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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [measure]

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measure

MEASURE, n. mezh'ur. [L. mensura, from mensus, with a casual n, the participle of metior, to measure; Eng. to mete.]

1. The whole extent or dimensions of a thing, including length, breadth and thickness.

The measure thereof is longer than the earth and broader than the sea. Job.11.

It is applied also to length or to breadth separately.

2. That by which extent or dimension is ascertained, either length, breadth, thickness, capacity, or amount; as, a rod or pole is a measure of five yards and a half; an inch, a foot, a yard, are measures of length; a gallon is a measure of capacity. Weights and measures should be uniform. Silver and gold are the common measure of value.

3. A limited or definite quantity; as a measure of wine or beer.

4. Determined extent or length; limit.

Lord, make me to know my end, and the measure of my days. Ps.39.

5. A rule by which any thing is adjusted or proportioned.

God's goodness is the measure of his providence.

6. Proportion; quantity settled.

I enter not into the particulars of the law of nature, or its measures of punishment; yet there is such a law.

7. Full or sufficient quantity.

I'll never pause again,

Till either death hath clos'd these eyes of mine,

Or fortune given me measure of revenge.

8. Extent of power or office.

We will not boast of things without our measure.

2 Cor.10.

9. Portion allotted; extent of ability.

If else thou seekest

Aught not surpassing human measure, say.

10. Degree; quantity indefinite.

I have laid down, in some measure,the description of the old world.

A great measure of discretion is to be used in the performance of confession.

11. In music, that division by which the motion of music is regulated; or the interval or space of time between the rising and falling of the hand or foot of him who beats time. This measure regulates the time of dwelling on each note. The ordinary or common measure is one second.

12. In poetry, the measure or meter is the manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or the long and short syllables. Thus,hexameter, pentameter, Iambic, Sapphic verses, &c. consist of different measure.

13. In dancing, the interval between steps, corresponding to the interval between notes in the music.

My legs can keep no measure in delight.

14. In geometry, any quantity assumed as one or unity, to which the ratio of other homogeneous or similar quantities is expressed.

15. Means to an end; an act, step or proceeding towards the accomplishment of an object; an extensive signification of the word, applicable to almost every act preparatory to a final end, and by which it is to be attained. Thus we speak of legislative measures, political measures, public measures, prudent measures, a rash measure, effectual measures, inefficient measures.

In measure, with moderation; with excess.

Without measure, without limits; very largely or copiously.

To have hard measure, to be harshly or oppressively treated.

Lineal or long measure, measure of length; the measure of lines or distances.

Liquid measure, the measure of liquors.

MEASURE, v.t. mezh'ur. To compute or ascertain extent, quantity, dimensions or capacity by a certain rule; as, to measure land; to measure distance; to measure the altitude of a mountain; to measure the capacity of a ship or of a cask.

1. To ascertain the degree of any thing; as, to measure the degrees of heat, or of moisture.

2. To pass through or over.

We must measure twenty miles to day.

The vessel plows the sea,

And measures back with speed her former way.

3. To judge of distance, extent or quantity; as, to measure any thing by the eye.

Great are thy works, Jehovah, infinite

Thy power; what thought can measure thee?

4. To adjust; to proportion.

To secure a contended spirit, measure your desires by your fortunes, not your fortunes by your desires.

5. To allot or distribute by measure.

With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. Matt.7.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [measure]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

MEASURE, n. mezh'ur. [L. mensura, from mensus, with a casual n, the participle of metior, to measure; Eng. to mete.]

1. The whole extent or dimensions of a thing, including length, breadth and thickness.

The measure thereof is longer than the earth and broader than the sea. Job.11.

It is applied also to length or to breadth separately.

2. That by which extent or dimension is ascertained, either length, breadth, thickness, capacity, or amount; as, a rod or pole is a measure of five yards and a half; an inch, a foot, a yard, are measures of length; a gallon is a measure of capacity. Weights and measures should be uniform. Silver and gold are the common measure of value.

3. A limited or definite quantity; as a measure of wine or beer.

4. Determined extent or length; limit.

Lord, make me to know my end, and the measure of my days. Ps.39.

5. A rule by which any thing is adjusted or proportioned.

God's goodness is the measure of his providence.

6. Proportion; quantity settled.

I enter not into the particulars of the law of nature, or its measures of punishment; yet there is such a law.

7. Full or sufficient quantity.

I'll never pause again,

Till either death hath clos'd these eyes of mine,

Or fortune given me measure of revenge.

8. Extent of power or office.

We will not boast of things without our measure.

2 Cor.10.

9. Portion allotted; extent of ability.

If else thou seekest

Aught not surpassing human measure, say.

10. Degree; quantity indefinite.

I have laid down, in some measure,the description of the old world.

A great measure of discretion is to be used in the performance of confession.

11. In music, that division by which the motion of music is regulated; or the interval or space of time between the rising and falling of the hand or foot of him who beats time. This measure regulates the time of dwelling on each note. The ordinary or common measure is one second.

12. In poetry, the measure or meter is the manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or the long and short syllables. Thus,hexameter, pentameter, Iambic, Sapphic verses, &c. consist of different measure.

13. In dancing, the interval between steps, corresponding to the interval between notes in the music.

My legs can keep no measure in delight.

14. In geometry, any quantity assumed as one or unity, to which the ratio of other homogeneous or similar quantities is expressed.

15. Means to an end; an act, step or proceeding towards the accomplishment of an object; an extensive signification of the word, applicable to almost every act preparatory to a final end, and by which it is to be attained. Thus we speak of legislative measures, political measures, public measures, prudent measures, a rash measure, effectual measures, inefficient measures.

In measure, with moderation; with excess.

Without measure, without limits; very largely or copiously.

To have hard measure, to be harshly or oppressively treated.

Lineal or long measure, measure of length; the measure of lines or distances.

Liquid measure, the measure of liquors.

MEASURE, v.t. mezh'ur. To compute or ascertain extent, quantity, dimensions or capacity by a certain rule; as, to measure land; to measure distance; to measure the altitude of a mountain; to measure the capacity of a ship or of a cask.

1. To ascertain the degree of any thing; as, to measure the degrees of heat, or of moisture.

2. To pass through or over.

We must measure twenty miles to day.

The vessel plows the sea,

And measures back with speed her former way.

3. To judge of distance, extent or quantity; as, to measure any thing by the eye.

Great are thy works, Jehovah, infinite

Thy power; what thought can measure thee?

4. To adjust; to proportion.

To secure a contended spirit, measure your desires by your fortunes, not your fortunes by your desires.

5. To allot or distribute by measure.

With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. Matt.7.

MEAS-URE, n. [mezh'ur; Fr. mesure; It. misura; Sp. medida; Arm. musur or musul; Ir. meas; W. meidyr and mesur; G. mass, measure, and messen, to measure; D. moat; Sw. matt; Dan. maade, measure, and mode; L. mensura, from mensus, with a casual n, the participle of metior, to measure, Eng. to mete; Gr. μετρον, μετρεω. With these correspond the Eng. meet, fit, proper, and meet, the verb; Sax. gemet, meet, fit; metan and gemettan, to meet or meet with, to find, to mete or measure, and to paint. The sense is, to come to, to fall, to happen, and this sense is connected with that of stretching, extending, that is, reaching to; the latter gives the sense of measure. We find in Heb. מר, measure; מדר, to mete, to measure. This word in Ar. مَدً madda, signifies to stretch or extend, to draw out in length or time; as do other verbs with the same elements, under one of which we find the meta of the Latins. The Ch. מטא signifies to come to, to arrive, to reach, to be mature, and מצא, in Heb. Ch. and Eth. MD, signifies to find, to come to. Now the Saxon verb unites in itself the significations of all three of the oriental verbs.]

  1. The whole extent or dimensions of a thing, including length, breadth and thickness. The measure thereof is longer than the earth and broader than the sea. Job xi. It is applied also to length or to breadth separately.
  2. That by which extent or dimension is ascertained, either length, breadth, thickness, capacity, or amount; as, a rod or pole is a measure of five yards and a half; an inch, a foot, a yard, are measures of length; a gallon is a measure of capacity. Weights and measures should be uniform. Silver and gold are the common measure of value.
  3. A limited or definite quantity; as, a measure of wine or beer.
  4. Determined extent or length; limit. Lord, make me to know my end, and the measure of my days. Ps. xxxix.
  5. A rule by which any thing is adjusted or proportioned. God's goodness is the measure of his providence. More.
  6. Proportion; quantity settled. I enter not into the particulars of the law of nature, or its measures of punishment; yet there is such a law. Locke.
  7. Full or sufficient quantity. I'll never pause again, / Till either death hath clos'd these eyes of mine, / Or fortune given me measure of revenge. Shak.
  8. Extent of power or office. We will not boast of things without our measure. 2 Cor. x.
  9. Portion allotted; extent of ability. If else thou seekest / Aught not surpassing human measure, say. Milton.
  10. Degree; quantity indefinite. I have laid down, in some measure, the description of the old world. Abbot. A great measure of discretion is to be used in the performance of confession. Taylor.
  11. In music, that division by which the motion of music is regulated; or the interval or space of time between the rising and falling of the hand or foot of him who beats time. This measure regulates the time of dwelling on each note. The ordinary or common measure is one second. Encyc.
  12. In poetry, the measure or meter is the manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or the long and short syllables. Thus hexameter, pentameter, Iambic, Sapphic verses, &c., consist of different measures. Encyc.
  13. In dancing, the interval between steps, corresponding to the interval between notes in the music. My legs can keep no measure in delight. Shak.
  14. In geometry, any quantity assumed as one or unity, to which the ratio of other homogeneous or similar qualities is expressed. Encyc.
  15. Means to an end; an act, step or proceeding toward the accomplishment of an object; an extensive signification of the word, applicable to almost every act preparatory to a final end, and by which it is to be attained. Thus we speak of legislative measures, political measures, public measures, prudent measures, a rash measure, effectual measures, inefficient measures. In measure, with moderation; without excess. Without measure, without limits; very largely or copiously. To have hard measure, to be harshly or oppressively treated. Lineal or long measure, measure of length; the measure of lines or distances. Liquid measure, the measure of liquors.

MEAS-URE, v.i.

To be of a certain extent, or to have a certain length, breadth or thickness; as, cloth measures three-fourths of a yard; a tree measures three feet in diameter.


MEAS-URE, v.t. [mezh'ur.]

  1. To compute or ascertain extent, quantity, dimensions or capacity by a certain rule; as, to measure land; to measure distance; to measure the altitude of a mountain; to measure the capacity of a ship or of a cask.
  2. To ascertain the degree of any thing; as, to measure the degrees of heat, or of moisture.
  3. To pass through or over. We must measure twenty miles today. Shak. The vessel plows the sea, / And measures back with speed her former way. Dryden.
  4. To judge of distance, extent or quantity; as, to measure any thing by the eye. Great are thy works, Jehovah, infinite / Thy power; what thought can measure thee! Milton.
  5. To adjust; to proportion. To secure a contented spirit, measure your desires by your fortunes, not your fortunes by your desires. Taylor.
  6. To allot or distribute by measure. With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. Matth. vii.

Meas"ure
  1. A standard of dimension; a fixed unit of quantity or extent; an extent or quantity in the fractions or multiples of which anything is estimated and stated; hence, a rule by which anything is adjusted or judged.
  2. To ascertain by use of a measuring instrument] to compute or ascertain the extent, quantity, dimensions, or capacity of, by a certain rule or standard; to take the dimensions of; hence, to estimate; to judge of; to value; to appraise.

    Great are thy works, Jehovah, infinite
    Thy power! what thought can measure thee?
    Milton.

  3. To make a measurement or measurements.
  4. An instrument by means of which size or quantity is measured, as a graduated line, rod, vessel, or the like.

    False ells and measures be brought all clean adown. R. of Gloucester.

  5. To serve as the measure of; as, the thermometer measures changes of temperature.
  6. To result, or turn out, on measuring; as, the grain measures well; the pieces measure unequally.
  7. The dimensions or capacity of anything, reckoned according to some standard; size or extent, determined and stated; estimated extent; as, to take one's measure for a coat.

    The measure thereof is longer than the earth, and broader than the sea. Job xi. 9.

  8. To pass throught or over in journeying, as if laying off and determining the distance.

    A true devoted pilgrim is not weary
    To measure kingdoms with his feeble steps.
    Shak.

  9. To be of a certain size or quantity, or to have a certain length, breadth, or thickness, or a certain capacity according to a standard measure; as, cloth measures three fourths of a yard; a tree measures three feet in diameter.
  10. The contents of a vessel by which quantity is measured; a quantity determined by a standard; a stated or limited quantity or amount.

    It is like leaven which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal. Luke xiii. 21.

  11. To adjust by a rule or standard.

    To secure a contented spirit, measure your desires by your fortunes, not your fortunes by your desires. Jer. Taylor.

  12. Extent or degree not excessive or beyong bounds; moderation; due restraint; esp. in the phrases, in measure; with measure; without or beyond measure.

    Hell hath enlarged herself, and opened her mouth without measure. Is. v. 14.

  13. To allot or distribute by measure; to set off or apart by measure; -- often with out or off.

    With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. Matt. vii. 2.

    That portion of eternity which is called time, measured out by the sun. Addison.

    To measure swords with one, to try another's skill in the use of the sword; hence, figuratively, to match one's abilities against an antagonist's.

  14. Determined extent, not to be exceeded; limit; allotted share, as of action, influence, ability, or the like; due proportion.

    Lord, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days. Ps. xxxix. 4.

  15. The quantity determined by measuring, especially in buying and selling; as, to give good or full measure.
  16. Undefined quantity; extent; degree.

    There is a great measure of discretion to be used in the performance of confession. Jer. Taylor.

  17. Regulated division of movement

    : (a) (Dancing)
  18. A number which is contained in a given number a number of times without a remainder; as in the phrases, the common measure, the greatest common measure, etc., of two or more numbers.
  19. A step or definite part of a progressive course or policy; a means to an end; an act designed for the accomplishment of an object; as, political measures; prudent measures; an inefficient measure.

    His majesty found what wrong measures he had taken in the conferring that trust, and lamented his error. Clarendon.

  20. The act of measuring; measurement.

    Shak.
  21. Beds or strata; as, coal measures; lead measures.

    Lineal, or Long, measure, measure of length; the measure of lines or distances. -- Liquid measure, the measure of liquids. -- Square measure, the measure of superficial area of surfaces in square units, as inches, feet, miles, etc. -- To have hard measure, to have harsh treatment meted out to one; to be harshly or oppressively dealt with. -- To take measures, to make preparations; to provide means. -- To take one's measure, to measure one, as for a garment; hence, to form an opinion of one's disposition, character, ability, etc. -- To tread a measure, to dance in the style so called. See 9 (a).

    Say to her, we have measured many miles
    To tread a measure with her on this grass.
    Shak.

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Measure

MEASURE, noun mezh'ur. [Latin mensura, from mensus, with a casual n, the participle of metior, to measure; Eng. to mete.]

1. The whole extent or dimensions of a thing, including length, breadth and thickness.

The measure thereof is longer than the earth and broader than the sea. Job 11:9.

It is applied also to length or to breadth separately.

2. That by which extent or dimension is ascertained, either length, breadth, thickness, capacity, or amount; as, a rod or pole is a measure of five yards and a half; an inch, a foot, a yard, are measures of length; a gallon is a measure of capacity. Weights and measures should be uniform. Silver and gold are the common measure of value.

3. A limited or definite quantity; as a measure of wine or beer.

4. Determined extent or length; limit.

Lord, make me to know my end, and the measure of my days. Psalms 39:4.

5. A rule by which any thing is adjusted or proportioned.

God's goodness is the measure of his providence.

6. Proportion; quantity settled.

I enter not into the particulars of the law of nature, or its measures of punishment; yet there is such a law.

7. Full or sufficient quantity.

I'll never pause again,

Till either death hath clos'd these eyes of mine,

Or fortune given me measure of revenge.

8. Extent of power or office.

We will not boast of things without our measure

2 Corinthians 10:13.

9. Portion allotted; extent of ability.

If else thou seekest

Aught not surpassing human measure say.

10. Degree; quantity indefinite.

I have laid down, in some measure the description of the old world.

A great measure of discretion is to be used in the performance of confession.

11. In music, that division by which the motion of music is regulated; or the interval or space of time between the rising and falling of the hand or foot of him who beats time. This measure regulates the time of dwelling on each note. The ordinary or common measure is one second.

12. In poetry, the measure or meter is the manner of ordering and combining the quantities, or the long and short syllables. Thus, hexameter, pentameter, Iambic, Sapphic verses, etc. consist of different measure

13. In dancing, the interval between steps, corresponding to the interval between notes in the music.

My legs can keep no measure in delight.

14. In geometry, any quantity assumed as one or unity, to which the ratio of other homogeneous or similar quantities is expressed.

15. Means to an end; an act, step or proceeding towards the accomplishment of an object; an extensive signification of the word, applicable to almost every act preparatory to a final end, and by which it is to be attained. Thus we speak of legislative measures, political measures, public measures, prudent measures, a rash measure effectual measures, inefficient measures.

In measure with moderation; with excess.

Without measure without limits; very largely or copiously.

To have hard measure to be harshly or oppressively treated.

Lineal or long measure measure of length; the measure of lines or distances.

Liquid measure the measure of liquors.

MEASURE, verb transitive mezh'ur. To compute or ascertain extent, quantity, dimensions or capacity by a certain rule; as, to measure land; to measure distance; to measure the altitude of a mountain; to measure the capacity of a ship or of a cask.

1. To ascertain the degree of any thing; as, to measure the degrees of heat, or of moisture.

2. To pass through or over.

We must measure twenty miles to day.

The vessel plows the sea,

And measures back with speed her former way.

3. To judge of distance, extent or quantity; as, to measure any thing by the eye.

Great are thy works, Jehovah, infinite

Thy power; what thought can measure thee?

4. To adjust; to proportion.

To secure a contended spirit, measure your desires by your fortunes, not your fortunes by your desires.

5. To allot or distribute by measure

With what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. Matthew 7:2.

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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NIM'BLY, adv. With agility; with light, quick motion.

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