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Friday - July 19, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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main

MAIN, a. [L. magnus.]

1. Principal; chief; that which has most power in producing an effect, or which is mostly regarded in prospect; as the main branch or tributary stream of a river; the main timbers of an edifice; a main design; a main object.

Our main interest is to be as happy as we can, and as long as possible.

2. Mighty; vast; as the main abyss.

3. Important; powerful.

This young prince, with a train of young noblemen and gentlemen, not with any main army, came over to take possession of his patrimony.

MAIN, n. Strength; force; violent effort; as in the phrase, "with might and main."

1. The gross; the bulk; the greater part.

The main of them may be reduced to language and an improvement in wisdom--

2. The ocean; the great sea, as distinguished from rivers, bays, sounds and the like.

He fell, and struggling in the main--

3. The continent, as distinguished from an isle. We arrived at Nantucket on Saturday, but did not reach the main till Monday. In this use of the word, land is omitted; main for main land.

4. A hamper.

5. A course; a duct.

For the main, in the main, for the most part; in the greatest part.

MAIN, n. [L. manus, hand.] A hand at dice. We throw a merry main.

And lucky mains make people wise. [Not used.]

1. A match at cock fighting.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [main]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

MAIN, a. [L. magnus.]

1. Principal; chief; that which has most power in producing an effect, or which is mostly regarded in prospect; as the main branch or tributary stream of a river; the main timbers of an edifice; a main design; a main object.

Our main interest is to be as happy as we can, and as long as possible.

2. Mighty; vast; as the main abyss.

3. Important; powerful.

This young prince, with a train of young noblemen and gentlemen, not with any main army, came over to take possession of his patrimony.

MAIN, n. Strength; force; violent effort; as in the phrase, "with might and main."

1. The gross; the bulk; the greater part.

The main of them may be reduced to language and an improvement in wisdom--

2. The ocean; the great sea, as distinguished from rivers, bays, sounds and the like.

He fell, and struggling in the main--

3. The continent, as distinguished from an isle. We arrived at Nantucket on Saturday, but did not reach the main till Monday. In this use of the word, land is omitted; main for main land.

4. A hamper.

5. A course; a duct.

For the main, in the main, for the most part; in the greatest part.

MAIN, n. [L. manus, hand.] A hand at dice. We throw a merry main.

And lucky mains make people wise. [Not used.]

1. A match at cock fighting.

MAIN, a. [Sax. mægn, strength, force, power, from magan, to be able or strong, that is, to strain or stretch, Eng. may, might. If g is radical in the L. magnus, this may be of the same family; Goth. mickels; Eng. much.]

  1. Principal; chief; that which has most power in producing an effect, or which is mostly regarded in prospect; as, the main branch or tributary stream of a river; the main timbers of an edifice; a main design; a main object. Our main interest is to be as happy as we can, and as long as possible. Tillotson.
  2. Mighty; vast; as, the main abyss. Milton.
  3. Important; powerful. This young prince, with a train of young noblemen and gentlemen, not with any main army, came over to take possession of his patrimony. Davies.

MAIN, n.1

  1. Strength; force; violent effort; as in the phrase, “with might and main.” Dryden.
  2. The gross; the bulk; the greater part. The main of them may be reduced to language and an improvement in wisdom. Locke.
  3. The ocean; the great sea, as distinguished from rivers, bays, sounds and the like. He fell, and struggling in the main. Dryden.
  4. The continent, as distinguished from an isle. We arrived at Nantucket on Saturday, but did not reach the main till Monday. In this use of the word, land is omitted; main for main land.
  5. A hamper. Ainsworth.
  6. A course; a duct. Act of Parliament. For the main, in the main, for the most part; in the greatest part.

MAIN, n.2 [L. manus, hand; Fr. main.]

  1. A hand at dice. We throw a merry main. And lucky mains make people wise. [Not used.] Prior.
  2. A match at cock-fighting.

Main
  1. A hand or match at dice.

    Prior. Thackeray.
  2. Strength; force; might; violent effort.

    [Obs., except in certain phrases.]

    There were in this battle of most might and main. R. of Gl.

    He 'gan advance,
    With huge force, and with importable main.
    Spenser.

  3. Very or extremely strong.

    [Obs.]

    That current with main fury ran. Daniel.

  4. Very; extremely; as, main heavy.

    "I'm main dry." Foote. [Obs. or Low]
  5. A stake played for at dice.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  6. The chief or principal part; the main or most important thing.

    [Obs., except in special uses.]

    Resolved to rest upon the title of Lancaster as the main, and to use the other two . . . but as supporters. Bacon.

  7. Vast; huge.

    [Obs.] "The main abyss." Milton.
  8. The largest throw in a match at dice; a throw at dice within given limits, as in the game of hazard.
  9. The great sea, as distinguished from an arm, bay, etc. ; the high sea; the ocean.

    "Struggling in the main." Dryden. (b)
  10. Unqualified; absolute; entire; sheer.

    [Obs.] "It's a man untruth." Sir W. Scott.
  11. A match at cockfighting.

    "My lord would ride twenty miles . . . to see a main fought." Thackeray.
  12. Principal; chief; first in size, rank, importance, etc.

    Our main interest is to be happy as we can. Tillotson.

  13. A main-hamper.

    [Obs.] Ainsworth.
  14. Important; necessary.

    [Obs.]

    That which thou aright
    Believest so main to our success, I bring.
    Milton.

    By main force, by mere force or sheer force; by violent effort; as, to subdue insurrection by main force.

    That Maine which by main force Warwick did win. Shak.

    -- By main strength, by sheer strength; as, to lift a heavy weight by main strength. -- Main beam (Steam Engine), working beam. -- Main boom (Naut.), the boom which extends the foot of the mainsail in a fore and aft vessel. -- Main brace. (a) (Mech.) The brace which resists the chief strain. Cf. Counter brace. (b) (Naut.) The brace attached to the main yard. -- Main center (Steam Engine), a shaft upon which a working beam or side lever swings. -- Main chance. See under Chance. -- Main couple (Arch.), the principal truss in a roof. -- Main deck (Naut.), the deck next below the spar deck; the principal deck. -- Main keel (Naut.), the principal or true keel of a vessel, as distinguished from the false keel.

    Syn. -- Principal; chief; leading; cardinal; capital.

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Main

MAIN, adjective [Latin magnus.]

1. Principal; chief; that which has most power in producing an effect, or which is mostly regarded in prospect; as the main branch or tributary stream of a river; the main timbers of an edifice; a main design; a main object.

Our main interest is to be as happy as we can, and as long as possible.

2. Mighty; vast; as the main abyss.

3. Important; powerful.

This young prince, with a train of young noblemen and gentlemen, not with any main army, came over to take possession of his patrimony.

MAIN, noun Strength; force; violent effort; as in the phrase, 'with might and main '

1. The gross; the bulk; the greater part.

The main of them may be reduced to language and an improvement in wisdom--

2. The ocean; the great sea, as distinguished from rivers, bays, sounds and the like.

He fell, and struggling in the main--

3. The continent, as distinguished from an isle. We arrived at Nantucket on Saturday, but did not reach the main till Monday. In this use of the word, land is omitted; main for main land.

4. A hamper.

5. A course; a duct.

For the main in the main for the most part; in the greatest part.

MAIN, noun [Latin manus, hand.] A hand at dice. We throw a merry main

And lucky mains make people wise. [Not used.]

1. A match at cock fighting.

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I'm Christian and the original meanings of words from the Christian perspective is important to me.

— Libby (Charlotte, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

arseniac

ARSE'NIAC or ARSEN'ICAL ACID. Arsenic combined with a greater proportion of oxygen, than in the arsenious acid. It is called arsenic acid by most authors.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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