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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord touch

1828 edition of Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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touch

TOUCH, v.t. tuch. [L. tango, originally tago, [our vulgar tag.] pret. tetigi, pp. tactus.]

1. To come in contact with; to hit or strike against.

He touched the hollow of his thigh. Gen. 32. Matt.9.

Esther drew near, and touched the top of the scepter. Esth.5.

2. To perceive by the sense of feeling.

Nothing but body can be touch'd or touch.

3. To come to; to reach; to attain to.

The god vindictive doom'd them never more,

Ah men unbless'd! to touch that natal shore.

4. To try, as gold with a stone.

Wherein I mean to touch your love indeed--

5. To relate to; to concern.

The quarrel toucheth none but thee alone.

[This sense is now nearly obsolete.]

6. To handle slightly.

7. To meddle with. I have not touched the books.

8. To affect.

What of sweet

Hath touch'd my sense, flat seems to this.

9. To move; to soften; to melt.

The tender sire was touch'd with what he said.

10. To mark or delineate slightly.

The lines, though touch'd but faintly--

11. To infect; as men touched with pestilent diseases. [Little used.]

12. To make an impression on.

Its face must be--so hard that the file will not touch it.

13. To strike, as an instrument of music; to play on.

They touch'd their golden harps.

14. To influence by impulse; to impel forcibly.

No decree of mine,

To touch with lightest moment of impulse

His free will.

15. To treat slightly. In his discourse, he barely touched upon the subject deemed the most interesting.

16. To afflict or distress. Gen.26.

To touch up, to repair; or to improve by slight touches or emendations.

To touch the wind, in seamen's language, is to keep the ship as near the wind as possible.

TOUCH, v.i. tuch. To be in contact with; to be in a state of junction, so that no space is between. Two spheres touch only at points.

1. To fasten on; to take effect on.

Strong waters will touch upon gold,that will not touch silver.

2. To treat of slightly in discourse.

To touch at, to come or go to, without stay.

The ship touched at Lisbon.

The next day we touched at Sidon. Acts 27.touch on or upon, to mention slightly.

If the antiquaries have touched upon it, they have immediately quitted it.

1. In the sense of touch at. [Little used.]

TOUCH, n. tuch. Contact; the hitting of two bodies; the junction of two bodies at the surface, so that there is no space between them. The mimosa shrinks at the slightest touch.

1. The sense of feeling; one of the five senses. We say, a thing is cold or warm to the touch; silk is soft to the touch.

The spider's touch how exquisitely fine!

2. The act of touching. The touch of cold water made him shrink.

3. The state of being touched.

--That never touch was welcome to thy hand

Unless I touch'd.

4. Examination by a stone.

5. Test; that by which any thing is examined.

Equity, the true touch of all laws.

6. Proof; tried qualities.

My friends of noble touch.

7. Single act of a pencil on a picture.

Never give the least touch with your pencil, till you have well examined your design.

8. Feature; lineament.

Of many faces, eyes and hearts,

To have the touches dearest priz'd.

9. Act of the hand on a musical instrument.

Soft stillness and the night

Become the touches of sweet harmony.

10. Power of exciting the affections.

Not alone

The death of Fulvia, with more urgent touches,

Do strongly speak t'us.

11. Something of passion of affection.

He both makes intercession to God for sinners, and exercises dominion over all men, with a true, natural and sensible touch of mercy.

12. Particular application of any thing to a person.

Speech of touch towards others should be sparingly used.

13. A stroke; as a touch of raillery; a satiric touch.

14. Animadversion; censure; reproof.

I never bore any touch of conscience with greater regret.

15. Exact performance of agreement.

I keep touch with my promise.

16. A small quantity intermixed.

Madam, I have a touch of your condition.

17. A hint; suggestion; slight notice.

A small touch will put him in mind of them.

18. A cant word for a slight essay.

Print my preface in such forms, in the bookseller's phrase, will make a sixpenny touch. [Not in use.]

19. In music, the resistance of the keys of an instrument to the fingers; as a heavy touch, or light touch.

20. In music, an organ is said to have a good touch or stop,when the keys close well.

21. In ship-building, touch is the broadest part of a plank worked top and butt; or the middle of a plank worked anchor-stock fashion; also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.


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About 1828

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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Patent Searching 101: A Patent Search Tutorial Inventors and entrepreneurs who are looking to cut costs frequently want to do their own search. This is a wise first move, but you really need to be careful. It is quite common for inventors to search and find nothing even when there are things that could and would be found by a professional searcher. So while it makes sense to do your own search first, be careful relying on your own search to justify spending the thousands of dollars you will need to spend to ultimately obtain a patent. In other words, nothing in this article should be interpreted as me suggesting that inventors can or should forgo a professional patent search. There is simply no comparison between an inventor done patent search and a patent search done by a pro. Having said that, every inventor should spend time searching and looking if for no other reason than to familiarize themselves with the prior art. Of course, if you can find something that is too close on your own you save time and money and can move on to whatever invention/project is next. Another thing you MUST know about when you use Google Patent Search is that there are also some holes in the database. I have specifically looked for patents I know to exist and cannot always find them. I have heard the same experience from other patent attorneys and agents. Additionally, the most recent patents are not available on Google. What this means is you cannot only rely on Google, but you still must use Google. The Google database covers patents that are issued all the way back to US Patent No. 1. This scope is much broader than either Free Patents or the USPTO . So while you might not find everything, while it is difficult to specifically narrow your search, you still really need to check yourself using the Google database to see if there are old references that might be on point. In this case there are not many to choose from. Many times, however, the list will contain hundreds or even thousands of patents depending upon the popularity of the term or phrase selected. For example, if you search "SPEC/thermos", you will find hundreds of patents that use this word in the specification. In fact, at the time this sample search was conducted (March 16, 2012) no fewer than 970 US patents have the word "thermos" in the specification, and that is only for patents issued since 1976. So what should you do now? If you find too many patents, rework the specification field search. For example, if your search were "SPEC/thermos and SPEC/beverage" you get down to 200 US patents. Ultimately, upon receiving manageable results, just click on several of the patents. The key, however, is to start off broad and then narrow your way down to those that are the most likely relevant references. Also remember that it is critically important to figure out what things are called. I cannot stress this enough. You need to use different names and labels. You will find that patent attorneys typically call certain features by a select few names. These names are not always obvious, but once you figure out what the industry calls something you are far more likely to find relevant patents.
Why is classification so important? While it is possible to search patents using keywords, the best way to conduct a comprehensive patent search is by classification. Classification helps bring together similar devices and concepts, even when different terms have been used to describe them. When a device is truly new, terminology is not set. For example, before personal computers a mouse was nothing more than a rodent. The inventor of the first "Computer Input and Display Control" would not have found related devices by searching the keyword "mouse." A classification is used both as a tool for finding patents (patentability searches), and for assisting in the assignment of patent applications to examiners for examination purposes. Classifications have definitions. Classifications have hierarchical relationships to one another.
Attorney Fees / Invention Complexity The USPTO, IP Watchdog and every patent law firm strongly recommends that inventors hire a patent agent or attorney to prepare the application. IP Watchdog reminds inventors that not only is the process confusing, but a patent is a legal document that uses the language found in the application and patents can only be protected in court, where every word in the document matters. IP Watchdog reports that the median cost of a patent attorney is around $250 an hour, higher in urban areas (Quinn suggests hiring an experienced attorney that works in an area with a low cost of living as a way to control costs, as opposed to hiring an inexperienced attorney). Quinn states that, depending on the complexity of the invention, attorney fees for conducting a search and preparing an application with drawings usually run between $7,000 and $15,000. The more complex an invention, the longer the attorney spends researching related patents, writing up a detailed description and outlining exactly what the patent should protect. Drawings also take longer the more complex the invention is, and USPTO rewrites can be more difficult.
The Do-It-Yourself Patent Search If you decide to do the patent search yourself, you have several search methods available: The USPTO (United States Patent Trade Office) Public Search Facility. The USPTO operates a Patent Public Search Facility located in Alexandria, Virginia. Here every U.S. patent granted since 1790 may be searched and examined. Many inventors like to make at least one pilgrimage to the Patent Public Search Facility. It's located fewer than 15 minutes from National Airport by taxi; Metro Rail serves it off the Blue and Yellow lines, King Street Station; and several hotels are within walking distance, so it's easy to get to and around.
Typical Filing Fees for an Independent Inventor $625 - $825 for the filing fee with no more than 3 claims, which is non-refundable whether or not a patent is granted. This is the fee to have your application "examined" by the USPTO and your patent application may be rejected.

Learn more about U.S. patents:

Patent # 7,654,321 ()
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