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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [command]

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command

COMMAND, v.t.

1. To bid; to order; to direct; to charge; implying authority, and power to control, and to require obedience.

We will sacrifice to the Lord our God, as he shall command us. Ex. 8.

I know that he [Abraham] will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord. Gen. 18.

2. To govern, lead or direct; to have or to exercise supreme authority over.

Lord Wellington commanded an army in Spain; he commanded the army at the battle of Waterloo.

3. To have in power; to be able to exercise power or authority over; as, a military post commands the surrounding country; a fort commands the harbor.

4. To overlook, or have in the power of the eye, without obstruction.

One side commands a view of the finest garden in the world.

5. To direct; to send.

The Lord shall command the blessing on thee. Deut. 28.

The Lord will command his loving kindness. Ps. 43.

6. To have or to exercise a controlling influence over.

A good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.

COMMAND, v.i. To have or to exercise supreme authority; to possess the chief power; to govern; as, the general commands with dignity and humanity. What general commands in Canada?

COMMAND, n.

1. The right or power of governing with chief or exclusive authority; supreme power; control; as, an officer has a brigade under his command; he takes command of the army in France; an appropriate military term.

2. The power of controlling; governing influence; sway.

He assumed an absolute command over his readers.

3. Cogent or absolute authority.

Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.

4. The act of commanding; the mandate uttered; order given.

The captain gives command.

5. The power of overlooking, or surveying, without obstruction.

The steepy strand, Which overlooks the vale with wide command.

6. The power of governing or controlling by force, or of defending and protecting.

The fortress has complete command of the port.

7. That which is commanded control; as a body of troop under command.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [command]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

COMMAND, v.t.

1. To bid; to order; to direct; to charge; implying authority, and power to control, and to require obedience.

We will sacrifice to the Lord our God, as he shall command us. Ex. 8.

I know that he [Abraham] will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord. Gen. 18.

2. To govern, lead or direct; to have or to exercise supreme authority over.

Lord Wellington commanded an army in Spain; he commanded the army at the battle of Waterloo.

3. To have in power; to be able to exercise power or authority over; as, a military post commands the surrounding country; a fort commands the harbor.

4. To overlook, or have in the power of the eye, without obstruction.

One side commands a view of the finest garden in the world.

5. To direct; to send.

The Lord shall command the blessing on thee. Deut. 28.

The Lord will command his loving kindness. Ps. 43.

6. To have or to exercise a controlling influence over.

A good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.

COMMAND, v.i. To have or to exercise supreme authority; to possess the chief power; to govern; as, the general commands with dignity and humanity. What general commands in Canada?

COMMAND, n.

1. The right or power of governing with chief or exclusive authority; supreme power; control; as, an officer has a brigade under his command; he takes command of the army in France; an appropriate military term.

2. The power of controlling; governing influence; sway.

He assumed an absolute command over his readers.

3. Cogent or absolute authority.

Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.

4. The act of commanding; the mandate uttered; order given.

The captain gives command.

5. The power of overlooking, or surveying, without obstruction.

The steepy strand, Which overlooks the vale with wide command.

6. The power of governing or controlling by force, or of defending and protecting.

The fortress has complete command of the port.

7. That which is commanded control; as a body of troop under command.

COM-MAND', n.

  1. The right or power of governing with chief or exclusive authority; supreme power; control; as, an officer has a brigade under his command; he takes command of the army in France; an appropriate military term.
  2. The power of controlling; governing influence; sway. He assumed an absolute command over his readers. – Dryden.
  3. Cogent or absolute authority. Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion. – Locke.
  4. The act of commanding; the mandate uttered; order given. The captain gives command. – Dryden.
  5. The power of overlooking, or surveying, without obstruction. The sleepy strand, / Which overlooks the vale with wide command. – Dryden.
  6. The power of governing or controlling by force, or of defending and protecting; as, the fortress has complete command of the port.
  7. That which is commanded; control; as, a body of troops under command. – Marshall.
  8. Order, request, message, any communication desired, or sent; a complimentary use.
  9. A body of troops, or any naval or military force, under the command of a particular officer.

COM-MAND', v.i.

To have or to exercise supreme authority; to possess the chief power; to govern; as, the general commands with dignity and humanity. What general commands in Canada?


COM-MAND', v.t. [It. comandare; Sp. comandar, mandar; Arm. coumandi; Fr. commander; con, or com, and L. mando, to command, to commit to, Basque manatu; literally, to send to, to send forth, from the same root as commend, demand, and L. moneo. See Class Mn.]

  1. To bid; to order; to direct; to charge; implying authority, and power to control, and to require obedience. We will sacrifice to the Lord our God, as he shall command us. – Ex. viii. I know that he [Abraham] will command his children and his household after him, and they will keep the way of the Lord. – Gen. xviii
  2. To govern, lead, or direct; to have or to exercise supreme authority over; as, Lord Wellington commanded an army in Spain; he command the army at the battle of Waterloo.
  3. To have in power; to be able to exercise power or authority over; as, a military post commands the surrounding country; a fort commands the harbor.
  4. To overlook, or have in the power of the eye, without obstruction. One side commands a view of the finest garden in the world. – Addison.
  5. To direct; to send. The Lord shall command the blessing on thee. – Deut. xxviii. The Lord will command his loving kindness. – Ps. xlii.
  6. To have or to exercise a controlling influence over; as, a good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.

Com*mand"
  1. To order with authority] to lay injunction upon; to direct; to bid; to charge.

    We are commanded to forgive our enemies, but you never read that we are commanded to forgive our friends.
    Bacon.

    Go to your mistress:
    Say, I command her come to me.
    Shak.

  2. To have or to exercise direct authority; to govern; to sway; to influence; to give an order or orders.

    And reigned, commanding in his monarchy.
    Shak.

    For the king had so commanded concerning [Haman].
    Esth. iii. 2.

  3. An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction.

    Awaiting what command their mighty chief
    Had to impose.
    Milton.

  4. To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to have at one's disposal; to lead.

    Monmouth commanded the English auxiliaries.
    Macaulay.

    Such aid as I can spare you shall command.
    Shak.

  5. To have a view, as from a superior position.

    Far and wide his eye commands.
    Milton.

  6. The possession or exercise of authority.

    Command and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.
    Locke.

  7. To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.

    Bridges commanded by a fortified house.
    Motley.

    Up to the eastern tower,
    Whose height commands as subject all the vale.
    Shak.

    One side commands a view of the finest garden.
    Addison.

  8. Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command.
  9. To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price.

    'Tis not in mortals to command success.
    Addison.

  10. Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey.

    The steepy stand
    Which overlooks the vale with wide command.
    Dryden.

  11. To direct to come; to bestow.

    [Obs.]

    I will command my blessing upon you.
    Lev. xxv. 21.

    Syn. -- To bid; order; direct; dictate; charge; govern; rule; overlook.

  12. Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge.

    He assumed an absolute command over his readers.
    Dryden.

  13. A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer.

    Word of command (Mil.), a word or phrase of definite and established meaning, used in directing the movements of soldiers; as, aim; fire; shoulder arms, etc.

    Syn. -- Control; sway; power; authority; rule; dominion; sovereignty; mandate; order; injunction; charge; behest. See Direction.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Command

COMMAND, verb transitive

1. To bid; to order; to direct; to charge; implying authority, and power to control, and to require obedience.

We will sacrifice to the Lord our God, as he shall command us. Exodus 8:27.

I know that he [Abraham] will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord. Genesis 18:19.

2. To govern, lead or direct; to have or to exercise supreme authority over.

Lord Wellington commanded an army in Spain; he commanded the army at the battle of Waterloo.

3. To have in power; to be able to exercise power or authority over; as, a military post commands the surrounding country; a fort commands the harbor.

4. To overlook, or have in the power of the eye, without obstruction.

One side commands a view of the finest garden in the world.

5. To direct; to send.

The Lord shall command the blessing on thee. Deuteronomy 28:1.

The Lord will command his loving kindness. Psalms 43:1.

6. To have or to exercise a controlling influence over.

A good magistrate commands the respect and affections of the people.

COMMAND, verb intransitive To have or to exercise supreme authority; to possess the chief power; to govern; as, the general commands with dignity and humanity. What general commands in Canada?

COMMAND, noun

1. The right or power of governing with chief or exclusive authority; supreme power; control; as, an officer has a brigade under his command; he takes command of the army in France; an appropriate military term.

2. The power of controlling; governing influence; sway.

He assumed an absolute command over his readers.

3. Cogent or absolute authority.

COMMAND and force may often create, but can never cure, an aversion.

4. The act of commanding; the mandate uttered; order given.

The captain gives command

5. The power of overlooking, or surveying, without obstruction.

The steepy strand, Which overlooks the vale with wide command

6. The power of governing or controlling by force, or of defending and protecting.

The fortress has complete command of the port.

7. That which is commanded control; as a body of troop under command

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Its definitions of words from the KJV Bible are more inline with the definitions of the Greek and Hebrew text than more modern dictionaries.

— Rich

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

unnerved

UNNERV'ED, pp.

1. Deprived of strength.

2. a. Weak; feeble.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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