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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [mind]

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mind

MIND, n. [L. reminiscor; L. mens; Gr. memory, mention, to remember, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence; anger. Mind signifies properly intention, a reaching or inclining forward to an object, from the primary sense of extending, stretching or inclining, or advancing eagerly, pushing or setting forward, whence the Greek sense of the word, in analogy with the Teutonic mod, moed, muth, mind, courage, spirit, mettle. So L. animus, animosus.]

1. Intention; purpose; design.

The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination; how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind. Prov.21.

2. Inclination; will; desire; a sense much used, but expressing less than settled purpose; as in the common phrases, "I wish to know your mind;" "let me know your mind;" "he had a mind to go;" "he has a partner to his mind."

3. Opinion; as, to express one's mind. We are of one mind.

4. Memory; remembrance; as, to put one in mind; to call to mind; the fact is out of my mind; time out of mind. From the operations of the intellect in man,this word came to signify.

5. The intellectual or intelligent power in man; the understanding; the power that conceives, judges or reasons.

I fear I am not in my perfect mind.

So we speak of a sound mind, a disordered mind, a weak mind, a strong mind, with reference to the active powers of the understanding; and in a passive sense, it denotes capacity, as when we say, the mind cannot comprehend a subject.

6. The heart or seat of affection.

Which were a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. Gen.26.

7. The will and affection; as readiness of mind. Acts.17.

8. The implanted principle of grace. Rom.7.

MIND, v.t. To attend to; to fix the thoughts on; to regard with attention.

Cease to request me; let us mind our way.

Mind not high things. Rom.12.

1. To attend to or regard with submission; to obey. His father told him to desist, but he would not mind him.

2. To put in mind; to remind.

3. To intend; to mean.

MIND, v.i. To be inclined or disposed to incline.

When one of them mindeth to go into rebellion.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [mind]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

MIND, n. [L. reminiscor; L. mens; Gr. memory, mention, to remember, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence; anger. Mind signifies properly intention, a reaching or inclining forward to an object, from the primary sense of extending, stretching or inclining, or advancing eagerly, pushing or setting forward, whence the Greek sense of the word, in analogy with the Teutonic mod, moed, muth, mind, courage, spirit, mettle. So L. animus, animosus.]

1. Intention; purpose; design.

The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination; how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind. Prov.21.

2. Inclination; will; desire; a sense much used, but expressing less than settled purpose; as in the common phrases, "I wish to know your mind;" "let me know your mind;" "he had a mind to go;" "he has a partner to his mind."

3. Opinion; as, to express one's mind. We are of one mind.

4. Memory; remembrance; as, to put one in mind; to call to mind; the fact is out of my mind; time out of mind. From the operations of the intellect in man,this word came to signify.

5. The intellectual or intelligent power in man; the understanding; the power that conceives, judges or reasons.

I fear I am not in my perfect mind.

So we speak of a sound mind, a disordered mind, a weak mind, a strong mind, with reference to the active powers of the understanding; and in a passive sense, it denotes capacity, as when we say, the mind cannot comprehend a subject.

6. The heart or seat of affection.

Which were a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. Gen.26.

7. The will and affection; as readiness of mind. Acts.17.

8. The implanted principle of grace. Rom.7.

MIND, v.t. To attend to; to fix the thoughts on; to regard with attention.

Cease to request me; let us mind our way.

Mind not high things. Rom.12.

1. To attend to or regard with submission; to obey. His father told him to desist, but he would not mind him.

2. To put in mind; to remind.

3. To intend; to mean.

MIND, v.i. To be inclined or disposed to incline.

When one of them mindeth to go into rebellion.

MIND, n. [Sax. gemind, gemynde; Ir. mein, mian; W. myn or menw, mind or will; govyn, a demand; Dan. minde, mind, vote, consent; minder, to remind; Sw. minne, memory; minnas, to remember, to call to mind, as L. reminiscor; L. mens; Gr. μνεια, memory, mention; μναομαι, to remember; μενος, mind, ardor of mind, vehemence; μηνις, anger; Sans. man, mana, mind, will, heart, thought; Zend. meno. Mind signifies properly intention, a reaching or inclining forward to an object, from the primary sense of extending, stretching or inclining, or advancing eagerly, pushing or setting forward, whence the Greek sense of the word, in analogy with the Teutonic mod, moed, muth, mind, courage, spirit, mettle. So L. animus, animosus. The Russ. has pominayu, to mention, to remember; pomin, remembrance, and umenie or umeinie, understanding. Qu. Minos, Menu, Menes, Mentor. Class Mn, No. 1, 9.]

  1. Intention; purpose; design. The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination; how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind. Prov. xxi.
  2. Inclination; will; desire; a sense much used, but expressing less than settled purpose; as in the, common phrases, “I wish to know your mind;” “let me know your mind;” “he had a mind to go;” “he has a partner to his mind.”
  3. Opinion; as, to express one's mind. We are of one mind.
  4. Memory; remembrance; as, to put one in mind; to call to mind; the fact is out of my mind; time out of mind. From the operations of the intellect in man, this word came to signify,
  5. The intellectual or intelligent power in man; the understanding; the power that conceives, judges or reasons. I fear I am not in my perfect mind. – Shak. So we speak of a sound mind, a disordered mind, a weak mind, a strong mind, with reference to the active powers of the understanding; and in a passive sense, it denotes capacity, as when we say, the mind can not comprehend a subject.
  6. The heart or seat of affection. Which were a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. – Gen. xxvi.
  7. The will and affection; as, readiness of mind. – Acts xvii.
  8. The implanted principle of grace. – Rom. vii.

MIND, v.i.

To be inclined or disposed to incline. When one of them mindeth to go into rehelhon. [Obs.] – Spenser.


MIND, v.t.

  1. To attend to; to fix the thoughts on; to regard with attention. Cease to request me; let us mind our way. – Dryden. Mind not high things. – Rom. xii.
  2. To attend to or regard with submission; to obey. His father told him to desist, but he would not mind him.
  3. To put in mind; to remind. [Obs.] – Locke.
  4. To intend; to mean. – Chapman.

Mind
  1. The intellectual or rational faculty in man; the understanding; the intellect; the power that conceives, judges, or reasons; also, the entire spiritual nature; the soul; -- often in distinction from the body.

    By the mind of man we understand that in him which thinks, remembers, reasons, wills. Reid.

    What we mean by mind is simply that which perceives, thinks, feels, wills, and desires. Sir W. Hamilton.

    Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind. Rom. xiv. 5.

    The mind shall banquet, though the body pine. Shak.

  2. To fix the mind or thoughts on; to regard with attention; to treat as of consequence; to consider; to heed; to mark; to note.

    "Mind not high things, but condescend to men of low estate." Rom. xii. 16.

    My lord, you nod: you do not mind the play. Shak.

  3. To give attention or heed; to obey; as, the dog minds well.
  4. The state, at any given time, of the faculties of thinking, willing, choosing, and the like; psychical activity or state; as: (a) Opinion; judgment; belief.

    A fool uttereth all his mind. Prov. xxix. 11.

    Being so hard to me that brought your mind, I fear she'll prove as hard to you in telling her mind. Shak.

    (b)

  5. To occupy one's self with; to employ one's self about; to attend to; as, to mind one's business.

    Bidding him be a good child, and mind his book. Addison.

  6. Memory; remembrance; recollection; as, to have or keep in mind, to call to mind, to put in mind, etc.

    To have a mind or great mind, to be inclined or strongly inclined in purpose; -- used with an infinitive. "Sir Roger de Coverly . . . told me that he had a great mind to see the new tragedy with me." Addison. -- To lose one's mind, to become insane, or imbecile. -- To make up one's mind, to come to an opinion or decision; to determine. -- To put in mind, to remind. "Regard us simply as putting you in mind of what you already know to be good policy." Jowett (Thucyd. ).

  7. To obey; as, to mind parents; the dog minds his master.
  8. To have in mind; to purpose.

    Beaconsfield.

    I mind to tell him plainly what I think. Shak.

  9. To put in mind; to remind.

    [Archaic] M. Arnold.

    He minded them of the mutability of all earthly things. Fuller.

    I do thee wrong to mind thee of it. Shak.

    Never mind, do not regard it; it is of no consequence; no matter.

    Syn. -- To notice; mark; regard; obey. See Attend.

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Mind

MIND, noun [Latin reminiscor; Latin mens; Gr. memory, mention, to remember, mind ardor of mind vehemence; anger. mind signifies properly intention, a reaching or inclining forward to an object, from the primary sense of extending, stretching or inclining, or advancing eagerly, pushing or setting forward, whence the Greek sense of the word, in analogy with the Teutonic mod, moed, muth, mind courage, spirit, mettle. So Latin animus, animosus.]

1. Intention; purpose; design.

The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination; how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind Proverbs 21:27.

2. Inclination; will; desire; a sense much used, but expressing less than settled purpose; as in the common phrases, 'I wish to know your mind; ' 'let me know your mind; ' 'he had a mind to go; ' 'he has a partner to his mind '

3. Opinion; as, to express one's mind We are of one mind

4. Memory; remembrance; as, to put one in mind; to call to mind; the fact is out of my mind; time out of mind From the operations of the intellect in man, this word came to signify.

5. The intellectual or intelligent power in man; the understanding; the power that conceives, judges or reasons.

I fear I am not in my perfect mind

So we speak of a sound mind a disordered mind a weak mind a strong mind with reference to the active powers of the understanding; and in a passive sense, it denotes capacity, as when we say, the mind cannot comprehend a subject.

6. The heart or seat of affection.

Which were a grief of mind to Isaac and Rebekah. Genesis 26:35.

7. The will and affection; as readiness of mind Acts 17:11.

8. The implanted principle of grace. Romans 7:23.

MIND, verb transitive To attend to; to fix the thoughts on; to regard with attention.

Cease to request me; let us mind our way.

MIND not high things. Romans 12:2.

1. To attend to or regard with submission; to obey. His father told him to desist, but he would not mind him.

2. To put in mind; to remind.

3. To intend; to mean.

MIND, verb intransitive To be inclined or disposed to incline.

When one of them mindeth to go into rebellion.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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calumniator

CALUMNIATOR, n. One who slanders; one who falsely and knowingly accuses another of a crime or offense, or maliciously propagates false accusations or reports.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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