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Thursday - April 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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bear

BEAR, v.t. pret.bore; pp. born,borne. [L. fero, pario, porto. The primary sense is to throw out, to bring forth, or in general, to thrust or drive along. ]

1. To support; to sustain; as, to bear a weight or burden.

2. To carry; to convey; to support and remove from place to place; as, "they bear him upon the shoulder;", "the eagle beareth them on her wings."

3. To wear; to bear as a mark of authority or distinction; as, to bear a sword, a badge, a name; to bear arms in a coat.

4. To keep afloat; as, the water bears a ship.

5. To support or sustain without sinking or yielding; to endure; as, a man can bear severe pain or calamity; or to sustain with proportionate strength, and without injury; as, a man may bear stronger food or drink.

6. To entertain; to carry in the mind; as, to bear a great love for a friend; to bear inveterate hatred to gaming.

7. To suffer; to undergo; as, to bear punishment.

8. To suffer without resentment, or interference to prevent; to have patience; as, to bear neglect or indignities.

9. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence,injury,or change; as, to give words the most favorable interpretation they will bear.

10. To bring forth or produce, as the fruit of plants, or the young of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear children.

11. To give birth to, or be the native place of.

Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore.

12. To possess and use as power; to exercise; as, to bear sway.

13. To gain or win.

Some think to bear it by speaking a great word. [Not now used. The phrase now used is, to bear away.]

14. To carry on, or maintain; to have; as, to bear a part in conversation.

15. To show or exhibit; to relate; as, to bear testimony or witness. This seems to imply utterance, like the Latin fero, to relate or utter.

16. To sustain the effect, or be answerable for; as, to bear the blame.

17. To sustain, as expense; to supply the means of paying; as, to bear the charges, that is, to pay the expenses.

18. To be the object of.

Let me but bear your love, and I'll bear your cares.

19. To behave; to act in any character; as,"hath he borne himself penitent?"

20. To remove, or to endure the effects of; and hence to give satisfaction for.

He shall bear their iniquities. Is. 53. Heb.9.

To bear the infirmities of the weak, to bear one another's burdens, is to be charitable towards their faults, to sympathize with them, and to aid them in distress.

To bear off, is to restrain; to keep from approach; and in seamanship, to remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against any thing; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat; also, to carry away; as, to bear off stolen goods.

To bear down, is to impel or urge; to overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy.

To bear down upon, to press to overtake; to make all sail to come up with.

To bear hard, is to press or urge.

Cesar doth bear me hard.

To bear on, is to press against; also to carry forward, to press, incite or animate.

Confidence hath borne thee on.

To bear through, is to conduct or manage; as,"to bear through the consulship." B.Jonson. Also, to maintain or support to the end; as, religion will bear us through the evils of life.

To bear out, is to maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last.

Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.

To bear up, to support; to keep from falling.

Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.

To bear up, to keep afloat.

To bear a body. A color is said to bear a body in painting, when it is capable of being ground so fine, and mixed so entirely with the oil, as to seem only a very thick oil of the same color. To bear date, is to have the mark of time when written or executed; as, a letter or bond bears date, Jan.6,1811.

To bear a price,is to have a certain price. In common mercantile language,it often signifies or implies, to bear a good or high price.

To bear in hand, to amuse with false pretenses; to deceive.

I believe this phrase is obsolete, or never used in America.

To bear a hand, in seamanship, is to make haste, be quick.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bear]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BEAR, v.t. pret.bore; pp. born,borne. [L. fero, pario, porto. The primary sense is to throw out, to bring forth, or in general, to thrust or drive along. ]

1. To support; to sustain; as, to bear a weight or burden.

2. To carry; to convey; to support and remove from place to place; as, "they bear him upon the shoulder;", "the eagle beareth them on her wings."

3. To wear; to bear as a mark of authority or distinction; as, to bear a sword, a badge, a name; to bear arms in a coat.

4. To keep afloat; as, the water bears a ship.

5. To support or sustain without sinking or yielding; to endure; as, a man can bear severe pain or calamity; or to sustain with proportionate strength, and without injury; as, a man may bear stronger food or drink.

6. To entertain; to carry in the mind; as, to bear a great love for a friend; to bear inveterate hatred to gaming.

7. To suffer; to undergo; as, to bear punishment.

8. To suffer without resentment, or interference to prevent; to have patience; as, to bear neglect or indignities.

9. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence,injury,or change; as, to give words the most favorable interpretation they will bear.

10. To bring forth or produce, as the fruit of plants, or the young of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear children.

11. To give birth to, or be the native place of.

Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore.

12. To possess and use as power; to exercise; as, to bear sway.

13. To gain or win.

Some think to bear it by speaking a great word. [Not now used. The phrase now used is, to bear away.]

14. To carry on, or maintain; to have; as, to bear a part in conversation.

15. To show or exhibit; to relate; as, to bear testimony or witness. This seems to imply utterance, like the Latin fero, to relate or utter.

16. To sustain the effect, or be answerable for; as, to bear the blame.

17. To sustain, as expense; to supply the means of paying; as, to bear the charges, that is, to pay the expenses.

18. To be the object of.

Let me but bear your love, and I'll bear your cares.

19. To behave; to act in any character; as,"hath he borne himself penitent?"

20. To remove, or to endure the effects of; and hence to give satisfaction for.

He shall bear their iniquities. Is. 53. Heb.9.

To bear the infirmities of the weak, to bear one another's burdens, is to be charitable towards their faults, to sympathize with them, and to aid them in distress.

To bear off, is to restrain; to keep from approach; and in seamanship, to remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against any thing; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat; also, to carry away; as, to bear off stolen goods.

To bear down, is to impel or urge; to overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy.

To bear down upon, to press to overtake; to make all sail to come up with.

To bear hard, is to press or urge.

Cesar doth bear me hard.

To bear on, is to press against; also to carry forward, to press, incite or animate.

Confidence hath borne thee on.

To bear through, is to conduct or manage; as,"to bear through the consulship." B.Jonson. Also, to maintain or support to the end; as, religion will bear us through the evils of life.

To bear out, is to maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last.

Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.

To bear up, to support; to keep from falling.

Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.

To bear up, to keep afloat.

To bear a body. A color is said to bear a body in painting, when it is capable of being ground so fine, and mixed so entirely with the oil, as to seem only a very thick oil of the same color. To bear date, is to have the mark of time when written or executed; as, a letter or bond bears date, Jan.6,1811.

To bear a price,is to have a certain price. In common mercantile language,it often signifies or implies, to bear a good or high price.

To bear in hand, to amuse with false pretenses; to deceive.

I believe this phrase is obsolete, or never used in America.

To bear a hand, in seamanship, is to make haste, be quick.


BEAR, n. [Sax. bera; Ger. bär; D. beer; Sw. Dan. and Ice. biörn; Ir. bear; allied perhaps to fierce, L. ferus, fera, or to barbarus.]

  1. A wild quadruped, of the genus ursus. The marks of the genus are, six fore teeth in the upper jaw, alternately hollow on the inside; and six in the under jaw, the two lateral ones lobated; the dog teeth are solitary and conical; the eyes have a nictitating membrane, and the nose is prominent. The arctos, or black bear, has his body covered with long shaggy hair. Some are found in Tartary, of a pure white color. The polar, or white bear, has a long head and neck; short, round ears; the hair long, soft, and white, tinged in some parts with yellow. He grows to a great size, the skins of some being 13 feet long. This bear lives in cold climates only, and frequently swims from one isle of ice to another. – Encyc.
  2. The name of two constellations in the northern hemisphere, called the Greater and Lesser Bear. In the tail of the Lesser Bear is the pole star.

BEAR, v.i.

  1. To suffer, as with pain. But man is born to bear. – Pope. This is unusual in prose; and though admissible, is rendered intransitive, merely by the omission of pain, or other word expressive of evil.
  2. To be patient; to endure. I can not, can not bear. – Dryden. To also seems to be elliptical.
  3. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness. This age to blossom, and the next to bear. – Dryden. Here fruit must be understood.
  4. To take effect; to succeed; as, to bring matters to bear. – Guardian.
  5. To act in any character. Instruct me how I may bear like a true friar. [Unusual.] – Shak.
  6. To be situated as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bore E. N. E. from the ship.
  7. To have weight on the neck by the yoke, as oxen attached to the neap of a cart.
  8. To bear away, in navigation, is to change the course of a ship, when close hauled, or sailing with a side wind, and make her run before the wind. To bear up, is used in a like sense, froin the act of bearing up the helm to the windward. – Mar. Dict. Hence, perhaps, in other cases, the expression may be used to denote tending or moving from.
  9. To bear down, is to drive or tend to; to approach with a fair wind; as, the fleet bore down upon the enemy.
  10. To bear in, is to run or tend toward; as, a ship bears in with the land; opposed to bear off, or keeping at a greater distance.
  11. To bear up, is to tend or move toward; as, to bear up to one another: also, to be supported; to have fortitude; to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up under afflictions.
  12. To bear upon, or against, is to lean upon or against; to act on as weight or force, in any direction, as a column upon its base, or the sides of two inclining objects against each other.
  13. To bear against, to approach for attack or seizure; as, a lion bears against his prey. – Dryden.
  14. To bear upon, to act upon; as, the artillery bore upon the center; or to be pointed or situated so as to affect; as, to bring or plant guns so as to bear upon a fort, or a ship.
  15. To bear with, to endure what is unpleasing; to be indulgent; to forbear to resent, oppose, or punish. Reason would I should bear with you. – Acts xviii. Shall not God avenge his elect, though he bear long with them? – Luke xviii.

BEAR, v.t. [pret. bore; pp. born, borne. Sax. bæran, beran, beoran, byran, gebæran, geberan, gebyran, abæran, aberan, to bear, carry, bring, sustain, produce, bring forth; gebyrian, gebyrigan, to pertain to, to belong to, to happen, to become, or be suitable; answering to the Latin fero, porto, pario and oporteo. Hence, probably, Sax. barn, bearn, a son, coinciding with born. Goth. bairan, to bear, or carry; gabairan, to bear; G. führen, to carry, and gebären, to bring forth; D. beuren, to lift, voeren, to carry or bear; baaren, to bring forth; Sw. bära, to carry; bära fram, to bring forth; barn, a son; Dan. bærer, to carry, bear, produce; L. fero, pario, porto; Gr. φερω, φορεω; Sp. and Port. parir, to bring forth; portar, to carry; It. portare, to carry; Ir. bearadh, beirim, to bear or bring forth, to tell or relate, whence Fr. parler; Russ. bere, to take, to carry; Sans. bharadi, to bear. This verb I suppose to be radically the same as the Shemitic ברא, to produce; L. pario. The primary sense is to throw out, to bring forth, or in general, to thrust or drive along. It includes the proper significations, both of L. fero and pario; Shemitic פרה, farah, and ፈረየ, fari. Hence, probably Gr. βαρος, βαρυς, and a great family of words. See Class Br. Nos. 15, 22, 33, 35.]

  1. To support; to sustain; as, to bear a weight or burden.
  2. To carry; to convey; to support and remove from place to place; as, they bear him upon the shoulder; the eagle, beareth them on her wings. – Isaiah. Deuteronomy.
  3. To wear; to bear as a mark of authority or distinction, as, to bear a sword, a badge, a name; to bear arms in a coat.
  4. To keep afloat; as, the water bears a ship.
  5. To support or sustain without sinking or yielding; to endure; as, a man can bear severe pain or calamity; or to sustain with proportionate strength, and without injury; as, a man may bear stronger food or drink.
  6. To entertain; to carry in the mind; as, to bear a great love for a friend; to bear inveterate hatred to gaming.
  7. To suffer; to undergo; as, to bear punishment.
  8. To suffer without resentment, or interference to prevent; to have patience; as, to bear neglect or indignities.
  9. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change; as, to give words the most favorable interpretation they will bear.
  10. To bring forth or produce, as the fruit of plants, or the young of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear children.
  11. To give birth to, or be the native place of. Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore. – Dryden.
  12. To possess and use as power; to exercise; as, to bear sway.
  13. To gain or win. Some think to bear it by speaking a great word. – Bacon. [Not now used. The phrase now used is, to bear away.]
  14. To carry on, or maintain; to have; as, to bear a part in conversation.
  15. To show or exhibit; to relate; as, to bear testimony or witness. This seems to imply utterance, like the Latin fero, to relate or utter.
  16. To sustain the effect, or be answerable for; as, to bear the blame.
  17. To sustain, as expense; to supply the means of paying; as, to bear the charges, that is, to pay the expenses.
  18. To be the object of. Let me but bear your love, and I'll bear your cares. [Unusual.] – Shak.
  19. To behave; to act in any character; as, hath he borne himself penitent? [Not usual.] – Shak.
  20. To remove, or to endure the effects of; and hence, to give satisfaction for. He shall bear their iniquities. – Is. liii. Heb. ix. To bear the infirmities of the weak, To bear one another's burdens, is to be charitable toward their faults, to sympathize with them, and to aid them in distress. – Brown. To bear off, is to restrain; to keep from approach; and in seamanship, to remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against any thing; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat; also, to carry away; as, to bear off stolen goods. To bear down, is to impel or urge; to overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy. To bear down upon, to press to overtake; to make all sail to come up with. To bear hard, is to press or urge. Cesar doth bear me hard. – Shak. To bear on, is to press against; also to carry forward, to press, incite or animate. Confidence hath borne thee on. – Milton. To bear through, is to conduct or manage; as, to bear through the consulship. B. Jonson. Also, to maintain or support to the end; as religion will bear us through the evils of life. To bear out, is to maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last. Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing. – South. To bear up, to support, to keep from falling. Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings. – Addison. To bear up, to keep afloat. To bear a body. A color is said to bear a body in painting, when it is capable of being ground so fine, and mixed so entirely with the oil, as to seem only a very thick oil of the same color. – Johnson. To bear date, is to have the mark of time when written or executed; as, a letter or bond bears date, Jan. 6, 1811. To bear a price, is to have a certain price. In common mercantile language, it often signifies or implies, to bear a good or high price. To bear in hand, to amuse with false pretenses; to deceive. – Bacon. South. Shak. I believe this phrase is obsolete, or never used in America. To bear a hand, in seamanship, is to make haste, be quick.

Bear
  1. To support or sustain; to hold up.
  2. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness.

    This age to blossom, and the next to bear.
    Dryden.

  3. A bier.

    [Obs.] Spenser.
  4. Any species of the genus Ursus, and of the closely allied genera. Bears are plantigrade Carnivora, but they live largely on fruit and insects.

    The European brown bear (U. arctos), the white polar bear (U. maritimus), the grizzly bear (U. horribilis), the American black bear, and its variety the cinnamon bear (U. Americanus), the Syrian bear (Ursus Syriacus), and the sloth bear, are among the notable species.

  5. To endeavor to depress the price of, or prices in; as, to bear a railroad stock; to bear the market.
  6. Barley; the six-rowed barley or the four-rowed barley, commonly the former (Hordeum hexastichon or H. vulgare).

    [Obs. except in North of Eng. and Scot.]
  7. To support and remove or carry; to convey.

    I 'll bear your logs the while.
    Shak.

  8. To suffer, as in carrying a burden.

    But man is born to bear.
    Pope.

  9. An animal which has some resemblance to a bear in form or habits, but no real affinity; as, the woolly bear; ant bear; water bear; sea bear.
  10. To conduct; to bring; -- said of persons.

    [Obs.]

    Bear them to my house.
    Shak.

  11. To endure with patience; to be patient.

    I can not, can not bear.
    Dryden.

  12. One of two constellations in the northern hemisphere, called respectively the Great Bear and the Lesser Bear, or Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.
  13. To possess and use, as power; to exercise.

    Every man should bear rule in his own house.
    Esther i. 22.

  14. To press; -- with on or upon, or against.

    These men bear hard on the suspected party.
    Addison.

  15. Metaphorically: A brutal, coarse, or morose person.
  16. To sustain; to have on (written or inscribed, or as a mark), as, the tablet bears this inscription.
  17. To take effect; to have influence or force; as, to bring matters to bear.
  18. A person who sells stocks or securities for future delivery in expectation of a fall in the market.

    * The bears and bulls of the Stock Exchange, whose interest it is, the one to depress, and the other to raise, stocks, are said to be so called in allusion to the bear's habit of pulling down, and the bull's of tossing up.

  19. To possess or carry, as a mark of authority or distinction; to wear; as, to bear a sword, badge, or name.
  20. To relate or refer; -- with on or upon; as, how does this bear on the question?
  21. A portable punching machine.
  22. To possess mentally; to carry or hold in the mind; to entertain; to harbor

    Dryden.

    The ancient grudge I bear him.
    Shak.

  23. To have a certain meaning, intent, or effect.

    Her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform.
    Hawthorne.

  24. A block covered with coarse matting; -- used to scour the deck.

    Australian bear. (Zoöl.) See Koala. -- Bear baiting, the sport of baiting bears with dogs. -- Bear caterpillar (Zoöl.), the hairy larva of a moth, esp. of the genus Euprepia. -- Bear garden. (a) A place where bears are kept for diversion or fighting. (b) Any place where riotous conduct is common or permitted. M. Arnold. -- Bear leader, one who leads about a performing bear for money; hence, a facetious term for one who takes charge of a young man on his travels.

  25. To endure; to tolerate; to undergo; to suffer.

    Should such a man, too fond to rule alone,
    Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne.
    Pope.

    I cannot bear
    The murmur of this lake to hear.
    Shelley.

    My punishment is greater than I can bear.
    Gen. iv. 13.

  26. To be situated, as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bears N. by E.

    To bear against, to approach for attack or seizure; as, a lion bears against his prey. [Obs.] -- To bear away (Naut.), to change the course of a ship, and make her run before the wind. -- To bear back, to retreat. "Bearing back from the blows of their sable antagonist." Sir W. Scott. -- To bear down upon (Naut.), to approach from the windward side; as, the fleet bore down upon the enemy. -- To bear in with (Naut.), to run or tend toward; as, a ship bears in with the land. -- To bear off (Naut.), to steer away, as from land. -- To bear up. (a) To be supported; to have fortitude; to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up under afflictions. (b) (Naut.) To put the helm up (or to windward) and so put the ship before the wind; to bear away. Hamersly. - - To bear upon (Mil.), to be pointed or situated so as to affect; to be pointed directly against, or so as to hit (the object); as, to bring or plant guns so as to bear upon a fort or a ship; the artillery bore upon the center. -- To bear up to, to tend or move toward; as, to bear up to one another. -- To bear with, to endure; to be indulgent to; to forbear to resent, oppose, or punish.

  27. To gain or win.

    [Obs.]

    Some think to bear it by speaking a great word.
    Bacon.

    She was . . . found not guilty, through bearing of friends and bribing of the judge.
    Latimer.

  28. To sustain, or be answerable for, as blame, expense, responsibility, etc.

    He shall bear their iniquities.
    Is. liii. 11.

    Somewhat that will bear your charges.
    Dryden.

  29. To render or give; to bring forward.

    "Your testimony bear" Dryden.
  30. To carry on, or maintain; to have.

    "The credit of bearing a part in the conversation." Locke.
  31. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change.

    In all criminal cases the most favorable interpretation should be put on words that they can possibly bear.
    Swift.

  32. To manage, wield, or direct.

    "Thus must thou thy body bear." Shak. Hen
  33. To afford; to be to; to supply with.

    His faithful dog shall bear him company.
    Pope.

  34. To bring forth or produce; to yield; as, to bear apples; to bear children; to bear interest.

    Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore.
    Dryden.

    * In the passive form of this verb, the best modern usage restricts the past participle born to the sense of brought forth, while borne is used in the other senses of the word. In the active form, borne alone is used as the past participle.

    To bear down. (a) To force into a lower place; to carry down; to depress or sink. "His nose, . . . large as were the others, bore them down into insignificance." Marryat. (b) To overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy. -- To bear a hand. (a) To help; to give assistance. (b) (Naut.) To make haste; to be quick. -- To bear in hand, to keep (one) up in expectation, usually by promises never to be realized; to amuse by false pretenses; to delude. [Obs.] "How you were borne in hand, how crossed." Shak. -- To bear in mind, to remember. -- To bear off. (a) To restrain; to keep from approach. (b) (Naut.) To remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against anything; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat. (c) To gain; to carry off, as a prize. -- To bear one hard, to owe one a grudge. [Obs.] "Cæsar doth bear me hard." Shak. -- To bear out. (a) To maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last. "Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing." South. (b) To corroborate; to confirm. -- To bear up, to support; to keep from falling or sinking. "Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings." Addison.

    Syn. -- To uphold; sustain; maintain; support; undergo; suffer; endure; tolerate; carry; convey; transport; waft.

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Bear

BEAR, verb transitive preterit tense bore; participle passive born, borne. [Latin fero, pario, porto. The primary sense is to throw out, to bring forth, or in general, to thrust or drive along. ]

1. To support; to sustain; as, to bear a weight or burden.

2. To carry; to convey; to support and remove from place to place; as, 'they bear him upon the shoulder; ', 'the eagle beareth them on her wings.'

3. To wear; to bear as a mark of authority or distinction; as, to bear a sword, a badge, a name; to bear arms in a coat.

4. To keep afloat; as, the water bears a ship.

5. To support or sustain without sinking or yielding; to endure; as, a man can bear severe pain or calamity; or to sustain with proportionate strength, and without injury; as, a man may bear stronger food or drink.

6. To entertain; to carry in the mind; as, to bear a great love for a friend; to bear inveterate hatred to gaming.

7. To suffer; to undergo; as, to bear punishment.

8. To suffer without resentment, or interference to prevent; to have patience; as, to bear neglect or indignities.

9. To admit or be capable of; that is, to suffer or sustain without violence, injury, or change; as, to give words the most favorable interpretation they will bear

10. To bring forth or produce, as the fruit of plants, or the young of animals; as, to bear apples; to bear children.

11. To give birth to, or be the native place of.

Here dwelt the man divine whom Samos bore.

12. To possess and use as power; to exercise; as, to bear sway.

13. To gain or win.

Some think to bear it by speaking a great word. [Not now used. The phrase now used is, to bear away.]

14. To carry on, or maintain; to have; as, to bear a part in conversation.

15. To show or exhibit; to relate; as, to bear testimony or witness. This seems to imply utterance, like the Latin fero, to relate or utter.

16. To sustain the effect, or be answerable for; as, to bear the blame.

17. To sustain, as expense; to supply the means of paying; as, to bear the charges, that is, to pay the expenses.

18. To be the object of.

Let me but bear your love, and I'll bear your cares.

19. To behave; to act in any character; as, 'hath he borne himself penitent?'

20. To remove, or to endure the effects of; and hence to give satisfaction for.

He shall bear their iniquities. Isaiah 53:11. Hebrews 9:28.

To bear the infirmities of the weak, to bear one another's burdens, is to be charitable towards their faults, to sympathize with them, and to aid them in distress.

To bear off, is to restrain; to keep from approach; and in seamanship, to remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against any thing; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat; also, to carry away; as, to bear off stolen goods.

To bear down, is to impel or urge; to overthrow or crush by force; as, to bear down an enemy.

To bear down upon, to press to overtake; to make all sail to come up with.

To bear hard, is to press or urge.

Cesar doth bear me hard.

To bear on, is to press against; also to carry forward, to press, incite or animate.

Confidence hath borne thee on.

To bear through, is to conduct or manage; as, 'to bear through the consulship.' B.Jonson. Also, to maintain or support to the end; as, religion will bear us through the evils of life.

To bear out, is to maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last.

Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing.

To bear up, to support; to keep from falling.

Religious hope bears up the mind under sufferings.

To bear up, to keep afloat.

To bear a body. A color is said to bear a body in painting, when it is capable of being ground so fine, and mixed so entirely with the oil, as to seem only a very thick oil of the same color. To bear date, is to have the mark of time when written or executed; as, a letter or bond bears date, Jan.6, 1811.

To bear a price, is to have a certain price. In common mercantile language, it often signifies or implies, to bear a good or high price.

To bear in hand, to amuse with false pretenses; to deceive.

I believe this phrase is obsolete, or never used in America.

To bear a hand, in seamanship, is to make haste, be quick.

BEAR, verb intransitive To suffer, as with pain.

But man is born to bear

This is unusual in prose; and though admissible, is rendered intransitive, merely by the omission of pain, or other word expressive of evil.

1. To be patient; to endure.

I cannot, cannot bear

2. To produce, as fruit; to be fruitful, in opposition to barrenness.

This age to blossom, and the next to bear

Here fruit must be understood.

3. To take effect; to succeed; as, to bring matters to bear

4. To act in any character.

Instruct me how I may bear like a true friar.

5. To be situated as to the point of compass, with respect to something else; as, the land bore E,nounE. from the ship.

6. To bear away, in navigation, is to change the course of a ship, when close hauled, or sailing with a side wind, and make her run before the wind. To bear up, is used in a like sense, from the act of bearing up the helm to the windward.

Hence, perhaps, in other cases, the expression may be used to denote tending or moving from.

7. To bear down, is to drive or tend to; to approach with a fair wind; as, the fleet bore down upon the enemy.

8. To bear in, is to run or tend towards; as, a ship bears in with the land; opposed to bear off, or keeping at a greater distance.

9. To bear up, is to tend or move towards; as, to bear up to one another; also, to be supported; to have fortitude; to be firm; not to sink; as, to bear up under afflictions.

10. To bear upon, or against, is to lean

upon or against; to act on as weight or force, in any direction, as a column upon its base, or the sides of two inclining objects against each other.

11. To bear against, to approach for attack or seizure; as, 'a lion bears against his prey.'

12. To bear upon, to act upon; as, the artillery bore upon the center; or to be pointed or situated so as to affect; as, to bring or plant guns so as to bear upon a fort, or a ship.

13. To bear with, to endure what is unpleasing; to be indulgent; to forbear to resent, oppose, or punish.

Reason would I should bear with you. Acts 18:14.

Shall not God avenge his elect, though he bear long with them? Luke 18:7.

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Mary Baker Eddy, the discoverer and founder of Christian Science, used this dictionary when she wrote Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. I use your site to understand her meaning better.

— Jason (Livermore, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

enticer

ENTI'CER, n. One who entices; one who incites or instigates to evil; one who seduces.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

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89

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



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