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Tuesday - July 16, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [hair]

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hair

HAIR, n.

1. A small filament issuing from the skin of an animal, and from a bulbous root. Each filament contains a tube or hollow within, occupied by a pulp or pith, which is intended for its nutrition,and extends only to that part which is in a state of growth.

When hair means a single filament,it has a plural,hairs.

2. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming an integument or covering; as the hair of the head. Hair is the common covering of many beasts. When the filaments are very fine and short, the collection of them is called fur. Wool, also, is a kind of hair. When hair signifies a collection of these animal filaments, it has no plural.

3. Any thing very small or fine; or a very small distance; the breadth of a hair. He judges to a hair, that is, very exactly.

4. A trifling value. It is not worth a hair.

5. Course; order; grain; the hair falling in a certain direction. [Not used.]

You go against the hair of your profession.

6. Long, straight and distinct filaments on the surface of plants; a species of down or pubescence.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [hair]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

HAIR, n.

1. A small filament issuing from the skin of an animal, and from a bulbous root. Each filament contains a tube or hollow within, occupied by a pulp or pith, which is intended for its nutrition,and extends only to that part which is in a state of growth.

When hair means a single filament,it has a plural,hairs.

2. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming an integument or covering; as the hair of the head. Hair is the common covering of many beasts. When the filaments are very fine and short, the collection of them is called fur. Wool, also, is a kind of hair. When hair signifies a collection of these animal filaments, it has no plural.

3. Any thing very small or fine; or a very small distance; the breadth of a hair. He judges to a hair, that is, very exactly.

4. A trifling value. It is not worth a hair.

5. Course; order; grain; the hair falling in a certain direction. [Not used.]

You go against the hair of your profession.

6. Long, straight and distinct filaments on the surface of plants; a species of down or pubescence.

HAIR, n. [Sax. hær; G. haar; D. hair; Sw. hår; Dan. haar.]

  1. A small filament issuing from the skin of an animal, and from a bulbous root. Each filament contains a tube or hollow within, occupied by a pulp or pith, which is intended for its nutrition, and extends only to that part which is in a state of growth. Cyc. When hair means a single filament, it has a plural, hairs.
  2. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming an integument or covering; as, the hair of the head. Hair is the common covering of many beasts. When the filaments are very fine and short, the collection of them is called fur. Wool, also, is a kind of hair. When hair signifies a collection of these animal filaments, it has no plural.
  3. Any thing very small or fine; or a very small distance; the breadth of a hair. He judges to a hair, that is, very exactly. Dryden.
  4. A trifling, value. It is not worth a hair.
  5. Course; order; grin; the hair falling in a certain direction. [Not used.] You go against the hair of your profession. Shak.
  6. Long, straight and distinct filaments, on the surface of plants; a species of down or pubescence. Martyn.

Hair
  1. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming a covering for a part of the head or for any part or the whole of the body.
  2. One the above-mentioned filaments, consisting, in vertebrate animals, of a long, tubular part which is free and flexible, and a bulbous root imbedded in the skin.

    Then read he me how Sampson lost his hairs. Chaucer.

    And draweth new delights with hoary hairs. Spenser.

  3. Hair (human or animal) used for various purposes; as, hair for stuffing cushions.
  4. A slender outgrowth from the chitinous cuticle of insects, spiders, crustaceans, and other invertebrates. Such hairs are totally unlike those of vertebrates in structure, composition, and mode of growth.
  5. An outgrowth of the epidermis, consisting of one or of several cells, whether pointed, hooked, knobbed, or stellated. Internal hairs occur in the flower stalk of the yellow frog lily (Nuphar).
  6. A spring device used in a hair-trigger firearm.
  7. A haircloth.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  8. Any very small distance, or degree; a hairbreadth.

    * Hairs is often used adjectively or in combination; as, hairbrush or hair brush, hair dye, hair oil, hairpin, hair powder, a brush, a dye, etc., for the hair.

    Against the hair, in a rough and disagreeable manner; against the grain. [Obs.] "You go against the hair of your professions." Shak. -- Hair bracket (Ship Carp.), a molding which comes in at the back of, or runs aft from, the figurehead. -- Hair cells (Anat.), cells with hairlike processes in the sensory epithelium of certain parts of the internal ear. -- Hair compass, Hair divider, a compass or divider capable of delicate adjustment by means of a screw. -- Hair glove, a glove of horsehair for rubbing the skin. -- Hair lace, a netted fillet for tying up the hair of the head. Swift. -- Hair line, a line made of hair; a very slender line. -- Hair moth (Zoöl.), any moth which destroys goods made of hair, esp. Tinea biselliella. -- Hair pencil, a brush or pencil made of fine hair, for painting; -- generally called by the name of the hair used; as, a camel's hair pencil, a sable's hair pencil, etc. - - Hair plate, an iron plate forming the back of the hearth of a bloomery fire. -- Hair powder, a white perfumed powder, as of flour or starch, formerly much used for sprinkling on the hair of the head, or on wigs. -- Hair seal (Zoöl.), any one of several species of eared seals which do not produce fur; a sea lion. -- Hair seating, haircloth for seats of chairs, etc. -- Hair shirt, a shirt, or a band for the loins, made of horsehair, and worn as a penance. -- Hair sieve, a strainer with a haircloth bottom. -- Hair snake. See Gordius. -- Hair space (Printing), the thinnest metal space used in lines of type. -- Hair stroke, a delicate stroke in writing. -- Hair trigger, a trigger so constructed as to discharge a firearm by a very slight pressure, as by the touch of a hair. Farrow. -- Not worth a hair, of no value. -- To a hair, with the nicest distinction. -- To split hairs, to make distinctions of useless nicety.

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Hair

HAIR, noun

1. A small filament issuing from the skin of an animal, and from a bulbous root. Each filament contains a tube or hollow within, occupied by a pulp or pith, which is intended for its nutrition, and extends only to that part which is in a state of growth.

When hair means a single filament, it has a plural, hairs.

2. The collection or mass of filaments growing from the skin of an animal, and forming an integument or covering; as the hair of the head. hair is the common covering of many beasts. When the filaments are very fine and short, the collection of them is called fur. Wool, also, is a kind of hair When hair signifies a collection of these animal filaments, it has no plural.

3. Any thing very small or fine; or a very small distance; the breadth of a hair He judges to a hair that is, very exactly.

4. A trifling value. It is not worth a hair

5. Course; order; grain; the hair falling in a certain direction. [Not used.]

You go against the hair of your profession.

6. Long, straight and distinct filaments on the surface of plants; a species of down or pubescence.

Why 1828?

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Its definitions of words from the KJV Bible are more inline with the definitions of the Greek and Hebrew text than more modern dictionaries.

— Rich

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

overrake

OVERRA'KE, v.t. To break in upon a ship. When the waves break in upon a ship riding at anchor, it is said, they overrake her, or she is overraked.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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