E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 140: session_start(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_8rg09dmcbsj15octkqjj0jk713, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_start(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_8rg09dmcbsj15octkqjj0jk713, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 140, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(140): session_start()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/include_pre.php(165): sessionStart()
#3 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(7): require_once('/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/include_pre.php')
E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 261: session_write_close(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_8rg09dmcbsj15octkqjj0jk713, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_write_close(): open(/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data//sess_8rg09dmcbsj15octkqjj0jk713, O_RDWR) failed: Disk quota exceeded (122)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 261, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(261): session_write_close()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(12): endPage()
E_WARNING Error in file class.myPage.php at line 261: session_write_close(): Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct (/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data/)
#0  - file - UNKNOWN( - line - UNKNOWN): ErrorHandler(2, 'session_write_close(): Failed to write session data (files). Please verify that the current setting of session.save_path is correct (/home/mshaffer/_common_/session_data/)', '/home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php', 261, Array)
#1 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/php/classes/class.myPage.php(261): session_write_close()
#2 /home/mshaffer/public_html/1828/page.php(12): endPage()
Warp [ WARP, n. Waurp. [See the Verb.] 1. In manufactures, the threads, ... ] :: Search the 1828 Noah Webster's Dictionary of the English Language (FREE) :: 1828.mshaffer.com
HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Sunday - May 26, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [warp]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

warp

WARP, n. Waurp. [See the Verb.]

1. In manufactures, the threads, which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof.

2. In a ship, a rope employed in drawing, towing or removing a ship or boat; a towing line.

3. In agriculture, a slimy substance deposited on land by marine tides, by which a rich alluvial soil is formed. [Local.]

4. In cows, a miscarriage. [See the Verb.] [Local.]

WARP, v.i. [G., to cast or throw, to whelp.]

1. To turn, twist or be twisted out of a straight direction; as, a board warps in seasoning, or in the heat of the sun, by shrinking.

They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting or warping.

2. To turn or incline from a straight, true or proper course; to deviate.

Theres our commission, from which we would not have you warp.

Methinks my favor here begins to warp.

3. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. The following use of warp is inimitably beautiful.

As when the potent rod of Amrams son, in Egypts evil day, wavd round the coast, up called a pitchy cloud of locusts, warping on the eastern wind--

4. To slink; to cast the young prematurely; as cows.

In an enclosure near a dog-kennel, eight heifers out of twenty warped. [Local.]

WARP, v.t.

1. To turn or twist out of shape, or out of a straight direction, by contraction. The heat of the sun warps boards and timber.

2. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert.

This first avowd, nor folly warpd my mind.

I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy.

--Zeal, to a degree of warmth able to warp the sacred rule of Gods word.

3. In seamens language, to two or move with a line or warp, attached to buoys, to anchors or to other ships, &c. By which means a ship is drawn, usually in a bending course or with various turns.

4. In rural economy, to cast the young prematurely. [Local.]

5. In agriculture, to inundate, as land, with sea water; or to let in the tide, forth purpose of fertilizing the ground by a deposit of warp or slimy substance. Warp here is the throw, or that which is cast by the water.

6. In rope-making, to run the yarn off the winches into hauls to be tarred.

To warp water, in Shakespeare, is forced and unusual; indeed it is not English.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [warp]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WARP, n. Waurp. [See the Verb.]

1. In manufactures, the threads, which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof.

2. In a ship, a rope employed in drawing, towing or removing a ship or boat; a towing line.

3. In agriculture, a slimy substance deposited on land by marine tides, by which a rich alluvial soil is formed. [Local.]

4. In cows, a miscarriage. [See the Verb.] [Local.]

WARP, v.i. [G., to cast or throw, to whelp.]

1. To turn, twist or be twisted out of a straight direction; as, a board warps in seasoning, or in the heat of the sun, by shrinking.

They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting or warping.

2. To turn or incline from a straight, true or proper course; to deviate.

Theres our commission, from which we would not have you warp.

Methinks my favor here begins to warp.

3. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. The following use of warp is inimitably beautiful.

As when the potent rod of Amrams son, in Egypts evil day, wavd round the coast, up called a pitchy cloud of locusts, warping on the eastern wind--

4. To slink; to cast the young prematurely; as cows.

In an enclosure near a dog-kennel, eight heifers out of twenty warped. [Local.]

WARP, v.t.

1. To turn or twist out of shape, or out of a straight direction, by contraction. The heat of the sun warps boards and timber.

2. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert.

This first avowd, nor folly warpd my mind.

I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy.

--Zeal, to a degree of warmth able to warp the sacred rule of Gods word.

3. In seamens language, to two or move with a line or warp, attached to buoys, to anchors or to other ships, &c. By which means a ship is drawn, usually in a bending course or with various turns.

4. In rural economy, to cast the young prematurely. [Local.]

5. In agriculture, to inundate, as land, with sea water; or to let in the tide, forth purpose of fertilizing the ground by a deposit of warp or slimy substance. Warp here is the throw, or that which is cast by the water.

6. In rope-making, to run the yarn off the winches into hauls to be tarred.

To warp water, in Shakespeare, is forced and unusual; indeed it is not English.

WARP, a. [waurp; Sax. wearp; D. werp, a cast or throw. See the verb.]

  1. In manufactures, the threads which are extended length-wise in the loom, and crossed by the woof.
  2. In a ship, a rope employed in drawing, towing or removing a ship or boat; a towing line. – Mar. Dict.
  3. In agriculture, a slimy substance deposited on land by marine tides, by which a rich alluvial soil is formed. [Local.] – Cyc.
  4. In cows, a premature casting of the young. [See the verb.] [Local.]

WARP, v.i. [Sax. weorpan, wurpan, wyrpan, to throw, to return; G. werfen, to cast or throw, to whelp; D. werpen, to throw or fling, to whelp, kitten or litter; Dan. værper, to lay eggs; varper, to tow; Sw. värpa, to lay eggs; Ir. and Gaelic, fiaram, to bend, twist, incline.]

  1. To turn, twist or be twisted out of a straight direction; as, a board warps in seasoning, or in the heat of the sun, by shrinking. They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting or warping. – Moxon.
  2. To turn or incline from a straight, true or proper course; to deviate. There's our commission, / From which we would not have you warp. – Shak. Methinks / My favor here begins to warp. – Shak.
  3. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. The following use of warp is inimitably beautiful. As when the potent rod / Of Amram's son, in Egypt's evil day, / Wav'd round the coast, up call'd a pitchy cloud / Of locusts, warping on the eastern wind. – Milton.
  4. To slink; to cast the young prematurely; as cows. In an inclosure near a dog-kennel, eight heifers out of twenty warped. [Local.] – Cyc.

WARP, v.t.

  1. To turn or twist out of shape, or out of a straight direction, by contraction. The heat of the sun warps boards and timber.
  2. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert. This first avow'd, nor folly warp'd my mind. – Dryden. I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy. – Addison. Zeal, to a degree of warmth able to warp the sacred rule of God's word. – Locke.
  3. In seamen's language, to tow or move with a line or warp, attached to buoys, to anchors, or to other ships, &c. by which means a ship is drawn, usually in a bending course or with various turns.
  4. In rural economy, to cast the young prematurely. [Lord.] – Cyc.
  5. In agriculture, to inundate, as land, with sea water; or to let in the tide, for the purpose of fertilizing the ground by a deposit of warp or slimy substance. Warp here is the throw, or that which is cast by the water. [Local in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, Eng.] – Cyc.
  6. In rope-making, to run the yarn off the winches into hauls to be tarred. To warp water, in Shakspeare, is forced and unusual; indeed it is not English.

Warp
  1. To throw; hence, to send forth, or throw out, as words; to utter.

    [Obs.] Piers Plowman.
  2. To turn, twist, or be twisted out of shape] esp., to be twisted or bent out of a flat plane; as, a board warps in seasoning or shrinking.

    One of you will prove a shrunk panel, and, like green timber, warp, warp. Shak.

    They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting, or warping. Moxon.

  3. The threads which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof.
  4. To twist the end surfaces of (an aërocurve in an aëroplane) in order to restore or maintain equilibrium.
  5. To turn or twist out of shape; esp., to twist or bend out of a flat plane by contraction or otherwise.

    The planks looked warped. Coleridge.

    Walter warped his mouth at this
    To something so mock solemn, that I laughed.
    Tennyson.

  6. to turn or incline from a straight, true, or proper course; to deviate; to swerve.

    There is our commission,
    From which we would not have you warp.
    Shak.

  7. A rope used in hauling or moving a vessel, usually with one end attached to an anchor, a post, or other fixed object; a towing line; a warping hawser.
  8. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert.

    This first avowed, nor folly warped my mind. Dryden.

    I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy. Addison.

    We are divested of all those passions which cloud the intellects, and warp the understandings, of men. Southey.

  9. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects.

    A pitchy cloud
    Of locusts, warping on the eastern wind.
    Milton.

  10. A slimy substance deposited on land by tides, etc., by which a rich alluvial soil is formed.

    Lyell.
  11. To weave; to fabricate.

    [R. *** Poetic.] Nares.

    While doth he mischief warp. Sternhold.

  12. To cast the young prematurely; to slink; -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  13. A premature casting of young; -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  14. To tow or move, as a vessel, with a line, or warp, attached to a buoy, anchor, or other fixed object.
  15. To wind yarn off bobbins for forming the warp of a web; to wind a warp on a warp beam.
  16. Four; esp., four herrings; a cast. See Cast, n., 17.

    [Prov. Eng.] Wright.
  17. To cast prematurely, as young] -- said of cattle, sheep, etc.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  18. The state of being warped or twisted; as, the warp of a board.

    Warp beam, the roller on which the warp is wound in a loom. -- Warp fabric, fabric produced by warp knitting. -- Warp frame, or Warp-net frame, a machine for making warp lace having a number of needles and employing a thread for each needle. -- Warp knitting, a kind of knitting in which a number of threads are interchained each with one or more contiguous threads on either side; -- also called warp weaving. -- Warp lace, or Warp net, lace having a warp crossed by weft threads.

  19. To let the tide or other water in upon (lowlying land), for the purpose of fertilization, by a deposit of warp, or slimy substance.

    [Prov. Eng.]
  20. To run off the reel into hauls to be tarred, as yarns.
  21. To arrange (yarns) on a warp beam.

    Warped surface (Geom.), a surface generated by a straight line moving so that no two of its consecutive positions shall be in the same plane. Davies *** Peck.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

85

617

68

664

97

657
Warp

WARP, noun Waurp. [See the Verb.]

1. In manufactures, the threads, which are extended lengthwise in the loom, and crossed by the woof.

2. In a ship, a rope employed in drawing, towing or removing a ship or boat; a towing line.

3. In agriculture, a slimy substance deposited on land by marine tides, by which a rich alluvial soil is formed. [Local.]

4. In cows, a miscarriage. [See the Verb.] [Local.]

WARP, verb intransitive [G., to cast or throw, to whelp.]

1. To turn, twist or be twisted out of a straight direction; as, a board warps in seasoning, or in the heat of the sun, by shrinking.

They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting or warping.

2. To turn or incline from a straight, true or proper course; to deviate.

Theres our commission, from which we would not have you warp

Methinks my favor here begins to warp

3. To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. The following use of warp is inimitably beautiful.

As when the potent rod of Amrams son, in Egypts evil day, wavd round the coast, up called a pitchy cloud of locusts, warping on the eastern wind--

4. To slink; to cast the young prematurely; as cows.

In an enclosure near a dog-kennel, eight heifers out of twenty warped. [Local.]

WARP, verb transitive

1. To turn or twist out of shape, or out of a straight direction, by contraction. The heat of the sun warps boards and timber.

2. To turn aside from the true direction; to cause to bend or incline; to pervert.

This first avowd, nor folly warpd my mind.

I have no private considerations to warp me in this controversy.

--Zeal, to a degree of warmth able to warp the sacred rule of Gods word.

3. In seamens language, to two or move with a line or warp attached to buoys, to anchors or to other ships, etc. By which means a ship is drawn, usually in a bending course or with various turns.

4. In rural economy, to cast the young prematurely. [Local.]

5. In agriculture, to inundate, as land, with sea water; or to let in the tide, forth purpose of fertilizing the ground by a deposit of warp or slimy substance. warp here is the throw, or that which is cast by the water.

6. In rope-making, to run the yarn off the winches into hauls to be tarred.

To warp water, in Shakespeare, is forced and unusual; indeed it is not English.

Why 1828?

0
2
 


I love this dictronary

— Pam (Salisbury, MD)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

grapeshot

GRA'PESHOT, n. A cluster of small shot, confined in a canvas bag, forming a kind of cylinder, whose diameter is equal to that of the ball adapted to the cannon.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

174

336

Compact Edition

137

115

CD-ROM

108

91

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.313 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top