HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Wednesday - July 8, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [con]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

con

CON. A Latin inseparable preposition or prefix to other words. Ainsworth remarks that con and cum habe the same signification, but that cum is used separately, and con in composition. Con and cum may be radically distinct words. The Irish comh, or coimh, is equivalent to the Latin con; and the Welsh cym, convertible into cyv, appears to be the same word, denoting, says Owen, a mutual act, quality or effect. It is precisely equivalent to the Latin com, in comparo, compono, and the Latin com, in composition, may be the Celtic comh or cym. But generally it seems to be con, changed into com. Ainsworth deduces cum from the Greek; for originally it was written cyn. But this is probably a mistake.

Con coincides in radical letters and in signification with the Teutonic gain, gen, gean, igen, igien, in the English again, against; Sax. Gean, ongean; sw. Igen; Dan. Igien. Whatever may be its origin or affinities, the primary sense of the word is probably from some root that signifies to meet or oppose, or turn and meet; to approach to, or to be with. This is the radical sense of most propositions of the like import. See the English with, again. So in Irish, coinne, a meeting; as coinne, opposite.

Con, in compounds, is change into l before l, as in colligo, to collect, and into m before a labial, as in comparo, to compare. Before a vowel or h, the na is dropped; as in coalesco, to coalesce, to cooperate; cohibeo, to restrain. I denotes union, as in conjoin; or opposition, as in conflict, contend.

CON, [abbreviated from Latin contra, against.] In the phrase, pro and con, for and against, con denotes the negative side of a question. As a noun, a person who is in the negative; as the pros and cons.

CON, v.t. [to know, to be able, to be skillful or wise; and to bear or bring forth, Gr. To try, to attempt, to prove, L., whence cunning, skillful, experienced, or skill, experience; coincides in sense with to begin, to try to attempt. G. To know; to be able. The primary sense is, to strain or stretch, which gives the sense of strength, power, as in can, and of holding, containing, comprehending, as contain, from contineo, teneo, Gr., L. To beget or to bring forth. In the sense of know, con signifies to hold or to reach.]

1. To know.

I conne no skill.

I shall not conne answer. I shall not know or be able to answer.

2. To make ones self master of; to fix in the mend or commit to memory; as, to con a lesson.

To con thanks, to be pleased or obliged, or to thank.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [con]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CON. A Latin inseparable preposition or prefix to other words. Ainsworth remarks that con and cum habe the same signification, but that cum is used separately, and con in composition. Con and cum may be radically distinct words. The Irish comh, or coimh, is equivalent to the Latin con; and the Welsh cym, convertible into cyv, appears to be the same word, denoting, says Owen, a mutual act, quality or effect. It is precisely equivalent to the Latin com, in comparo, compono, and the Latin com, in composition, may be the Celtic comh or cym. But generally it seems to be con, changed into com. Ainsworth deduces cum from the Greek; for originally it was written cyn. But this is probably a mistake.

Con coincides in radical letters and in signification with the Teutonic gain, gen, gean, igen, igien, in the English again, against; Sax. Gean, ongean; sw. Igen; Dan. Igien. Whatever may be its origin or affinities, the primary sense of the word is probably from some root that signifies to meet or oppose, or turn and meet; to approach to, or to be with. This is the radical sense of most propositions of the like import. See the English with, again. So in Irish, coinne, a meeting; as coinne, opposite.

Con, in compounds, is change into l before l, as in colligo, to collect, and into m before a labial, as in comparo, to compare. Before a vowel or h, the na is dropped; as in coalesco, to coalesce, to cooperate; cohibeo, to restrain. I denotes union, as in conjoin; or opposition, as in conflict, contend.

CON, [abbreviated from Latin contra, against.] In the phrase, pro and con, for and against, con denotes the negative side of a question. As a noun, a person who is in the negative; as the pros and cons.

CON, v.t. [to know, to be able, to be skillful or wise; and to bear or bring forth, Gr. To try, to attempt, to prove, L., whence cunning, skillful, experienced, or skill, experience; coincides in sense with to begin, to try to attempt. G. To know; to be able. The primary sense is, to strain or stretch, which gives the sense of strength, power, as in can, and of holding, containing, comprehending, as contain, from contineo, teneo, Gr., L. To beget or to bring forth. In the sense of know, con signifies to hold or to reach.]

1. To know.

I conne no skill.

I shall not conne answer. I shall not know or be able to answer.

2. To make ones self master of; to fix in the mend or commit to memory; as, to con a lesson.

To con thanks, to be pleased or obliged, or to thank.

CON, n. [abbreviated from Latin contra, against.]

In the phrase, pro and con, for and against, con denotes the negative side of a question. As a noun, a person who is in the negative; as, the pros and cons.


CON, prep. [CON-; with or against.]

A Latin inseparable preposition or prefix to other words. Ainsworth remarks that con and cum have the same signification, but that cum is used separately, and con in composition. Con and cum may be radically distinct words. The Irish comh, or coimh, is equivalent to the Latin con; and the Welsh cym, convertible into cyv, appears to be the same word, denoting, says Owen, a mutual act, quality or effect. It is precisely equivalent to the Latin com, in comparo, compono, and the Latin com, in composition, may be the Celtic comh or cym. But generally it seems to be con, changed into com. Ainsworth deduces cum from the Greek συν; for originally it was written cyn. But this is probably a mistake. Con coincides in radical letters and in signification with the Teutonic gain, gen, gean, igen, igien, in the English again, against; Sax. gean, ongean; Sw. igen; Dan. igien. Whatever may be its origin or affinities, the primary sense of the word is probably from some root that signifies to meet or oppose, or turn and meet; to approach to, or to be with. This is the radical sense of most prepositions of the like import. See the English with, again. So in Irish, coinne, a meeting; os coinne, opposite. Con, in compounds, is changed into l before l, as in colligo, to collect, and into m before a labial, as in comparo, to compare. Before a vowel or h, the n is dropped; as in coalesco, to coalesce, to cooperate; cohibeo, to restrain. It denotes union, as in conjoin; or opposition, as in conflict, contend. Qu. W. gan, with.


CON, v.t. [Sax. cennan, connan, cunnan, to know, to be able, to be skillful or wise; and cennan, to bear or bring forth, Gr. γενναω; and cunnian, to try, to attempt, to prove, L. conor; whence cunning, skillful, experienced, or skill, experience; the latter word, cunnian, coincides in sense with Sax. anginnan, onginnan, to begin, to try, to attempt, L. conor. D. kennen, to know, understand, or be acquainted; kunnen, to be able, can, to know or understand, to hold or contain; the last signification coinciding with the W. ganu, to contain. G. kennen, to know; and können, to be able. Dan. kan, to be able, pret. kunde, whence kundskab, knowledge, skill, experience. Sw. känna, to know; kuna, to be able, to be skilled, to know. The primary sense is, to strain or stretch, which gives the sense of strength, power, as in can, and of holding, containing, comprehending, as contain, from contineo, teneo, Gr. τεινω, L. tendo. And this signification connects these words with gin, in its compounds, begin, Sax. beginnan, anginnan, &c., to strain, to try, to stretch forward and make an effort; also with the Gr. γενναω, L. gignor, to beget, or to bring forth. See Class Gn, No. 29, 36, 40, 42, 45, 58. In the sense of know, con signifies to hold or to reach.]

  1. To know. [Obs.] “I conne no skill.” – Spenser. “I shall not conne answer.” I shall not know or be able to answer. – Chaucer.
  2. To make one's self master of; to fix in the mind, or commit to memory; as, to con a lesson. – Milton. Holder. To con thanks, to be pleased or obliged, or to thank. [Obs.] – Chaucer. Shak.

Con-
  1. A prefix, fr. L. cum, signifying with, together, etc. See Com- .
  2. Against the affirmative side; in opposition; on the negative side; -- The antithesis of pro, and usually in connection with it. See Pro.
  3. To know] to understand; to acknowledge.

    [Obs.]

    Of muses, Hobbinol, I con no skill.
    Spenser.

    They say they con to heaven the highway.
    Spenser.

  4. To conduct, or superintend the steering of (a vessel); to watch the course of (a vessel) and direct the helmsman how to steer.
  5. To study in order to know; to peruse; to learn; to commit to memory; to regard studiously.

    Fixedly did look
    Upon the muddy waters which he conned
    As if he had been reading in a book.
    Wordsworth.

    I did not come into Parliament to con my lesson.
    Burke.

    To con answer, to be able to answer. [Obs.] -- To con thanks, to thank; to acknowledge obligation. [Obs.] Shak.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

90

698

78

754

113

765

Why 1828?

1
2
 


To help me with my Bible studies.

— Pat (Riverside, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

dozer

DOZER, n. One that dozes or slumbers.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

210

393

Compact Edition

184

146

CD-ROM

141

111

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 1.982 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top