HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Wednesday - January 16, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [what]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

what

WHAT, pronoun relative or substitute. [G., L. See Wight.]

1. That which. Say what you will, is the same as say that which you will.

2. Which part. Consider what is due to nature, and what to art or labor.

3. What is the substitute for a sentence or clause of a sentence. I tell thee what, corporal, I could tear her. Here what relates to the last clause, I could tear her; this is what I tell you.

4. What is used as an adjective, of both genders, often in specifying sorts or particulars. See what colors this silk exhibits. I know what qualities you desire in a friend; that is, I know the qualities which you desire.

5. What is much used in asking questions. What sort of character is this? What poem is this? What man is this we see coming?

6. What time, at the time or on the day when.

What time the morn mysterious visions brings.

7. To how great a degree.

What a partial judges are our love and hate!

8. Whatever.

Whether it was the shortness of his foresight, the strength of his will--or what it was--

9. Some part, or some. The year before, he had so used the matter, that what by force, what by policy, he had taken from the Christians above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles, a part or some by force, a part or some by policy; or what may be interpreted partly. Sometimes what has no verb to govern it, and it must be considered as adverbially used. What with carrying apples and fuel, he finds himself in a hurry; that is, partly, in part.

10. What is sometimes used elliptically for what is this, or how is this?

What! Could ye not watch with me one hour? Matthew 26.

11. What is used interrogatively and elliptically, as equivalent to what will be the consequence? What will follow? As in the phrase, what if I undertake this business myself?

What though, that is, grant this or that; allow it to be so.

What ho, an exclamation of calling.

WHAT, n. Fare; things; matter. [Not in use.]




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [what]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WHAT, pronoun relative or substitute. [G., L. See Wight.]

1. That which. Say what you will, is the same as say that which you will.

2. Which part. Consider what is due to nature, and what to art or labor.

3. What is the substitute for a sentence or clause of a sentence. I tell thee what, corporal, I could tear her. Here what relates to the last clause, I could tear her; this is what I tell you.

4. What is used as an adjective, of both genders, often in specifying sorts or particulars. See what colors this silk exhibits. I know what qualities you desire in a friend; that is, I know the qualities which you desire.

5. What is much used in asking questions. What sort of character is this? What poem is this? What man is this we see coming?

6. What time, at the time or on the day when.

What time the morn mysterious visions brings.

7. To how great a degree.

What a partial judges are our love and hate!

8. Whatever.

Whether it was the shortness of his foresight, the strength of his will--or what it was--

9. Some part, or some. The year before, he had so used the matter, that what by force, what by policy, he had taken from the Christians above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles, a part or some by force, a part or some by policy; or what may be interpreted partly. Sometimes what has no verb to govern it, and it must be considered as adverbially used. What with carrying apples and fuel, he finds himself in a hurry; that is, partly, in part.

10. What is sometimes used elliptically for what is this, or how is this?

What! Could ye not watch with me one hour? Matthew 26.

11. What is used interrogatively and elliptically, as equivalent to what will be the consequence? What will follow? As in the phrase, what if I undertake this business myself?

What though, that is, grant this or that; allow it to be so.

What ho, an exclamation of calling.

WHAT, n. Fare; things; matter. [Not in use.]


WHAT, n.

Fare; things; matter. [Not in use.] – Spenser.


WHAT, pron. [relative or substitute. Sax. hwæt; Goth. waiht; D. wat; G. was; Dan. and Sw. hvad; Scot. quhat; L. quod, quid. The Sax. hwæt, hwat, signifies brisk, lively vigorous; which shows that this pronoun is the same word as wight, a living being, from the root of the L. vivo, for vigo. See Wight. The Gothic h, represents the Latin c, in victus.]

  1. That which. Say what you will, is the same as say that which you will.
  2. Which part. Consider what is due to nature, and what to art or labor.
  3. What is the substitute for a sentence or clause of a sentence. “I tell thee what, corporal, I could tear her.” Here what relates to the last clause, “I could tear her;” this is what I tell you.
  4. What is used as an adjective, of both genders, often in specifying sorts or particulars. See what colors this silk exhibits. I know what qualities you desire in a friend; that is, I know the qualities which you desire.
  5. What is much used in asking questions. What sort of character is this? What poem is this? What man is this we see coming?
  6. What time, at the time or on the day when. What time the morn mysterious visions brings. – Pope.
  7. To how great a degree. What partial judges are our love and hate! – Dryden.
  8. Whatever. Whether it was the shortness of his foresight, the strength of his will … or what it was. – Bacon.
  9. Some part, or some. "The year before, he had so used the matter, that what by force, what by policy, he had taken from the Christians above thirty castles;" that is, he had taken above thirty castles, a part or some by force, a part or some by policy; or what may be interpreted partly. – Knolles. Sometimes what has no verb to govern it, and it must be considered as adverbially used. "What with carrying apples and fuel, he finds himself in a hurry;" that is, partly, in part.
  10. What is sometimes used elliptically for what is this, or how is this? What! could ye not watch with me one hour? – Matth. xxvi.
  11. What is used interrogatively and elliptically, as equivalent to what will be the consequence? What will follow as in the phrase, what if I undertake this business myself? What though, that is, grant this or that; allow it to be so. What ho, an exclamation of calling.

What
  1. As an interrogative pronoun, used in asking questions regarding either persons or things; as, what is this? what did you say? what poem is this? what child is lost?

    What see'st thou in the ground? Shak.

    What is man, that thou art mindful of him? Ps. viii. 4.

    What manner of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him! Matt. viii. 27.

    * Originally, what, when, where, which, who, why, etc., were interrogatives only, and it is often difficult to determine whether they are used as interrogatives or relatives.

    What in this sense, when it refers to things, may be used either substantively or adjectively; when it refers to persons, it is used only adjectively with a noun expressed, who being the pronoun used substantively.

  2. Something; thing; stuff.

    [Obs.]

    And gave him for to feed,
    Such homely what as serves the simple (?)lown.
    Spenser.

  3. Why? For what purpose? On what account?

    [Obs.]

    What should I tell the answer of the knight. Chaucer.

    But what do I stand reckoning upon advantages and gains lost by the misrule and turbulency of the prelates? What do I pick up so thriftily their scatterings and diminishings of the meaner subject? Milton.

  4. As an exclamatory word: -- (a) Used absolutely or independently; -- often with a question following.

    "What welcome be thou." Chaucer.

    What, could ye not watch with me one hour? Matt. xxvi. 40.

    (b)

  5. As a relative pronoun

    : --

    (a)

  6. Whatever; whatsoever; what thing soever; -- used indefinitely.

    "What after so befall." Chaucer.

    Whether it were the shortness of his foresight, the strength of his will, . . . or what it was. Bacon.

  7. Used adverbially, in part; partly; somewhat; -- with a following preposition, especially, with, and commonly with repetition.

    What for lust [pleasure] and what for lore. Chaucer.

    Thus, what with the war, what with the sweat, what with the gallows, and what with poverty, I am custom shrunk. Shak.

    The year before he had so used the matter that what by force, what by policy, he had taken from the Christians above thirty small castles. Knolles.

    * In such phrases as I tell you what, what anticipates the following statement, being elliptical for what I think, what it is, how it is, etc. "I tell thee what, corporal Bardolph, I could tear her." Shak. Here what relates to the last clause, "I could tear her;" this is what I tell you.

    What not is often used at the close of an enumeration of several particulars or articles, it being an abbreviated clause, the verb of which, being either the same as that of the principal clause or a general word, as be, say, mention, enumerate, etc., is omitted. "Men hunt, hawk, and what not." Becon. "Some dead puppy, or log, orwhat not." C. Kingsley. "Battles, tournaments, hunts, and what not." De Quincey. Hence, the words are often used in a general sense with the force of a substantive, equivalent to anything you please, a miscellany, a variety, etc. From this arises the name whatnot, applied to an étagère, as being a piece of furniture intended for receiving miscellaneous articles of use or ornament.

    But what is used for but that, usually after a negative, and excludes everything contrary to the assertion in the following sentence. "Her needle is not so absolutely perfect in tent and cross stitch but what my superintendence is advisable." Sir W. Scott. "Never fear but what our kite shall fly as high." Ld. Lytton.

    What ho! an exclamation of calling. -- What if, what will it matter if; what will happen or be the result if. "What if it be a poison?" Shak. -- What of this? that? it? etc., what follows from this, that, it, etc., often with the implication that it is of no consequence. "All this is so; but what of this, my lord?" Shak. "The night is spent, why, what of that?" Shak. -- What though, even granting that; allowing that; supposing it true that. "What though the rose have prickles, yet't is plucked." Shak. -- What time, or What time as, when. [Obs. or Archaic] "What time I am afraid, I will trust in thee." Ps. lvi. 3.

    What time the morn mysterious visions brings. Pope.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

77

584

64

632

89

623
What

WHAT, pronoun relative or substitute. [G., Latin See Wight.]

1. That which. Say what you will, is the same as say that which you will.

2. Which part. Consider what is due to nature, and what to art or labor.

3. what is the substitute for a sentence or clause of a sentence. I tell thee what corporal, I could tear her. Here what relates to the last clause, I could tear her; this is what I tell you.

4. what is used as an adjective, of both genders, often in specifying sorts or particulars. See what colors this silk exhibits. I know what qualities you desire in a friend; that is, I know the qualities which you desire.

5. what is much used in asking questions. what sort of character is this? what poem is this? what man is this we see coming?

6. what time, at the time or on the day when.

WHAT time the morn mysterious visions brings.

7. To how great a degree.

WHAT a partial judges are our love and hate!

8. Whatever.

Whether it was the shortness of his foresight, the strength of his will--or what it was--

9. Some part, or some. The year before, he had so used the matter, that what by force, what by policy, he had taken from the Christians above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles; that is, he had taken above thirty castles, a part or some by force, a part or some by policy; or what may be interpreted partly. Sometimes what has no verb to govern it, and it must be considered as adverbially used. what with carrying apples and fuel, he finds himself in a hurry; that is, partly, in part.

10. what is sometimes used elliptically for what is this, or how is this?

WHAT! Could ye not watch with me one hour? Matthew 26:8.

11. what is used interrogatively and elliptically, as equivalent to what will be the consequence? what will follow? As in the phrase, what if I undertake this business myself?

WHAT though, that is, grant this or that; allow it to be so.

WHAT ho, an exclamation of calling.

WHAT, noun Fare; things; matter. [Not in use.]

Why 1828?

0
6
 


scripture references in definitions

— Kat (Brockton, MA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

metallize

MET'ALLIZE, v.t. To form into metal; to give to a substance its proper metallic properties.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

160

315

Compact Edition

125

108

CD-ROM

103

84

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.328 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top