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Monday - November 12, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [compromise]

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compromise

COMPROMISE, n. [L. To give bond to stand to an award, to promise. See Promise.]

1. A mutual promise or contract of two parties in controversy, to refer their differences to the decision of arbitrators.

2. An amicable agreement between parties in controversy, to settle their differences by mutual concessions.

3. Mutual agreement; adjustment.

[This is its usual signification.]

COMPROMISE, v.t.

1. To adjust and settle a difference by mutual agreement, with concessions of claims by the parties; to compound.

2. To agree; to accord.

3. To commit; to put to hazard; to pledge by some act or declaration.

[In this sense, see Compromit, which is generally used.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [compromise]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

COMPROMISE, n. [L. To give bond to stand to an award, to promise. See Promise.]

1. A mutual promise or contract of two parties in controversy, to refer their differences to the decision of arbitrators.

2. An amicable agreement between parties in controversy, to settle their differences by mutual concessions.

3. Mutual agreement; adjustment.

[This is its usual signification.]

COMPROMISE, v.t.

1. To adjust and settle a difference by mutual agreement, with concessions of claims by the parties; to compound.

2. To agree; to accord.

3. To commit; to put to hazard; to pledge by some act or declaration.

[In this sense, see Compromit, which is generally used.]

COM'PRO-MISE, n. [s as z. L. compromissum, from compromitto, to give bond to stand to an award; con and promitto, to promise; It. compromesso; Fr. compromis; Sp. compromiso. See Promise.]

  1. A mutual promise or contract of two parties in controversy, to refer their differences to the decision of arbitrators.
  2. An amicable agreement between parties in controversy, to settle their differences by mutual concessions.
  3. Mutual agreement; adjustment. – Judge Chipman. [This is its usual signification.]

COM'PRO-MISE, v.t.

  1. To adjust and settle a difference by mutual agreement, with concessions of claims by the parties; to compound.
  2. To agree; to accord. Shak.
  3. To commit; to put to hazard; to pledge by some act or declaration. [In this sense, see Compromit, which is generally used.]

Com"pro*mise
  1. A mutual agreement to refer matters in dispute to the decision of arbitrators.

    [Obs.] Burrill.
  2. To bind by mutual agreement; to agree.

    [Obs.]

    Laban and himself were compromised
    That all the eanlings which were streaked and pied
    Should fall as Jacob's hire.
    Shak.

  3. To agree; to accord.

    [Obs.]
  4. A settlement by arbitration or by mutual consent reached by concession on both sides; a reciprocal abatement of extreme demands or rights, resulting in an agreement.

    But basely yielded upon compromise
    That which his noble ancestors achieved with blows.
    Shak.

    All government, indeed every human benefit and enjoyment, every virtue and every prudent act, is founded on compromise and barter.
    Burke.

    An abhorrence of concession and compromise is a never failing characteristic of religious factions.
    Hallam.

  5. To adjust and settle by mutual concessions; to compound.

    The controversy may easily be compromised.
    Fuller.

  6. To make concession for conciliation and peace.
  7. A committal to something derogatory or objectionable; a prejudicial concession; a surrender; as, a compromise of character or right.

    I was determined not to accept any fine speeches, to the compromise of that sex the belonging to which was, after all, my strongest claim and title to them.
    Lamb.

  8. To pledge by some act or declaration; to endanger the life, reputation, etc., of, by some act which can not be recalled; to expose to suspicion.

    To pardon all who had been compromised in the late disturbances.
    Motley.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Compromise

COMPROMISE, noun [Latin To give bond to stand to an award, to promise. See Promise.]

1. A mutual promise or contract of two parties in controversy, to refer their differences to the decision of arbitrators.

2. An amicable agreement between parties in controversy, to settle their differences by mutual concessions.

3. Mutual agreement; adjustment.

[This is its usual signification.]

COMPROMISE, verb transitive

1. To adjust and settle a difference by mutual agreement, with concessions of claims by the parties; to compound.

2. To agree; to accord.

3. To commit; to put to hazard; to pledge by some act or declaration.

[In this sense, see Compromit, which is generally used.]

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the accountability of word definitions is paramount especially in our day and age where the evil one seeks to destroy every thing that is good and honorable and seeking peace and joy. The lord be with you.

— Sharon (Oakdale, CT)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

direct

DIRECT, a. [L., to make straight. See Right.]

1. Straight; right; as, to pass in a direct line from one body or place to another. It is opposed to crooked, winding, oblique. It is also opposed to refracted; as a direct ray of light.

2. In astronomy, appearing to move forward in the zodiac, in the direction of the sign; opposed to retrograde; as, the motion of a planet is direct.

3. In the line of father and sons; opposed to collateral; as a descendant in the direct line.

4. Leading or tending to an end, as by a straight line or course; not circuitous. Thus we speak of direct means to effect an object; a direct course; a direct way.

5. Open; not ambiguous or doubtful.

6. Plain; express; not ambiguous; as, he said this in direct words; he made a direct acknowledgment.

7. In music, a direct interval is that which forms any kind of harmony on the fundamental sound which produces it; as the fifth, major third and octave.

Direct tax, is a tax assess on real estate, as houses and lands.

DIRECT, v.t. [L.]

1. To point or aim in a straight line, towards a place or object; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance; to direct the eye; to direct a course or flight.

2. To point; to show the right road or course; as, he directed me to the left hand road.

3. To regulate; to guide or lead; to govern; to cause to proceed in a particular manner; as, to direct the affairs of a nation.

Wisdom is profitable to direct. Ecclesiastes 10.

4. To prescribe a course; to mark out a way. Job 37.

5. To order; to instruct; to point out a course of proceeding, with authority; to command. But direct is a softer term than command.

DIRECT, n. In music, a character placed at the end of a stave to direct the performer to the first note of the next stave.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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