HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Friday - January 17, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [church]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

church

CHURCH, n.

1. A house consecrated to the worship of God, among Christians; the Lords house. This seems to be the original meaning of the word. The Greek, to call out or call together, denotes an assembly or collection. But, Lord, a term applied by the early Christians to Jesus Christ; and the house in which they worshipped was named from the title. So church goods, bona ecclesiastica; the Lords day, dies dominica.

2. The collective body of Christians, or of those who profess to believe in Christ, and acknowledge him to be the Savior of mankind. In this sense, the church is sometimes called the Catholic or Universal Church.

3. A particular number of christens, united under one form of ecclesiastical government, in one creed, and using the same ritual and ceremonies; as the English church; the Gallican church; the Presbyterian church; the Romish church; the Greek church.

4. The followers of Christ in a particular city or province; as the church of Ephesus, or of Antioch.

5. The disciples of Christ assembled for worship in a particular place, as in a private house. Col. 4.

6. The worshipers of Jehovah or the true God, before the advent of Christ; as the Jewish church.

7. The body of clergy, or ecclesiastics, in distinction from the laity. Hence, ecclesiastical authority.

8. An assembly of sacred rulers convened in Christs name to execute his laws.

9. The collective body of Christians, who have made a public profession of the Christian religion, and who are untied under the same pastor; in distinction from those who belong to the same parish, or ecclesiastical society, but have made no profession of their faith.

CHURCH, v.t. To perform with any one the office of returning thanks in the church, after any signal deliverance, as from the dangers of childbirth.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [church]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CHURCH, n.

1. A house consecrated to the worship of God, among Christians; the Lords house. This seems to be the original meaning of the word. The Greek, to call out or call together, denotes an assembly or collection. But, Lord, a term applied by the early Christians to Jesus Christ; and the house in which they worshipped was named from the title. So church goods, bona ecclesiastica; the Lords day, dies dominica.

2. The collective body of Christians, or of those who profess to believe in Christ, and acknowledge him to be the Savior of mankind. In this sense, the church is sometimes called the Catholic or Universal Church.

3. A particular number of christens, united under one form of ecclesiastical government, in one creed, and using the same ritual and ceremonies; as the English church; the Gallican church; the Presbyterian church; the Romish church; the Greek church.

4. The followers of Christ in a particular city or province; as the church of Ephesus, or of Antioch.

5. The disciples of Christ assembled for worship in a particular place, as in a private house. Col. 4.

6. The worshipers of Jehovah or the true God, before the advent of Christ; as the Jewish church.

7. The body of clergy, or ecclesiastics, in distinction from the laity. Hence, ecclesiastical authority.

8. An assembly of sacred rulers convened in Christs name to execute his laws.

9. The collective body of Christians, who have made a public profession of the Christian religion, and who are untied under the same pastor; in distinction from those who belong to the same parish, or ecclesiastical society, but have made no profession of their faith.

CHURCH, v.t. To perform with any one the office of returning thanks in the church, after any signal deliverance, as from the dangers of childbirth.


CHURCH, v.t.

To perform with any one the office of returning thanks in the church, after any signal deliverance, as from the dangers of childbirth. – Johnson.


CHURCH, n. [Sax. circe, circ, or cyric; Scots, kirk, which retains the Saxon pronunciation; D. kerk; G. kirche; Sw. kyrckia; Dan. kirke; Gr. κυριακον, a temple of God, from κυριακος, pertaining to a Lord, or to our Lord Jesus Christ, from κυριος, a Lord; Russ. tzerkov.]

  1. A house consecrated to the worship of God, among Christians; the Lord's house. This seems to be the original meaning of the word. The Greek εκκλησια, from εκκαλεω, to call out or call together, denotes an assembly or collection. But κυριακος, κυριακον, are from κυριος, Lord, a term applied by the early Christians to Jesus Christ; and the house in which they worshiped was named from that title. So κυριακα signifies church goods, bona ecclesiastica; κυριακη, sc. ἠμερα, the Lord's day, dies dominica.
  2. The collective body of Christians, or of those who profess to believe in Christ, and acknowledge him to be the Savior of mankind. In this sense, the church is sometimes called, the Catholic or Universal Church. – Johnson. Encyc.
  3. A particular number of Christians, united under one form of ecclesiastical government, in one creed, and using the same ritual and ceremonies; as, the English church; the Gallican church; the Presbyterian church; the Romish church; the Greek church.
  4. The followers of Christ in a particular city or province; as, the church of Ephesus, or of Antioch.
  5. The disciples of Christ assembled for worship in a particular place, as in a private house. Col. iv. [See No. 9.]
  6. The worshipers of Jehovah, or the true God, before the advent of Christ; as, the Jewish church.
  7. The body of clergy, or ecclesiastics, in distinction from the laity. Hence, ecclesiastical authority. – Encyc.
  8. An assembly of sacred rulers convened in Christ's name to execute his laws. – Cruden. Brown.
  9. The collective body of Christians, who have made a public profession of the Christian religion, and who are united under the same pastor; in distinction from those who belong to the same parish, or ecclesiastical society, but have made no profession of their faith.

Church
  1. A building set apart for Christian worship.
  2. To bless according to a prescribed form, or to unite with in publicly returning thanks in church, as after deliverance from the dangers of childbirth] as, the churching of women.
  3. A Jewish or heathen temple.

    [Obs.] Acts xix. 37.
  4. A formally organized body of Christian believers worshiping together.

    "When they had ordained them elders in every church." Acts xiv. 23.
  5. A body of Christian believers, holding the same creed, observing the same rites, and acknowledging the same ecclesiastical authority; a denomination; as, the Roman Catholic church; the Presbyterian church.
  6. The collective body of Christians.
  7. Any body of worshipers; as, the Jewish church; the church of Brahm.
  8. The aggregate of religious influences in a community; ecclesiastical influence, authority, etc.; as, to array the power of the church against some moral evil.

    Remember that both church and state are properly the rulers of the people, only because they are their benefactors.
    Bulwer.

    * Church is often used in composition to denote something belonging or relating to the church; as, church authority; church history; church member; church music, etc.

    Apostolic church. See under Apostolic. -- Broad church. See Broad Church. -- Catholic or Universal church, the whole body of believers in Christ throughout the world. -- Church of England, or English church, the Episcopal church established and endowed in England by law. -- Church living, a benefice in an established church. - - Church militant. See under Militant. -- Church owl (Zoöl.), the white owl. See Barn owl. -- Church rate, a tax levied on parishioners for the maintenance of the church and its services. -- Church session. See under Session. -- Church triumphant. See under Triumphant. -- Church work, work on, or in behalf of, a church; the work of a particular church for the spread of religion. -- Established church, the church maintained by the civil authority; a state church.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

87

658

71

708

103

709
Church

CHURCH, noun

1. A house consecrated to the worship of God, among Christians; the Lords house. This seems to be the original meaning of the word. The Greek, to call out or call together, denotes an assembly or collection. But, Lord, a term applied by the early Christians to Jesus Christ; and the house in which they worshipped was named from the title. So church goods, bona ecclesiastica; the Lords day, dies dominica.

2. The collective body of Christians, or of those who profess to believe in Christ, and acknowledge him to be the Savior of mankind. In this sense, the church is sometimes called the Catholic or Universal church

3. A particular number of Christians, united under one form of ecclesiastical government, in one creed, and using the same ritual and ceremonies; as the English church; the Gallican church; the Presbyterian church; the Romish church; the Greek church

4. The followers of Christ in a particular city or province; as the church of Ephesus, or of Antioch.

5. The disciples of Christ assembled for worship in a particular place, as in a private house. Colossians 4:15.

6. The worshipers of Jehovah or the true God, before the advent of Christ; as the Jewish church

7. The body of clergy, or ecclesiastics, in distinction from the laity. Hence, ecclesiastical authority.

8. An assembly of sacred rulers convened in Christs name to execute his laws.

9. The collective body of Christians, who have made a public profession of the Christian religion, and who are untied under the same pastor; in distinction from those who belong to the same parish, or ecclesiastical society, but have made no profession of their faith.

CHURCH, verb transitive To perform with any one the office of returning thanks in the church after any signal deliverance, as from the dangers of childbirth.

Why 1828?

0
6
 


Bible references, not as corrupted as new dictionaries.

— Doc (Cleveland, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

training

TRA'INING, ppr. Drawing; alluring; educating; teaching and forming by practice.

TRA'INING, n. The act or process of drawing or educating; education. In gardening, the operation or art of forming young trees to a wall or espalier, or of causing them to grow in a shape suitable for that end.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

190

369

Compact Edition

151

129

CD-ROM

117

98

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.299 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top