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Friday - January 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [mass]

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mass

M`ASS, n. [L. massa, a mass; Gr. to beat or pound.]

1. A lump; a body of matter concreted, collected or formed into a lump; applied to any solid body; as a mass of iron or lead; a mass of flesh; as mass of ice; a mass of dough.

2. A collective body of fluid matter. The ocean is a mass of water.

3. A heap; as a mass of earth.

4. A great quantity collected; as a mass of treasure.

5. Bulk; magnitude.

This army of such mass and charge.

6. An assemblage; a collection of particulars blended, confused or indistinct; as a mass of colors.

They lose their forms, and make a mass

Confused and black, if brought too near.

7. Gross body of things considered collectively; the body; the bulk; as the mass of people in a nation. A small portion of morbid matter may infect the whole mass of fluids in the body.

M`ASS, n. [Low L. missa. The word signifies primarily leisure, cessation from labor, from the L. missus, remissus, like the L. ferioe; hence a feast or holiday.] The service of the Romish church; the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; the consecration of the bread and wine.

M`ASS, v.i. To celebrate mass. [Not used.]

M`ASS, v.t. To fill; to stuff; to strengthen. [Not used.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [mass]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

M`ASS, n. [L. massa, a mass; Gr. to beat or pound.]

1. A lump; a body of matter concreted, collected or formed into a lump; applied to any solid body; as a mass of iron or lead; a mass of flesh; as mass of ice; a mass of dough.

2. A collective body of fluid matter. The ocean is a mass of water.

3. A heap; as a mass of earth.

4. A great quantity collected; as a mass of treasure.

5. Bulk; magnitude.

This army of such mass and charge.

6. An assemblage; a collection of particulars blended, confused or indistinct; as a mass of colors.

They lose their forms, and make a mass

Confused and black, if brought too near.

7. Gross body of things considered collectively; the body; the bulk; as the mass of people in a nation. A small portion of morbid matter may infect the whole mass of fluids in the body.

M`ASS, n. [Low L. missa. The word signifies primarily leisure, cessation from labor, from the L. missus, remissus, like the L. ferioe; hence a feast or holiday.] The service of the Romish church; the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; the consecration of the bread and wine.

M`ASS, v.i. To celebrate mass. [Not used.]

M`ASS, v.t. To fill; to stuff; to strengthen. [Not used.]


MASS, n.1 [Fr. masse, a mass, a heap, a mace, or club; Port. maça, dough, and a mace; Sp. masa, dough, mortar, a mass, and maza, a club, a mace; mazo, a mallet; It. massa, a heap, and mazza, a maze; G. masse; L. massa, a mass. These words seem to belong to the root of the Greek μασσω, to beat or pound, the root of which is μαγ; hence the connection between mass, and mace, a club. If any of these words are of a different origin, they may belong to the root of mix.]

  1. A lump; a body of matter concreted, collected or formed into a lump; applied to any solid body; as, a mass of iron or lead; a mass of flesh; a mass of ice; a mass of dough.
  2. A collective body of fluid matter. The ocean is a mass of water.
  3. A heap; as, a mass of earth.
  4. A great quantity collected; as, a mass of treasure.
  5. Bulk; magnitude. This army of such mass and charge. Shak.
  6. An assemblage; a collection of particulars blended, confused or indistinct; as, a mass of colors. Addison. They lose their forms, and make a mass / Confused and black, if brought too near. Prior.
  7. Gross body of things considered collectively; the body; the bulk; as, the mass of people in a nation. A small portion of morbid matter may infect the whole mass of fluids in the body. Comets have power over the mass of things. Bacon.

MASS, n.2 [Sax. mæsa, mæsse; Fr. masse; It. messa; Sp. misa; D. misse; G. and Dan. messe; Sw. messa; Low L. missa. The word signifies primarily leisure, cessation from labor, from the L. missus, remissus, like the L. feriæ; hence a feast or holiday. Laws of Alfred, 39. “Be mæsse dæge freolse.” De festivitate diei festi. See also Laws of Cnute, Lib. 1, 14, and 2, 42. Hence Sax. hlafmæsse, lemmas, bread-feast, and Martin-mas, Michael-mas, Candlemas, Christmas.]

The service of the Romish church; the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; the consecration of the bread and wine. Lye. Encyc. Wilkins.


MASS, v.i.

To celebrate mass. [Not used.] Hooker.


MASS, v.t.

To fill; to stuff; to strengthen. [Not used.] Hayward.


Mass
  1. The sacrifice in the sacrament of the Eucharist, or the consecration and oblation of the host.
  2. To celebrate Mass.

    [Obs.] Hooker.
  3. A quantity of matter cohering together so as to make one body, or an aggregation of particles or things which collectively make one body or quantity, usually of considerable size; as, a mass of ore, metal, sand, or water.

    If it were not for these principles, the bodies of the earth, planets, comets, sun, and all things in them, would grow cold and freeze, and become inactive masses. Sir I. Newton.

    A deep mass of continual sea is slower stirred
    To rage.
    Savile.

  4. To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.

    But mass them together and they are terrible indeed. Coleridge.

  5. The portions of the Mass usually set to music, considered as a musical composition; -- namely, the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei, besides sometimes an Offertory and the Benedictus.

    Canon of the Mass. See Canon. -- High Mass, Mass with incense, music, the assistance of a deacon, subdeacon, etc. -- Low Mass, Mass which is said by the priest throughout, without music. -- Mass bell, the sanctus bell. See Sanctus. -- Mass book, the missal or Roman Catholic service book.

  6. A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
  7. A large quantity; a sum.

    All the mass of gold that comes into Spain. Sir W. Raleigh.

    He had spent a huge mass of treasure. Sir J. Davies.

  8. Bulk; magnitude; body; size.

    This army of such mass and charge. Shak.

  9. The principal part; the main body.

    Night closed upon the pursuit, and aided the mass of the fugitives in their escape. Jowett (Thucyd.).

  10. The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume.

    * Mass and weight are often used, in a general way, as interchangeable terms, since the weight of a body is proportional to its mass (under the same or equal gravitative forces), and the mass is usually ascertained from the weight. Yet the two ideas, mass and weight, are quite distinct. Mass is the quantity of matter in a body; weight is the comparative force with which it tends towards the center of the earth. A mass of sugar and a mass of lead are assumed to be equal when they show an equal weight by balancing each other in the scales.

    Blue mass. See under Blue. -- Mass center (Geom.), the center of gravity of a triangle. -- Mass copper, native copper in a large mass. -- Mass meeting, a large or general assembly of people, usually a meeting having some relation to politics. -- The masses, the great body of the people, as contrasted with the higher classes; the populace.

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Mass

M'ASS, noun [Latin massa, a mass; Gr. to beat or pound.]

1. A lump; a body of matter concreted, collected or formed into a lump; applied to any solid body; as a mass of iron or lead; a mass of flesh; as mass of ice; a mass of dough.

2. A collective body of fluid matter. The ocean is a mass of water.

3. A heap; as a mass of earth.

4. A great quantity collected; as a mass of treasure.

5. Bulk; magnitude.

This army of such mass and charge.

6. An assemblage; a collection of particulars blended, confused or indistinct; as a mass of colors.

They lose their forms, and make a mass

Confused and black, if brought too near.

7. Gross body of things considered collectively; the body; the bulk; as the mass of people in a nation. A small portion of morbid matter may infect the whole mass of fluids in the body.

M'ASS, noun [Low Latin missa. The word signifies primarily leisure, cessation from labor, from the Latin missus, remissus, like the Latin ferioe; hence a feast or holiday.] The service of the Romish church; the office or prayers used at the celebration of the eucharist; the consecration of the bread and wine.

M'ASS, verb intransitive To celebrate mass [Not used.]

M'ASS, verb transitive To fill; to stuff; to strengthen. [Not used.]

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Bible Study

— Chuck (Spokane, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

lumping

LUMP'ING, ppr.

1. Throwing into a mass or sum.

2. a. Bulky; heavy. [A low word.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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