

14653

decumbence
DECUMBENCE,

14654

decumbency
DECUMBENCY, n. [L. To lie down.] The act of lying down; the posture of lying down.

14655

decumbent
DECUMBENT, a. In botany, declined or bending down; having the stamens and pistils bending down to ...

14656

decumbiture
DECUMBITURE, n.1. The time at which a person takes to his bed in a disease.2. In astrology, the ...

14657

decuple
DECUPLE, a. [L. Ten.] Tenfold; containing ten times as many.DECUPLE, n. A number ten times ...

14658

decurion
DECURION, n. [L. Ten] An officer in the Roman army, who commanded a decuria, or ten soldiers, which ...

14659

decurrent
DECURRENT, a. [L. To run down; to run.] Extending downwards. A decurrent leaf is a sessile leaf ...

14660

decursion
DECURSION, n. [L. To run.] The act of running down, as a stream.

14661

decursive
DECURSIVE, a. Running down.Decursively pinnate, in botany, applied to a leaf, having the leaflets ...

14662

decurt
DECURT, v.t. To shorten by cutting off.

14663

decurtation
DECURTATION, n. [L. To shorten.] Tha act of shortening, or cutting short.

14664

decury
DECURY, n. [L. Ten.] A set of ten men under an officer called decurio.

14665

decussate
DECUSSATE, v.t. [L. To cut or strike across.] To intersect at acute angles, thus X; or in general, ...

14666

decussated
DECUSSATED, a. Crossed; intersected. In botany, decussated leaves and branches, are such as grow ...

14667

decussating
DECUSSATING, ppr. Intersecting at acute angles; crossing.

14668

decussation
DECUSSATION, n. The act of crossing at unequal angles; the crossing of two lines, rays or nerves, ...

14669

dedalian
DEDALIAN, a. Various; variegated; intricate; complex; expert.

14670

dedalous
DEDALOUS, a. Having a margin with various windings and turnings; of a beautiful and delicate ...

14671

dedecorate
DEDECORATE, v.t. To disgrace.

14672

dedecoration
DEDECORATION, n. A disgracing.

14673

dedentition
DEDENTITION, n. The shedding of teeth.

14674

dedicate
DEDICATE, v.t. [L. To vow, promise, devote, dedicate. See Class Dg. No. 12, 15, 45. The sense is ...

14675

dedicated
DEDICATED, pp. Devoted to a divine Being, or to a sacred use; consecrated; appropriated; given ...

14676

dedicating
DEDICATING, ppr. Devoting to a divine Being, or to a sacred purpose; consecrating; appropriating; ...

14677

dedication
DEDICATION, n.1. The act of consecrating to a divine Being, or to a sacred use, often with ...

14678

dedicator
DEDICATOR, n. One who dedicates; one who inscribes a book to the favor of a patron.

14679

dedicatory
DEDICATORY, a. Composing a dedication; as an epistle dedicatory.

14680

dedition
DEDITION, n. [L. To yield.] The act of yielding any thing; surrendry.

14681

dedolent
DEDOLENT, a. Feeling no compunction.

14682

deduce
DEDUCE, v.t. [L. To lead, bring or draw.]1. To draw from; to bring from.O goddess, say, shall I ...

14683

deduced
DEDUCED, pp. Drawn from; inferred; as a consequence from principles or premises.

14684

deducement
DEDUCEMENT, n. The thing drawn from or deduced; inference; that which is collected from premises.

14685

deducible
DEDUCIBLE, a. That may be deduced; inferable; collectible by reason from premises; ...

14686

deducing
DEDUCING, ppr. Drawing from; inferring; collecting from principles or facts already established or ...

14687

deducive
DEDUCIVE, a. Performing the act of deduction.

14688

deduct
DEDUCT, v.t. To take from; to subtract; to separate or remove, in numbering, estimating or ...

14689

deducted
DEDUCTED, pp. Taken from; subtracted.

14690

deducting
DEDUCTING, ppt. Taking from; subtracting.

14691

deduction
DEDUCTION, n. 1. The act of deducting.2. That which is deducted; sum or amount taken from ...

14692

deductive
DEDUCTIVE, a. Deducible; that is or may be deduced from premises.All knowledge is deductive.

14693

deductively
DEDUCTIVELY, adv. By regular deduction; by way of inference; by consequence.

14694

deed
DEED, n.1. That which is done, acted or effected; an act; a fact; a word of extensive application, ...

14695

deed-achieving
DEED-ACHIEVING, a. That accomplishes great deeds.

14696

deed-poll
DEED-POLL, n. A deed not indented, that is, shaved or even, made by one party only.

14697

deedless
DEEDLESS, a. Inactive; not performing or having performed deeds or exploits.

14698

deem
DEEM, v.t.1. To think; to judge; to be of opinion; to conclude on consideration; as, he deems it ...

14699

deemed
DEEMED, pp. Thought; judged; supposed.

14700

deeming
DEEMING, ppr. Thinking; judging; believing.

14701

deemster
DEEMSTER, n. A judge in the Isle of Man and in Jersey.

14702

deep
DEEP, a.1. Extending or being far below the surface; descending far downward; profound ; opposed ...

14703

deep-mouthed
DEEP-MOUTHED, a. Having a hoarse, loud, hollow voice; as a deep-mouthed dog.

14704

deep-musing
DEEP-MUSING, a. Contemplative; thinking closely or profoundly.

14705

deep-read
DEEP-READ, a. Having fully read; profoundly versed.

14706

deep-revolving
DEEP-REVOLVING, a. Profoundly revolving or meditating.

14707

deep-throated
DEEP-THROATED, a. With deep throats.

14708

deep-toned
DEEP-TONED, a. Having a very low or grave tone.

14709

deep-vaulted
DEEP-VAULTED, a. Formed like a deep vault or arch.

14710

deep-waisted
DEEP-WAISTED, a. Having a deep waist, as a ship when the quarter deck and forecastle are raised ...

14711

deepen
DEEPEN, v.t.1. To make deep or deeper; to sink lower; as, to deepen the channel of a river or ...

14712

deepened
DEEPENED, pp. Made more deep.

14713

deepening
DEEPENING, ppr. Sinking lower; making more deep.

14714

deeply
DEEPLY, adv. 1. At or to a great depth; far below the surface; as a passion deeply rooted in our ...

14715

deepness
DEEPNESS, n. 1. Depth; remoteness from the surface in a descending line; interior distance from ...

14716

deer
DEER, n. Sing. And plu. [Gr. A wild beast. The primary sense is simply roving, wild, untamed; ...

14717

deer-stealer
DEER-STEALER, n. One who steals deer.

14718

deer-stealing
DEER-STEALING, n. The act or crime of stealing deer.

14719

deess
DEESS, n. A goddess.

14720

deface
DEFACE, v.t.1. To destroy or mar the face or surface of a thing; to injure the superficies or ...

14721

defacer
DEFACER, n. He or that which defaces; one who injures, mars or disfigures.

14722

defacing
DEFACING, ppr. Injuring the face or surface; marring; disfiguring; erasing.De facto. [L.] ...

14723

defailance
DEFAILANCE, n. Failure; miscarriage.

14724

defalcate
DEFALCATE, v.t. To cut off; to take away or deduct a part; used chiefly of money, accounts, rents, ...

14725

defalcation
DEFALCATION,. N. 1. The act of cutting off, or deducting a part; deduction; diminution; ...

14726

defalk
DEFALK, v.t. To defalcate.

14727

defamation
DEFAMATION, n. The uttering of slanderous words with a view to injure anothers reputation; the ...

14728

defamatory
DEFAMATORY, a. Calumnious; slanderous; containing defamation; false and injurious to reputation; ...

14729

defame
DEFAME,1. To slander; falsely and maliciously to utter words respecting another which tend to ...

14730

defamed
DEFAMED, pp. Slandered; dishonored or injured by evil reports.

14731

defamer
DEFAMER, n. A slanderer; a detractor; a calumniator.

14732

defaming
DEFAMING, ppr. Slandering; injuring the character by false reports.DEFAMING, n. Defamation; ...

14733

defaticate
DEFATICATE, v.t. [L. To tire.] To weary or tire.

14734

defatigable
DEFATIGABLE, a. Liable to be wearied.

14735

defatigation
DEFATIGATION, n. Weariness.

14736

default
DEFAULT, n.1. A failing, or failure; an omission of that which ought to be done; neglect to do ...

14737

defaulted
DEFAULTED, pp. 1. Called out of court, as a defendant or his cause.2. A. Having defect.

14738

defaulter
DEFAULTER, n.1. One who makes default; one who fails to appear in court when called.2. One who ...

14739

defaulting
DEFAULTING, ppr.1. Failing to fulfil a contract; delinquent.2. Failing to perform a duty or legal ...

14740

defeasance
DEFEASANCE,, n. S as z.1. Literally, a defeating; a rendering null; the preventing of the ...

14741

defeasible
DEFEASIBLE, a. S as z. That may be defeated, or annulled; as a defeasible title; a defeasible ...

14742

defeasibleness
DEFEASIBLENESS, n. The quality of being defeasible.

14743

defeat
DEFEAT, n.1. Overthrow; loss of battle; the check, rout, or destruction of an army by the victory ...

14744

defeating
DEFEATING, ppr. Vanquishing; subduing; opposing successfully; overthrowing; frustrating; ...

14745

defeature
DEFEATURE, n. 1. Change of feature.2. Overthrow; defeat.

14746

defecate
DEFECATE, v.t. [L. Dregs.]1. To purify; to refine; to clear from dregs or impurities; to clarify; ...

14747

defecated
DEFECATED, pp. Purtified; clarified; refined.

14748

defecating
DEFECATING, ppr. Purifying; purging of lees or impurities.

14749

defecation
DEFECATION, n. The act of separating from lees or dregs; purification from impurities or foreign ...

14750

defect
DEFECT, n. [L. To fail; to make or do.]1. Want or absence of something necessary or useful ...

14751

defectibility
DEFECTIBILITY, n. Deficiency; imperfection.

14752

defectible
DEFECTIBLE, a. Imperfect; deficient; wanting.

14753

defection
DEFECTION, n.1. Want or failure of duty; particularly, a falling away; apostasy; the act of ...

14754

defective
DEFECTIVE, a.1. Wanting either in substance, quantity or quality, or in any thing necessary; ...

14755

defectively
DEFECTIVELY, adv. In a defective manner; imperfectly.

14756

defectiveness
DEFECTIVENESS, n. Want; the state of being imperfect; faultiness.

14757

defectuosity
DEFECTUOSITY, n. Defectiveness; faultiness.

14758

defectuous
DEFECTUOUS, a. Full of defects.

14759

defedation
DEFEDATION, n. Pollution.

14760

defend
DEFEND, v.t.1. To drive from; to thrust back; hence, to deny; to repel a demand, charge, or ...

14761

defendable
DEFENDABLE, a. That may be defended.

14762

defendant
DEFENDANT, a. 1. Defensive; proper for defense.2. Making defense; being in the character of a ...

14763

defended
DEFENDED, pp. Opposed; denied; prohibited; maintained by resistance; vindicated; preserved ...

14764

defender
DEFENDER, n. One who defends by oppostition; one who maintains, supports, protects or vindicates; ...

14765

defending
DEFENDING, ppr. Denying; opposing; resisiting; forbidding; maintaining uninjured by force or by ...

14766

defensative
DEFENSATIVE, n. Guard; defense; a bandage, plaster, or the like, to secure a wound from external ...

14767

defense
DEFENSE, n.1. Any thing that opposes attack, violence, danger or injury; any thing that secures ...

14768

defensed
DEFENSED, pp. Fortified.

14769

defenseless
DEFENSELESS, a. Being without defense, or without means of repelling assault or injury; applied to ...

14770

defenselessness
DEFENSELESSNESS, n. The state of being unguarded or unprotected.

14771

defensible
DEFENSIBLE, a.1. That may be defended; as a defensible city.2. That may be vindicated, maintained ...

14772

defensive
DEFENSIVE, a.1. That serves to defend; proper for defense; as defensive armor, which repels ...

14773

defensively
DEFENSIVELY, adv. In a defensive manner; on the defensive; in defense.

14774

defer
DEFER, v.t. [L. To bear.]1. To delay; to put off; to postpone to a future time; as, to defer the ...

14775

deference
DEFERENCE, n. 1. A yielding in opinion; submission of judgment to the opinion or judgment of ...

14776

deferent
DEFERENT, a. Bearing; carrying; conveying.DEFERENT, n.1. That which carries or conveys. The ...

14777

deferential
DEFERENTIAL,, a. Expressing deference.

14778

deferment
DEFERMENT, n. Delay.

14779

deferrer
DEFERRER, n. One who delays or puts off.

14780

deferring
DEFERRING, ppr. Delaying; postponing.

14781

defiance
DEFIANCE, n.1. A daring; a challenge to fight; invitation to combat; a call to an adversary to ...

14782

defiatory
DEFIATORY, a. Bidding or bearing defiance.

14783

deficience
DEFICIENCE,

14784

deficiency
DEFICIENCY, n. [L. To fail to do.]1. A failing; a falling short; imperfection; as a deficiency in ...

14785

deficient
DEFICIENT, a.1. Wanting; defective; imperfect; not sufficient or adequate; as deficient estate; ...

14786

deficit
DEFICIT, n. Want; deficiency; as a deficit in the taxes or revenue.

14787

defier
DEFIER, n. A challenger; one who dares to combat or encounter; one who braves; one who acts in ...

14788

defiguration
DEFIGURATION, n. A disfiguring.

14789

defigure
DEFIGURE, v.t. To delineate.

14790

defile
DEFILE, v.t.1. To make unclean; to render foul or dirty; in a general sense.2. To make impure; to ...

14791

defiled
DEFILED, pp. Made dirty, or foul; polluted; soiled; corrupted; violated; vitiated.

14792

defilement
DEFILEMENT, n.1. The act of defiling, or state of being defiled; foulness; dirtiness; ...

14793

defiler
DEFILER, n. One who defiles; one who corrupts or violates; that which pollutes.

14794

defiling
DEFILING, ppr.1. Polluting; making impure.2. Marching in a file, or with a narrow front.

14795

definable
DEFINABLE, a.1. Literally, that may be limited, or have its limits ascertained. Hence, capable of ...

14796

define
DEFINE, v.t. [L. To end, to limit, from finis, end.]1. To determine or describe the end or limit; ...

14797

defined
DEFINED, pp.1. Determined; having the extent ascertained; having the signification determined.2. ...

14798

definer
DEFINER, n. He who defines; he who ascertains or marks the limits; he who determines or explains ...

14799

defining
DEFINING, ppr. Determining the limits; ascertaining the extent; explaining the meaning; describing ...

14800

definite
DEFINITE, a.1. Having certain limits; bounded with precision; determinate; as a definite extent of ...

14801

definiteness
DEFINITENESS, n. Certainty of extent; certainty of signification; determinateness.

14802

definition
DEFINITION, n.1. A brief description of a thing by its properties; as a definition of wit or of a ...

14803

definitive
DEFINITIVE, a. 1. Limiting the extent; determinate; positive; express; as a definitive term.2. ...

14804

definitively
DEFINITIVELY, adv. 1. Determinately; positively; expressly.2. Finally; conclusively; ...

14805

definitiveness
DEFINITIVENESS, n. Determinateness; decisiveness; conclusiveness.

14806

defix
DEFIX, v.t. To fix; to fasten.

14807

deflagrability
DEFLAGRABILITY, n. Combustibility; the quality of taking fire and burning away, as a metallic ...

14808

deflagrable
DEFLAGRABLE, a. Combustible; having the quality of taking fire and burning, as alcohol, oils, &c.

14809

deflagrate
DEFLAGRATE, v.t. [L. To burn.] To set fire to; to burn; to consume; as, to deflagrate oil or ...

14810

deflagration
DEFLAGRATION, n. A kindling or setting fire to a substance; burning; combustion.The strength of ...

14811

deflagrator
DEFLAGRATOR, n. A galvanic instrument for producing combustion, particularly the combustion of ...

14812

deflect
DEFLECT, v.i. [L. To turn or bend.] To turn from or aside; to deviate from a true course or right ...

14813

deflected
DEFLECTED, pp. Turned aside, or from a direct line or course. In botany, bending downward ...

14814

deflecting
DEFLECTING, ppr. Turning aside; turning from a right line or regular course.

14815

deflection
DEFLECTION, n.1. Deviation; the act of turning aside; a turning from a true line or the regular ...

14816

deflexure
DEFLEXURE, n. A bending down; a turning aside; deviation.

14817

deflorate
DEFLORATE, a. [L. To deflour.] In botany, having cast its farin, pollen, or fecundating dust.

14818

defloration
DEFLORATION, n.1. The act of deflouring; the act of depriving of the flower or prime beauties; ...

14819

deflour
DEFLOUR, v.t. [L. A flower.] 1. To deprive a woman of her virginity, either by force or with ...

14820

defloured
DEFLOURED, pp. Deprived of maidenhood; ravished; robbed or prime beauty .

14821

deflourer
DEFLOURER, n. One who deprives a woman of her virginity.

14822

deflouring
DEFLOURING, ppr. Depriving of virginity or maidenhood; robbing of prime beauties.

14823

deflow
DEFLOW, v.i. To flow down.

14824

defluous
DEFLUOUS, a. [L. To flow.] Flowing down; falling off.

14825

deflux
DEFLUX, n. A flowing down; a running downward; as a deflux of humors.

14826

defluxion
DEFLUXION, n. [L. To flow down.]1. A flowing, running or falling of humors or fluid matter, from ...

14827

defly
DEFLY, adv. Dextrously; skilfully.

14828

defoliation
DEFOLIATION, n. [L. Foliage; a leaf.] Literally, the fall of the leaf or shedding of leaves; but ...

14829

deforce
DEFORCE, v.t. To disseize and keep out of lawful possession of an estate; to withhold the ...

14830

deforced
DEFORCED, pp. Kept out of lawful possession.

14831

deforcement
DEFORCEMENT, n. 1. The holding of lands or tenements to which another person has a right; a ...

14832

deforciant
DEFORCIANT, n. He that keeps out of possession the rightful owner of an estate; he against whom a ...

14833

deforcing
DEFORCING, ppr. Keeping out of lawful possession.

14834

deform
DEFORM, v.t. [L. Form.]1. To mar or injure the form; to alter that form or disposition of parts ...

14835

deformation
DEFORMATION, n. A disfiguring or defacing.

14836

deformed
DEFORMED, pp. 1. Injured in the form; disfigured; distorted; ugly; wanting natural beauty, or ...

14837

deformedly
DEFORMEDLY, adv. In an ugly manner.

14838

deformedness
DEFORMEDNESS, n. Ugliness; a disagreeable or unnatural form.

14839

deformer
DEFORMER, n. One who deforms.

14840

deforming
DEFORMING, ppr. Marring the natural form or figure; rendering ugly or disppleasing; destroying ...

14841

deformity
DEFORMITY, n.1. Any unnatural state of the shape or form; want of that uniformity or symmetry ...

14842

deforser
DEFORSER, n. One that casts out by force.

14843

defraud
DEFRAUD, v.t. [L. To cheat.] 1. To deprive of right, either by obtaining something by deception ...

14844

defrauded
DEFRAUDED, pp. Deprived of property or right by trick, artifice or deception; injured by the ...

14845

defrauder
DEFRAUDER, n. One who defrauds; one who takes from another his right by deception, or withholds ...

14846

defrauding
DEFRAUDING, ppr. Depriving another of his property or right by deception or artifice; injuring by ...

14847

defraudment
DEFRAUDMENT, n. Tha act of defrauding.

14848

defray
DEFRAY, v.t.1. To pay; to discharge, as cost or expense; to bear, as charge, cost or expense. It ...

14849

defrayed
DEFRAYED, pp. Paid; discharged; as expense, or cost.

14850

defrayer
DEFRAYER, n. One who pays or discharges expenses.

14851

defraying
DEFRAYING, ppr. Paying; discharging.

14852

defrayment
DEFRAYMENT, n. Payment.

14853

deft
DEFT, a. Neat; handsome; spruce; ready; dextrous; fit; convenient.

14854

deftly
DEFTLY, adv. Neatly; dextrously; in a skilful manner.

14855

deftness
DEFTNESS, n. Neatness; beauty.

14856

defunct
DEFUNCT, a. [L. To perform and discharge.] Having finished the course of life; dead; ...

14857

defunction
DEFUNCTION, n. Death.

14858

defy
DEFY, v.t.1. To dare; to provoke to combat or strife, by appealing to the courage of another; to ...

14859

defyer
DEFYER, [See defier.]

14860

degarnish
DEGARNISH, v.t.1. To unfurnish; to strip of furniture, ornaments or apparatus.2. To deprive of a ...

14861

degarnished
DEGARNISHED, pp. Stripped of furniture or apparatus; deprived of troops for defense.

14862

degarnishing
DEGARNISHING, ppr. Stripping of furniture, dress, apparatus or a garrison.

14863

degarnishment
DEGARNISHMENT, n. The act of depriving of furniture, apparatus or a garrison.

14864

degender
DEGENDER, v.i. To degenerate.

14865

degeneracy
DEGENERACY, n.1. A growing worse or inferior; a decline in good qualities; or a state of being ...

14866

degenerate
DEGENERATE, v.i. [L. Grown worse, ignoble, base.]1. To become worse; to decay in good qualities; ...

14867

degenerately
DEGENERATELY, adv. In a degenerate or base manner.

14868

degenerateness
DEGENERATENESS, n. A degenerate state; a state in which the natural good qualities of the species ...

14869

degeneration
DEGENERATION, n. 1. A growing worse, or losing of good qualities; a decline from the virtue and ...

14870

degenerous
DEGENEROUS, a.1. Degenerated; fallen from a state of excellence, or from the virtue and merit of ...

14871

degenerously
DEGENEROUSLY, adv. In a degenerous manner; basely; meanly.

14872

deglutinate
DEGLUTINATE,, v.t. [L. To glue.] To unglue; to loosen or separate substances glued together.

14873

deglutition
DEGLUTITION, n. [L. To swallow.]1. The act of swallowing; as, deglutition is difficult.2. The ...

14874

degradation
DEGRADATION, n.1. A reducing in rank; the act of depriving one of a degree of honor, of dignity, ...

14875

degrade
DEGRADE, v.t. [L. A step, a degree.]1. To reduce from a higher to a lower rank or degree; to ...

14876

degraded
DEGRADED, pp. Reduced in rank; deprived of an office or dignity; lowered; sunk; reduced in ...

14877

degradement
DEGRADEMENT, n. Deprivation of rank or office.

14878

degrading
DEGRADING, ppr.1. Reducing in rank; depriving of honors or offices; reducing in value or ...

14879

degradingly
DEGRADINGLY, adv. In a degrading manner, or in a way to depreciate.

14880

degree
DEGREE, n.1. A step; a distinct portion of space of indefinite extent; a space in progression; as, ...

14881

degustation
DEGUSTATION, n. A tasting.

14882

dehiscence
DEHISCENCE, n. [L. To gape.] A gaping. In botany, the opening of capsules; the season when ...

14883

dehiscent
DEHISCENT, a. Opening, as the capsule of a plant.

14884

dehort
DEHORT, v.t. [L. To dissuade; to advise.] To dissuade; to advise to the contrary; to counsel not ...

14885

dehortation
DEHORTATION, n. Dissuasion; advice or counsel against something.

14886

dehortatory
DEHORTATORY, a. Dissuading; belonging to dissuasion

14887

dehorter
DEHORTER, n. A dissuader; an adviser to the contrary.

14888

dehorting
DEHORTING, ppr. Dissuading.

14889

deicide
DEICIDE, n. [L. God and to slay.]1. The act of putting to death Jesus Christ, our Savior.2. One ...

14890

deific
DEIFIC, a. [L. To make.]1. Divine; pertaining to the gods.2. Making divine.

14891

deification
DEIFICATION, n. The act of deifying; the act of exalting to the rank of, or enrolling among the ...

14892

deified
DEIFIED, pp. Exalted or ranked among the gods; regarded or praised as divine.

14893

deifier
DEIFIER, n. One that deifies.

14894

deiform
DEIFORM, a. [L. A god, and form.] Like a god; of a godlike form.These souls exhibit a deiform ...

14895

deify
DEIFY, v.t. [L. A god, and to make.]1. To make a god; to exalt to the rank of a heathen deity; to ...

14896

deifying
DEIFYING, ppr. Exalting to the rank of a deity; treating as divine.

14897

deign
DEIGN, v.i. Dane. To think worthy; to vouchsafe; to condescend.O deign to visit our foraken ...

14898

deigning
DEIGNING, ppr. Daning. Vouchsafing; thinking worthy.

14899

deintgrate
DEINTGRATE, v.t. To disintegrate.

14900

deiparous
DEIPAROUS, a. Bearing or bringing forth a god; an epithet applied the Virgin Mary.

14901

deipnosophist
DEIPNOSOPHIST, n. [Gr. A feast; a sophist.] One of an ancient sect of philosophers, who were famous ...

14902

deism
DEISM, n. [L. God.] The doctrine or creed of a deist; the belief or system of religious opinions ...

14903

deist
DEIST, n. One who believes in the existence of a God, but denies revealed religion, but follows ...

14904

deistic
DEISTIC,

14905

deistical
DEISTICAL, a. Pertaining to deism or to deists; embracing deism, as a deistical writer; or ...

14906

deity
DEITY, n.1. Godhead; divinity; the nature and essence of the Supreme Being; as, the deity of the ...

14907

deject
DEJECT, v.t. [L. To throw.]1. To cast down; usually, to cast down the countenance; to cause to ...

14908

dejected
DEJECTED, pp. Cast down; depressed; grieved; discouraged.

14909

dejectedly
DEJECTEDLY, adv. In a dejected manner; sadly; heavily.

14910

dejectedness
DEJECTEDNESS, n. The state being cast down; lowness of spirits.

14911

dejecting
DEJECTING, ppr. Casting down; depressing; dispiriting.

14912

dejection
DEJECTION, n. 1. A casting down; depression of mind; melancholy; lowness of spirits, occasioned ...

14913

dejectly
DEJECTLY, adv. In a downcast manner.

14914

dejectory
DEJECTORY, a. Having power or tending to cast down, or to promote evacuations by stool.

14915

dejecture
DEJECTURE, n. That which is ejected; excrements.

14916

delacrymation
DELACRYMATION, n. [L. A weeping.] A preternatural discharge of watery humors from the eyes; ...

14917

delactable
DELACTABLE, a. [L. To delight.] Delightful; highly pleasing; that gives great joy or pleasure; as ...

14918

delactation
DELACTATION, n. A weaning.

14919

delapsation
DELAPSATION, n. A falling down.

14920

delapse
DELAPSE, v.i. [L. To slide. ] To fall or slide down.

14921

delapsed
DELAPSED, pp. Fallen down.

14922

delapsion
DELAPSION, n. A falling down of the uterus, anus, &c.

14923

delate
DELATE, v.t. [L. To bear.] 1. To carry; to convey.2. To accuse; to inform against; that is, to ...

14924

delation
DELATION, n.1. Carriage; conveyance; as the delation of sound.2. To accuse; to inform against; ...

14925

delator
DELATOR, n. An accuser; an informer.

14926

delay
DELAY, v.t.1. To prolong the time of acting, or proceeding; to put off; to defer.My lord delayeth ...

14927

delayed
DELAYED, pp. Deferred; detained; hindered for a time; retarded.

14928

delayer
DELAYER, n. One who defers; one who lingers.

14929

delaying
DELAYING, ppr. Putting off; deferring; procrastinating; retarding; detaining.

14930

delayment
DELAYMENT, n. Hinderance.

14931

dele
DELE, v.t. Blot out; erase.

14932

deleble
DELEBLE, a. That can be blotted out.

14933

delectableness
DELECTABLENESS, n. Delightfulness.

14934

delectably
DELECTABLY, adv. Delightfully.

14935

delectation
DELECTATION, n. Great pleasure; delight.

14936

delegacy
DELEGACY, n. A number of persons delegated.

14937

delegate
DELEGATE, v.t. [L. To send.]1. To send away; appropriately, to send on an embassy; to send with ...

14938

delegated
DELEGATED, pp. Deputed; sent with a trust or commission to act for another; appointed a judge; ...

14939

delegating
DELEGATING, ppr. Deputing; sending with a commission to act for another; appointing; committing; ...

14940

delegation
DELEGATION, n.1. A sending away; the act of putting in commission, or investing with authority to ...

14941

delete
DELETE, v.t. To blot out.

14942

deleterious
DELETERIOUS, a. [L. To blot out or destroy.] 1. Having the quality of destroying, or ...

14943

deletery
DELETERY, a. Destructive; poisonous.

14944

deletion
DELETION, n. [L. To blot out.]1. The act of blotting out or erasing.2. Destruction.

14945

deletory
DELETORY, n. That which blots out.

14946

delf
DELF, n. 1. A mine; a quarry; a pit dug.2. Earthern ware, covered with enamel or white glazing ...

14947

delibate
DELIBATE, v.t. [L. To taste.] To taste; to take a sip.

14948

delibation
DELIBATION, n. A taste; an essay.

14949

deliberate
DELIBERATE, v.i. [L. To weigh.] To weigh in the mind; to consider and examine the reasons for and ...

14950

deliberately
DELIBERATELY, adv. With careful consideration, or deliberation;circumspectly; not hastily or ...

14951

deliberateness
DELIBERATENESS, n. Calm consideration; circumspection; due attention to the arguments for and ...

14952

deliberation
DELIBERATION, 1. The act of deliberating; the act of weighing and examining the reasons for and ...

14953

deliberative
DELIBERATIVE, a.1. Pertaining to deliberation; proceeding or acting by deliberation, or by mutual ...

14954

deliberatively
DELIBERATIVELY, adv. By deliberation.

14955

delicacy
DELICACY, n. In a general sense, that which delights or pleases. Hence,1. Fineness of texture; ...

14956

delicate
DELICATE, a. [L. Connected with delight; to delight.]1. Of a fine texture; fine; soft; smooth; ...

14957

delicately
DELICATELY, adv. 1. In a delicate manner; with nice regard to propriety and the feelings of ...

14958

delicateness
DELICATENESS, n. The state of being delicate; tenderness; softness; effeminacy. Deut. 28.

14959

delicious
DELICIOUS, a.1. Highly pleasing to the taste; most sweet or grateful to the senses; affording ...

14960

deliciously
DELICIOUSLY, adv. In a delicious manner; in a manner to please the taste or gratify the mind; ...

14961

deliciousness
DELICIOUSNESS, n. 1. The quality of being delicious, or very grateful to the taste or mind; as ...

14962

deligation
DELIGATION, n. [L. To bind.] In surgery, a binding up; a bandaging.

14963

delight
DELIGHT, n.1. A high degree of pleasure, or satisfaction of mind; joy.His delight is in the law of ...

14964

delighted
DELIGHTED, pp. 1. Greatly pleased; rejoiced; followed by with.That ye may be delighted with the ...

14965

delighter
DELIGHTER, n. One who takes delight.

14966

delightful
DELIGHTFUL, a. Highly pleasing; affording great pleasure and satisfaction; as a delightful ...

14967

delightfully
DELIGHTFULLY, adv.1. In a manner to receive great pleasure; very agreeable; as, we were ...

14968

delightfulness
DELIGHTFULNESS, n.1. The quality of being delightful, or of affording great pleasure; as the ...

14969

delightless
DELIGHTLESS, a. Affording no pleasure or delight.

14970

delightsome
DELIGHTSOME, a. Very pleasing; delightful.

14971

delightsomely
DELIGHTSOMELY, adv. Very pleasantly; in a delightful manner.

14972

delightsomeness
DELIGHTSOMENESS, n. Delightfulness; pleasantness in a high degree.

14973

delineament
DELINEAMENT, n. Representation by delineation.

14974

delineate
DELINEATE, v.t. [L. A line.]1. To draw the lines which exhibit the form of a thing; to mark out ...

14975

delineated
DELINEATED, pp. Drawn; marked with lines exhibiting the form or figure; sketched; designed; ...

14976

delineating
DELINEATING, ppr. Drawing the form; sketching; painting; describing.

14977

delineation
DELINEATION, n. 1. First draught of a thing; outline; representation of a form or figure by ...

14978

delineature
DELINEATURE, n. Delineation.

14979

deliniment
DELINIMENT, n. Mitigation.

14980

delinquency
DELINQUENCY, n. [L. To fail or omit duty; to leave.] Failure or omission of duty; a fault; a ...

14981

delinquent
DELINQUENT, a. Failing in duty; offending by neglect of duty.DELINQUENT, n. One who fails to ...

14982

deliquate
DELIQUATE, v.t. or I. [L. To melt.] To melt or be dissolved.

14983

deliquation
DELIQUATION, n. A melting.

14984

deliquesce
DELIQUESCE, v.i. [L. To melt; to melt or become soft.] To melt gradually and become liquid by ...

14985

deliquescence
DELIQUESCENCE, n. Spontaneous liquefaction in the air; a gradual melting or becoming liquid by ...

14986

deliquescent
DELIQUESCENT, a. Liquefying in the air; capable of attracting moisture from the atmosphere and ...

14987

deliquiate
DELIQUIATE, v.i. To melt and become liquid by imbibing water from the air.

14988

deliquiation
DELIQUIATION, n. A melting by attracting water from the air.

14989

deliquium
DELIQUIUM, n. 1. In chimistry, a melting or dissolution in the air, or in a moist place.2. A ...

14990

delirament
DELIRAMENT, n. A wandering of the mind; foolish fancy.

14991

delirious
DELIRIOUS, a. Roving in mind; light-headed; disordered in intellect; having ideas that are wild, ...

14992

deliriousness
DELIRIOUSNESS, n. The state of being delirious; delirium.

14993

delirium
DELIRIUM, n. [L. To wander in mind, to rave; to make balks in plowing, that is, to err, wander, ...

14994

delitescence
DELITESCENCE, n. Retirement; obscurity.

14995

deliver
DELIVER, v.t. [L. Free, disengaged; to free, to peel.]1. To free; to release, as from restraint; to ...

14996

deliverable
DELIVERABLE, a. That may be or is to be delivered.A bill of lading may state that the goods are ...

14997

deliverance
DELIVERANCE, n.1. Release from captivity, slavery, oppression, or any restraint.He hath sent me to ...

14998

delivered
DELIVERED, pp. Freed; released; transferred or transmitted; passed from one to another; committed; ...

14999

deliverer
DELIVERER, n.1. One who delivers; one who releases or rescues; a preserver.The Lord raised up a ...

15000

delivering
DELIVERING, ppr. Releasing; setting free; rescuing; saving; surrendering; giving over; yielding; ...

15001

delivery
DELIVERY, n.1. The act of delivering.2. Release; rescue; as from slavery, restraint, oppression ...

15002

dell
DELL, n. A pit, or a hollow place; a cavity or narrow opening.

15003

delph
DELPH, [See Delf. No. 2.]

15004

delphia
DELPHIA or DELPHINIA, n. A vegetable alkali lately discovered in the Delphinium staphysagria. It ...

15005

delphian
DELPHIAN or DELPHIC, a. Relating to Delphi, and to the celebrated oracle of that place.

15006

delphine
DELPHINE, a.1. Pertaining to the dolphin, a genus of fishes.2. Pertaining to the dauphin of ...

15007

delphinite
DELPHINITE, n. A mineral called also pistacite and epidote.

15008

deltoid
DELTOID, n.1. Triangular; an epithet applied to a muscle of the shoulder which moves the arm ...

15009

deludable
DELUDABLE, a. That may be deluded or deceived; liable to be imposed on.

15010

delude
DELUDE, v.t.1. To deceive; to impose on; to lead from truth or into error; to mislead the mind or ...

15011

deluded
DELUDED, pp. Deceived; misled; led into error.

15012

deluder
DELUDER, n. One who deceives; a deceiver; an imposter; one who holds out false pretenses.

15013

deluding
DELUDING, ppr. Deceiving; leading astray; misleading the opinion or judgment.DELUDING, n. The act ...

15014

deluge
DELUGE, n. [L. To wash.]1. Any overflowing of water; an inundation; a flood; a swell of water ...

15015

deluged
DELUGED, pp. Overflowed; inundated; overwhelmed.

15016

deluging
DELUGING, ppr. Overflowing; inundating; overwhelming.

15017

delusion
DELUSION, n. S as z.1. The act of deluding; deception; a misleading of the mind. We are all ...

15018

delusive
DELUSIVE, a. Apt to deceive; tending to mislead the mind; deceptive; beguiling; as delusive arts; ...

15019

delusiveness
DELUSIVENESS, n. The quality of being delusive; tendency to deceive.

15020

delusory
DELUSORY, a. Apt to deceive; deceptive.

15021

delve
DELVE, v.t. Delv. [L. A mole, perhaps the delver.]1. To dig; to open the ground with a ...

15022

delver
DELVER, n. One who digs, as with a spade.

15023

delving
DELVING, ppr. Digging.

15024

demagogue
DEMAGOGUE, n. Demagog. [Gr. The populas, and to lead.]1. A leader of the people; an orator who ...

15025

demain
DEMAIN, n. 1. A manor-house and the land adjacent or near, which a lord keeps in his own hands or ...

15026

demand
DEMAND, v.t. [L. To command; to send; hence, to commit or entrust. To ask is to press or urge.]1. ...

15027

demandable
DEMANDABLE, a. That may be demanded, claimed, asked for, or required; as, payment is demandable at ...

15028

demandant
DEMANDANT, n. One who demands; the plaintiff in a real action; any plaintiff.

15029

demanded
DEMANDED, pp. Called for; claimed; challenged as due; requested; required; interrogated.

15030

demander
DEMANDER, n. One who demands; one who requires with authority; one who claims as due; one who ...

15031

demanding
DEMANDING, ppr. Claiming or calling for as due, or by authority; requiring; asking; pursuing a ...

15032

demandress
DEMANDRESS, n. A female demandant.

15033

demarch
DEMARCH, n. March; walk; gait.

15034

demarkation
DEMARKATION, n.1. The act of marking, or of ascertaining and setting a limit.2. A limit or bound ...

15035

demean
DEMEAN, v.t.1. To behave; to carry; to conduct; with the reciprocal pronoun; as, it is our duty to ...

15036

demeanor
DEMEANOR, n. Behavior; carriage; deportment; as decent demeanor; sad demeanor.

15037

demeanure
DEMEANURE, n. Behavior.

15038

demency
DEMENCY, n. Madness.

15039

dementate
DEMENTATE, a. Mad; infatuated.DEMENTATE, v.t. To make mad.

15040

dementation
DEMENTATION, n. The act of making frantic.

15041

demephitization
DEMEPHITIZATION, n. The act of purifying from mephitic or foul air.

15042

demephitize
DEMEPHITIZE, v.t. To purify from foul unwholesome air.

15043

demephitized
DEMEPHITIZED, pp. Purified; freed from foul air.

15044

demephitizing
DEMEPHITIZING, ppr. Purifying from foul air.

15045

demerit
DEMERIT, n. [ L. To earn or deserve.]1. That which deserves punishment, the opposite of merit; an ...

15046

demersed
DEMERSED, a. Plunged; situated or growing under water.

15047

demersion
DEMERSION, n. [L. To plunge or drown.]1. A plunging into a fluid; a drowning.2. The state of ...

15048

demesne
DEMESNE, [See Demain.]

15049

demi
DEMI, a prefix, Fr. Demi, from the L. Dimidium, signifies half. It is used only in composition.

15050

demi-brigade
DEMI-BRIGADE, n. A half-brigade.

15051

demi-cadence
DEMI-CADENCE, n. In music, an imperfect cadence, or one that falls on any other than the key note.

15052

demi-cannon
DEMI-CANNON, n. A cannon of different sizes; the lowest carries a ball of thirty pounds weight, ...

15053

demi-cross
DEMI-CROSS, n. An instrument for taking the altitude of the sun and stars.

15054

demi-culverin
DEMI-CULVERIN, n. A large gun, or piece of ordnance; the least is ten feet long, and carries a ...

15055

demi-devil
DEMI-DEVIL, n. Half a devil.

15056

demi-distance
DEMI-DISTANCE, n. In fortification, the distance between the outward polygons and the flank.

15057

demi-ditone
DEMI-DITONE, n. In music, a minor third.

15058

demi-god
DEMI-GOD, n. Half a god; one partaking of the divine nature; a fabulous hero, produced by the ...

15059

demi-gorge
DEMI-GORGE, n. In fortification, that part of the polygon which remains after the flank is raised, ...

15060

demi-groat
DEMI-GROAT, n. A half-groat.

15061

demi-lance
DEMI-LANCE, n. A light lance; a short spear; a half-pike.

15062

demi-lune
DEMI-LUNE, n. A half-moon.

15063

demi-man
DEMI-MAN, n. Half a man; a term of reproach.

15064

demi-natured
DEMI-NATURED, a. Having half the nature of another animal.

15065

demi-premises
DEMI-PREMISES, n. Plu. Half-premises.

15066

demi-quaver
DEMI-QUAVER, n. A note in music, of half the length of the quaver.

15067

demi-semi-quaver
DEMI-SEMI-QUAVER, n. The shortest note in music, two of which are equal to a semi-quaver.

15068

demi-tone
DEMI-TONE, n. In music, an interval of half a tone; a semi-tone.

15069

demi-vill
DEMI-VILL, n. A half-vill, consisting of five freemen or frank pledges.

15070

demi-volt
DEMI-VOLT, n. One of the seven artificial motions of a horse, in which he raises his fore legs in ...

15071

demi-wolf
DEMI-WOLF, n. Half a wolf; a mongrel dog between a dog and a wolf; lycisca.

15072

demigrate
DEMIGRATE or DEMIGRATION, [Not used. See Migrate.]

15073

demirep
DEMIREP, n. A woman of suspicious chastity. [Demi-reputation.]

15074

demisable
DEMISABLE, a. S sa z. That may be leased; as an estate demisable by copy of court roll.

15075

demise
DEMISE, n. S as z. [L. Literally, a laying down, or sending from; a removing.]1. In England, a ...

15076

demission
DEMISSION, n. A lowering; degradation; depression.

15077

demissive
DEMISSIVE or DEMISS, a. Humble.

15078

demissly
DEMISSLY, adv. In a humble manner.

15079

demit
DEMIT, v.t. To let fall; to depress; to submit.

15080

demiurge
DEMIURGE, n. [Gr., a public servant, and work.] In the mythology of Eastern Philosophers, an eon ...

15081

demiurgic
DEMIURGIC, a. Pertaining to a demiurge, or to creative power.

15082

democracy
DEMOCRACY, n. [Gr. People, and to possess, to govern.] Government by the people; a form of ...

15083

democrat
DEMOCRAT, n. One who adheres to a government by the people, or favors the extension of the right ...

15084

democratic
DEMOCRATIC,

15085

democratical
DEMOCRATICAL, a. Popular; pertaining to democracy or government by the people; as a democratical ...

15086

democratically
DEMOCRATICALLY, adv. In a democratical manner.

15087

demolish
DEMOLISH, v.t. [L. To build.] To throw or pull down; to raze; to destroy, as a heap or structure; ...

15088

demolished
DEMOLISHED, pp. Pulled down; thrown down; razed; destroyed, as a fabric or structure.

15089

demolisher
DEMOLISHER, n. One who pulls or throws down; one who destroys or lays waste; as a demolisher of ...

15090

demolishing
DEMOLISHING, ppr. Pulling or throwing down; destroying.

15091

demolishment
DEMOLISHMENT, n. Ruin; overthrow.

15092

demolition
DEMOLITION, n. The act of overthrowing, pulling down or destroying a pile or structure; ruin; ...

15093

demon
DEMON, n. A spirit, or immaterial being, holding a middle place between men and the celestial ...

15094

demoness
DEMONESS, n. A female demon.

15095

demoniac
DEMONIAC or DEMONIACAL or DEMONIAN, a. 1. Pertaining to demons or evil spirits.2. Influenced by ...

15096

demoniacs
DEMONIACS, n. In church history, a branch of the Anabaptists, whose distinguishing tenet is, that ...

15097

demonocracy
DEMONOCRACY, n. [Gr. Demon and to hold.] The power or government of demons.

15098

demonolatry
DEMONOLATRY, n. [Gr. Demon and worship.] The worship of demons, or of evil spirits.

15099

demonology
DEMONOLOGY, n. [Gr. Demon and discourse.] A discourse on demons; a treatise on evil spirits. So ...

15100

demonomist
DEMONOMIST, n. [Gr. Demon and law.] One that lives in subjection to the devil, or to evil spirits.

15101

demonomy
DEMONOMY, n. The dominion of demons, or of evil spirits.

15102

demonship
DEMONSHIP, n. The state of a demon.

15103

demonstrable
DEMONSTRABLE, a. That may be demonstrated; that may be proved beyond doubt or contradiction; ...

15104

demonstrableness
DEMONSTRABLENESS, n. The quality of being demonstrable.

15105

demonstrably
DEMONSTRABLY, adv. In a manner to preclude doubt; beyond the possibility of contradiction.

15106

demonstrate
DEMONSTRATE, v.t. [L. To show.]1. To show or prove to be certain; to prove beyond the possibility ...

15107

demonstrated
DEMONSTRATED, pp. Proved beyond the possibility of doubt; rendered certain to the mind.

15108

demonstrating
DEMONSTRATING, ppr. Proving to be certain; evincing beyond the possibility of doubt.

15109

demonstration
DEMONSTRATION, n.1. The act of demonstrating, or of exhibiting certain proof.2. The highest ...

15110

demonstrative
DEMONSTRATIVE, a. 1. Showing or proving by certain evidence; having the power of demonstration; ...

15111

demonstratively
DEMONSTRATIVELY, adv. With certain evidence; with proof which cannot be questioned; certainly; ...

15112

demonstrator
DEMONSTRATOR, n. 1. One who demonstrates; one who proves any thing with certainty, or with ...

15113

demonstratory
DEMONSTRATORY, a. Tending to demonstrate; having a tendency to prove beyond a possibility of ...

15114

demoralization
DEMORALIZATION, n. The act of subverting or corrupting morals; destruction of moral principles.

15115

demoralize
DEMORALIZE, v.t. To corrupt or undermine the morals of ; to destroy or lessen the effect of moral ...

15116

demoralized
DEMORALIZED, pp. Corrupted in morals.

15117

demoralizing
DEMORALIZING, ppr. 1. Corrupting or destroying morals or moral principles.2. A. Tending to ...

15118

demulce
DEMULCE, v.t. Demuls. To sooth; to soften or pacify.

15119

demulcent
DEMULCENT, a. [L. To stroke, to soften; allied perhaps to mollis, mellow.] Softening; mollifying; ...

15120

demur
DEMUR, v.i. [L. To stay or delay.]1. To stop; to pause; to hesitate; to suspend proceeding; to ...

15121

demure
DEMURE, a. Sober; grave; modest; downcast; as a demure countenance; a demure abasing of the ...

15122

demurely
DEMURELY, adv. With grave, solemn countenance; with a fixed look; with a solemn gravity.Esops ...

15123

demureness
DEMURENESS, n. Gravity of countenance; soberness; a modest look.

15124

demurrage
DEMURRAGE, n. An allowance made to the master of a trading vessel, for delay or detention in port ...

15125

demurrer
DEMURRER, n.1. One who demure.2. In law, a stop at some point in the pleadings, and a resting of ...

15126

demurring
DEMURRING, ppr. Stopping; pausing; suspending proceedings or decision; resting or abiding on a ...

15127

demy
DEMY,1. A particular size of paper; a kind of paper of small size.2. A half fellow at Magdalen ...

15128

den
DEN, n.1. A cave or hollow place in the earth; usually applied to a cave, pit, or subterraneous ...

15129

denarcotize
DENARCOTIZE, v.t. [de and narcotic.] To deprive of the narcotic principle or quality; as, to ...

15130

denary
DENARY, a. Containing ten.DENARY, n. The number ten.

15131

denationalize
DENATIONALIZE, v.t. To divest of national character or rights, by transferrence to the service of ...

15132

denay
DENAY, n. Denial; refusal.DENAY, v.t. To deny.

15133

dendrachate
DENDRACHATE, n. [Gr. A tree, and agate.] Arborescent agate; agate containing the figures of shrubs ...

15134

dendrite
DENDRITE, n. [Gr. A tree.] A stone or mineral on or in which are the figures of shrubs or trees; ...

15135

dendritic
DENDRITIC,

15136

dendritical
DENDRITICAL, a. Containing the figures of shrubs or trees.

15137

dendroid
DENDROID, a. [Gr. A tree, and form.] Resembling a shrub.

15138

dendroit
DENDROIT, n. A fossil which has some resemblance in form to the branch of a tree.

15139

dendrolite
DENDROLITE, n. [Gr. A tree and a stone.] A petrified or fossil shrub, plant, or part of a plant.

15140

dendrology
DENDROLOGY, n. [Gr. A tree and a discourse.] A discourse or treatise on trees; the natural ...

15141

dendrometer
DENDROMETER, n. [Gr. Tree and to measure.] An instrument to measure the highth and diameter of ...

15142

denegate
DENEGATE, v.t. To deny.

15143

denegation
DENEGATION, n. Denial.

15144

deniable
DENIABLE, a. That may be denied, or contradicted.

15145

denial
DENIAL, n.1. An affirmation to the contrary; an assertion that a declaration or fact stated is not ...

15146

denier
DENIER, n. One who denies, or contradicts; one who refuses or rejects; a disowner; one who does ...

15147

denigrate
DENIGRATE, v.t. [L. Black.] To blacken; to make black.

15148

denigration
DENIGRATION, n. The act of making black; a blackening.

15149

denitration
DENITRATION, n. A disengaging of nitric acid.

15150

denization
DENIZATION, n. The act of making one a denizen, subject or citizen. This in England is done by ...

15151

denizen
DENIZEN, n. 1. In England, an alien who is made a subject by the kings letters patent, holding a ...

15152

denomiinable
DENOMIINABLE, a. That may be denominated, or named.

15153

denominate
DENOMINATE, v.t. [L. To name.] To name; to give a name or epithet to; as, a race of intelligent ...

15154

denominated
DENOMINATED, pp. Named; called.

15155

denominating
DENOMINATING, ppr. Naming.

15156

denomination
DENOMINATION, n.1. The act of naming.2. A name or appellation; a vocal sound, customarily used to ...

15157

denominative
DENOMINATIVE, a. That gives a name; that confers a distinct appellation.

15158

denominator
DENOMINATOR, n. 1. He that gives a name.2. In arithmetic, that number placed below the line in ...

15159

denotable
DENOTABLE, a. That may be denoted or marked.

15160

denotation
DENOTATION, n. The act of denoting.

15161

denotative
DENOTATIVE, a. Having power to denote.

15162

denote
DENOTE, v.t. [L. To note or mark.]1. To mark; to signify by a visible sign; to indicate; to ...

15163

denoted
DENOTED, pp. Marked; signified, indicated.

15164

denotement
DENOTEMENT, n. Sign; indication.

15165

denoting
DENOTING, ppr. Marking; expressing; indicating.

15166

denouement
DENOUEMENT, n. The unraveling or discovery of a plot.

15167

denounce
DENOUNCE, v.t. [L. To tell, or declare.]1. To declare solemnly; to proclaim in a threatening ...

15168

denounced
DENOUNCED, pp. 1. Threatened by open declaration; as, punishment is denounced against the ...

15169

denouncement
DENOUNCEMENT, n. The declaration of a menace, or of evil; denunciation.

15170

denouncer
DENOUNCER, n. One who denounces, or declares a menace.Here comes the sad denouncer of my fate.

15171

denouncing
DENOUNCING, ppr. Declaring, as a threat; threatening; accusing.

15172

dense
DENSE, a.1. Close; compact; having its constituent parts closely united; applied to solids or ...

15173

denseness
DENSENESS, n. The same as density.

15174

density
DENSITY, n. 1. Closeness of constituent parts; compactness. Density is opposed to rarity; and in ...

15175

dent
DENT, n.1. Literally, a tooth or projecting point. But it is used to express a gap or notch, or ...

15176

dental
DENTAL, a. Pertaining to the teeth. In grammar, formed or pronounced by the teeth, with the aid ...

15177

dentalite
DENTALITE, n. A fossil shell of the genus Dentalium.

15178

dentate
DENTATE,

15179

dentated
DENTATED, a. Toothed; notched.In botany, a dentated root is one that consists of a concatenation ...

15180

dentato-sinuate
DENTATO-SINUATE, a. Having points like teeth with hollows about the edge.

15181

dented
DENTED, a. Indented; impressed with little hollows.

15182

dentelli
DENTELLI, n. Modillions.

15183

denticle
DENTICLE, n. A small tooth or projecting point.

15184

denticulate
DENTICULATE,

15185

denticulated
DENTICULATED, a. [L. A tooth.] Having small teeth or notches; as a denticulate leaf, calyx or ...

15186

denticulation
DENTICULATION, n. The state of being set with small teeth, or prominences or points, resembling ...

15187

dentiform
DENTIFORM, a. [L. A tooth and form.] Having the form of a tooth.

15188

dentifrice
DENTIFRICE, n. [L. A tooth and to rub] A powder or other substance to be used in cleaning the ...

15189

dentil
DENTIL, n. [L. A tooth.] In architecture, an ornament in cornices bearing some resemblance to ...

15190

dentist
DENTIST, n. One whose occupation is to clean and extract teeth, or repair the loss of them.

15191

dentition
DENTITION, n. [L. To breed teeth.]1. The breeding or cutting of teeth in infancy.2. The time of ...

15192

dentize
DENTIZE, v.t. To renew the teeth, or have them renewed.

15193

dentoid
DENTOID, a. [L. A tooth and form.] Having a form of teeth.

15194

denudate
DENUDATE or DENUDE, v.t. [L. To make bare; naked.] To strip; to divest of all covering; to make ...

15195

denudation
DENUDATION, n. 1. The act of stripping off covering; a making bare.2. In geology, the act of ...

15196

denuded
DENUDED, pp. Stripped; divested of covering; laid bare.

15197

denuding
DENUDING, ppr. Stripping of covering; making bare.

15198

denunciate
DENUNCIATE, v.t. To denounce, which see.

15199

denunciation
DENUNCIATION, n. 1. Publication; proclamation; annunciation; preaching; as a faithful ...

15200

denunciator
DENUNCIATOR, n. 1. He that denounces; one who publishes or proclaims, especially intended evil; ...

15201

deny
DENY, v.t.1. To contradict; to gainsay; to declare a statement or position not to be true. We ...

15202

deobstruct
DEOBSTRUCT, v.t. [L. To stop; to pile.]To remove obstructions, or impediments to a passage; to ...

15203

deobstructed
DEOBSTRUCTED, pp. Cleared of obstructions; opened.

15204

deobstructing
DEOBSTRUCTING, ppr. Removing impediments to a passage.

15205

deobstruent
DEOBSTRUENT, a. Removing obstructions; having power to clear or open the natural ducts of the ...

15206

deodand
DEODAND, n. [L. To be given to God.] In England, a personal chattel which is the immediate ...

15207

deonerate
DEONERATE, v.t. To unload.

15208

deoppilate
DEOPPILATE, v.t. To free from obstructions; to clear a passage.

15209

deoppilation
DEOPPILATION, n. The removal of obstructions.

15210

deoppilative
DEOPPILATIVE, a. Deobstruent; aperient.

15211

deordination
DEORDINATION, n. Disorder.

15212

deosculate
DEOSCULATE, v.t. To kiss.

15213

deosculation
DEOSCULATION, n. A kissing.

15214

deosydated
DEOSYDATED, pp. Reduced from the state of an oxyd.

15215

deoxydate
DEOXYDATE, v.t. To deprive of oxygen, or reduce from the state of an oxyd.

15216

deoxydating
DEOXYDATING, ppr. Reducing from the state of an oxyd.

15217

deoxydation
DEOXYDATION, n. The act or process of reducing from the state of an oxyd.

15218

deoxydization
DEOXYDIZATION, n. Deoxydation.

15219

deoxydize
DEOXYDIZE, v.t. To deoxydate.

15220

deoxydized
DEOXYDIZED, pp. Deoxydated.

15221

deoxydizing
DEOXYDIZING, ppr. Deoxydating.NOTE. Deoxydate and deoxydize are synonymous; but the former is ...

15222

deoxygenate
DEOXYGENATE, v.t. To deprive of oxygen.

15223

deoxygenated
DEOXYGENATED, v.t. Deprived of oxygen.

15224

deoxygenating
DEOXYGENATING, ppr. Depriving of oxygen.

15225

deoxygenation
DEOXYGENATION, n. The act or operation of depriving of oxygen.

15226

depaint
DEPAINT, v.t. [L. To paint.]1. To paint; to picture; to represent in colors, as by painting the ...

15227

depainted
DEPAINTED, pp. Painted; represented in colors; described.

15228

depainter
DEPAINTER, n. A painter.

15229

depainting
DEPAINTING, ppr. Painting; representing in colors; describing.

15230

depart
DEPART, v.i.1. To go or move from.Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire. Matt. 25.It ...

15231

departer
DEPARTER, n. One who refines metals by separation.

15232

departing
DEPARTING, ppr. Going from; leaving; desisting; forsaking; vanishing; dying.DEPARTING, n. A going ...

15233

department
DEPARTMENT, n.1. Literally, a separation or division; hence, a separate part, or portion; a ...

15234

departmental
DEPARTMENTAL, a. Pertaining to a department, or division.

15235

departure
DEPARTURE, n.1. The act of going away; a moving from or leaving a place; as a departure from ...

15236

depascent
DEPASCENT, a. [L. To feed.] Feeding.

15237

depasture
DEPASTURE, v.t. To eat up; to consume.DEPASTURE, v.i. To feed; to graze.If a man takes in a ...

15238

depasturing
DEPASTURING, ppr. Feeding; grazing; eating up.

15239

depauperate
DEPAUPERATE, v.t. [L. To beggar.] To make poor; to impoverish; to deprive of fertility or ...

15240

depauperated
DEPAUPERATED, pp. Impoverished; made poor.

15241

depauperating
DEPAUPERATING, ppr. Impoverishing; making poor.

15242

depectible
DEPECTIBLE, a. [L. To comb.] Tough; thick.

15243

depeinct
DEPEINCT, v.t. To paint.

15244

depend
DEPEND, v.i. [L. To hang.] 1. To hang; to be sustained by being fastened or attached to ...

15245

dependable
DEPENDABLE, a. That may be depended on; as dependable friendships.

15246

dependence
DEPENDENCE,

15247

dependency
DEPENDENCY, n. 1. A state of hanging down from a supporter.2. Any thing hanging down; a series ...

15248

dependent
DEPENDENT, a. 1. Hanging down; as a dependent leaf.The furs in the tails were dependent.2. ...

15249

depender
DEPENDER, n. One who depends; a dependent.

15250

depending
DEPENDING, ppr. 1. Hanging down; relying.2. A. Pending; undecided; as a suit or question.

15251

deperdit
DEPERDIT, a. That which is lost or destroyed.

15252

deperdition
DEPERDITION, n. Loss; destruction.

15253

dephlegmate
DEPHLEGMATE, v.t. [Gr. To burn.] To deprive of superabundant water, as by evaporation or ...

15254

dephlegmation
DEPHLEGMATION, n. The operation of separating water from spirits and acids, by evaporation or ...

15255

dephlegmedness
DEPHLEGMEDNESS, n. A state of being freed from water.

15256

dephlogisticate
DEPHLOGISTICATE, v.t. [Gr. Burnt, inflammable.] To deprive of phlogiston, or the supposed ...

15257

dephlogisticated
DEPHLOGISTICATED, pp. Deprived of phlogiston. Dephlogisticated air, is an elastic fluid capable of ...

15258

depict
DEPICT, v.t. [L. To paint.] 1. To paint; to portray; to form a likeness in colors; as, to depict ...

15259

depicted
DEPICTED, pp. Painted; represented in colors; described.

15260

depicting
DEPICTING, ppr. Painting; representing in colors, or in words.

15261

depicture
DEPICTURE, v.t. To paint; to picture; to represent in colors.

15262

depilate
DEPILATE, v.t. [L. Hair.] To strip of hair.

15263

depilation
DEPILATION, n. The act of pulling off the hair.

15264

depilatory
DEPILATORY, a. Having the quality or power to take off hair and make bald.DEPILATORY, n. Any ...

15265

depilous
DEPILOUS, a. Without hair.

15266

deplantation
DEPLANTATION, n. The act of taking up plants from beds.

15267

depletion
DEPLETION, n. [L. To fill.] The act of emptying; particularly, in the medical art, the act of ...

15268

deplorable
DEPLORABLE, a.1. That may be deplored or lamented; lamentable; that demands or causes lamentation; ...

15269

deplorableness
DEPLORABLENESS, n. The state of being deplorable; misery; wretchedness; a miserable state.

15270

deplorably
DEPLORABLY, adv. In a manner to be deplored; lamentably; miserable; as, manners are deplorably ...

15271

deploration
DEPLORATION, n. The act of lamenting. In music, a dirge or mournful strain.

15272

deplore
DEPLORE, v.t. [L. To howl; to wail.] To lament; to bewail; to mourn; to feel or express deep and ...

15273

deplored
DEPLORED, pp. Lamented; bewailed; deeply regretted.

15274

deploredly
DEPLOREDLY, adv. Lamentably.

15275

deplorer
DEPLORER, n. One who deplores, or deeply laments; a deep mourner.

15276

deploring
DEPLORING, ppr. Bewailing; deeply lamenting.

15277

deploy
DEPLOY, v.t. To display; to open; to extend; a military term.DEPLOY, v.i. To open; to extend; to ...

15278

deploying
DEPLOYING, ppr. Opening; extending; displaying.

15279

deplumation
DEPLUMATION, n. 1. The stripping or falling off of plumes or feathers.2. A tumor of the eye-lids ...

15280

deplume
DEPLUME, v.t. [L. A feather.] To strip or pluck off feathers; to deprive of plumage.

15281

deplumed
DEPLUMED, pp. Stripped of feathers or plumes.

15282

depluming
DEPLUMING, ppr. Stripping off plumes or feathers.

15283

depolarize
DEPOLARIZE, v.t. To deprive of polarity.

15284

depone
DEPONE, v.t. To lay down as a pledge; to wage.

15285

deponent
DEPONENT, a.1. Laying down.2. A deponent verb, in the Latin Grammar, is a verb which has a ...

15286

depopulate
DEPOPULATE, v.t. [L. To ravage or lay waste.] To dispeople; to unpeople; to deprive of ...

15287

depopulated
DEPOPULATED, pp. Dispeopled; deprived of inhabitants.

15288

depopulating
DEPOPULATING, ppr. Dispeopling; depriving of inhabitants.

15289

depopulation
DEPOPULATION, n. The act of dispeopling; destruction or expulsion of inhabitants.

15290

depopulator
DEPOPULATOR, n. One who depopulates; one who destroys or expels the inhabitants of a city, town or ...

15291

deport
DEPORT, v.t. [L. To carry.]1. With the reciprocal pronoun, to carry; to demean; to behave.Let an ...

15292

deportation
DEPORTATION, n. Transportation; a carrying away; a removal from one country to another, or to a ...

15293

deported
DEPORTED, pp. Carried away; transported; banished.

15294

deporting
DEPORTING, ppr. Carrying away; removing to a distant place or country; transporting; banishing.

15295

deportment
DEPORTMENT, n. Carriage; manner of acting in relation to the duties of life; behavior; demeanor ; ...

15296

deposable
DEPOSABLE, a. That may be deposed, or deprived of office.

15297

deposal
DEPOSAL, n. The act of deposing, or divesting of office.

15298

depose
DEPOSE, v.t. [L. To lay or put.]1. To lay down; to throw; to let fall; as, the flood deposed fine ...

15299

deposed
DEPOSED, pp. Dethroned; degraded; testified.

15300

deposer
DEPOSER, n. One who deposes or degrades from office.

15301

deposing
DEPOSING, ppr. Dethroning; degrading; bearing witness.DEPOSING, n. The act of dethroning.

15302

deposit
DEPOSIT, v.t.1. To lay down; to lay; to throw down. A crocodile deposits her eggs in the sand. A ...

15303

depositary
DEPOSITARY, n. 1. A person with whom any thing is left or lodged in trust; one to whom a thing is ...

15304

depositing
DEPOSITING, ppr. Laying down; pledging; repositing.

15305

deposition
DEPOSITION, n. 1. The act of laying or throwing down; as, soil is formed by the deposition of ...

15306

depository
DEPOSITORY, n. A place where any thing is lodged for safe-keeping. A warehouse is a depository ...

15307

depositum
DEPOSITUM, n. A deposit.

15308

depot
DEPOT. [A french word. See deposit.]

15309

depravation
DEPRAVATION, n.1. The act of making bad or worse; the act of corrupting.2. The state of being made ...

15310

deprave
DEPRAVE, v.t. [L. Crooked, perverse, wicked.]1. To make bad or worse; to impair good qualities; ...

15311

depraved
DEPRAVED, pp. 1. Made bad or worse; vitiated; tainted; corrupted.2. A. Corrupt; wicked; ...

15312

depravedly
DEPRAVEDLY, adv. In a corrupt manner.

15313

depravedness
DEPRAVEDNESS, n. Corruption; taint; a vitiated state.

15314

depravement
DEPRAVEMENT, n. A vitiated state.

15315

depraver
DEPRAVER, n. A corrupted; he who citiates; a vilifier.

15316

depraving
DEPRAVING, n. A traducing.

15317

depravity
DEPRAVITY, n.1. Corruption; a vitiated state; as the depravity of manners and morals.2. A ...

15318

deprecate
DEPRECATE, v.t. [L. To pray.]1. To pray against; to pray or intreat that a present evil may be ...

15319

deprecated
DEPRECATED, pp. Prayed against; deeply regretted.

15320

deprecating
DEPRECATING, ppr. Praying against; regretting.

15321

deprecation
DEPRECATION, n.1. A praying against; a praying that an evil may be removed or prevented.2. ...

15322

deprecative
DEPRECATIVE, a. 1. That serves to deprecate; tending to remove or avert evil by prayer; as ...

15323

deprecator
DEPRECATOR, n. One who deprecates.

15324

deprecatory
DEPRECATORY,

15325

depreciate
DEPRECIATE, v.t. [Low L. Price.]1. To lessen the price of a thing; to cry down the price or ...

15326

depreciated
DEPRECIATED, pp. Lessened in value or price; undervalued.

15327

depreciating
DEPRECIATING, ppr. 1. Lessening the price or worth; undervaluing.2. Falling in value.

15328

depreciation
DEPRECIATION, n.1. The act of lessening or crying down price or value.2. The falling of value; ...

15329

depredate
DEPREDATE,v.t. [L. To plunder; prey.]1. To plunder; to rob; to pillage; to take the property of an ...

15330

depredated
DEPREDATED, pp. Spoiled; plundered; wasted; pillaged.

15331

depredating
DEPREDATING, ppr. Plundering; robbing; pillaging.

15332

depredation
DEPREDATION, n. 1. The act of plundering; a robbing; a pillaging.2. Waste; consumption; a taking ...

15333

depredator
DEPREDATOR, n. One who plunders, or pillages; a spoiler; a waster.

15334

depredatory
DEPREDATORY, a. Plundering; spoiling; consisting in pillaging.

15335

deprehend
DEPREHEND, v.t. [L. To take or seize.]1. To catch; to take unawares or by surprise; to seize, as ...

15336

deprehended
DEPREHENDED, pp. Taken by surprise; caught; seized; discovered.

15337

deprehending
DEPREHENDING, ppr. Taking unawares; catching; seizing; discovering.

15338

deprehensible
DEPREHENSIBLE, a. That may be caught, or discovered.

15339

deprehensibleness
DEPREHENSIBLENESS, n. Capableness of being caught or discovered.

15340

deprehension
DEPREHENSION, n. A catching or seizing; a discovery.

15341

depress
DEPRESS, v.t. [L. To press.]1. To press down; to press to a lower state or position; as, to ...

15342

depressing
DEPRESSING, ppr. Pressing down; lowering in place; letting fall; sinking; dejecting; abasing; ...

15343

depression
DEPRESSION, n.1. The act of pressing down; or the state of being pressed down; a low state.2. A ...

15344

depressive
DEPRESSIVE, a. Able or tending to depress or cast down.

15345

depressor
DEPRESSOR, n.1. He that presses down; an oppressor.2. In anatomy, a muscle that depresses or ...

15346

deprivable
DEPRIVABLE, a. That may be deprived.A chaplain shall be deprivable by the founder, not by the ...

15347

deprivation
DEPRIVATION, n.1. The act of depriving; a taking away.2. A state of being deprived; loss; want; ...

15348

deprive
DEPRIVE, v.t. [L. To take away.]1. To take from; to bereave of something possessed or enjoyed; ...

15349

deprived
DEPRIVED, pp. Bereft; divested; hindered; stripped of office or dignity; deposed; degraded.

15350

deprivement
DEPRIVEMENT, n. The state of losing or being deprived.

15351

depriver
DEPRIVER, n. He or that which deprives or bereaves.

15352

depriving
DEPRIVING, ppr. Bereaving; taking away what is possessed; divesting; hindering from enjoying; ...

15353

depth
DEPTH, n.1. Deepness; the distance or measure of a thing from the surface to the bottom, or to the ...

15354

depulsion
DEPULSION, n. [L. To drive.] A driving or thrusting away.

15355

depulsory
DEPULSORY, a. Driving or thrusting away; averting.

15356

depurate
DEPURATE, v.t. To purify; to free from impurities, heterogeneous matter or feculence; a chimical ...

15357

depurated
DEPURATED, pp. Purified from heterogeneous matter, or from impurities.

15358

depurating
DEPURATING, ppr. Purifying; freeing from impurities.

15359

depuration
DEPURATION, n.1. The act of purifying or freeing fluids from heterogeneous matter. This is done ...

15360

depuratory
DEPURATORY, a. Cleansing; purifying; or tending to purify. A depuratory fever, is a fever that ...

15361

depure
DEPURE, v.t. To depurate.

15362

deputation
DEPUTATION, n.1. The act of appointing a substitute or representative to act for another; the act ...

15363

depute
DEPUTE, v.t. To appoint as a substitute or agent to act for another; to appoint and send with a ...

15364

deputed
DEPUTED, pp. Appointed as a substitute; appointed and sent with special authority to act for ...

15365

deputing
DEPUTING, ppr. Appointing as a substitute; appointed and sent with special authority to act for ...

15366

deputize
DEPUTIZE, v.t. To appoint a deputy; to empower to act for another, as a sheriff.

15367

deputy
DEPUTY, n.1. A person appointed or elected to act for another, especially a person sent with a ...

15368

deputy-collector
DEPUTY-COLLECTOR, n. A person appointed to perform the duties of a collector of the customs, in ...

15369

deputy-marshall
DEPUTY-MARSHALL, n. One appointed to act in the place of the marshal.

15370

deputy-post-master
DEPUTY-POST-MASTER, n. A person who is appointed to act as post-master, in subordination to the ...

15371

deputy-sheriff
DEPUTY-SHERIFF, n. A person deputed or authorized to perform the duties of the sheriff, as his ...

15372

der
DER, prefixed to names of places, may be from Sax. deor, a wild beast, or from dur, water.

15373

deracinate
DERACINATE, v.t. To pluck up by the roots; to extirpate.

15374

deracinated
DERACINATED, pp. Plucked up by the roots; extirpated.

15375

deracinating
DERACINATING, ppr. Tearing up by the roots; extirpating.

15376

deraign
DERAIGN or DERAIN, v.t. To prove; to justify; to vindicate, as an assertion; to clear ones self.

15377

deraignment
DERAIGNMENT,

15378

derainment
DERAINMENT, n. The act of deraining; proof; justification. A like word was formerly used in the ...

15379

derange
DERANGE, v.t.1. To put out of order; to disturb the regular order of; to throw into confusion; as, ...

15380

deranged
DERANGED, pp. Put out of order; disturbed; embarrassed; confused; disordered in mind; delirious; ...

15381

derangement
DERANGEMENT, n.1. A putting out of order; disturbance of regularity or regular course; ...

15382

deranging
DERANGING, ppr. 1. Putting out of order; disturbing regularity or regular course; embarrassment; ...

15383

deray
DERAY, v.t. Tumult; disorder; merriment.

15384

dere
DERE, v.t. To hurt.

15385

derelict
DERELICT, a. [L. To leave.] Left; abandoned.DERELICT, n.1. In law, an article of goods, or any ...

15386

dereliction
DERELICTION, n.1. The act of leaving with an intention not to reclaim; an utter forsaking; ...

15387

deride
DERIDE, v.t. [L. To laugh.] To laugh at in contempt; to turn to ridicule or make sport of; to ...

15388

derided
DERIDED, pp. Laughed at in contempt; mocked; ridiculed.

15389

derider
DERIDER, n. 1. One who laughs at another in contempt; a mocker; a scoffer.2. A droll or buffoon.

15390

deriding
DERIDING, ppr. Laughing at with contempt; mocking; ridiculing.

15391

deridingly
DERIDINGLY, adv. By way of derision or mockery.

15392

derision
DERISION, n.1. The act of laughing at in contempt.2. Contempt manifested by laughter; scorn.I am ...

15393

derisive
DERISIVE, a. Containing derision; mocking; ridiculing.Derisive taunts.

15394

derisively
DERISIVELY, adv. With mockery or contempt.

15395

derisory
DERISORY, a. Mocking; ridiculing.

15396

derivable
DERIVABLE, a. 1. That may be derived; that may be drawn, or received, as from a source. Income is ...

15397

derivate
DERIVATE, n. A word derived from another.

15398

derivation
DERIVATION, n.1. The act of deriving, drawing or receiving from a source; as the derivation of an ...

15399

derivative
DERIVATIVE, a.1. Derived; taken or having proceeded from another or something preceding; ...

15400

derivatively
DERIVATIVELY, adv. In a derivative manner; by derivation.

15401

derive
DERIVE, v.t. [L. A stream.]1. To draw from, as in a regular course or channel; to receive from a ...

15402

derived
DERIVED, pp. Drawn, as from a source; deduced; received; regularly conveyed; descended; ...

15403

deriver
DERIVER, n. One who derives, or draws from a source.

15404

deriving
DERIVING, ppr. Drawing; receiving; deducing; communicating; diverting or turning into another ...

15405

dermal
DERMAL, a. Pertaining to skin; consisting of skin.

15406

dermoid
DERMOID, a. Pertaining to the skin; a medical term.

15407

dern
DERN, a. Solitary; sad; cruel.

15408

dernful
DERNFUL, a. Sad; mournful.

15409

dernier
DERNIER, a. Last; final; ultimate; as the dernier resort.

15410

dernly
DERNLY, adv. Sadly; mournfully.

15411

derogate
DEROGATE, v.t. [L. To ask, to propose. In ancient Rome, rogo was used in proposing new laws, and ...

15412

derogated
DEROGATED, pp. Diminished in value; degraded; damaged.

15413

derogately
DEROGATELY, adv. In a manner to lessen or take from.

15414

derogating
DEROGATING, ppr. Annulling a part. Lessening by taking from.

15415

derogation
DEROGATION, n. 1. The act of annulling or revoking a law, or some part of it. More generally, ...

15416

derogative
DEROGATIVE, a. Derogatory.

15417

derogatorily
DEROGATORILY, adv. In a detracting manner.

15418

derogatoriness
DEROGATORINESS, n. The quality of being derogatory.

15419

derogatory
DEROGATORY, a. 1. Detracting or tending to lessen by taking something from; that lessens the ...

15420

derring
DERRING, a. Daring.

15421

dervis
DERVIS, n. A turkish priest or monk, who professes extreme poverty, and leads an austere life.

15422

descant
DESCANT, n. 1. A song or tune composed in parts.2. A song or tune with various modulations.The ...

15423

descanting
DESCANTING, ppr. Singing in parts or with various modulations; discoursing freely; ...

15424

descend
DESCEND, v.i. [L. To climb.]1. To move or pass from a higher to a lower place; to move, come or go ...

15425

descendant
DESCENDANT, n. Any person proceeding from an ancestor in any degree; issue; offspring, in the line ...

15426

descendent
DESCENDENT, a. 1. Descending; falling; sinking.2. Proceeding from an original or ancestor.

15427

descendibility
DESCENDIBILITY, n. The quality of being descendible, or capable of being trnasmitted from ...

15428

descendible
DESCENDIBLE, a.1. That may be descended, or passed down; as, the hill is descendible.2. That may ...

15429

descension
DESCENSION, n.1. The act of going downwards; descent; a falling or sinking; declension; ...

15430

descensional
DESCENSIONAL, a. Pertaining to descent.

15431

descensive
DESCENSIVE, a. Tending downwards; having power to descend.

15432

descent
DESCENT, n.1. The act of descending; the act of passing from a higher to a lower place, by any ...

15433

describable
DESCRIBABLE, a. That may be described; capable of description.

15434

describe
DESCRIBE, v.t. [L. To write.]1. To delineate or mark the form or figure; as, to describe a circle ...

15435

described
DESCRIBED, pp. Represented in form by marks or figures; delineated; represented by words or signs.

15436

describer
DESCRIBER, n. One who describes by marks, words or signs.

15437

describing
DESCRIBING, ppr. Representing the form or figure of, by lines or marks; communicating a view of, ...

15438

descried
DESCRIED, pp. Espied; discovered; seen.

15439

descrier
DESCRIER, n. One who espies, or discovers; a discoverer; a detecter.

15440

description
DESCRIPTION, n.1. The act of delineating, or representing the figure of any thing by a plan, to be ...

15441

descriptiv
DESCRIPTIV,E, a. Containing description; tending to describe; having the quality of representing; ...

15442

descry
DESCRY, v.t.1. To espy; to explore; to examine by observation.The house of Joseph sent to descry ...

15443

descrying
DESCRYING, ppr. Descovering; espying.

15444

desecrate
DESECRATE, v.t. [L. To consecrate, from sacred.]1. To divert from a sacred purpose or ...

15445

desecrated
DESECRATED, pp. Diverted from a sacred purpose or appropriation; divested of a sacred character or ...

15446

desecrating
DESECRATING, ppr. Diverting from a purpose to which a thing is consecrated; divested of a sacred ...

15447

desecration
DESECRATION, n. The act of diverting from a sacred purpose or use to which a thing had been ...

15448

desert
DESERT, a. S as z [L. To sow, plant or scatter.]1. Literally, forsaken; hence, uninhabited; as a ...

15449

deserted
DESERTED, pp. Wholly forsaken; abandoned; left.

15450

deserter
DESERTER, n. A person who forsakes his cause, his post, or his party or friend; particularly, a ...

15451

desertful
DESERTFUL, a. High in desert; meritorious.

15452

deserting
DESERTING, ppr. Forsaking utterly; abandoning.

15453

desertion
DESERTION, n. 1. The act of forsaking or abandoning, as a party, a friend, a country, an army or ...

15454

desertless
DESERTLESS, a. Without merit or claim to favor or reward.

15455

desertlessly
DESERTLESSLY, adv. Undeservedly.

15456

desertrice
DESERTRICE,

15457

desertrix
DESERTRIX, n. A female who deserts.

15458

deserve
DESERVE, v.t. [L. To serve.]1. To merit; to be worthy of; applied to good or evil.2. To merit by ...

15459

deserved
DESERVED, pp. Merited; worthy of.

15460

deservedly
DESERVEDLY, adv. Justly; according to desert, whether of good or evil. A man may be deservedly ...

15461

deserver
DESERVER, n. He who deserves or merits; one who is worthy of; used generally in a good sense.

15462

deserving
DESERVING, ppr. 1. Meriting; having a just claim to reward; justly meriting punishment.2. Worthy ...

15463

deservingly
DESERVINGLY, adv. Meritoriously; with just desert.

15464

deshabille
DESHABILLE or DESHABIL, n. An undress; a loose morning dress; hence, any home dress; as, the lady ...

15465

desiccant
DESICCANT, a. Drying.DESICCANT, n. A medicine or application that dries a sore.

15466

desiccate
DESICCATE, v.t. [L. To dry.] to dry; to exhaust of moisture; to exhale or remove moisture ...

15467

desiccated
DESICCATED, pp. Dried.

15468

desiccating
DESICCATING, ppr. Drying; exhausting moisture.

15469

desiccation
DESICCATION, n. The act of making dry; the state of being dried.

15470

desiccative
DESICCATIVE, a. Drying; tending to dry; that has the power to dry.

15471

desiderate
DESIDERATE,v.t. [from the L.] To want; to miss.

15472

desideratum
DESIDERATUM, n. Plu. Desiderata. [L. To desire.] That which is desired; that which is not ...

15473

design
DESIGN, v.t.[L. To seal or stamp, that is, to set or throw.]1. To delineate a form or figure by ...

15474

designable
DESIGNABLE, a. 1. Capable of being designed or marked out.2. Distinguishable.

15475

designate
DESIGNATE, v.t.1. To mark out or show, so as to make known; to indicate by bisible lines, marks, ...

15476

designated
DESIGNATED, pp. Marked out; indicated; shown; pointed out appointed.

15477

designating
DESIGNATING, ppr. Marking out; indicating; pointing out; appointing.

15478

designation
DESIGNATION, n.1. The act of pointing or marking out by signs or objects; as the designation of an ...

15479

designative
DESIGNATIVE, a. Serving to designate or indicate.

15480

designator
DESIGNATOR, n. A Roman officer who assigned to each person his rank and place in public shows and ...

15481

designed
DESIGNED, pp. Marked out; delineated; planned; intended.

15482

designedly
DESIGNEDLY, adv. By design; purposely; intentionally; opposed to accidentally, ignorantly, or ...

15483

designer
DESIGNER, n.1. One who designs, marks out or plans; one who frames a scheme or project; a ...

15484

designfulness
DESIGNFULNESS, n. Abundance of design.

15485

designing
DESIGNING, ppr.1. Forming a design; plnning; delineating the outline; drawing figures on a ...

15486

designless
DESIGNLESS, a. Without design or intention; inadvertent.

15487

designlessly
DESIGNLESSLY, adv. Without design; inadvertently; ignorantly.

15488

designment
DESIGNMENT, n.1. Design; sketch; delineation.2. Design; purpose; aim; intent; scheme.

15489

desinence
DESINENCE, n. End; close.

15490

desinent
DESINENT, a. Ending; extreme; lower-most.

15491

desipient
DESIPIENT, a. [L. To dote; to be wise.] trifling; foolish; playful.

15492

desirable
DESIRABLE, a.1. Worthy of desire; that is to be wished for with sincerity or earnestness. An easy ...

15493

desirableness
DESIRABLENESS,n. The quality of being desirable.

15494

desire
DESIRE, n.1. An emotion or excitement of the mind, directed to the attainment or possession of an ...

15495

desired
DESIRED, pp. Wished for; coveted; requested; entreated.

15496

desireless
DESIRELESS, a. Free from desire.

15497

desirer
DESIRER, n. One who desires or asks; one who wishes.

15498

desiring
DESIRING, ppr. Wishing for; coveting; asking; expressing a wish; soliciting.

15499

desirous
DESIROUS, a. Wishing for; wishing to obtain; coveting; solicitous to possess and enjoy.Be not ...

15500

desirously
DESIROUSLY, adv. With desire; with earnest wishes.

15501

desirousness
DESIROUSNESS, n. The state or affection of being desirous.

15502

desist
DESIST, v.i. [L. To stand.] To stop; to cease to act or proceed; to forbear; with from; as, he ...

15503

desistance
DESISTANCE, n. A ceasing to act or proceed; a stopping.

15504

desisting
DESISTING, ppr. Ceasing to act or proceed.

15505

desitive
DESITIVE, a. Final; conclusive.

15506

desk
DESK, n.1. An inclining table for the use of writers and readers; usually made with a box or ...

15507

desmine
DESMINE, n. A mineral that crystalizes in little silken tufts, which accompany spinellane in the ...

15508

desolate
DESOLATE, a. 1. Destitute or deprived of inhabitants; desert; uninhabited; denoting either ...

15509

desolated
DESOLATED, pp. Deprived of inhabitants; wasted; ruined.

15510

desolately
DESOLATELY, adv. In a desolate manner.

15511

desolater
DESOLATER, n. One who lays waste or desolates; that which desolates.

15512

desolating
DESOLATING, ppr. Depriving of inhabitants; wasting; ravaging.

15513

desolation
DESOLATION, n.1. The act of desolating destruction or expulsion of inhabitants; destruction; ruin; ...

15514

desolatory
DESOLATORY, a. Causing desolation.

15515

despair
DESPAIR, n.1. Hopelessness; a hopeless state; a destitution of hope or expectation.We are ...

15516

despairer
DESPAIRER, n. One without hope.

15517

despairful
DESPAIRFUL, a. Hopeless.

15518

despairing
DESPAIRING, ppr. Giving up all hope or expectation.

15519

despairingly
DESPAIRINGLY, adv. In a despairing manner; in a manner indicating hopelessness; as, he speaks ...

15520

despatch
DESPATCH, [See Dispatch.]

15521

despection
DESPECTION, n. A looking down; a despising.

15522

desperado
DESPERADO, n. A desperate fellow; a furious man; a madman; a person urged by furious passions; one ...

15523

desperate
DESPERATE, a. [L. To despair.]1. Without hope.I am desperate of obtaining her.2. Without care of ...

15524

desperately
DESPERATELY, adv. 1. In a desperate manner; as in despair; hence, furiously; with rage; madly; ...

15525

desperateness
DESPERATENESS, n. Madness; fury; rash precipitance.

15526

desperation
DESPERATION, n.1. A despairing; a giving up of hope; as desperation of success.2. Hopelessness; ...

15527

despicable
DESPICABLE, a. [Low L. To look down, to despise; to look.] That may be or deserves to be despised; ...

15528

despicableness
DESPICABLENESS, n. The quality or state of being despicable; meanness; vileness; worthlessness.

15529

despicably
DESPICABLY, adv. Meanly; vilely; contemptibly; as despicably poor.

15530

despisable
DESPISABLE, a. Despicable; contemptible.

15531

despisal
DESPISAL, n. Contempt.

15532

despise
DESPISE, .v.t.1. To contemn; to scorn; to disdain; to have the lowest opinion of.Fools despise ...

15533

despised
DESPISED, pp. Contemned; disdained; abhorred.

15534

despisedness
DESPISEDNESS, n. The state of being despised.

15535

despiser
DESPISER, n. A contemner; a scorner.

15536

despising
DESPISING, ppr. Contemning; scorning; disdaining.DESPISING, n. Contempt.

15537

despisingly
DESPISINGLY, adv. With contempt.

15538

despite
DESPITE, n.1. Extreme malice; violent hatred; malignity; malice irritated or enraged; active ...

15539

despiteful
DESPITEFUL, a. Full of spite; malicious; malignant; as a despiteful enemy.Hater of God, ...

15540

despitefully
DESPITEFULLY, adv. With despite; maliciously; contemptuously.Pray for them that despitefully use ...

15541

despitefulness
DESPITEFULNESS, n. Malice; extreme hatred; malignity.

15542

despiteous
DESPITEOUS, a. Malicious.

15543

despiteously
DESPITEOUSLY, adv.. Furiously.

15544

despoil
DESPOIL,v.t. [L. To spoil.]1. To strip; to take from by force; to rob; to deprive; followed by of; ...

15545

despoiled
DESPOILED, pp. Stripped; robbed; bereaved; deprived.

15546

despoiler
DESPOILER, n. One who strips by force; a plunderer.

15547

despoiling
DESPOILING, ppr. Depriving; stripping; robbing.

15548

despoliation
DESPOLIATION, n. The act of despoiling; a stripping.

15549

despond
DESPOND, v.i.[L. To promise; literally, to throw to or forward.]1. To be cast down; to be ...

15550

despondency
DESPONDENCY, n. A sinking or dejection of spirits at the loss of hope; loss of courage at the ...

15551

despondent
DESPONDENT, a. Losing courage at the loss of hope; sinking into dejection; depressed and inactive ...

15552

desponder
DESPONDER, n. One destitute of hope.

15553

desponding
DESPONDING, ppr. Losing courage to act, in consequence of loss of hope, or of deep calamity, or of ...

15554

despondingly
DESPONDINGLY, adv. In a desponding manner; with dejection of spirits; despairingly.

15555

desponsate
DESPONSATE, v.t. To betroth.

15556

desponsation
DESPONSATION, n. A betrothing.

15557

despot
DESPOT, n. An emperor, king or price invested with absolute power, or ruling without any control ...

15558

despotic
DESPOTIC,

15559

despotical
DESPOTICAL, a.1. Absolute in power; independent of control from men, constitution or laws; ...

15560

despotically
DESPOTICALLY, adv. With unlimited power; arbitrarily; in a despotic manner.

15561

despoticalness
DESPOTICALNESS, n. Absolute or arbitrary authority.

15562

despotism
DESPOTISM, n.1. Absolute power; authority unlimited and uncontrolled by men, constitution or laws, ...

15563

despumate
DESPUMATE, v.i. [L. Froth or scum.] To foam; to froth; to form froth or scum.

15564

despumation
DESPUMATION, n. The act of throwing off excrementitious matter and forming a froth or scum on the ...

15565

desquamation
DESQUAMATION, n. [L. A scale.] A scaling or exfoliation of bone; the separation of the cuticle in ...

15566

dess
DESS, for desk.

15567

dessert
DESSERT, n. A service of fruits and sweetmeats, at the close of an entertainment; the last course ...

15568

destinate
DESTINATE, v.t. To design or appoint.DESTINATE, a. Appointed; destined; determined.

15569

destination
DESTINATION, n. 1. The act of destining, or appointing.2. The purpose for which any thing is ...

15570

destine
DESTINE, v.t. [L.]1. To set, ordain or appoint to a use, purpose, state or place. We destine a son ...

15571

destined
DESTINED, pp. Ordained; appointed by previous determination; devoted; fixed unalterably.

15572

destining
DESTINING, ppr. Ordaining; appointing.

15573

destiny
DESTINY, n. 1. State or condition appointed or predetermined; ultimate fate; as, men are ...

15574

destitute
DESTITUTE, a. [L. To set. Literally, set from or away.]1. Not having or possessing; wanting; as ...

15575

destitution
DESTITUTION, n. Want; absence of a thing; a state in which something is wanted or not possessed; ...

15576

destroy
DESTROY, v.t. [L. To pile, to build.]1. To demolish; to pull down; to separate the parts of an ...

15577

destroyable
DESTROYABLE, a. That may be destroyed.Plants scarcely destroyable by the weather.

15578

destroyed
DESTROYED, pp. Demolished; pulled down; ruined; annihilated; devoured; swept away; &c.

15579

destroyer
DESTROYER, n. One who destroys, or lays waste; one who kills a man, or an animal, or who ruins a ...

15580

destroying
DESTROYING, ppr. Demolishing; laying waste; killing; annihilating; putting an end to.DESTROYING, ...

15581

destruct
DESTRUCT, fro destroy, is not used.

15582

destructibility
DESTRUCTIBILITY, n. The quality of being capable of destruction.

15583

destructible
DESTRUCTIBLE, a. [L.] Liable to destruction; capable of being destroyed.

15584

destruction
DESTRUCTION, n.1. The act of destroying; demolition; a pulling down; subversion; ruin, by whatever ...

15585

destructive
DESTRUCTIVE, a. Causing destruction; having the quality of destroying; ruinous; mischievous; ...

15586

destructively
DESTRUCTIVELY, adv. With destruction; ruinously; mischievously; with power to destroy; as ...

15587

destructiveness
DESTRUCTIVENESS, n. The quality of destroying or ruining.

15588

destructor
DESTRUCTOR, n. A destroyer; a consumer. [Not used.]

15589

desudation
DESUDATION, n. [L., to sweat.] A sweating; a profuse or morbid sweating, succeeded by an eruption ...

15590

desuetude
DESUETUDE, n. [L.] The cessation of use; disuse; discontinuance of practice, custom or fashion. ...

15591

desulphurate
DESULPHURATE, v.t. To deprive of sulphur.

15592

desulphurated
DESULPHURATED, pp. Deprived of sulphur.

15593

desulphurating
DESULPHURATING, ppr. Depriving of sulphur.

15594

desulphuration
DESULPHURATION, n. The act or operation of depriving of sulphur.

15595

desultorily
DESULTORILY, adv. [See Desultory.] In a desultory manner; without method; loosely.

15596

desultoriness
DESULTORINESS, n. A desultory manner; unconnectedness; a passing from one thing to another without ...

15597

desultory
DESULTORY, a. [L., to leap.]1. Leaping; passing from one thing or subject to another, without order ...

15598

desume
DESUME, v.t. [L.] To take from; to borrow. [Not in use.]

15599

detach
DETACH, v.t. [See Attach.]1. To separate or disunite; to disengage; to part from; as, to detach the ...

15600

detached
DETACHED, pp. 1. Separated; parted from ; disunited; drawn and sent on a separate service.2. a. ...

15601

detaching
DETACHING, ppr. Separating; parting from; drawing and sending on a separate employment.

15602

detachment
DETACHMENT, n. 1. The act of detaching.2. A body of troops, selected or taken from the main army, ...

15603

detail
DETAIL, v.t. 1. To relate, report or narrate in particulars; to recite the particulars of; to ...

15604

detailed
DETAILED, pp. Related in particulars; minutely recited; selected.

15605

detailer
DETAILER, n. One who details.

15606

detailing
DETAILING, ppr. 1. Relating minutely; telling the particulars.2. Selecting from the rosters.

15607

detainder
DETAINDER, n. A writ. [See Detinue.]

15608

detained
DETAINED, pp. Withheld; kept back; prevented from going or coming; held; restrained.

15609

detainer
DETAINER, n. 1. One who withholds what belongs to another; one who detains, stops or prevents from ...

15610

detaing
DETAING, v.t. [L., to hold. See Tenant.]1. To keep back or from; to withhold; to keep what belongs ...

15611

detaining
DETAINING, ppr. Withholding what belongs to another; holding back; restraining from going or ...

15612

detainment
DETAINMENT, n. The act of detaining; detention.

15613

detect
DETECT, v.t. [L., to cover.] Literally, to uncover; hence, to discover; to find out; to bring to ...

15614

detected
DETECTED, pp. Discovered; found out; laid open; brought to light.

15615

detecter
DETECTER, n. A discoverer; one who finds out what another attempts to conceal.

15616

detecting
DETECTING, ppr. Discovering; finding out.

15617

detection
DETECTION, n. The act of detecting; discovery of a person or thing attempted to be concealed; as ...

15618

detenebrate
DETENEBRATE, v.t. [L.] To remove darkness. [Not in use.]

15619

detent
DETENT, n. [L.] A stop in a clock, which by being lifted up or let down, locks and unlocks the ...

15620

detention
DETENTION, n. [See Detain.]1. The act of detaining; a withholding from another his right; a keeping ...

15621

deter
DETER, v.t. [L., to frighten.] 1. To discourage and stop by fear; to stop or prevent from acting or ...

15622

deterge
DETERGE, v.t. deterj. [L., to wipe or scour.] To cleanse; to purge away foul or offending matter, ...

15623

deterged
DETERGED, pp. Cleansed; purged.

15624

detergent
DETERGENT, a. Cleansing; purging.DETERGENT, n. A medicine that has the power of cleansing the ...

15625

deterging
DETERGING, ppr. Cleansing; carrying off obstructions or foul matter.

15626

deteriorate
DETERIORATE, v.i. [L.] To grow worse; to be impaired in quality to degenerate; opposed to ...

15627

deteriorated
DETERIORATED, pp. Made worse; impaired in quality.

15628

deteriorating
DETERIORATING, ppr. Becoming worse or inferior in quality.

15629

deterioration
DETERIORATION, n. A growing or making worse; the state of growing worse.

15630

deteriority
DETERIORITY, n. Worse sate or quality; as deteriority of diet.

15631

determent
DETERMENT, n. [See Deter.] The act of deterring; the cause of deterring; that which deters.

15632

determinable
DETERMINABLE, a. [See Determine.]1. That may be decided with certainty.2. That may end or be ...

15633

determinate
DETERMINATE, a. [L.]1. Limited; fixed; definite; as a determinate quantity of matter.2. ...

15634

determinately
DETERMINATELY, adv. 1. With certainty.The principles of religion are determinately true or false.2. ...

15635

determinateness
DETERMINATENESS, n. The state of being determinate, certain, or precise.

15636

determination
DETERMINATION, n. 1. The act of determining or deciding.2. Decision of a question in the mind; firm ...

15637

determinative
DETERMINATIVE, a. 1. That uncontrollably directs to a certain end.The determinative power of a just ...

15638

determinator
DETERMINATOR, n. One who determines.

15639

determine
DETERMINE, v.t. [L., to bound; a boundary or limit. Gr. See Term.]1. To end; particularly, to end ...

15640

determined
DETERMINED, pp. 1. Ended; concluded; decided; limited; fixed; settled; resolved; directed.2. a. ...

15641

determining
DETERMINING, ppr. Ending; deciding; fixing; settling; resolving; limiting; directing.

15642

deterration
DETERRATION, n. [L., de and terra, earth.] The uncovering of any thing which is buried or covered ...

15643

deterred
DETERRED, pp. [See Deter.] Discouraged or prevented from proceeding or acting, by fear, difficulty ...

15644

deterring
DETERRING, pp. 1. Discouraging or influencing not to proceed or act, by fear, difficulty, danger, ...

15645

detersion
DETERSION, n. [L. See Deterge.] The act of cleansing, as a sore.

15646

detersive
DETERSIVE, a. [See Deterge.] Cleansing; having power to cleanse from offending matter.DETERSIVE, n. ...

15647

detest
DETEST, v.t. [L., to affirm or bear witness. The primary sense of testor is to set, throw or ...

15648

detestable
DETESTABLE, a. Extremely hateful; abominable; very odious; deserving abhorrence.Thou hast defiled ...

15649

detestableness
DETESTABLENESS, n. Extreme hatefulness.

15650

detestably
DETESTABLY, adv. Very hatefully; abominably.

15651

detestation
DETESTATION, n. Extreme hatred; abhorrence; with of. The good man entertains uniformly a ...

15652

detested
DETESTED, pp. Hated extremely; abhorred.

15653

detester
DETESTER, n. One who abhors.

15654

detesting
DETESTING, ppr. Hating extremely; abhorring; abominating.

15655

dethrone
DETHRONE, v.t. [L.] 1. To remove or drive from a throne; to depose; to divest of royal authority ...

15656

dethroned
DETHRONED, pp. Removed from a throne; deposed.

15657

dethronement
DETHRONEMENT, n. Removal from a throne; deposition of a king, emperor or prince.

15658

dethroner
DETHRONER, n. One who dethrones.

15659

dethroning
DETHRONING, ppr. Driving from a throne; depriving of regal power.

15660

detinue
DETINUE, n. In law, a writ of detinue is one that lies against him who wrongfully detains goods or ...

15661

detonate
DETONATE, v.t. [L., to thunder.] In chemistry, to cause to explode; to burn or inflame with a ...

15662

detonated
DETONATED, pp. Exploded; burnt with explosion.

15663

detonating
DETONATING, ppr. Exploding; inflaming with a sudden report.

15664

detonation
DETONATION, n. An explosion or sudden report made by the inflammation of certain combustible ...

15665

detonization
DETONIZATION, n. The acct of exploding, as certain combustible bodies.

15666

detonize
DETONIZE, v.t [See Detonate.] To cause to explode; to burn with an explosion; to calcine with ...

15667

detonized
DETONIZED, pp. Exploded, as a combustible body.

15668

detonizing
DETONIZING, ppr. Exploding with a sudden report.

15669

detorsion
DETORSION, n. A turning or wresting; perversion.

15670

detort
DETORT, v.t. [L., to twist.] To twist; to wrest; to pervert; to turn from the original or plain ...

15671

detorted
DETORTED, pp. Twisted; wrested; perverted.

15672

detorting
DETORTING, ppr. Wresting; perverting.

15673

detour
DETOUR, n. A turning; a circuitous way.

15674

detract
DETRACT, v.t. [L., to draw. See Draw and Drag.]1. Literally, to draw from. Hence, to take away from ...

15675

detraction
DETRACTION, n. [L.] The act of taking something from the reputation or worth of another, with the ...

15676

detractious
DETRACTIOUS, a. Containing detraction; lessening reputation. [Not in use.]

15677

detractive
DETRACTIVE, a. Having the quality or tendency to lessen the worth or estimation.

15678

detractor
DETRACTOR, n. One who takes away or impairs the reputation of another injuriously; one who attempts ...

15679

detractory
DETRACTORY, a. Derogatory; defamatory by denial of desert; with from.

15680

detractress
DETRACTRESS, n. A female detractor; a censorious woman.

15681

detrect
DETRECT, v.t. [L.] To refuse. [Not in use.]

15682

detriment
DETRIMENT, n. [L., worn off.] Loss; damage; injury; mischief; harm; diminution. We speak of ...

15683

detrimental
DETRIMENTAL, a. Injurious; hurtful; causing loss or damage.A spirit of speculation may be ...

15684

detrition
DETRITION, n. [L.] A wearing off.

15685

detritus
DETRITUS, n. [L., worn; to wear.] In geology, a mass of substances worn off or detached from solid ...

15686

detrude
DETRUDE, v.t. [L., to thrust.] To thrust down; to push down with force.

15687

detruded
DETRUDED, pp. Thrust or forced down.

15688

detruding
DETRUDING, ppr. Thrusting or forcing down.

15689

detruncate
DETRUNCATE, v.t. [L., to cut shorter; cut short. See Trench.] To cut off; to lop; to shorten by ...

15690

detruncation
DETRUNCATION, n. The act of cutting off.

15691

detrusion
DETRUSION, n. s as z. [See Detrude.] The act of thrusting or driving down.

15692

deturpate
DETURPATE, v.t. [L.] To defile. [Little used.]

15693

deuce
DEUCE, n. Two; a card with two spots; a die with two spots; a term used in gaming.DEUCE, n. A ...

15694

deuterogamist
DEUTEROGAMIST, n. [infra.] One who marries the second time.

15695

deuterogamy
DEUTEROGAMY, n. [Gr., second; marriage.] A second marriage after the death of the first husband or ...

15696

deuteronomy
DEUTERONOMY, n. [Gr., second; law.] The second law, or second giving of the law by Moses; the name ...

15697

deutoxyd
DEUTOXYD, n. [Gr., second; strictly.] In chemistry, a substance oxydized in the second degree.

15698

devaporation
DEVAPORATION, n. [L.] The change of vapor into water, as in the generation of rain.

15699

devast
DEVAST, v.t. [L.] To lay waste; to plunder. [Not in use.]

15700

devastate
DEVASTATE, v.t. [L., to waste. See Waste.] To lay waste; to waste; to ravage; to desolate; to ...

15701

devastated
DEVASTATED, pp. Laid waste; ravaged.

15702

devastating
DEVASTATING, ppr. Laying waste; desolating.

15703

devastation
DEVASTATION, n. [L.] 1. Waste; ravage; desolation; destruction of works of art and natural ...

15704

develop
DEVELOP, v.t. 1. To uncover; to unfold; to lay open; to disclose or make known something concealed ...

15705

developed
DEVELOPED, pp. Unfolded; laid open; unraveled.

15706

development
DEVELOPMENT, n. 1. An unfolding; the discovering of something secret or withheld from the knowledge ...

15707

devest
DEVEST, v.t. [L., a vest, a garment. Generally written divest.]1. To strip; to deprive of clothing ...

15708

devested
DEVESTED, pp. Stripped of clothes; deprived; freed from; alienated or lost, as title.

15709

devesting
DEVESTING, ppr. Stripping of clothes; depriving; freeing from ; alienating.

15710

devex
DEVEX, a. [L.] Bending down. [Not in use.]

15711

devexity
DEVEXITY, n. [L., to carry.] A bending downward; a sloping; incurvation downward.

15712

deviate
DEVIATE, v.i. [L., way.]1. To turn aside or wander from the common or right way, course or line, ...

15713

deviation
DEVIATION, n. 1. A wandering or turning aside from the right way, course or line.2. Variation from ...

15714

device
DEVICE, n. [L.]1. That which is formed by design, or invented; scheme; artificial contrivance; ...

15715

deviceful
DEVICEFUL, a. Full of devices; inventive.

15716

devicefully
DEVICEFULLY, adv. In a manner curiously contrived.

15717

devil
DEVIL, n. Devl. [L., to calumniate.]1. In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being; a fallen ...

15718

deviling
DEVILING, n. A young devil. [Not in use.]

15719

devilish
DEVILISH, a. 1. Partaking of the qualities of the devil; diabolical; very evil and mischievous; ...

15720

devilishly
DEVILISHLY, adv. 1. In a manner suiting the devil; diabolically; wickedly.2. Greatly; excessively; ...

15721

devilishness
DEVILISHNESS, n. The qualities of the devil.

15722

devilism
DEVILISM, n. The state of devils. [Not used.]

15723

devilize
DEVILIZE, v.t. To place among devils. [Not used.]

15724

devilkin
DEVILKIN, n. A little devil.

15725

devilship
DEVILSHIP, n. The character of a devil.

15726

devious
DEVIOUS, a. [L., way.]1. Out of the common way or track; as a devious course.2. Wandering; roving; ...

15727

devirginate
DEVIRGINATE, v.t. [Low L.] To deflour.

15728

devisable
DEVISABLE, a. s as z. [See the Verb.]1. That may be bequeathed or given by will.2. That can be ...

15729

devise
DEVISE, v.t. s as z. [L.] 1. To invent; to contrive; to form in the mind by new combinations of ...

15730

devised
DEVISED, pp. Given by will; bequeathed; contrived.

15731

devisee
DEVISEE, n. The person to whom a devise is made; one to whom real estate is bequeathed.

15732

deviser
DEVISER, n. One who contrives or invents; a contriver; an inventor.

15733

devising
DEVISING, ppr. 1. Contriving; inventing; forming a scheme or plan.2. Giving by will; bequeathing.

15734

devisor
DEVISOR, n. One who gives by will; one who bequeaths lands or tenements.

15735

devitable
DEVITABLE, a. Avoidable. [Not in use.]

15736

devitation
DEVITATION, n. An escaping. [Not in use.]

15737

devocation
DEVOCATION, n. [L.] A calling away; seduction. [Not in use.]

15738

devoid
DEVOID, a. [See Void.]1. Void; empty; vacant; applied to place.2. Destitute; not possessing; as ...

15739

devoir
DEVOIR, n. [L., to owe.] Primarily, service or duty. Hence, an act of civility or respect; ...

15740

devolution
DEVOLUTION, n. [L.]1. The act of rolling down; as the devolution of earth into a valley.2. Removal ...

15741

devolve
DEVOLVE, v.t. devolv. [L., to roll.]1. To roll down; to pour or flow with windings.Through splendid ...

15742

devolved
DEVOLVED, pp. Rolled down; passed over to another.

15743

devolving
DEVOLVING, ppr. Rolling down; falling to a successor.

15744

devotary
DEVOTARY, n. A votary. [Not in use.]

15745

devote
DEVOTE, v.t. [L., to vow.]1. To appropriate by vow; to set apart ro dedicate by a solemn act; to ...

15746

devoted
DEVOTED, pp. Appropriated by vow; solemnly set apart or dedicated; consecrated; addicted; given up; ...

15747

devotedness
DEVOTEDNESS, n. The state of being devoted or given; addictedness; as devotedness to religion.

15748

devotee
DEVOTEE, n. One who is wholly devoted; particularly, one given wholly to religion; one who is ...

15749

devotement
DEVOTEMENT, n. 1. Devotedness; devotion.2. Vowed dedication.

15750

devoter
DEVOTER, n. One that devotes; also, a worshiper.

15751

devoting
DEVOTING, ppr. Giving or appropriating by vow; solemnly setting apart or dedicating; consecrating; ...

15752

devotion
DEVOTION, n. 1. The state of being dedicated, consecrated, or solemnly set apart for a particular ...

15753

devotional
DEVOTIONAL, a. 1. Pertaining to devotion; used in devotion; as a devotional posture; devotional ...

15754

devotionalist
DEVOTIONALIST, DEVOTIONIST, n. A person given to devotion; or one superstitiously or formally ...

15755

devotionist
DEVOTIONALIST, DEVOTIONIST, n. A person given to devotion; or one superstitiously or formally ...

15756

devoto
DEVOTO, n. A devotee. [Not in use.]

15757

devotor
DEVOTOR, n. One who reverences or worships.

15758

devour
DEVOUR, v.t. [L., to eat.] 1. To eat up; to eat with greediness; to eat ravenously, as a beast of ...

15759

devoured
DEVOURED, pp. Eaten; swallowed with greediness; consumed; destroyed; wasted; slain.

15760

devourer
DEVOURER, n. One who devours; he or that which eats, consumes or destroys; he that preys on.

15761

devouring
DEVOURING, ppr. Eating greedily; consuming; wasting; destroying; annihilating.

15762

devouringly
DEVOURINGLY, adv. In a devouring manner.

15763

devout
DEVOUT, a. [L. See Devote.]1. Yielding a solemn and reverential attention to God in religious ...

15764

devoutless
DEVOUTLESS, a. Destitute of devotion.

15765

devoutlessness
DEVOUTLESSNESS, n. Want of devotion.

15766

devoutly
DEVOUTLY, adv. 1. With solemn attention and reverence to God; with ardent devotion.He was devoutly ...

15767

devoutness
DEVOUTNESS, n. The quality or state of being devout.

15768

devow
DEVOW, v.t. To give up. [Not in use.]

15769

dew
DEW, n. [G. To thaw.] The water or moisture collected or deposited on or near the surface of the ...

15770

dew-berry
DEW-BERRY, n. The fruit of a species of brier or bramble, that creeps along the ground, of the ...

15771

dew-bespangled
DEW-BESPANGLED, a. Spangled with dew-drops.

15772

dew-besprent
DEW-BESPRENT, a. Sprinkled with dew.

15773

dew-besprinkled
DEW-BESPRINKLED, a. Sprinkled with dew.

15774

dew-drop
DEW-DROP, n. A drop of dew, which sparkles at sunrise; a spangle of dew.

15775

dew-dropping
DEW-DROPPING, a. Wetting as with dew.

15776

dew-impearled
DEW-IMPEARLED, a. [See Pearl.] Covered with dew-drops, like pearls.

15777

dew-lap
DEW-LAP, n. [dew and lap, to lick.]1. The flesh that hangs from the throat of oxen, which laps or ...

15778

dew-lapt
DEW-LAPT, a. Furnished with a dew-lap.

15779

dew-worm
DEW-WORM, n. A worm, called otherwise earth-worm, a species of Lumbricus, which lives just under ...

15780

dewbent
DEWBENT, a. Bent by the dew.

15781

dewed
DEWED, pp. Moistened with dew.

15782

dewing
DEWING, ppr. Wetting or moistening the dew.

15783

dewy
DEWY, a. 1. Partaking of dew; like dew; as dewy mist.2. Moist with dew; as dewy fields.His dewy ...

15784

dexter
DEXTER, a. [L., Gr.] Right, as opposed to left; a term used in heraldry, to denote the right side ...

15785

dexterity
DEXTERITY, n. [L., right, fit, prompt.]1. Readiness of limbs; adroitness; activity; expertness; ...

15786

dextral
DEXTRAL, a. Right, as opposed to left.

15787

dextrality
DEXTRALITY, n. The state of being on the right side.

15788

dextrorsal
DEXTRORSAL, a. Rising from right to left, as a spiral line or helix.

15789

dextrous
DEXTROUS, a. 1. Ready and expert in the use of the body and limbs; skillful and active in manual ...

15790

dextrously
DEXTROUSLY, adv. With dexterity; expertly; skillfully; artfully; adroitly; promptly.

15791

dextrousness
DEXTROUSNESS, n. Dexterity; adroitness.

15792

dey
DEY, n. The title of the governor or sovereign of Algiers, under the protection of the Grand ...

15793

di
DI, a prefix, a contraction of dis, denotes from, separation or negation, or two.

15794

dia
DIA, Greek, a prefix, denotes through.

15795

diabase
DIABASE, n. Another name of greenstone.

15796

diabaterial
DIABATERIAL, a. [Gr.] Border-passing.

15797

diabetes
DIABETES, n. [Gr., to pass through; to go or pass.] A long continued increased quantity of urine; ...

15798

diabetic
DIABETIC, a. Pertaining to diabetes.

15799

diabolic
DIABOLIC, DIABOLICAL, a. [L., the devil.] Devilish; pertaining to the devil; hence, extremely ...

15800

diabolical
DIABOLIC, DIABOLICAL, a. [L., the devil.] Devilish; pertaining to the devil; hence, extremely ...

15801

diabolically
DIABOLICALLY, adv. In a diabolical manner; very wickedly; nefariously.

15802

diabolicalness
DIABOLICALNESS, n. The qualities of the devil.

15803

diabolism
DIABOLISM, n. 1. The actions of the devil.2. Possession by the devil.

15804

diacaustic
DIACAUSTIC, a. [G., to burn or inflame.] Belonging to curves formed by refraction.

15805

diachylon
DIACHYLON, n. [Gr.] An emollient plaster.

15806

diaconal
DIACONAL, a. [L.] Pertaining to a deacon.

15807

diacoustic
DIACOUSTIC, a. [Gr., to hear.] Pertaining to the science or doctrine of refracted sounds.

15808

diacoustics
DIACOUSTICS, n. The science or doctrine of refracted sounds; the consideration of the properties of ...

15809

diacritical
DIACRITICAL, a. [Gr., to separate.] That separates or distinguishes; distinctive; as a diacritical ...

15810

diadelph
DIADELPH, n. [Gr., twice; a brother.] In botany, a plant whose stamens are united into two bodies ...

15811

diadelphian
DIADELPHIAN, a. Having its stamens united into two bodies by their filaments.

15812

diadem
DIADEM, n. [Gr., to gird; to bind. L.]1. Anciently, a head-band or fillet worn by kings as a badge ...

15813

diademed
DIADEMED, a. Adorned with a diadem; crowned; ornamented.

15814

diadrom
DIADROM, n. [Gr., a running about; to run.] A course or passing; a vibration; the time in which the ...

15815

diagnostic
DIAGNOSTIC, a. [Gr., to know.] Distinguishing; characteristic; indicating the nature of a ...

15816

diagonal
DIAGONAL, a. [Gr. A corner.] 1. In geometry, extending from one angle to another of a quadrilateral ...

15817

diagonally
DIAGONALLY, adv. In a diagonal direction.

15818

diagram
DIAGRAM, n. [Gr., to write.] In geometry, a figure, draught or scheme delineated for the purpose of ...

15819

diagraphic
DIAGRAPHIC, DIAGRAPHICAL, a. [Gr., to describe.] Descriptive.

15820

diagraphical
DIAGRAPHIC, DIAGRAPHICAL, a. [Gr., to describe.] Descriptive.

15821

dial
DIAL, n. An instrument for measuring time, by the aid of the sun; being a plate or plain surface, ...

15822

dial-plate
DIAL-PLATE, n. The plate of a dial on which the lines are drawn, to show the hour or time of the ...

15823

dialect
DIALECT, n. [Gr.]1. The form or idiom of a language, peculiar to a province, or to a kingdom or ...

15824

dialectical
DIALECTICAL, a. 1. Pertaining to a dialect, or dialects; not radical.2. Logical; argumental.

15825

dialectically
DIALECTICALLY, adv. In the manner of dialect.

15826

dialectician
DIALECTICIAN, n. A logician; a reasoner.

15827

dialectics
DIALECTICS, n. That branch of logic which teaches the rules and modes of reasoning.

15828

dialing
DIALING, n. The art of constructing dials, or of drawing dials on a plane. The sciateric science, ...

15829

dialist
DIALIST, n. A constructor of dials; one skilled in dialing.

15830

diallage
DIALLAGE, n. [Gr., difference, alluding to the difference of luster between its natural joints.] A ...

15831

dialogism
DIALOGISM, n. A feigned speech between two or more.

15832

dialogist
DIALOGIST, n. [See Dialogue.] A speaker in a dialogue; also, a writer of dialogues.

15833

dialogistic
DIALOGISTIC, a. Having the form of a dialogue.

15834

dialogistically
DIALOGISTICALLY, adv. In the manner of dialogue.

15835

dialogize
DIALOGIZE, v.i. [See Dialogue.] To discourse in dialogue.

15836

dialogue
DIALOGUE, n. Dialog. [Gr., to dispute; to speak.]1. A conversation or conference between two or ...

15837

dialogue-writer
DIALOGUE-WRITER, n. A writer of dialogues or feigned conversations.

15838

dialysis
DIALYSIS, n. [Gr., to dissolve.] 1. A mark in writing or printing, consisting of two points placed ...

15839

diamantine
DIAMANTINE, for adamantine. [Not in use.]

15840

diameter
DIAMETER, n. [Gr., measure through.]1. A right line passing through the center of a circle or other ...

15841

diametral
DIAMETRAL, a. Diametrical, which see.

15842

diametrally
DIAMETRALLY, adv. Diametrically.

15843

diametrical
DIAMETRICAL, a. 1. Describing a diameter.2. Observing the direction of a diameter; direct; as ...

15844

diametrically
DIAMETRICALLY, adv. In a diametrical direction; directly; as diametrically opposite.

15845

diamond
DIAMOND, n. Dimond. [L., Gr. See Adamant.]1. A mineral, gem or precious stone, of the most valuable ...

15846

diamond-mine
DIAMOND-MINE, n. A mine in which diamonds are found.

15847

diamonded
DIAMONDED, a. Having the figure of an oblique angled parallelogram, or rhombus.

15848

diander
DIANDER, n. [Gr., twice; a male.] In botany, a plant having two stamens.

15849

diandrian
DIANDRIAN, a. Having two stamens.

15850

diapase
DIAPASON, DIAPASE, n. [Gr., through all.] 1. In music, the octave or interval which includes all ...

15851

diapasm
DIAPASM, n. [Gr., to sprinkle.] A perfume.

15852

diapason
DIAPASON, DIAPASE, n. [Gr., through all.] 1. In music, the octave or interval which includes all ...

15853

diapente
DIAPENTE, n. [Gr., five.]1. A fifth; an interval making the second of the concords, and with the ...

15854

diaper
DIAPER, n. Figured linen cloth; a cloth wove in flowers or figures; much used for towels or ...

15855

diaphaned
DIAPHANED, a. Transparent. [Little used.]

15856

diaphaneity
DIAPHANEITY, n. [Gr., to shine through; to shine.] The power of transmitting light; transparency; ...

15857

diaphanic
DIAPHANIC, a. [Gr. See supra.] Having power to transmit light; transparent.

15858

diaphanous
DIAPHANOUS, a. [See supra.] Having power to transmit rays of light, as glass; pellucid; ...

15859

diaphoresis
DIAPHORESIS, n. [Gr., to carry through; to carry.] Augmented perspiration; or an elimination of the ...

15860

diaphoretic
DIAPHORETIC, a. [supra.] Having the power to increase perspiration; sudorific; ...

15861

diaphragm
DIAPHRAGM, n. Diafram. [Gr., to break off, to defend.]1. In anatomy, the midriff, a muscle ...

15862

diaporesis
DIAPORESIS, n. [Gr., to doubt.] In rhetoric, doubt; hesitation.

15863

diaresis
DIARESIS, DIARESY, n. [Gr., a division; to take away.] The dissolution of a diphthong; the mark ...

15864

diaresy
DIARESIS, DIARESY, n. [Gr., a division; to take away.] The dissolution of a diphthong; the mark ...

15865

diarian
DIARIAN, a. [See Diary.] Pertaining to a diary; daily.

15866

diarist
DIARIST, n. One who keeps a diary.

15867

diarrhea
DIARRHEA, n. [Gr., to flow through; to flow.] Purging or flux; a frequent and copious evacuation of ...

15868

diarrhetic
DIARRHETIC, a. Promoting evacuation by stool; purgative.

15869

diary
DIARY, n. [L., a day.] An account of daily events or transactions; a journal; a register of daily ...

15870

diaschism
DIASCHISM, n. [Gr., a piece cut off; to cut off.] In music, the difference between the comma and ...

15871

diaspore
DIASPORE, n. [Gr., to disperse.] A mineral occurring in lamellar concretions, of a pearly gray ...

15872

diastaltic
DIASTALTIC, a. [Gr., dilating.] Dilated; noble; bold; an epithet given by the Greeks to certain ...

15873

diastem
DIASTEM, n. [Gr.] In music, a simple interval.

15874

diastole
DIASTOLE, DIASTOLY, n. [Gr., to set or send from.]1. Among physicians, a dilation of the heart, ...

15875

diastoly
DIASTOLE, DIASTOLY, n. [Gr., to set or send from.]1. Among physicians, a dilation of the heart, ...

15876

diastyle
DIASTYLE, n. [Gr.] An edifice in which three diameters of the columns are allowed for ...

15877

diatessaron
DIATESSARON, n. [Gr., four.] Among musicians, a concord or harmonic interval, composed of a greater ...

15878

diatonic
DIATONIC, a. [Gr., by or through, sound.] Ascending or descending, as in sound, or from sound to ...

15879

diatribe
DIATRIBE, n. [Gr.] A continued discourse or disputation.

15880

diazeutic
DIAZEUTIC, a. [Gr., to disjoin.] A diazeutic tone, in ancient Greek music, disjoined two fourths, ...

15881

dibble
DIBBLE, n. [probably from the root of top, tip, a point, and denoting a little sharp point; or ...

15882

dibstone
DIBSTONE, n. A little stone which children throw at another stone.

15883

dicacity
DICACITY, n. [L.] Pertness. [Little used.]

15884

dicast
DICAST, n. [Gr., to judge; justice.] In ancient Greece, an officer answering nearly to our juryman.

15885

dice
DICE, n. plu. of die; also, a game with dice.DICE, v.i. To play with dice.

15886

dice-box
DICE-BOX, n. A box from which dice are thrown in gaming.

15887

dice-maker
DICE-MAKER, n. A maker of dice.

15888

dicer
DICER, n. A player at dice.

15889

dichotomize
DICHOTOMIZE, v.t. [See the next word.] To cut into two parts; to divide into pairs.

15890

dichotomous
DICHOTOMOUS, a. [Gr., doubly, by pairs; to cut.] In botany, regularly dividing by pairs from top to ...

15891

dichotomous-corymb
DICHOTOMOUS-CORYMBED, a. Composed of corymbs, in which the pedicles divide and subdivide by pairs.

15892

dichotomy
DICHOTOMY, n. [Gr., a division into two parts; to cut.]1. Division or distribution of ideas by ...

15893

dichroit
DICHROIT, n. [See Iolite.]

15894

dicing-house
DICING-HOUSE, n. A house where dice is played; a gaming house. [Little used.]

15895

dicker
DICKER, n. [Gr., ten. L.] In old authors, the number or quantity of ten, particularly ten hides or ...

15896

dicoccous
DICOCCOUS, a. [Gr., L., a grain.] Two-grained; consisting of two cohering grains or cells, with one ...

15897

dicotyledon
DICOTYLEDON, n. [Gr., two; a cavity.] A plant whose seeds divide into two lobes in germinating.

15898

dicotyledonous
DICOTYLEDONOUS, a. Having two lobes. A dicotyledonous plant is one whose seeds have two lobes, and ...

15899

dictate
DICTATE, v.t. [L., to speak.]1. To tell with authority; to deliver, as an order, command, or ...

15900

dictated
DICTATED, pp. Delivered with authority; ordered; directed; suggested.

15901

dictating
DICTATING, ppr. Uttering or delivering with authority; instructing what to say or write; ordering; ...

15902

dictation
DICTATION, n. The act of dictating; the act or practice of prescribing.It affords security against ...

15903

dictator
DICTATOR, n. [L.]1. One who dictates; one who prescribes rules and maxims for the direction of ...

15904

dictatorial
DICTATORIAL, a. 1. Pertaining to a dictator; absolute; unlimited; uncontrollable.2. Imperious; ...

15905

dictatorship
DICTATORSHIP, n. 1. The office of a dictator; the term of a dictators office.2. Authority; ...

15906

dictatory
DICTATORY, a. Overbearing; dogmatical.

15907

dictature
DICTATURE, n. 1. The office of a dictator; dictatorship.2. Absolute authority; the power that ...

15908

diction
DICTION, n. [L., to speak.] Expression of ideas by words; style; manner of expression.

15909

dictionary
dictionary, n. [L., a word, or a speaking.] A book containing the words of a language arranged in ...

15910

did
DID, pret of do, contracted from doed. I did, thou didst, he did; we did, you or ye did, they ...

15911

didactic
DIDACTIC, DIDACTICAL, a. [Gr., to teach.] Adapted to teach; preceptive; containing doctrines, ...

15912

didactical
DIDACTIC, DIDACTICAL, a. [Gr., to teach.] Adapted to teach; preceptive; containing doctrines, ...

15913

didactically
DIDACTICALLY, adv. In a didactic manner; in a form to teach.

15914

didapper
DIDAPPER, n. [from dip.] A bird that dives into the water, a species of Colymbus.

15915

didascalic
DIDASCALIC, a. [Gr., to teach.] Didactic; preceptive; giving precepts. [Little used.]

15916

didder
DIDDER, v.i. To totter, as a child in walking.

15917