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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [chancellor]

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chancellor

CHANCELLOR, n. Ordinally, a chief notary or scribe, under the Roman Emperors; but in England, in later times, an officer invested with judicial powers, and particularly with the superintendence of all charters, letters and other official writings of the crown, that required to be solemnly authenticated. Hence this officer became the keeper of the great seal. From the Roman Empire, this office passed to the church, and hence every bishop has his chancellor.

The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Keeper of the Great Seal, is the highest officer of the crown. He is a privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the house of lords by prescription. To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace; he is keeper of the kings conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high court of chancery.

Chancellor of an Ecclesiastical Court, is the bishops lawyer, versed in the civil and canon law, to direct the bishop in causes of the church, civil and criminal.

Chancellor of a Cathedral, is an officer who hears lessons and lectures in the church, by himself or his vicar, inspects schools, hears causes, applies the seal, writes and dispatches letter of the chapter, keeps the books, &c.

Chancellor of the Exchequer, is an officer who presides in that court, and takes care of the interest of the crown. He has power, with the lord treasurer, to lease the crown lands, and with others, to compound for forfeitures on penal statutes. He has a great authority in managing the royal revenues, and in matters relating to the first fruits.

Chancellor of a University, is an officer who seals the diplomas, or letters of degree, &c. The chancellor of Oxford is usually one of the prime nobility, elected by the students in convocation, and he holds the office for life. He is the chief magistrate in the government of the university. The chancellor of Cambridge is also elected from among the prime nobility; he does not hold his office for life, but may be elected every three years.

Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and other military orders, is an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts under the seal of their order.

In France, a secretary is, in some cases, called a chancellor.

In the United States, a chancellor is the judge o a court of chancery or equity, established by statute.

In scripture, a mater of the decrees, or president of the council. Ezra 4.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [chancellor]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CHANCELLOR, n. Ordinally, a chief notary or scribe, under the Roman Emperors; but in England, in later times, an officer invested with judicial powers, and particularly with the superintendence of all charters, letters and other official writings of the crown, that required to be solemnly authenticated. Hence this officer became the keeper of the great seal. From the Roman Empire, this office passed to the church, and hence every bishop has his chancellor.

The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Keeper of the Great Seal, is the highest officer of the crown. He is a privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the house of lords by prescription. To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace; he is keeper of the kings conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high court of chancery.

Chancellor of an Ecclesiastical Court, is the bishops lawyer, versed in the civil and canon law, to direct the bishop in causes of the church, civil and criminal.

Chancellor of a Cathedral, is an officer who hears lessons and lectures in the church, by himself or his vicar, inspects schools, hears causes, applies the seal, writes and dispatches letter of the chapter, keeps the books, &c.

Chancellor of the Exchequer, is an officer who presides in that court, and takes care of the interest of the crown. He has power, with the lord treasurer, to lease the crown lands, and with others, to compound for forfeitures on penal statutes. He has a great authority in managing the royal revenues, and in matters relating to the first fruits.

Chancellor of a University, is an officer who seals the diplomas, or letters of degree, &c. The chancellor of Oxford is usually one of the prime nobility, elected by the students in convocation, and he holds the office for life. He is the chief magistrate in the government of the university. The chancellor of Cambridge is also elected from among the prime nobility; he does not hold his office for life, but may be elected every three years.

Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and other military orders, is an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts under the seal of their order.

In France, a secretary is, in some cases, called a chancellor.

In the United States, a chancellor is the judge o a court of chancery or equity, established by statute.

In scripture, a mater of the decrees, or president of the council. Ezra 4.

CHAN'CEL-LOR, n. [Fr. chancelier; Arm. chanceilher, or canceller; Sp. canciller; Port. chanceller; It. cancelliere; D. kanselier; G. kanzler; Sw. cantsler; Dan. kantsler or cantsler; L. cancellarius, a scribe, secretary, notary, or chancellor; from cancello, to make lattice work, to cancel, or blot out by crossing the lines; or from cancelli, lattices, because the secretary sat behind lattices.]

Originally, a chief notary or scribe, under the Roman Emperors; but in England, in later times, an officer invested with judicial powers, and particularly with the superintendence of all charters, letters and other official writings of the crown, that required to be solemnly authenticated. Hence this officer became the keeper of the great seal. From the Roman Empire, this office passed to the church, and hence every bishop has his chancellor. The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Keeper of the Great Seal, is the highest officer of the crown. He is a privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the house of lords by prescription. To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace; he is keeper of the king's conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high court of chancery. Chancellor of an Ecclesiastical Court, is the bishop's lawyer, versed in the civil and canon law, to direct the bishop in causes of the church, civil and criminal. Chancellor of a Cathedral, is an officer who hears lessons and lectures in the church, by himself or his vicar, inspects schools, hears causes, applies the seal, writes and dispatches letters of the chapter, keeps the books, &c. Chancellor of the Exchequer, is an officer who presides in that court, and takes care of the interest of the crown. He has power, with the lord treasurer, to lease the crown lands, and with others, to compound for forfeitures on penal statutes. He has a great authority in managing the royal revenues, and in matters relating to the first fruits. Chancellor of a University, is an officer who seals the diplomas, or letters of degree, &c. The chancellor of Oxford is usually one of the prime nobility, elected by the students in convocation, and he holds the office for life. He is the chief magistrate in the government of the university. The chancellor of Cambridge is also elected from among the prime nobility; he does not hold his office for life, but may be elected every three years. Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and other military orders, is an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts under the seal of their order. – Johnson. Encyc. In France, a secretary is, in some cases, called a chancellor. In the United States, a chancellor is the judge of a court of chancery or equity, established by statute. In Scripture, a master of the decrees, or president of the council. Ezra iv.


Chan"cel*lor
  1. A judicial court of chancery, which in England and in the United States is distinctively a court with equity jurisdiction.

    * The chancellor was originally a chief scribe or secretary under the Roman emperors, but afterward was invested with judicial powers, and had superintendence over the other officers of the empire. From the Roman empire this office passed to the church, and every bishop has his chancellor, the principal judge of his consistory. In later times, in most countries of Europe, the chancellor was a high officer of state, keeper of the great seal of the kingdom, and having the supervision of all charters, and like public instruments of the crown, which were authenticated in the most solemn manner. In France a secretary is in some cases called a chancellor. In Scotland, the appellation is given to the foreman of a jury, or assize. In the present German empire, the chancellor is the president of the federal council and the head of the imperial administration. In the United States, the title is given to certain judges of courts of chancery or equity, established by the statutes of separate States. Blackstone. Wharton.

    Chancellor of a bishop, or of a diocese (R. C. Ch. *** ch. of Eng.), a law officer appointed to hold the bishop's court in his diocese, and to assist him in matter of ecclesiastical law. -- Chancellor of a cathedral, one of the four chief dignitaries of the cathedrals of the old foundation, and an officer whose duties are chiefly educational, with special reference to the cultivation of theology. -- Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, an officer before whom, or his deputy, the court of the duchy chamber of Lancaster is held. This is a special jurisdiction. -- Chancellor of a university, the chief officer of a collegiate body. In Oxford, he is elected for life] in Cambridge, for a term of years; and his office is honorary, the chief duties of it devolving on the vice chancellor. -- Chancellor of the exchequer, a member of the British cabinet upon whom devolves the charge of the public income and expenditure as the highest finance minister of the government. -- Chancellor of the order of the Garter (or other military orders), an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts under the seal of their order. -- Lord high chancellor of England, the presiding judge in the court of chancery, the highest judicial officer of the crown, and the first lay person of the state after the blood royal. He is created chancellor by the delivery into his custody of the great seal, of which he becomes keeper. He is privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the House of Lords by prescription.

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Chancellor

CHANCELLOR, noun Ordinally, a chief notary or scribe, under the Roman Emperors; but in England, in later times, an officer invested with judicial powers, and particularly with the superintendence of all charters, letters and other official writings of the crown, that required to be solemnly authenticated. Hence this officer became the keeper of the great seal. From the Roman Empire, this office passed to the church, and hence every bishop has his chancellor

The Lord High chancellor of Great Britain, or Keeper of the Great Seal, is the highest officer of the crown. He is a privy counselor by his office, and prolocutor of the house of lords by prescription. To him belongs the appointment of all justices of the peace; he is keeper of the kings conscience, visitor of all hospitals and colleges founded by the king, guardian of all charitable uses, and judge of the high court of chancery.

CHANCELLOR of an Ecclesiastical Court, is the bishops lawyer, versed in the civil and canon law, to direct the bishop in causes of the church, civil and criminal.

CHANCELLOR of a Cathedral, is an officer who hears lessons and lectures in the church, by himself or his vicar, inspects schools, hears causes, applies the seal, writes and dispatches letter of the chapter, keeps the books, etc.

CHANCELLOR of the Exchequer, is an officer who presides in that court, and takes care of the interest of the crown. He has power, with the lord treasurer, to lease the crown lands, and with others, to compound for forfeitures on penal statutes. He has a great authority in managing the royal revenues, and in matters relating to the first fruits.

CHANCELLOR of a University, is an officer who seals the diplomas, or letters of degree, etc. The chancellor of Oxford is usually one of the prime nobility, elected by the students in convocation, and he holds the office for life. He is the chief magistrate in the government of the university. The chancellor of Cambridge is also elected from among the prime nobility; he does not hold his office for life, but may be elected every three years.

CHANCELLOR of the Order of the Garter, and other military orders, is an officer who seals the commissions and mandates of the chapter and assembly of the knights, keeps the register of their proceedings, and delivers their acts under the seal of their order.

In France, a secretary is, in some cases, called a chancellor

In the United States, a chancellor is the judge o a court of chancery or equity, established by statute.

In scripture, a mater of the decrees, or president of the council. Ezra 4:8.

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God's original intentions behind words are important to me.

— biblical definitions

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

cariated

CARIATED, a. Carious. [See Carious.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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