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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [marsh]

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marsh

M`ARSH, n. A tract of low land, usually or occasionally covered with water, or very wet and miry, and overgrown with coarse grass or with detached clumps of sedge; a fen. It differs from swamp, which is merely moist or spungy land, but often producing valuable crops of grass. Lowland occasionally overflowed by the tides, is called salt marsh.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [marsh]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

M`ARSH, n. A tract of low land, usually or occasionally covered with water, or very wet and miry, and overgrown with coarse grass or with detached clumps of sedge; a fen. It differs from swamp, which is merely moist or spungy land, but often producing valuable crops of grass. Lowland occasionally overflowed by the tides, is called salt marsh.


MARSH, n. [Sax. mersc; Fr. marais; D. moeras; G. morast. It was formerly written marish, directly from the French. We have morass from the Teutonic. See Moor.]

A tract of low land, usually or occasionally covered with water, or very wet and miry, and overgrown with coarse grass or with detached clumps of sedge; a fen. It differs from swamp, which is merely moist or spungy land, but often producing valuable crops of grass. Low land occasionally overflowed by the tides, is called salt marsh.


Marsh
  1. A tract of soft wet land, commonly covered partially or wholly with water; a fen; a swamp; a morass.

    [Written also marish.]

    Marsh asphodel (Bot.), a plant (Nartheeium ossifragum) with linear equitant leaves, and a raceme of small white flowers; -- called also bog asphodel. -- Marsh cinquefoil (Bot.), a plant (Potentilla palustris) having purple flowers, and found growing in marshy places; marsh five- finger. -- Marsh elder. (Bot.) (a) The guelder-rose or cranberry tree (Viburnum Opulus). (b) In the United States, a composite shrub growing in salt marshes (Iva frutescens). -- Marsh five-finger. (Bot.) See Marsh cinquefoil (above). -- Marsh gas. (Chem.) See under Gas. -- Marsh grass (Bot.), a genus (Spartina) of coarse grasses growing in marshes; - - called also cord grass. The tall S. cynosuroides is not good for hay unless cut very young. The low S. juncea is a common component of salt hay. -- Marsh harrier (Zoöl.), a European hawk or harrier (Circus æruginosus); -- called also marsh hawk, moor hawk, moor buzzard, puttock. -- Marsh hawk. (Zoöl.) (a) A hawk or harrier (Circus cyaneus), native of both America and Europe. The adults are bluish slate above, with a white rump. Called also hen harrier, and mouse hawk. (b) The marsh harrier. -- Marsh hen (Zoöl.), a rail; esp., Rallus elegans of fresh-water marshes, and R. longirostris of salt-water marshes. -- Marsh mallow (Bot.), a plant of the genus Althæa ( A. officinalis) common in marshes near the seashore, and whose root is much used in medicine as a demulcent. -- Marsh marigold. (Bot.) See in the Vocabulary. -- Marsh pennywort (Bot.), any plant of the umbelliferous genus Hydrocotyle; low herbs with roundish leaves, growing in wet places; -- called also water pennywort. -- Marsh quail (Zoöl.), the meadow lark. -- Marsh rosemary (Bot.), a plant of the genus Statice (S. Limonium), common in salt marshes. Its root is powerfully astringent, and is sometimes used in medicine. Called also sea lavender. -- Marsh samphire (Bot.), a plant (Salicornia herbacea) found along seacoasts. See Glasswort. -- Marsh St. John's-wort (Bot.), an American herb (Elodes Virginica) with small opposite leaves and flesh-colored flowers. -- Marsh tea. (Bot.). Same as Labrador tea. -- Marsh trefoil. (Bot.) Same as Buckbean. -- Marsh wren (Zoöl.), any species of small American wrens of the genus Cistothorus, and allied genera. They chiefly inhabit salt marshes.

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Marsh

M'ARSH, noun A tract of low land, usually or occasionally covered with water, or very wet and miry, and overgrown with coarse grass or with detached clumps of sedge; a fen. It differs from swamp, which is merely moist or spungy land, but often producing valuable crops of grass. Lowland occasionally overflowed by the tides, is called salt marsh

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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