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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [character]

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character

CHARACTER, n.

1. A mark made by cutting or engraving, as on stone, metal or other hard material; hence, a mark or figure made with a pen or style, on paper, or other material used to contain writing; a letter, or figure used to form words, and communicate ideas. Characters are literal, as the letters of an alphabet; numeral, as the arithmetical figures; emblematical or symbolical, which express things or ideas; and abbreviations, as C. For centrum, a hundred; lb. For libra, a pound; A.D. Anno domini; &c.

2. A mark or figure made by stamping or impression, as on coins.

3. The manner of writing; the peculiar from of letters used by a particular person.

You know the character to be your brothers

4. The peculiar qualities, impressed by nature or habit on a person, which distinguish him from others; these constitute real character, and the qualities which he is supposed to possess, constitute his estimated character, or reputation. Hence we say, a character is not formed, when the person has not acquired stable and distinctive qualities.

5. An account, description or representation of any thing, exhibiting its qualities and the circumstances attending it; as, to give a bad character o a town, or to a road.

6. A person; as, the assembly consisted of various characters, eminent characters, and low characters.

All the characters in the play appeared to advantage.

The friendship of distinguished characters.

7. By way of eminence, distinguished or good qualities; those which are esteemed and respected; and those which are ascribed to a person in common estimation. We enquire whether a stranger is a man of character.

8. Adventitious qualities impressed by office, or station; the qualities that, in public estimation, belong to a person in a particular station; as when we ask how a magistrate, or commander supports his character.

9. In natural history, the peculiar discriminating qualities or properties of animals, plants and minerals.

These properties, when employed for the purpose of discriminating minerals, are called characters.

CHARACTER, v.t.

1. To engrave; to inscribe.

2. A particular aspect or configuration of the heavens.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [character]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CHARACTER, n.

1. A mark made by cutting or engraving, as on stone, metal or other hard material; hence, a mark or figure made with a pen or style, on paper, or other material used to contain writing; a letter, or figure used to form words, and communicate ideas. Characters are literal, as the letters of an alphabet; numeral, as the arithmetical figures; emblematical or symbolical, which express things or ideas; and abbreviations, as C. For centrum, a hundred; lb. For libra, a pound; A.D. Anno domini; &c.

2. A mark or figure made by stamping or impression, as on coins.

3. The manner of writing; the peculiar from of letters used by a particular person.

You know the character to be your brothers

4. The peculiar qualities, impressed by nature or habit on a person, which distinguish him from others; these constitute real character, and the qualities which he is supposed to possess, constitute his estimated character, or reputation. Hence we say, a character is not formed, when the person has not acquired stable and distinctive qualities.

5. An account, description or representation of any thing, exhibiting its qualities and the circumstances attending it; as, to give a bad character o a town, or to a road.

6. A person; as, the assembly consisted of various characters, eminent characters, and low characters.

All the characters in the play appeared to advantage.

The friendship of distinguished characters.

7. By way of eminence, distinguished or good qualities; those which are esteemed and respected; and those which are ascribed to a person in common estimation. We enquire whether a stranger is a man of character.

8. Adventitious qualities impressed by office, or station; the qualities that, in public estimation, belong to a person in a particular station; as when we ask how a magistrate, or commander supports his character.

9. In natural history, the peculiar discriminating qualities or properties of animals, plants and minerals.

These properties, when employed for the purpose of discriminating minerals, are called characters.

CHARACTER, v.t.

1. To engrave; to inscribe.

2. A particular aspect or configuration of the heavens.

CHAR'AC-TER, n. [L. character; Fr. caractère; Sp. caracter; It. carattere; Gr. χαρακτηρ, from the verb χαρασσω, χαραττω, χαραξω, to scrape, cut, engrave.]

  1. A mark made by cutting or engraving, as on stone, metal or other hard material; hence, a mark or figure made with a pen or style, on paper, or other material used to contain writing; a letter or figure used to form words, and communicate ideas. Characters are: literal, as the letters of an alphabet; numeral, as the arithmetical figures; emblematical or symbolical, which express things or ideas; and abbreviations, as C. for centum, a hundred; lb. for libra, a pound; A. D. Anno Domini; &c.
  2. A mark or figure made by stamping or impression, as on coins.
  3. The manner of writing; the peculiar form of letters used by a particular person. You know the character to be your brother's. – Shak.
  4. The peculiar qualities, impressed by nature or habit on a person, which distinguish him from others; these constitute real character, and the qualities which he is supposed to possess, constitute his estimated character, or reputation. Hence we say, a character is not formed, when the person has not acquired stable and distinctive qualities.
  5. An account, description or representation of any thing, exhibiting its qualities and the circumstances attending it; as, to give a bad character to a town, or to a road.
  6. A person; as, the assembly consisted of various characters, eminent characters, and low characters; all the characters in the play appeared to advantage. The friendship of distinguished characters. – Roscoe.
  7. By way of eminence, distinguished or good qualities; those which are esteemed and respected; and those which are ascribed to a person in common estimation. We inquire whether a stranger is a man of character.
  8. Adventurous qualities impressed by office, or station; the qualities that, in public estimation, belong to a person in a particular station, as when we ask how a magistrate or commander supports his character.
  9. In natural history, the peculiar discriminating qualities or properties of animals, plants and minerals. These properties, when employed for the purpose of discriminating minerals, are called characters. – Cleaveland.
  10. Distinction of quality of any kind strongly marked; as a man is said to have no character, or a great deal of character.

CHAR'AC-TER, v.t.

  1. To engrave; to inscribe. – Milton. Shak.
  2. To describe; to distinguish by particular marks or traits. – Mitford.

Char"ac*ter
  1. A distinctive mark; a letter, figure, or symbol.

    It were much to be wished that there were throughout the world but one sort of character for each letter to express it to the eye.
    Holder.

  2. To engrave] to inscribe.

    [R.]

    These trees shall be my books.
    And in their barks my thoughts I 'll character.
    Shak.

  3. Style of writing or printing; handwriting; the peculiar form of letters used by a particular person or people; as, an inscription in the Runic character.

    You know the character to be your brother's?
    Shak.

  4. To distinguish by particular marks or traits; to describe; to characterize.

    [R.] Mitford.

  5. The peculiar quality, or the sum of qualities, by which a person or a thing is distinguished from others; the stamp impressed by nature, education, or habit; that which a person or thing really is; nature; disposition.

    The character or that dominion.
    Milton.

    Know well each Ancient's proper character;
    His fable, subject, scope in every page;
    Religion, Country, genius of his Age.
    Pope.

    A man of . . . thoroughly subservient character.
    Motley.

  6. Strength of mind; resolution; independence; individuality; as, he has a great deal of character.
  7. Moral quality; the principles and motives that control the life; as, a man of character; his character saves him from suspicion.
  8. Quality, position, rank, or capacity; quality or conduct with respect to a certain office or duty; as, in the miserable character of a slave; in his character as a magistrate; her character as a daughter.
  9. The estimate, individual or general, put upon a person or thing; reputation; as, a man's character for truth and veracity; to give one a bad character.

    This subterraneous passage is much mended since Seneca gave so bad a character of it.
    Addison.

  10. A written statement as to behavior, competency, etc., given to a servant.

    [Colloq.]
  11. A unique or extraordinary individuality; a person characterized by peculiar or notable traits; a person who illustrates certain phases of character; as, Randolph was a character; Cæsar is a great historical character.
  12. One of the persons of a drama or novel.

    * "It would be well if character and reputation were used distinctively. In truth, character is what a person is; reputation is what he is supposed to be. Character is in himself, reputation is in the minds of others. Character is injured by temptations, and by wrongdoing; reputation by slanders, and libels. Character endures throughout defamation in every form, but perishes when there is a voluntary transgression; reputation may last through numerous transgressions, but be destroyed by a single, and even an unfounded, accusation or aspersion." Abbott.

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Character
CHARACTER, noun

1. A mark made by cutting or engraving, as on stone, metal or other hard material; hence, a mark or figure made with a pen or style, on paper, or other material used to contain writing; a letter, or figure used to form words, and communicate ideas. Characters are literal, as the letters of an alphabet; numeral, as the arithmetical figures; emblematical or symbolical, which express things or ideas; and abbreviations, as C. For centrum, a hundred; lb. For libra, a pound; adjective D. Anno domini; etc.

2. A mark or figure made by stamping or impression, as on coins.

3. The manner of writing; the peculiar from of letters used by a particular person.

You know the character to be your brothers

4. The peculiar qualities, impressed by nature or habit on a person, which distinguish him from others; these constitute real character, and the qualities which he is supposed to possess, constitute his estimated character, or reputation. Hence we say, a character is not formed, when the person has not acquired stable and distinctive qualities.

5. An account, description or representation of any thing, exhibiting its qualities and the circumstances attending it; as, to give a bad character o a town, or to a road.

6. A person; as, the assembly consisted of various characters, eminent characters, and low characters.

All the characters in the play appeared to advantage.

The friendship of distinguished characters.

7. By way of eminence, distinguished or good qualities; those which are esteemed and respected; and those which are ascribed to a person in common estimation. We enquire whether a stranger is a man of character.

8. Adventitious qualities impressed by office, or station; the qualities that, in public estimation, belong to a person in a particular station; as when we ask how a magistrate, or commander supports his character.

9. In natural history, the peculiar discriminating qualities or properties of animals, plants and minerals.

These properties, when employed for the purpose of discriminating minerals, are called characters.

CHARACTER, verb transitive

1. To engrave; to inscribe.

2. A particular aspect or configuration of the heavens.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

paper-maker

PA'PER-MAKER, n. One that manufactures paper.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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