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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ceremony]

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ceremony

CEREMONY, n.

1. Outward rite; external form in religion.

2. Forms of civility; rules established by custom for regulating social intercourse.

3. Outward forms of state; the forms prescribed or established by order or custom, serving for the purpose of civility or magnificence, as in levees of princes, the reception of ambassadors, &c.

Master of ceremonies, an officer who superintends the reception of ambassadors. A person who regulates the forms to be observed by the company or attendants on a public occasion.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ceremony]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CEREMONY, n.

1. Outward rite; external form in religion.

2. Forms of civility; rules established by custom for regulating social intercourse.

3. Outward forms of state; the forms prescribed or established by order or custom, serving for the purpose of civility or magnificence, as in levees of princes, the reception of ambassadors, &c.

Master of ceremonies, an officer who superintends the reception of ambassadors. A person who regulates the forms to be observed by the company or attendants on a public occasion.

CER'E-MO-NY, n. [L. Sp. It. Port. ceremonia; Fr. ceremonie.]

  1. Outward rite; external form in religion.
  2. Forms of civility; rules established by custom for regulating social intercourse.
  3. Outward forms of state; the forms prescribed or established by order or custom, serving for the purpose of civility or magnificence, as in levees of princes, the reception of embassadors, &c. Master of ceremonies, an officer who superintends the reception of embassadors. A person who regulates the forms to be observed by the company or attendants on a public occasion.

Cer"e*mo*ny
  1. Ar act or series of acts, often of a symbolical character, prescribed by law, custom, or authority, in the conduct of important matters, as in the performance of religious duties, the transaction of affairs of state, and the celebration of notable events; as, the ceremony of crowning a sovereign; the ceremonies observed in consecrating a church; marriage and baptismal ceremonies.

    According to all the rites of it, and according to all the ceremonies thereof shall ye keep it [the Passover].
    Numb. ix. 3

    Bring her up the high altar, that she may
    The sacred ceremonies there partake.
    Spenser.

    [The heralds] with awful ceremony
    And trumpet's sound, throughout the host proclaim
    A solemn council.
    Milton.

  2. Behavior regulated by strict etiquette; a formal method of performing acts of civility; forms of civility prescribed by custom or authority.

    Ceremony was but devised at first
    To set a gloss on . . . hollow welcomes . . .
    But where there is true friendship there needs none.
    Shak.

    Al ceremonies are in themselves very silly things; but yet a man of the world should know them.
    Chesterfield.

  3. A ceremonial symbols; an emblem, as a crown, scepter, garland, etc.

    [Obs.]

    Disrobe the images,
    If you find them decked with ceremonies.
    . . . Let no images
    Be hung with Cæsar's trophies.
    Shak.

  4. A sign or prodigy; a portent.

    [Obs.]

    Cæsar, I never stood on ceremonies,
    Yet, now they fright me.
    Shak.

    Master of ceremonies, an officer who determines the forms to be observed, or superintends their observance, on a public occasion. -- Not to stand on ceremony, not to be ceremonious; to be familiar, outspoken, or bold.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Ceremony

CEREMONY, noun

1. Outward rite; external form in religion.

2. Forms of civility; rules established by custom for regulating social intercourse.

3. Outward forms of state; the forms prescribed or established by order or custom, serving for the purpose of civility or magnificence, as in levees of princes, the reception of ambassadors, etc.

Master of ceremonies, an officer who superintends the reception of ambassadors. A person who regulates the forms to be observed by the company or attendants on a public occasion.

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Education

— Cindy (Clayton, NC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

window

WINDOW, n. [ G. The vulgar pronunciation is windor, as if from the Welsh gwyntdor, wind-door.]

1. An opening in the wall of a building for the admission of light, and of air when necessary. This opening has a frame on the sides, in which are set movable sashes, containing panes of glass. In the United Sates, the sashes are made to rise and fall, for the admission or exclusion of air. In France, windows are shut with frames or sashes that open and shut vertically, like the leaves of a folding door.

2. An aperture or opening.

A window shalt thou make to the ark. Genesis 6.

3. The frame or other thing that covers the aperture.

Ere I let fall the windows of mine eyes.

4. An aperture; or rather the clouds or water-spouts.

The windows of heaven were opened. Genesis 7.

5. Lattice or casement; or the network of wire used before the invention of glass. Judges 5.

6. Lines crossing each other.

Till he has windows on his bread and butter.

WINDOW, v.t.

1. To furnish with windows.

2. To place at a window. [Unusual.]

3. To break into openings. [Unusual.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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