HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Sunday - April 18, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [windy]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

windy

WINDY, a.

1. Consisting of wind; as a windy tempest.

2. Next the wind; as the windy side.

3. Tempestuous; boisterous; as windy weather.

4. Puffy; flatulent; abounding with wind.

5. Empty; airy; as windy joy.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [windy]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WINDY, a.

1. Consisting of wind; as a windy tempest.

2. Next the wind; as the windy side.

3. Tempestuous; boisterous; as windy weather.

4. Puffy; flatulent; abounding with wind.

5. Empty; airy; as windy joy.

WIND'Y, a.

  1. Consisting of wind; as, a windy tempest. – Shak.
  2. Next the wind; as, the windy side. – Shak.
  3. Tempestuous; boisterous; as, windy weather.
  4. Puffy; flatulent; abounding with wind. – Arbuthnot.
  5. Empty; airy; as, windy joy. – Milton.

Wind"y
  1. Consisting of wind; accompanied or characterized by wind; exposed to wind.

    "The windy hill." M. Arnold.

    Blown with the windy tempest of my heart. Shak.

  2. Next the wind; windward.

    It keeps on the windy side of care. Shak.

  3. Tempestuous; boisterous; as, windy weather.
  4. Serving to occasion wind or gas in the intestines; flatulent; as, windy food.
  5. Attended or caused by wind, or gas, in the intestines.

    "A windy colic." Arbuthnot.
  6. Fig.: Empty; airy.

    "Windy joy." Milton.

    Here's that windy applause, that poor, transitory pleasure, for which I was dishonored. South.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

103

753

88

820

131

835
Windy

WINDY, adjective

1. Consisting of wind; as a windy tempest.

2. Next the wind; as the windy side.

3. Tempestuous; boisterous; as windy weather.

4. Puffy; flatulent; abounding with wind.

5. Empty; airy; as windy joy.

WIND, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive wound. [G.]

1. To blow; to sound by blowing or inflation.

Wind the shrill horn.

2. To turn; to move, or cause to turn.

To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus.

3. To turn round some fixed object; to bind, or to form into a ball or coil by turning; as, to wind thread on a spool; to wind thread into a ball; to wind a rope into a coil.

4. To introduce by insinuation. The child winds himself into my affections.

They have little arts and dexterities to wind in such things into discourse.

5. To change; to vary.

Were our legislature vested in the prince, he might wind and turn our constitution at his pleasure.

6. To entwist; to enfold; to encircle.

7. [With I short, as in win.] To nose; to perceive or to follow by the scent; as, hounds wind an animal.

8. To ventilate; to expose to the wind; to winnow.

To wind off, [with I long.] To unwind.

To wind out, to extricate.

To wind up,

1. To bring to a small compass, as a ball of thread.

2. To bring to a conclusion or settlement; as, to wind up ones affairs.

3. To put in a state of renovated or continued motion.

Fate seemd to wind him up for fourscore years.

To wind up a clock, is to wind the cord by which the weights are suspended, round an axis or pin.

To wind up a watch, is to wind the spring round its axis or pin.

4. To raise by degrees.

Thus they wound up his temper to a pitch--

5. To straiten, as a string; to put in tune.

6. To put in order for regular action.

WIND, verb intransitive

1. To turn; to change.

So swift your judgments turn and wind.

2. To turn around something; as, vines wind around a pole.

3. To have a circular direction; as winding stairs.

4. To crook; to bend. The road winds in various places.

5. To move round; as, a hare pursued turns and winds.

To wind out, to be extricated; to escape.

Long labring underneath, ere they could wind out of such prison.

WINDER, noun One who winds.

Why 1828?

2
0
 


It's foundation is The Bible and Christianity

— John (Howell, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

repacifying

REPAC'IFYING, ppr. Pacifying again.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

242

424

Compact Edition

223

174

CD-ROM

180

137

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 2.173 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top