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Tuesday - June 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [whip]

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whip

WHIP, v.t. [L., a sweeping throw or thrust.]

1. To strike with a lash or sweeping cord; as, to whip a horse.

2. To sew slightly.

3. To drive with lashes; as, to whip a top.

4. To punish with the whip; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one thirty nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy.

Who, for false quantities, was whippd at school.

5. To lash with sarcasm.

They would whip me with their fine wits.

6. To strike; to thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat. [Not in use int he United States.]

To whip about or round, to wrap; to inwrap; as, to whip a line round a rod.

To whip out, to draw nimbly; to snatch; as, to whip out a sword or rapier from its sheath.

To whip from, to take away suddenly.

To whip into, to thrust in with a quick motion. He whipped his hand into his pocket.

To whip us, to seize or take up with a quick motion. She whipped up the child, and ran off. Among seamen, to hoist with a whip or small tackle.

WHIP, v.i. To move nimbly; to start suddenly and run; or to turn and run; as, the boy whipped away in an instant; he whipped round the corner; he whipped into the house, and was out of wight in a moment.

WHIP, n.

1. An instrument for driving horses or other teams, or for correction, consisting of a lash tied to a handle or rod.

2. In ships, a small tackle, used to hoist light bodies.

Whip and spur, with the utmost haste.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [whip]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WHIP, v.t. [L., a sweeping throw or thrust.]

1. To strike with a lash or sweeping cord; as, to whip a horse.

2. To sew slightly.

3. To drive with lashes; as, to whip a top.

4. To punish with the whip; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one thirty nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy.

Who, for false quantities, was whippd at school.

5. To lash with sarcasm.

They would whip me with their fine wits.

6. To strike; to thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat. [Not in use int he United States.]

To whip about or round, to wrap; to inwrap; as, to whip a line round a rod.

To whip out, to draw nimbly; to snatch; as, to whip out a sword or rapier from its sheath.

To whip from, to take away suddenly.

To whip into, to thrust in with a quick motion. He whipped his hand into his pocket.

To whip us, to seize or take up with a quick motion. She whipped up the child, and ran off. Among seamen, to hoist with a whip or small tackle.

WHIP, v.i. To move nimbly; to start suddenly and run; or to turn and run; as, the boy whipped away in an instant; he whipped round the corner; he whipped into the house, and was out of wight in a moment.

WHIP, n.

1. An instrument for driving horses or other teams, or for correction, consisting of a lash tied to a handle or rod.

2. In ships, a small tackle, used to hoist light bodies.

Whip and spur, with the utmost haste.

WHIP, n. [Sax. hweop.]

  1. An instrument for driving horses or other teams, or for correction, consisting of a lash tied to a handle or rod.
  2. In ships, a small tackle, used to hoist light bodies. – Mar. Dict. Whip and spur, with the utmost haste.

WHIP, v.i.

To move nimbly; to start suddenly and run; or to turn and run; as, the boy whipped away in an instant; he whipped round the corner; he whipped into the house, and was out of sight in a moment.


WHIP, v.t. [Sax. hweopan, to whip, and to weep, that is, to whoop or hoop; D. wippen, to shake, to move or wag, to give the strapado; zweepen, to whip; Dan. vipper, to swing; W. çwipiaw, to move briskly, to whip; çwip, a quick flirt or turn. The sense is well expressed by the Welsh, and we say, a man whips round a corner, when running he suddenly turns. It seems to be allied to wipe and sweep, and L. vapulo, and implies a sweeping throw or thrust.]

  1. To strike with a lash or sweeping cord; as, to whip a horse.
  2. To sew slightly. – Gay.
  3. To drive with lashes; as, to whip a top.
  4. To punish with the whip; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one thirty-nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy. Who, for false quantities, was whipp'd at school. – Dryden.
  5. To lash with sarcasm. They would whip me with their fine wits. – Shak.
  6. To strike; to thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat. – Cyc. [Not in use in the United States.] To whip about or round, to wrap; to inwrap; as, to whip a line round a rod. – Moxon. To whip out, to draw nimbly; to snatch; as, to whip out a sword or rapier from its sheath. To whip from, to take away suddenly. To whip into, to thrust in with a quick motion. He whipped his hand into his pocket. To whip up, to seize or take up with a quick motion. She whipped up the child, and ran off. Among seamen, to hoist with a whip or small tackle.

Whip
  1. To strike with a lash, a cord, a rod, or anything slender and lithe] to lash; to beat; as, to whip a horse, or a carpet.
  2. To move nimbly; to start or turn suddenly and do something; to whisk; as, he whipped around the corner.

    With speed from thence he whipped. Sackville.

    Two friends, traveling, met a bear upon the way; the one whips up a tree, and the other throws himself flat upon the ground. L'Estrange.

  3. An instrument or driving horses or other animals, or for correction, consisting usually of a lash attached to a handle, or of a handle and lash so combined as to form a flexible rod.

    "[A] whip's lash." Chaucer.

    In his right hand he holds a whip, with which he is supposed to drive the horses of the sun. Addison.

  4. A whipping motion; a thrashing about; as, the whip of a tense rope or wire which has suddenly parted; also, the quality of being whiplike or flexible; flexibility; suppleness, as of the shaft of a golf club.
  5. To drive with lashes or strokes of a whip; to cause to rotate by lashing with a cord; as, to whip a top.
  6. A coachman; a driver of a carriage; as, a good whip.

    Beaconsfield.
  7. Any of various pieces that operate with a quick vibratory motion, as a spring in certain electrical devices for making a circuit, or a rocking certain piano actions.
  8. To punish with a whip, scourge, or rod; to flog; to beat; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one with thirty nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy.

    Who, for false quantities, was whipped at school. Dryden.

  9. One of the arms or frames of a windmill, on which the sails are spread.

    (b)
  10. To apply that which hurts keenly to; to lash, as with sarcasm, abuse, or the like; to apply cutting language to.

    They would whip me with their fine wits. Shak.

  11. A small tackle with a single rope, used to hoist light bodies.

    (b)
  12. To thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat.
  13. A huntsman who whips in the hounds; whipper- in.
  14. To beat (eggs, cream, or the like) into a froth, as with a whisk, fork, or the like.
  15. A person (as a member of Parliament) appointed to enforce party discipline, and secure the attendance of the members of a Parliament party at any important session, especially when their votes are needed.

    (b)
  16. To conquer; to defeat, as in a contest or game; to beat; to surpass.

    [Slang, U. S.]
  17. To overlay (a cord, rope, or the like) with other cords going round and round it; to overcast, as the edge of a seam; to wrap; -- often with about, around, or over.

    Its string is firmly whipped about with small gut. Moxon.

  18. To sew lightly; specifically, to form (a fabric) into gathers by loosely overcasting the rolled edge and drawing up the thread; as, to whip a ruffle.

    In half-whipped muslin needles useless lie. Gay.

  19. To take or move by a sudden motion; to jerk; to snatch; -- with into, out, up, off, and the like.

    She, in a hurry, whips up her darling under her arm. L'Estrange.

    He whips out his pocketbook every moment, and writes descriptions of everything he sees. Walpole.

  20. To hoist or purchase by means of a whip.

    (b)
  21. To fish (a body of water) with a rod and artificial fly, the motion being that employed in using a whip.

    Whipping their rough surface for a trout. Emerson.

    To whip in, to drive in, or keep from scattering, as hounds in a hurt; hence, to collect, or to keep together, as member of a party, or the like. -- To whip the cat. (a) To practice extreme parsimony. [Prov. Eng.] Forby. (b) To go from house to house working by the day, as itinerant tailors and carpenters do. [Prov. & U. S.]

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Whip

WHIP, verb transitive [Latin , a sweeping throw or thrust.]

1. To strike with a lash or sweeping cord; as, to whip a horse.

2. To sew slightly.

3. To drive with lashes; as, to whip a top.

4. To punish with the whip; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one thirty nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy.

Who, for false quantities, was whippd at school.

5. To lash with sarcasm.

They would whip me with their fine wits.

6. To strike; to thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat. [Not in use int he United States.]

To whip about or round, to wrap; to inwrap; as, to whip a line round a rod.

To whip out, to draw nimbly; to snatch; as, to whip out a sword or rapier from its sheath.

To whip from, to take away suddenly.

To whip into, to thrust in with a quick motion. He whipped his hand into his pocket.

To whip us, to seize or take up with a quick motion. She whipped up the child, and ran off. Among seamen, to hoist with a whip or small tackle.

WHIP, verb intransitive To move nimbly; to start suddenly and run; or to turn and run; as, the boy whipped away in an instant; he whipped round the corner; he whipped into the house, and was out of wight in a moment.

WHIP, noun

1. An instrument for driving horses or other teams, or for correction, consisting of a lash tied to a handle or rod.

2. In ships, a small tackle, used to hoist light bodies.

WHIP and spur, with the utmost haste.

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Because of Noah Webster's chriastian faith and the fact that he used the bible to help him define the words. I use this in preparing bible teaching materials.

— John (Dunstable, Bed)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

munch

MUNCH, v.t.chew by great mouthfuls. [Vulgar.]

MUNCH, v.i. To chew eagerly by great mouthfuls. [Vulgar.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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