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Wednesday - November 13, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [wake]

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wake

WAKE, v.i. [G. The primary sense is to stir, to rouse, to excite.]

1. To be awake; to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep. Psalm 127.

The father waketh for the daughter.

Though wisdom wakes, suspicion sleeps.

I cannot think any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it.

2. To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened. He wakes at the slightest noise.

3. To cease to sleep; to awake.

4. To be quick; to be alive or active.

5. To be excited from a torpid state; to be put in motion. The dormant powers of nature wake from their frosty slumbers.

Gentle airs to fan the earth now wakd.

WAKE, v.t.

1. To rouse from sleep.

The angel that talked with me, came again and waked me. Zechariah 4.

2. To arouse; to excite; to put in motion or action.

Prepare war, wake up the mighty men. Joel 3.

[The use of up is common, but not necessary.]

To wake the soul by tender strokes of art.

3. To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death.

To second life wakd in the renovation of the just.

WAKE, n.

1. The feast of the dedication of the church, formerly kept by watching all night.

2. Vigils; state of forbearing sleep.

--Their merry wakes and pastimes keep.

3. Act of waking. [Old song.]

Wake of a ship, the track it leaves in the water, formed by the meeting of the water, which rushes from each side to fill the space which the ship makes in passing through it.

To be in the wake of a ship, is to be in her track, or in a line with her keel.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [wake]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

WAKE, v.i. [G. The primary sense is to stir, to rouse, to excite.]

1. To be awake; to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep. Psalm 127.

The father waketh for the daughter.

Though wisdom wakes, suspicion sleeps.

I cannot think any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it.

2. To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened. He wakes at the slightest noise.

3. To cease to sleep; to awake.

4. To be quick; to be alive or active.

5. To be excited from a torpid state; to be put in motion. The dormant powers of nature wake from their frosty slumbers.

Gentle airs to fan the earth now wakd.

WAKE, v.t.

1. To rouse from sleep.

The angel that talked with me, came again and waked me. Zechariah 4.

2. To arouse; to excite; to put in motion or action.

Prepare war, wake up the mighty men. Joel 3.

[The use of up is common, but not necessary.]

To wake the soul by tender strokes of art.

3. To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death.

To second life wakd in the renovation of the just.

WAKE, n.

1. The feast of the dedication of the church, formerly kept by watching all night.

2. Vigils; state of forbearing sleep.

--Their merry wakes and pastimes keep.

3. Act of waking. [Old song.]

Wake of a ship, the track it leaves in the water, formed by the meeting of the water, which rushes from each side to fill the space which the ship makes in passing through it.

To be in the wake of a ship, is to be in her track, or in a line with her keel.

WAKE, n.

  1. The feast of the dedication of the church, formerly kept by watching all night. – Dryden. King.
  2. Vigils; state of forbearing sleep. Their merry wakes and pastimes keep. – Milton.
  3. Act of waking. [Old song.] Wake of a ship, the track it leaves in the water, formed by the meeting of the water, which rushes from each side to fill the space which the ship makes in passing through it. To be in the wake of a ship, is to be in her track or in a line with her keel.

WAKE, v.i. [Goth. wakan; Sax. wæcan; G. wachen; D. waaken, wekken; Sw. väcka, up-väcka; Dan. vækker; L. vigil, vigilo. The root wak is allied to wag. The primary sense is to stir, to rouse, to excite. The transitive verb in Saxon, is written wæcan, wecan; but both are from one root.]

  1. To be awake; to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep. – Ps. cxxvii. The father waketh for the daughter. – Ecclus. Though wisdom wakes, suspicion sleeps. – Milton. I can not think any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it. – Locke.
  2. To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened. He wakes at the slightest noise.
  3. To cease to sleep; to awake.
  4. To be quick; to be alive or active. – Dryden.
  5. To be excited from a torpid state; to be put in motion. The dormant powers of nature wake from their frosty slumbers. Gentle airs to fan the earth now wak'd. – Milton.

WAKE, v.t.

  1. To rouse from sleep. The angel that talked with me, came again and waked me. – Zech. iv.
  2. To arouse; to excite; to put in motion or action. Prepare war, wake up the mighty men. – Joel iii. [The use of up is common, but not necessary.] To wake the soul by tender strokes of art. – Pope.
  3. To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death. To second life / Wak'd in the renovation of the just. – Milton.

Wake
  1. The track left by a vessel in the water; by extension, any track; as, the wake of an army.

    This effect followed immediately in the wake of his earliest exertions. De Quincey.

    Several humbler persons . . . formed quite a procession in the dusty wake of his chariot wheels. Thackeray.

  2. To be or to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep.

    The father waketh for the daughter. Ecclus. xlii. 9.

    Though wisdom wake, suspicion sleeps. Milton.

    I can not think any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it. Locke.

  3. To rouse from sleep; to awake.

    The angel . . . came again and waked me. Zech. iv. 1.

  4. The act of waking, or being awaked; also, the state of being awake.

    [Obs. or Poetic]

    Making such difference 'twixt wake and sleep. Shak.

    Singing her flatteries to my morning wake. Dryden.

  5. To sit up late festive purposes; to hold a night revel.

    The king doth wake to-night, and takes his rouse,
    Keeps wassail, and the swaggering upspring reels.
    Shak.

  6. To put in motion or action; to arouse; to excite.

    "I shall waken all this company." Chaucer.

    Lest fierce remembrance wake my sudden rage. Milton.

    Even Richard's crusade woke little interest in his island realm. J. R. Green.

  7. The state of forbearing sleep, especially for solemn or festive purposes; a vigil.

    The warlike wakes continued all the night,
    And funeral games played at new returning light.
    Dryden.

    The wood nymphs, decked with daises trim,
    Their merry wakes and pastimes keep.
    Milton.

  8. To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened; to cease to sleep; -- often with up.

    He infallibly woke up at the sound of the concluding doxology. G. Eliot.

  9. To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death; to reanimate; to revive.

    To second life
    Waked in the renovation of the just.
    Milton.

  10. An annual parish festival formerly held in commemoration of the dedication of a church. Originally, prayers were said on the evening preceding, and hymns were sung during the night, in the church; subsequently, these vigils were discontinued, and the day itself, often with succeeding days, was occupied in rural pastimes and exercises, attended by eating and drinking, often to excess.

    Great solemnities were made in all churches, and great fairs and wakes throughout all England. Ld. Berners.

    And every village smokes at wakes with lusty cheer. Drayton.

    (b)

  11. To be exited or roused up; to be stirred up from a dormant, torpid, or inactive state; to be active.

    Gentle airs due at their hour
    To fan the earth now waked.
    Milton.

    Then wake, my soul, to high desires. Keble.

  12. To watch, or sit up with, at night, as a dead body.
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Wake

WAKE, verb intransitive [G. The primary sense is to stir, to rouse, to excite.]

1. To be awake; to continue awake; to watch; not to sleep. Psalms 127:1.

The father waketh for the daughter.

Though wisdom wakes, suspicion sleeps.

I cannot think any time, waking or sleeping, without being sensible of it.

2. To be excited or roused from sleep; to awake; to be awakened. He wakes at the slightest noise.

3. To cease to sleep; to awake.

4. To be quick; to be alive or active.

5. To be excited from a torpid state; to be put in motion. The dormant powers of nature wake from their frosty slumbers.

Gentle airs to fan the earth now wakd.

WAKE, verb transitive

1. To rouse from sleep.

The angel that talked with me, came again and waked me. Zechariah 4:1.

2. To arouse; to excite; to put in motion or action.

Prepare war, wake up the mighty men. Joel 3:9.

[The use of up is common, but not necessary.]

To wake the soul by tender strokes of art.

3. To bring to life again, as if from the sleep of death.

To second life wakd in the renovation of the just.

WAKE, noun

1. The feast of the dedication of the church, formerly kept by watching all night.

2. Vigils; state of forbearing sleep.

--Their merry wakes and pastimes keep.

3. Act of waking. [Old song.]

WAKE of a ship, the track it leaves in the water, formed by the meeting of the water, which rushes from each side to fill the space which the ship makes in passing through it.

To be in the wake of a ship, is to be in her track, or in a line with her keel.

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— gabriel butler (Bridgeport, CT)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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HA'TEFULLY, adv. Odiously; with great dislike.

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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