HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - September 17, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [warrant]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

warrant

WARRANT, v.t. [The primary sense of the root is to stop or hold, or to repel, and thus guard by resisting danger; as we say, to keep off. Hence the sense of security. See Guard and Garrison.]

1. To authorize; to give authority or power to do or forbear any thing, by which the person authorized is secured or saved harmless from any loss or damage by the act. A commission warrants an officer to seize an enemy. We are not warranted to resist legitimate government. Except in extreme cases.

2. To maintain; to support by authority or proof.

Reason warrants it, and we may safely receive it as true.

3. To justify.

True fortitude is seen in great exploits, that justice warrants, and that wisdom guides.

4. To secure; to exempt; to privilege..

Ill warrant him from drowning.

In a place less warranted than this, or less secure, I cannot be--

5. To declare with assurance.

My neck is as smooth as silk, I warrant ye.

6. In law, to secure to a grantee an estate granted; to assure.

7. To secure to a purchaser of goods the title to the same; or to indemnify him against loss.

8. To secure to a purchaser the good quality of the goods sold. [See Warranty.]

9. To assure that a thing is what it appears to be, which implies a covenant to make good any defect or loss incurred by it.

WARRANT, n.

1. An act, instrument or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; a word of general application.

2. A precept authorizing an officer to seize an offender and bring him to justice. A general warrant to seize suspected persons, is illegal.

3. Authority; power that authorizes or justifies any act. Those who preach the gospel have the warrant of Scripture. We have the warrant of natural right to do what the laws do not forbid; but civility and propriety may sometimes render things improper, which natural right warrants.

4. A commission that gives authority, or that justifies.

5. A voucher; that which attests or proves.

6. Right; legality.

Theres warrant in that theft which steals itself when theres no mercy left.

7. A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing.

Warrant of attorney, that by which a man appoints another to act in his name, and warrants his transaction.

Land warrant, is an instrument or writing issued by the proper officer, authorizing a person to locate or take up a tract of new or uncultivated land.

Search warrant, a precept authorizing a person to enter houses, shops, &c. to search for a criminal, for stolen or smuggled goods.

Warrant officer, an officer holding a warrant from the navy board, such as the master, surgeon, purser, &c. of a ship.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [warrant]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WARRANT, v.t. [The primary sense of the root is to stop or hold, or to repel, and thus guard by resisting danger; as we say, to keep off. Hence the sense of security. See Guard and Garrison.]

1. To authorize; to give authority or power to do or forbear any thing, by which the person authorized is secured or saved harmless from any loss or damage by the act. A commission warrants an officer to seize an enemy. We are not warranted to resist legitimate government. Except in extreme cases.

2. To maintain; to support by authority or proof.

Reason warrants it, and we may safely receive it as true.

3. To justify.

True fortitude is seen in great exploits, that justice warrants, and that wisdom guides.

4. To secure; to exempt; to privilege..

Ill warrant him from drowning.

In a place less warranted than this, or less secure, I cannot be--

5. To declare with assurance.

My neck is as smooth as silk, I warrant ye.

6. In law, to secure to a grantee an estate granted; to assure.

7. To secure to a purchaser of goods the title to the same; or to indemnify him against loss.

8. To secure to a purchaser the good quality of the goods sold. [See Warranty.]

9. To assure that a thing is what it appears to be, which implies a covenant to make good any defect or loss incurred by it.

WARRANT, n.

1. An act, instrument or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; a word of general application.

2. A precept authorizing an officer to seize an offender and bring him to justice. A general warrant to seize suspected persons, is illegal.

3. Authority; power that authorizes or justifies any act. Those who preach the gospel have the warrant of Scripture. We have the warrant of natural right to do what the laws do not forbid; but civility and propriety may sometimes render things improper, which natural right warrants.

4. A commission that gives authority, or that justifies.

5. A voucher; that which attests or proves.

6. Right; legality.

Theres warrant in that theft which steals itself when theres no mercy left.

7. A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing.

Warrant of attorney, that by which a man appoints another to act in his name, and warrants his transaction.

Land warrant, is an instrument or writing issued by the proper officer, authorizing a person to locate or take up a tract of new or uncultivated land.

Search warrant, a precept authorizing a person to enter houses, shops, &c. to search for a criminal, for stolen or smuggled goods.

Warrant officer, an officer holding a warrant from the navy board, such as the master, surgeon, purser, &c. of a ship.

WAR'RANT, n.

  1. An act, instrument or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; a word of general application.
  2. A precept authorizing an officer to seize an offender and bring him to justice. A general warrant to seize suspected persons, is illegal.
  3. Authority; power that authorizes or justifies any act. Those who preach the Gospel have the warrant of Scripture. We have the warrant of natural right to do what the laws do not forbid; but civility and propriety may sometimes render things improper, which natural right warrants.
  4. A commission that gives authority, or that justifies.
  5. A voucher; that which attests or proves.
  6. Right; legality. There's warrant in that theft / Which steals itself when there's no mercy left. – Shak. [Obs.]
  7. A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing. Warrant of attorney, that by which a man appoints another to act in his name, and warrants his transaction. Land warrant, is an instrument or writing issued by the proper officer, authorizing a person to locate or take up a tract of new or uncultivated land. – United States. Search warrant, a precept authorizing a person to enter houses, shops, &c., to search for a criminal, or for stolen or smuggled goods. Warrant officer, an officer holding a warrant from the navy board, such as the master, surgeon, purser, &c. of a ship.

WAR'RANT, v.t. [Gaelic, barantas, a warrant or pledge; baranta, a warrantee or surety; W. gwarantu, to warrant or guaranty; gwarant, warrant, attestation, authority, security; said to be from gwar, smooth, placid, secure; Norm. garranty, warranted, proved; garren, (guarren,) a warren; Fr. garantir, (guarantir,) to warrant; garenne, a warren; It. guarentire. This is from the root of guard, warren and wary. The primary sense of the root is to stop or hold, or to repel, and thus guard by resisting danger; as we say, to keep off. Hence the sense of security. The Welsh sense of smooth, placid, is derivative, either from security, or from repressing. See Guard and Garrison.]

  1. To authorize; to give authority or power to do or forbear any thing, by which the person authorized is secured or, saved harmless from any loss or damage by the act. A commission warrants an officer to seize an enemy. We are not warranted to resist legitimate government, except in extreme cases.
  2. To maintain; to support by authority or proof. Reason warrants it, and we may safely receive it as true. – Anon.
  3. To justify. True fortitude is seen in great exploits, / That justice warrants, and that wisdom guides. – Addison.
  4. To secure; to exempt; to privilege. I'll warrant him from drowning. – Shak. In a place / Less warranted than this, or less secure, / I can not be. – Milton.
  5. To declare with assurance. My neck is as smooth as silk, I warrant ye. – L'Estrange.
  6. In law, to secure to a grantee an estate granted; to assure.
  7. To secure to a purchaser of goods the title to the same; or to indemnify him against loss.
  8. To secure to a purchaser the good quality of the goods sold. [See Warranty.]
  9. To assure that a thing is what it appears to be, which implies a covenant to make good any defect or loss incurred by it.

War"rant
  1. That which warrants or authorizes; a commission giving authority, or justifying the doing of anything; an act, instrument, or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; commission; authority.

    Specifically: --

    (a)

  2. To make secure; to give assurance against harm; to guarantee safety to; to give authority or power to do, or forbear to do, anything by which the person authorized is secured, or saved harmless, from any loss or damage by his action.

    That show I first my body to warrant. Chaucer.

    I'll warrant him from drowning. Shak.

    In a place
    Less warranted than this, or less secure,
    I can not be.
    Milton.

  3. That which vouches or insures for anything] guaranty; security.

    I give thee warrant of thy place. Shak.

    His worth is warrant for his welcome hither. Shak.

  4. To support by authority or proof; to justify; to maintain; to sanction; as, reason warrants it.

    True fortitude is seen in great exploits,
    That justice warrants, and that wisdom guides.
    Addison.

    How little while it is since he went forth out of his study, -- chewing a Hebrew text of Scripture in his mouth, I warrant. Hawthorne.

  5. That which attests or proves; a voucher.
  6. To give a warrant or warranty to; to assure as if by giving a warrant to.

    [My neck is] as smooth as silk, I warrant ye. L' Estrange.

  7. Right; legality; allowance.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    Bench warrant. (Law) See in the Vocabulary. -- Dock warrant (Com.), a customhouse license or authority. -- General warrant. (Law) See under General. -- Land warrant. See under Land. -- Search warrant. (Law) See under Search, n. -- Warrant of attorney (Law), written authority given by one person to another empowering him to transact business for him; specifically, written authority given by a client to his attorney to appear for him in court, and to suffer judgment to pass against him by confession in favor of some specified person. Bouvier. -- Warrant officer, a noncommissioned officer, as a sergeant, corporal, bandmaster, etc., in the army, or a quartermaster, gunner, boatswain, etc., in the navy. -- Warrant to sue and defend. (a) (O. Eng. Law) A special warrant from the crown, authorizing a party to appoint an attorney to sue or defend for him. (b) A special authority given by a party to his attorney to commence a suit, or to appear and defend a suit in his behalf. This warrant is now disused. Burrill.

  8. To secure to, as a grantee, an estate granted; to assure.

    (b)
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

85

642

69

689

99

683
Warrant

WARRANT, verb transitive [The primary sense of the root is to stop or hold, or to repel, and thus guard by resisting danger; as we say, to keep off. Hence the sense of security. See Guard and Garrison.]

1. To authorize; to give authority or power to do or forbear any thing, by which the person authorized is secured or saved harmless from any loss or damage by the act. A commission warrants an officer to seize an enemy. We are not warranted to resist legitimate government. Except in extreme cases.

2. To maintain; to support by authority or proof.

Reason warrants it, and we may safely receive it as true.

3. To justify.

True fortitude is seen in great exploits, that justice warrants, and that wisdom guides.

4. To secure; to exempt; to privilege..

Ill warrant him from drowning.

In a place less warranted than this, or less secure, I cannot be--

5. To declare with assurance.

My neck is as smooth as silk, I warrant ye.

6. In law, to secure to a grantee an estate granted; to assure.

7. To secure to a purchaser of goods the title to the same; or to indemnify him against loss.

8. To secure to a purchaser the good quality of the goods sold. [See Warranty.]

9. To assure that a thing is what it appears to be, which implies a covenant to make good any defect or loss incurred by it.

WARRANT, noun

1. An act, instrument or obligation, by which one person authorizes another to do something which he has not otherwise a right to do; an act or instrument investing one with a right or authority, and thus securing him from loss or damage; a word of general application.

2. A precept authorizing an officer to seize an offender and bring him to justice. A general warrant to seize suspected persons, is illegal.

3. Authority; power that authorizes or justifies any act. Those who preach the gospel have the warrant of Scripture. We have the warrant of natural right to do what the laws do not forbid; but civility and propriety may sometimes render things improper, which natural right warrants.

4. A commission that gives authority, or that justifies.

5. A voucher; that which attests or proves.

6. Right; legality.

Theres warrant in that theft which steals itself when theres no mercy left.

7. A writing which authorizes a person to receive money or other thing.

WARRANT of attorney, that by which a man appoints another to act in his name, and warrants his transaction.

Land warrant is an instrument or writing issued by the proper officer, authorizing a person to locate or take up a tract of new or uncultivated land.

Search warrant a precept authorizing a person to enter houses, shops, etc. to search for a criminal, for stolen or smuggled goods.

WARRANT officer, an officer holding a warrant from the navy board, such as the master, surgeon, purser, etc. of a ship.

Why 1828?

0
4
 


WRITTEN in Gods word

— Elijah (Boca Raton, FL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

habitance

HAB'ITANCE, n. Dwelling; abode; residence. [Not now used.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

182

352

Compact Edition

142

123

CD-ROM

111

94

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.352 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top