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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [winter]

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winter

WINTER, n.

1. The cold season of the year. Astronomically considered, winter commences in northern latitudes when the sun enters Capricorn, or at the solstice about the 21st of December, and ends at the equinox in March; but in ordinary discourse, the three winter months are December, January, and February. Our Saxon ancestors reckoned the years by winters; as ten winters; thirty winters. In tropical climates, there are two winters annually; but they cannot be said to be cold. In the temperate and frigid climates, there is one winter only in the year.

2. The part of the printing press which sustains the carriage.

WINTER, v.i. To pass the winter. He wintered in Italy. Cattle winter well on good fodder.

WINTER, v.t. To feed or manage during the winter. To winter young cattle on straw, is not profitable. Delicate plants must be wintered under cover.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [winter]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WINTER, n.

1. The cold season of the year. Astronomically considered, winter commences in northern latitudes when the sun enters Capricorn, or at the solstice about the 21st of December, and ends at the equinox in March; but in ordinary discourse, the three winter months are December, January, and February. Our Saxon ancestors reckoned the years by winters; as ten winters; thirty winters. In tropical climates, there are two winters annually; but they cannot be said to be cold. In the temperate and frigid climates, there is one winter only in the year.

2. The part of the printing press which sustains the carriage.

WINTER, v.i. To pass the winter. He wintered in Italy. Cattle winter well on good fodder.

WINTER, v.t. To feed or manage during the winter. To winter young cattle on straw, is not profitable. Delicate plants must be wintered under cover.


WIN'TER, n. [Sax. G. D. Sw. and Dan.; from wind, or its root; Goth. wintrus.]

  1. The cold season of the year. Astronomically considered, winter commences in northern latitudes when the san enters Capricorn, or at the solstice about the 21st of December, and ends at the equinox in March; but in ordinary discourse, the three winter months are December, January, and February. Our Saxon ancestors reckoned the years by winters; as, ten winters; thirty winters. In tropical climates, there are two winters annually; but they can not be said to be cold. In the temperate and frigid climates, there is one winter only in the year.
  2. The part of a printing press which sustains the carriage.

WIN'TER, v.i.

To pass the winter. He wintered in Italy. Cattle winter well on good fodder.


WIN'TER, v.t.

To feed or manage during the winter. To winter young cattle on straw, is not profitable. Delicate plants must be wintered under cover.


Win"ter
  1. The season of the year in which the sun shines most obliquely upon any region; the coldest season of the year.

    "Of thirty winter he was old." Chaucer.

    And after summer evermore succeeds
    Barren winter, with his wrathful nipping cold.
    Shak.

    Winter lingering chills the lap of May. Goldsmith.

    * North of the equator, winter is popularly taken to include the months of December, January, and February (see Season). Astronomically, it may be considered to begin with the winter solstice, about December 21st, and to end with the vernal equinox, about March 21st.

  2. To pass the winter] to hibernate; as, to winter in Florida.

    Because the haven was not commodious to winter in, the more part advised to depart thence. Acts xxvii. 12.

  3. To keep, feed or manage, during the winter; as, to winter young cattle on straw.
  4. The period of decay, old age, death, or the like.

    Life's autumn past, I stand on winter's verge. Wordsworth.

    Winter apple, an apple that keeps well in winter, or that does not ripen until winter. -- Winter barley, a kind of barley that is sown in autumn. -- Winter berry (Bot.), the name of several American shrubs (Ilex verticillata, I. lævigata, etc.) of the Holly family, having bright red berries conspicuous in winter. -- Winter bloom. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Azalea. (b) A plant of the genus Hamamelis (H. Viginica); witch-hazel; -- so called from its flowers appearing late in autumn, while the leaves are falling. -- Winter bud (Zoöl.), a statoblast. -- Winter cherry (Bot.), a plant (Physalis Alkekengi) of the Nightshade family, which has, a red berry inclosed in the inflated and persistent calyx. See Alkekengi. -- Winter cough (Med.), a form of chronic bronchitis marked by a cough recurring each winter. -- Winter cress (Bot.), a yellow-flowered cruciferous plant (Barbarea vulgaris). -- Winter crop, a crop which will bear the winter, or which may be converted into fodder during the winter. -- Winter duck. (Zoöl.) (a) The pintail. (b) The old squaw. -- Winter egg (Zoöl.), an egg produced in the autumn by many invertebrates, and destined to survive the winter. Such eggs usually differ from the summer eggs in having a thicker shell, and often in being enveloped in a protective case. They sometimes develop in a manner different from that of the summer eggs. -- Winter fallow, ground that is fallowed in winter. -- Winter fat. (Bot.) Same as White sage, under White. -- Winter fever (Med.), pneumonia. [Colloq.] -- Winter flounder. (Zoöl.) See the Note under Flounder. -- Winter gull (Zoöl.), the common European gull; -- called also winter mew. [Prov. Eng.] -- Winter itch. (Med.) See Prarie itch, under Prairie. -- Winter lodge, or Winter lodgment. (Bot.) Same as Hibernaculum. -- Winter mew. (Zoöl.) Same as Winter gull, above. [Prov. Eng.] -- Winter moth (Zoöl.), any one of several species of geometrid moths which come forth in winter, as the European species (Cheimatobia brumata). These moths have rudimentary mouth organs, and eat no food in the imago state. The female of some of the species is wingless. -- Winter oil, oil prepared so as not to solidify in moderately cold weather. -- Winter pear, a kind of pear that keeps well in winter, or that does not ripen until winter. -- Winter quarters, the quarters of troops during the winter; a winter residence or station. -- Winter rye, a kind of rye that is sown in autumn. -- Winter shad (Zoöl.), the gizzard shad. -- Winter sheldrake (Zoöl.), the goosander. [Local, U. S.] -- Winter sleep (Zoöl.), hibernation. - - Winter snipe (Zoöl.), the dunlin. -- Winter solstice. (Astron.) See Solstice, 2. -- Winter teal (Zoöl.), the green-winged teal. -- Winter wagtail (Zoöl.), the gray wagtail (Motacilla melanope). [Prov. Eng.] -- Winter wheat, wheat sown in autumn, which lives during the winter, and ripens in the following summer. -- Winter wren (Zoöl.), a small American wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) closely resembling the common wren.

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Winter

WINTER, noun

1. The cold season of the year. Astronomically considered, winter commences in northern latitudes when the sun enters Capricorn, or at the solstice about the 21st of December, and ends at the equinox in March; but in ordinary discourse, the three winter months are December, January, and February. Our Saxon ancestors reckoned the years by winters; as ten winters; thirty winters. In tropical climates, there are two winters annually; but they cannot be said to be cold. In the temperate and frigid climates, there is one winter only in the year.

2. The part of the printing press which sustains the carriage.

WINTER, verb intransitive To pass the winter He wintered in Italy. Cattle winter well on good fodder.

WINTER, verb transitive To feed or manage during the winter To winter young cattle on straw, is not profitable. Delicate plants must be wintered under cover.

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Because he is a christian in first place, and his work was to mantain the principles of god with out distortion

— Raul valin (maldonado, ml)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

astound

ASTOUND', v.t. To astonish; to strike dumb with amazement.

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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