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Tuesday - October 4, 2022

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [wing]

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wing

WING, n.

1. The limb of a fowl by which it flies. In a few species of fowls, the wings do not enable them to fly; as is the case with the dodo, ostrich, great auk, and penguin; but in the two former, the wings assist the fowls in running.

2. The limb of an insect by which it flies.

3. In botany, the side petal of a papilionaceous corol; also, an appendage of seeds, by means of which they are wafted in the air and scattered; also, any membranous or leafy dilatation of a footstalk, or of the angles of a stem, branch or flower stalk, or of a calyx.

4. Flight; passage by the wind; as, to be on the wind; to take wing.

5. Means of flying; acceleration. Fear adds wings to flight.

6. Motive or incitement of flight.

Then fiery expedition be my wing.

7. The flank or extreme body or part of an army.

8. Any side-piece.

9. In gardening, a side-shoot.

10. In architecture, a side-building, less than the main edifice.

11. In fortification, the longer sides of hornworks, crown-works, &c.

12. In a fleet, the ships on the extremities, when ranged in a line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.

13. In a ship, the wings are those parts of the hold and orlop deck, which are nearest the sides.

14. In Scripture, protection; generally in the plural. Psalm 63. Exodus 19.

On the wings of the wind, with the utmost velocity. Psalm 18.

WING, v.t.

1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly or to move with celerity.

Who heaves old ocean, and who wings the storms.

2. To supply with side bodies; as on either side well winged.

3. To transport by flight.

I, an old turtle, will wing me to some witherd bough.

Edge the keen sword, and wing th unerring ball.

To wing a flight, to exert the power of flying.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [wing]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WING, n.

1. The limb of a fowl by which it flies. In a few species of fowls, the wings do not enable them to fly; as is the case with the dodo, ostrich, great auk, and penguin; but in the two former, the wings assist the fowls in running.

2. The limb of an insect by which it flies.

3. In botany, the side petal of a papilionaceous corol; also, an appendage of seeds, by means of which they are wafted in the air and scattered; also, any membranous or leafy dilatation of a footstalk, or of the angles of a stem, branch or flower stalk, or of a calyx.

4. Flight; passage by the wind; as, to be on the wind; to take wing.

5. Means of flying; acceleration. Fear adds wings to flight.

6. Motive or incitement of flight.

Then fiery expedition be my wing.

7. The flank or extreme body or part of an army.

8. Any side-piece.

9. In gardening, a side-shoot.

10. In architecture, a side-building, less than the main edifice.

11. In fortification, the longer sides of hornworks, crown-works, &c.

12. In a fleet, the ships on the extremities, when ranged in a line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.

13. In a ship, the wings are those parts of the hold and orlop deck, which are nearest the sides.

14. In Scripture, protection; generally in the plural. Psalm 63. Exodus 19.

On the wings of the wind, with the utmost velocity. Psalm 18.

WING, v.t.

1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly or to move with celerity.

Who heaves old ocean, and who wings the storms.

2. To supply with side bodies; as on either side well winged.

3. To transport by flight.

I, an old turtle, will wing me to some witherd bough.

Edge the keen sword, and wing th unerring ball.

To wing a flight, to exert the power of flying.

WING, n. [Sax. gehwing; Sw. and Dan. vinge. The word signifies the side, end or extremity.]

  1. The limb of a fowl by which it flies. In a few species of fowls, the wings do not enable them to fly; as is the case with the dodo, ostrich, great auk, and penguin; but in the two former, the wings assist the fowls in running.
  2. The limb of an insect by which flies.
  3. In botany, the side petal of a papilionaceous coral; also, an appendage of seeds, by means of which they are wafted in the air and scattered; also, any membranous or leafy dilatation of a footstalk, or of the angles of a stem, branch or flower-stalk, or of a calyx. – Martyn. Cyc.
  4. Flight; passage by the wing; as, to be on the wing; to take wing.
  5. Means of flying; acceleration. Fear adds wings to flight.
  6. Motive or incitement of flight. Then fiery expedition be my wing. – Shak.
  7. The flank or extreme body or part of an army. – Dryden.
  8. Any side-piece. – Mortimer.
  9. In gardening, a side-shoot. – Cyc.
  10. In architecture, a side building, less than the main edifice.
  11. In fortification, the longer sides of horn-works, crown-works, &c. – Cyc.
  12. In a fleet, the ships on the extremities, when ranged in a line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.
  13. In a ship, the wings are those parts of the hold and orlop deck, which are nearest the sides.
  14. In Scripture, protection; generally in the plural. – Ps. lxiii. Exod. xix. On the wings of the wind, with the utmost velocity. – Ps. xviii.

WING, v.t.

  1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly or to move with celerity. Who heaves old ocean, and who wings the storms. – Pope.
  2. To supply with side bodies; as, on either side well winged.
  3. To transport by flight. – I‚ an old turtle, / Will wing me to some wither'd bough. – Shak. Edge the keen sword, and wing th' unerring ball. – Trumbull. To wing a flight, to exert the power of flying.

Wing
  1. One of the two anterior limbs of a bird, pterodactyl, or bat. They correspond to the arms of man, and are usually modified for flight, but in the case of a few species of birds, as the ostrich, auk, etc., the wings are used only as an assistance in running or swimming.

    As an eagle stirreth up her nest, fluttereth over her young, spreadeth abroad her wings, taketh them, beareth them on her wings. Deut. xxxii. 11.

    * In the wing of a bird the long quill feathers are in series. The primaries are those attached to the ulnar side of the hand; the secondaries, or wing coverts, those of the forearm: the scapulars, those that lie over the humerus; and the bastard feathers, those of the short outer digit. See Illust. of Bird, and Plumage.

  2. To furnish with wings] to enable to fly, or to move with celerity.

    Who heaves old ocean, and whowings the storms. Pope.

    Living, to wing with mirth the weary hours. Longfellow.

  3. Any surface used primarily for supporting a flying machine in flight, whether by edge-on motion, or flapping, or rotation; specif., either of a pair of supporting planes of a flying machine.
  4. Any similar member or instrument used for the purpose of flying.

    Specifically: (Zoöl.) (a)
  5. To supply with wings or sidepieces.

    The main battle, whose puissance on either side
    Shall be well winged with our chiefest horse.
    Shak.

  6. Passage by flying; flight; as, to take wing.

    Light thickens; and the crow
    Makes wing to the rooky wood.
    Shak.

  7. To transport by flight; to cause to fly.

    I, an old turtle,
    Will wing me to some withered bough.
    Shak.

  8. Motive or instrument of flight; means of flight or of rapid motion.

    Fiery expedition be my wing. Shak.

  9. To move through in flight; to fly through.

    There's not an arrow wings the sky
    But fancy turns its point to him.
    Moore.

  10. Anything which agitates the air as a wing does, or which is put in winglike motion by the action of the air, as a fan or vane for winnowing grain, the vane or sail of a windmill, etc.
  11. To cut off the wings of; to wound in the wing; to disable a wing of; as, to wing a bird.

    To wing a flight, to exert the power of flying; to fly.

  12. An ornament worn on the shoulder; a small epaulet or shoulder knot.
  13. Any appendage resembling the wing of a bird or insect in shape or appearance.

    Specifically: (a) (Zoöl.)
  14. One of two corresponding appendages attached; a sidepiece.

    Hence: (a) (Arch.)
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Wing

WING, noun

1. The limb of a fowl by which it flies. In a few species of fowls, the wings do not enable them to fly; as is the case with the dodo, ostrich, great auk, and penguin; but in the two former, the wings assist the fowls in running.

2. The limb of an insect by which it flies.

3. In botany, the side petal of a papilionaceous corol; also, an appendage of seeds, by means of which they are wafted in the air and scattered; also, any membranous or leafy dilatation of a footstalk, or of the angles of a stem, branch or flower stalk, or of a calyx.

4. Flight; passage by the wind; as, to be on the wind; to take wing

5. Means of flying; acceleration. Fear adds wings to flight.

6. Motive or incitement of flight.

Then fiery expedition be my wing

7. The flank or extreme body or part of an army.

8. Any side-piece.

9. In gardening, a side-shoot.

10. In architecture, a side-building, less than the main edifice.

11. In fortification, the longer sides of hornworks, crown-works, etc.

12. In a fleet, the ships on the extremities, when ranged in a line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.

13. In a ship, the wings are those parts of the hold and orlop deck, which are nearest the sides.

14. In Scripture, protection; generally in the plural. Psalms 63:7. Exodus 19:4.

On the wings of the wind, with the utmost velocity. Psalms 18:10.

WING, verb transitive

1. To furnish with wings; to enable to fly or to move with celerity.

Who heaves old ocean, and who wings the storms.

2. To supply with side bodies; as on either side well winged.

3. To transport by flight.

I, an old turtle, will wing me to some witherd bough.

Edge the keen sword, and wing th unerring ball.

To wing a flight, to exert the power of flying.

Why 1828?

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It's importance shows me that it has stayed true to defining words and using the biblical references by not using slang as cultures form and change this dictionary does not. It also helps me in my school studies for ministry.

— Erica (Oak Park, IL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

prudential

PRUDEN'TIAL, a. Proceeding from prudence; dictated or prescribed by prudence; as prudential motives; prudential rules.

1. Superintending the discretionary concerns of a society; as a prudential committee.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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