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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [miss]

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miss

MISS, n.

1. The title of a young woman or girl; as little masters and misses.

2. A kept mistress; a prostitute retained; a concubine.

MISS, v.t. [L. mitto, misi; omitto, omisi.]

1. To fail in aim; to fail of reaching the object; not to hit; as, to miss the mark; to miss the object intended.

2. To fail of finding the right way; to err in attempting to find; as, to miss the way or the road.

3. To fail of obtaining.

Orgalus feared nothing but to miss Parthenia.

4. To learn or discover that something is wanting, or not where it was supposed to be; as, to miss one's snuff-box; I missed the first volume of Livy.

Neither missed we any thing--. Nothing was missed of all that pertained to him. 1 Sam.25.

5. To be without; as, we cannot miss him.

6. To omit; to pass by; to go without; to fail to have; as, to miss a meal of victuals.

She would never miss one day

A walk so fine, a sight so gay.

7. To perceive the want of.

What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss,

He who has a firm sincere friend, may want all the rest without missing them.

8. To fail of seeing or finding.

MISS, v.i. To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

Flying bullets now,

To execute his rage, appear too slow;

They miss, or sweep but common souls away.

1. Not to succeed; to fail.

Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss--

2. To fail; to miscarry, as by accident.

The invention all admired, and each, how he

To be the inventor missed.

3. To fail to obtain, learn or find; with of.

On the least reflection, we can miss of them.

4. To fail; to mistake.

MISS, n. Loss; want.

There will be no great miss of those which are lost.

1. Mistake; error.

He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. [Little used.]

2. Harm from mistake.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [miss]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

MISS, n.

1. The title of a young woman or girl; as little masters and misses.

2. A kept mistress; a prostitute retained; a concubine.

MISS, v.t. [L. mitto, misi; omitto, omisi.]

1. To fail in aim; to fail of reaching the object; not to hit; as, to miss the mark; to miss the object intended.

2. To fail of finding the right way; to err in attempting to find; as, to miss the way or the road.

3. To fail of obtaining.

Orgalus feared nothing but to miss Parthenia.

4. To learn or discover that something is wanting, or not where it was supposed to be; as, to miss one's snuff-box; I missed the first volume of Livy.

Neither missed we any thing--. Nothing was missed of all that pertained to him. 1 Sam.25.

5. To be without; as, we cannot miss him.

6. To omit; to pass by; to go without; to fail to have; as, to miss a meal of victuals.

She would never miss one day

A walk so fine, a sight so gay.

7. To perceive the want of.

What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss,

He who has a firm sincere friend, may want all the rest without missing them.

8. To fail of seeing or finding.

MISS, v.i. To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

Flying bullets now,

To execute his rage, appear too slow;

They miss, or sweep but common souls away.

1. Not to succeed; to fail.

Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss--

2. To fail; to miscarry, as by accident.

The invention all admired, and each, how he

To be the inventor missed.

3. To fail to obtain, learn or find; with of.

On the least reflection, we can miss of them.

4. To fail; to mistake.

MISS, n. Loss; want.

There will be no great miss of those which are lost.

1. Mistake; error.

He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. [Little used.]

2. Harm from mistake.

MISS, n. [supposed by Bailey to be contracted from mistress. But probably it is from the Armoric mesell, a young lady, or contracted from Fr. demoiselle, Sp. damisola. See Damsel.]

  1. The title of a young woman or girl; as, little masters and misses. Swift.
  2. A kept mistress; a prostitute retained; a concubine. Dryden.

MISS, n.

  1. Loss; want. There will be no great miss of these which are lost. Locke.
  2. Mistake; error. He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. [Little used.] Ascham.
  3. Harm from mistake. [Obs.] Spenser.

MISS, v.i.

  1. To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction. Flying bullets now, / To execute his rage, appear too slow; / They miss, or sweep but common souls away. Waller.
  2. Not to succeed; to fail. Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss. Bacon.
  3. To fail; to miscarry, as by accident. The invention all admired, and each, how he / To be the inventor missed. Milton.
  4. To fail to obtain, learn or find; with of. On the least reflection, we can not miss of them. Atterbury.
  5. To fail; to mistake. Spenser.

MISS, v.t. [Sax. missian; D. and G. missen; Sw. mista; Dan. mister; allied perhaps to L. mitto, misi; omitto, omisi. But this is not certain. The Welsh has the word in methu, to fail, to miss, to become abortive, to miscarry, to decay. See Class Md, No. 8, 12, 13, 14, 16. Hence the prefix mis.]

  1. To fail in aim; to fail of reaching the object; not to hit; as, to miss the mark; to miss the object intended.
  2. To fail of finding the right way; to err in attempting to find; as, to miss the way or the road.
  3. To fail of obtaining. Orgalus feared nothing but to miss Parthenia. Sidney.
  4. To learn or discover that something is wanting, or not where it was supposed to be; as, to miss one's snuff-box; I missed the first volume of Livy. Neither missed we any thing. Nothing was missed of all that pertained to him. 1 Sam. xxv.
  5. To be without; as, we can not miss him. [Obs.] Shak.
  6. To omit; to pass by; to go without; to fail to have; as, to miss a meat of victuals. She would never miss one day / A walk so line, a sight so gay. Prior.
  7. To perceive the want of. What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss. Milton. He who has a firm sincere friend, may want all the rest, without missing them. South.
  8. To fail of seeing or finding.

Miss
  1. A title of courtesy prefixed to the name of a girl or a woman who has not been married. See Mistress, 5.

    * There is diversity of usage in the application of this title to two or more persons of the same name. We may write either the Miss Browns or the Misses Brown.

  2. To fail of hitting, reaching, getting, finding, seeing, hearing, etc.; as, to miss the mark one shoots at; to miss the train by being late; to miss opportunites of getting knowledge; to miss the point or meaning of something said.

    When a man misses his great end, happiness, he will acknowledge he judged not right. Locke.

  3. To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

    Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss. Bacon.

    Flying bullets now,
    To execute his rage, appear too slow;
    They miss, or sweep but common souls away.
    Waller.

  4. The act of missing; failure to hit, reach, find, obtain, etc.
  5. A young unmarried woman or a girl; as, she is a miss of sixteen.

    Gay vanity, with smiles and kisses,
    Was busy 'mongst the maids and misses.
    Cawthorn.

  6. To omit; to fail to have or to do; to get without; to dispense with; -- now seldom applied to persons.

    She would never miss, one day,
    A walk so fine, a sight so gay.
    Prior.

    We cannot miss him; he does make our fire,
    Fetch in our wood.
    Shak.

  7. To fail to obtain, learn, or find; -- with of.

    Upon the least reflection, we can not miss of them. Atterbury.

  8. Loss; want; felt absence.

    [Obs.]

    There will be no great miss of those which are lost. Locke.

  9. A kept mistress. See Mistress, 4.

    [Obs.] Evelyn.
  10. To discover the absence or omission of; to feel the want of; to mourn the loss of; to want.

    Shak.

    Neither missed we anything . . . Nothing was missed of all that pertained unto him. 1 Sam. xxv. 15, 21.

    What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss. Milton.

    To miss stays. (Naut.) See under Stay.

  11. To go wrong; to err.

    [Obs.]

    Amongst the angels, a whole legion
    Of wicked sprites did fall from happy bliss;
    What wonder then if one, of women all, did miss?
    Spenser.

  12. Mistake; error; fault.

    Shak.

    He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. Ascham.

  13. In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.
  14. To be absent, deficient, or wanting.

    [Obs.] See Missing, a.

    What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. Shak.

  15. Harm from mistake.

    [Obs.] Spenser.
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Miss

MISS, noun

1. The title of a young woman or girl; as little masters and misses.

2. A kept mistress; a prostitute retained; a concubine.

MISS, verb transitive [Latin mitto, misi; omitto, omisi.]

1. To fail in aim; to fail of reaching the object; not to hit; as, to miss the mark; to miss the object intended.

2. To fail of finding the right way; to err in attempting to find; as, to miss the way or the road.

3. To fail of obtaining.

Orgalus feared nothing but to miss Parthenia.

4. To learn or discover that something is wanting, or not where it was supposed to be; as, to miss one's snuff-box; I missed the first volume of Livy.

Neither missed we any thing--. Nothing was missed of all that pertained to him. 1 Samuel 25:15.

5. To be without; as, we cannot miss him.

6. To omit; to pass by; to go without; to fail to have; as, to miss a meal of victuals.

She would never miss one day

A walk so fine, a sight so gay.

7. To perceive the want of.

What by me thou hast lost, thou least shalt miss

He who has a firm sincere friend, may want all the rest without missing them.

8. To fail of seeing or finding.

MISS, verb intransitive To fail to hit; to fly wide; to deviate from the true direction.

Flying bullets now,

To execute his rage, appear too slow;

They miss or sweep but common souls away.

1. Not to succeed; to fail.

Men observe when things hit, and not when they miss--

2. To fail; to miscarry, as by accident.

The invention all admired, and each, how he

To be the inventor missed.

3. To fail to obtain, learn or find; with of.

On the least reflection, we can miss of them.

4. To fail; to mistake.

MISS, noun Loss; want.

There will be no great miss of those which are lost.

1. Mistake; error.

He did without any great miss in the hardest points of grammar. [Little used.]

2. Harm from mistake.

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For my christian studies.

— Joseph (Arlington, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

unhesitatingly

UNHES'ITATINGLY, adv. Without hesitation or doubt.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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