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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [mount]

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mount

MOUNT, n. [L. mons, literally a heap or an elevation.]

1. A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land. Mount is used for an eminence or elevation of earth, indefinite in highth or size, and may be a hillock, hill or mountain. We apply it to Mount Blanc, in Switzerland, to Mount Tom and Mount Holyoke, in Massachusetts, and it is applied in Scripture to the small hillocks on which sacrifice was offered as well as to Mount Sinai. Jacob offered sacrifice on the mount or heap of stones raised for a witness between him and Laban. Gen.31.

2. A mound; a bulwark for offense or defense.

Hew ye down trees and cast a mount against Jerusalem. Jer.6.

3. Formerly, a bank or fund of money.

MOUNT, v.i.

1. To rise on high; to ascend; with or without up.

Doth the eagle mount up at thy command? Job 39.

The fire of trees and houses mounts on high.

2. To rise; to ascend; to tower; to be built to a great altitude.

Though Babylon should mount up to heaven. Jer.51.

3. To get on horseback.

4. To leap upon any animal.

5. To amount; to rise in value.

Bring then these blessings to a strict account,

Make fair deductions, see to what they mount.

MOUNT, v.t. To raise aloft; to lift on high.

What power is it which mounts my love so high?

1. To ascend; to climb; to get upon an elevated place; as, to mount a throne.

2. To place one's self on horseback; as, to mount a horse.

3. To furnish with horses; as, to mount a troop. The dragoons were well mounted.

4. To put on or cover with something; to embellish with ornaments; as, to mount a sword.

5. To carry; to be furnished with; as, a ship of the line mounts seventy four guns; a fort mounts a hundred cannon.

6. To raise and place on a carriage; as, to mount a cannon.

To mount guard, to take the station and do the duty of a sentinel.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [mount]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

MOUNT, n. [L. mons, literally a heap or an elevation.]

1. A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land. Mount is used for an eminence or elevation of earth, indefinite in highth or size, and may be a hillock, hill or mountain. We apply it to Mount Blanc, in Switzerland, to Mount Tom and Mount Holyoke, in Massachusetts, and it is applied in Scripture to the small hillocks on which sacrifice was offered as well as to Mount Sinai. Jacob offered sacrifice on the mount or heap of stones raised for a witness between him and Laban. Gen.31.

2. A mound; a bulwark for offense or defense.

Hew ye down trees and cast a mount against Jerusalem. Jer.6.

3. Formerly, a bank or fund of money.

MOUNT, v.i.

1. To rise on high; to ascend; with or without up.

Doth the eagle mount up at thy command? Job 39.

The fire of trees and houses mounts on high.

2. To rise; to ascend; to tower; to be built to a great altitude.

Though Babylon should mount up to heaven. Jer.51.

3. To get on horseback.

4. To leap upon any animal.

5. To amount; to rise in value.

Bring then these blessings to a strict account,

Make fair deductions, see to what they mount.

MOUNT, v.t. To raise aloft; to lift on high.

What power is it which mounts my love so high?

1. To ascend; to climb; to get upon an elevated place; as, to mount a throne.

2. To place one's self on horseback; as, to mount a horse.

3. To furnish with horses; as, to mount a troop. The dragoons were well mounted.

4. To put on or cover with something; to embellish with ornaments; as, to mount a sword.

5. To carry; to be furnished with; as, a ship of the line mounts seventy four guns; a fort mounts a hundred cannon.

6. To raise and place on a carriage; as, to mount a cannon.

To mount guard, to take the station and do the duty of a sentinel.


MOUNT, n. [Fr. mont; Sax. munt; It. Port. and Sp. monte; Arm. menez; mene; W. mwnt, a mount, mountain or mound, a heap; L. mons, literally a heap or an elevation; Ir. moin or muine; Basque, mendia. Qu. Gr. βουνος.]

  1. A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land. Mount is used for an eminence or elevation of earth, indefinite highth or size, and may be a hillock, hill or mountain. We apply it to Mount Blanc, in Switzerland, to Mount Tom and Mount Holyoke, in Massachusetts, and it is applied Scripture to the small hillocks on which sacrifice was offered, as well as to Mount Sinai. Jacob offered sacrifice on the mount or heap of stones raised for a witness between him and Laban. Gen. xxxi.
  2. A mound; a bulwark for offense or defense. Hew ye down trees and cast a mount against Jerusalem. Jer. vi.
  3. Formerly, a bank or fund of money. [Obs.] Bacon.

MOUNT, v.i. [Fr. monter; It. montare; Sp. montar.]

  1. To rise on high; to ascend; with or without up. Doth the eagle mount up at thy command? Job xxxix. The fire of trees and houses mounts on high. Cowley.
  2. To rise; to ascend; to tower; to be built to a great altitude. Though Babylon should mount up to heaven. Jer. li.
  3. To get on horseback. Shak.
  4. To leap upon any animal.
  5. To amount; to rise in value. Bring them these blessings to a strict account, / Make fair deductions, see to what they mount. Pope.

MOUNT, v.t.

  1. To raise aloft; to lift on high. What power is it which mounts my love so high? Shak.
  2. To ascend; to climb; to get upon an elevated place; as, to mount a throne.
  3. To place one's self on horseback; as, to mount a horse.
  4. To furnish with horses; as, to mount a troop. The dragoons were well mounted.
  5. To put on or cover with something; to embellish wit ornaments; as, to mount a sword.
  6. To carry; to be furnished with; as, a ship of the line mounts seventy-four guns; a fort mounts a hundred cannon.
  7. To raise and place on a carriage; as, to mount a cannon. To mount guard, to take the station and do the duty of a sentinel.

Mount
  1. A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land; a mountain; a high hill; -- used always instead of mountain, when put before a proper name; as, Mount Washington; otherwise, chiefly in poetry.
  2. To rise on high] to go up; to be upraised or uplifted; to tower aloft; to ascend; -- often with up.

    Though Babylon should mount up to heaven. Jer. li. 53.

    The fire of trees and houses mounts on high. Cowley.

  3. To get upon; to ascend; to climb.

    Shall we mount again the rural throne? Dryden.

  4. That upon which a person or thing is mounted

    , as: (a)
  5. Any one of seven fleshy prominences in the palm of the hand which are taken as significant of the influence of "planets," and called the mounts of Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Saturn, the Sun or Apollo, and Venus.
  6. A bulwark for offense or defense; a mound.

    [Obs.]

    Hew ye down trees, and cast a mount against Jerusalem. Jer. vi. 6.

  7. To get up on anything, as a platform or scaffold; especially, to seat one's self on a horse for riding.
  8. To place one's self on, as a horse or other animal, or anything that one sits upon; to bestride.
  9. A bank; a fund.

    Mount of piety. See Mont de piété.

  10. To attain in value; to amount.

    Bring then these blessings to a strict account,
    Make fair deductions, see to what they mount.
    Pope.

  11. To cause to mount; to put on horseback; to furnish with animals for riding; to furnish with horses.

    "To mount the Trojan troop." Dryden.
  12. Hence: To put upon anything that sustains and fits for use, as a gun on a carriage, a map or picture on cloth or paper; to prepare for being worn or otherwise used, as a diamond by setting, or a sword blade by adding the hilt, scabbard, etc.
  13. To raise aloft; to lift on high.

    What power is it which mounts my love so high? Shak.

    * A fort or ship is said to mount cannon, when it has them arranged for use in or about it.

    To mount guard (Mil.), to go on guard; to march on guard; to do duty as a guard. -- To mount a play, to prepare and arrange the scenery, furniture, etc., used in the play.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Mount

MOUNT, noun [Latin mons, literally a heap or an elevation.]

1. A mass of earth, or earth and rock, rising considerably above the common surface of the surrounding land. mount is used for an eminence or elevation of earth, indefinite in highth or size, and may be a hillock, hill or mountain. We apply it to mount Blanc, in Switzerland, to mount Tom and mount Holyoke, in Massachusetts, and it is applied in Scripture to the small hillocks on which sacrifice was offered as well as to mount Sinai. Jacob offered sacrifice on the mount or heap of stones raised for a witness between him and Laban. Genesis 31:21.

2. A mound; a bulwark for offense or defense.

Hew ye down trees and cast a mount against Jerusalem. Jeremiah 6:6.

3. Formerly, a bank or fund of money.

MOUNT, verb intransitive

1. To rise on high; to ascend; with or without up.

Doth the eagle mount up at thy command? Job 39:27.

The fire of trees and houses mounts on high.

2. To rise; to ascend; to tower; to be built to a great altitude.

Though Babylon should mount up to heaven. Jeremiah 51:53.

3. To get on horseback.

4. To leap upon any animal.

5. To amount; to rise in value.

Bring then these blessings to a strict account,

Make fair deductions, see to what they mount

MOUNT, verb transitive To raise aloft; to lift on high.

What power is it which mounts my love so high?

1. To ascend; to climb; to get upon an elevated place; as, to mount a throne.

2. To place one's self on horseback; as, to mount a horse.

3. To furnish with horses; as, to mount a troop. The dragoons were well mounted.

4. To put on or cover with something; to embellish with ornaments; as, to mount a sword.

5. To carry; to be furnished with; as, a ship of the line mounts seventy four guns; a fort mounts a hundred cannon.

6. To raise and place on a carriage; as, to mount a cannon.

To mount guard, to take the station and do the duty of a sentinel.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

naming

NAMING, ppr. Calling; nominating; mentioning.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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