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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [voluntary]

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voluntary

VOL'UNTARY, a. [L. voluntarius, from voluntas, will, from volo.]

1. Acting by choice or spontaneously; acting without being influenced or impelled by another.

2. Free, or having power to act by choice; not being under restraint; as, man is a voluntary agent.

3. Proceeding from choice or free will.

That sin or guilt pertains exclusively to voluntary action, is the true principle of orthodoxy.

4. Willing; acting with willingness.

She fell to lust a voluntary prey.

5. Done by design; purposed; intended. If a man kills another by lopping a tree, here is no voluntary murder.

6. Done freely, or of choice; proceeding from free will. He went into voluntary exile. He made a voluntary surrender.

7. Acting of his own accord; spontaneous; as the voluntary dictates of knowledge.

8. Subject to the will; as the voluntary motions of an animal. Thus the motion of a leg or an arm is voluntary, but the motion of the heart is involuntary.

A voluntary escape, in law, is the escape of a prisoner by the express consent of the sheriff.

Voluntary jurisdiction, is that which is exercised in doing that which no one opposes; as in granting dispensations, &c.

Voluntary affidavit or oath, is one made in an extra-judicial matter.

Voluntary waste, is that which is committed by positive acts.

VOL'UNTARY, n.

1. One who engages in any affair of his own free will; a volunteer. [In this sense, volunteer is now generally used.]

2. In music, a piece played by a musician extemporarily, according to his fancy. In the Philosophical Transactions, we have a method of writing voluntaries, as fast as the musician plays the notes. This is by a cylinder turning under the keys of the organ.

3. A composition for the organ.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [voluntary]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

VOL'UNTARY, a. [L. voluntarius, from voluntas, will, from volo.]

1. Acting by choice or spontaneously; acting without being influenced or impelled by another.

2. Free, or having power to act by choice; not being under restraint; as, man is a voluntary agent.

3. Proceeding from choice or free will.

That sin or guilt pertains exclusively to voluntary action, is the true principle of orthodoxy.

4. Willing; acting with willingness.

She fell to lust a voluntary prey.

5. Done by design; purposed; intended. If a man kills another by lopping a tree, here is no voluntary murder.

6. Done freely, or of choice; proceeding from free will. He went into voluntary exile. He made a voluntary surrender.

7. Acting of his own accord; spontaneous; as the voluntary dictates of knowledge.

8. Subject to the will; as the voluntary motions of an animal. Thus the motion of a leg or an arm is voluntary, but the motion of the heart is involuntary.

A voluntary escape, in law, is the escape of a prisoner by the express consent of the sheriff.

Voluntary jurisdiction, is that which is exercised in doing that which no one opposes; as in granting dispensations, &c.

Voluntary affidavit or oath, is one made in an extra-judicial matter.

Voluntary waste, is that which is committed by positive acts.

VOL'UNTARY, n.

1. One who engages in any affair of his own free will; a volunteer. [In this sense, volunteer is now generally used.]

2. In music, a piece played by a musician extemporarily, according to his fancy. In the Philosophical Transactions, we have a method of writing voluntaries, as fast as the musician plays the notes. This is by a cylinder turning under the keys of the organ.

3. A composition for the organ.

VOL'UN-TA-RY, a.

  1. [Fr. volontaire; L. voluntarius, from voluntas, will, from volo. Voluntary is applicable only to beings that have will; spontaneous is applicable to physical causes, as well as to the will of an agent.
  2. Acting by choice or spontaneously; acting without being influenced or impelled by another.
  3. Free, or having power to act by choice; not being under restraint; as, man is a voluntary agent. – Hooker.
  4. Proceeding from choice or free will. That sin or guilt pertains exclusively to voluntary action, is the true principle of orthodoxy. – N. W. Taylor.
  5. Willing; acting with willingness. She fell to lust a voluntary prey. – Pope.
  6. Done by design; purposed; intended. If a man kills another by lopping a tree, here is a no voluntary murder.
  7. Done freely, or of choice; proceeding from free will. He went into voluntary exile. He made a voluntary surrender.
  8. Acting of his own accord; spontaneous; as, the voluntary dictates of knowledge.
  9. Subject to the will; as, the voluntary motions of an animal. Thus the motion of a leg or an arm is voluntary, but the motion of the heart is involuntary. A voluntary escape, in law, is the escape of a prisoner by the express consent of the sherif. Voluntary jurisdiction, is that which is exercised in doing that which no one opposes; as in granting dispensations, &c. Voluntary affidavit or oath, is one made in an extra-judicial matter. Voluntary waste, is that which is committed by positive acts.

VOL'UN-TA-RY, n.

  1. One who engages in any affair of his own free will; a volunteer. [In this sense, volunteer is now generally used.]
  2. In music, a piece played by a musician extemporarily, according to his fancy. In the Philosophical Transactions, we have a method of writing voluntaries, as fast as the musician plays the notes. This is by a cylinder turtling under the keys of the organ. – Cyc.
  3. A composition for the organ.

Vol"un*ta*ry
  1. Proceeding from the will; produced in or by an act of choice.

    That sin or guilt pertains exclusively to voluntary action is the true principle of orthodoxy. N. W. Taylor.

  2. One who engages in any affair of his own free will; a volunteer.

    [R.] Shak.
  3. Unconstrained by the interference of another; unimpelled by the influence of another; not prompted or persuaded by another; done of his or its own accord; spontaneous; acting of one's self, or of itself; free.

    Our voluntary service he requires. Milton.

    She fell to lust a voluntary prey. Pope.

  4. A piece played by a musician, often extemporarily, according to his fancy; specifically, an organ solo played before, during, or after divine service.
  5. Done by design or intention; intentional; purposed; intended; not accidental; as, if a man kills another by lopping a tree, it is not voluntary manslaughter.
  6. One who advocates voluntaryism.
  7. Of or pertaining to the will; subject to, or regulated by, the will; as, the voluntary motions of an animal, such as the movements of the leg or arm (in distinction from involuntary motions, such as the movements of the heart); the voluntary muscle fibers, which are the agents in voluntary motion.
  8. Endowed with the power of willing; as, man is a voluntary agent.

    God did not work as a necessary, but a voluntary, agent, intending beforehand, and decreeing with himself, that which did outwardly proceed from him. Hooker.

  9. Free; without compulsion; according to the will, consent, or agreement, of a party; without consideration; gratuitous; without valuable consideration.
  10. Of or pertaining to voluntaryism; as, a voluntary church, in distinction from an established or state church.

    Voluntary affidavit or oath (Law), an affidavit or oath made in extrajudicial matter. - - Voluntary conveyance (Law), a conveyance without valuable consideration. -- Voluntary escape (Law), the escape of a prisoner by the express consent of the sheriff. -- Voluntary jurisdiction. (Eng. Eccl. Law) See Contentious jurisdiction, under Contentious. -- Voluntary waste. (Law) See Waste, n., 4.

    Syn. -- See Spontaneous.

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Voluntary

VOL'UNTARY, adjective [Latin voluntarius, from voluntas, will, from volo.]

1. Acting by choice or spontaneously; acting without being influenced or impelled by another.

2. Free, or having power to act by choice; not being under restraint; as, man is a voluntary agent.

3. Proceeding from choice or free will.

That sin or guilt pertains exclusively to voluntary action, is the true principle of orthodoxy.

4. Willing; acting with willingness.

She fell to lust a voluntary prey.

5. Done by design; purposed; intended. If a man kills another by lopping a tree, here is no voluntary murder.

6. Done freely, or of choice; proceeding from free will. He went into voluntary exile. He made a voluntary surrender.

7. Acting of his own accord; spontaneous; as the voluntary dictates of knowledge.

8. Subject to the will; as the voluntary motions of an animal. Thus the motion of a leg or an arm is voluntary but the motion of the heart is involuntary.

A voluntary escape, in law, is the escape of a prisoner by the express consent of the sheriff.

Voluntary jurisdiction, is that which is exercised in doing that which no one opposes; as in granting dispensations, etc.

Voluntary affidavit or oath, is one made in an extra-judicial matter.

Voluntary waste, is that which is committed by positive acts.

VOL'UNTARY, noun

1. One who engages in any affair of his own free will; a volunteer. [In this sense, volunteer is now generally used.]

2. In music, a piece played by a musician extemporarily, according to his fancy. In the Philosophical Transactions, we have a method of writing voluntaries, as fast as the musician plays the notes. This is by a cylinder turning under the keys of the organ.

3. A composition for the organ.

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I am a homeschooling mom, trying to raise young God-fearing men, with a spirit of excellence in diction. The curricula I use is between 1875 and 1998. I choose literature prioir to 1940 for reading aloud. They search vocabulary they don't understand.

— Lynn (Baden, ON)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

bridge

BRIDGE, n.

1. Any structure of wood, stone, brick, or iron, raised over a river, pond, or lake, for the passage of men and other animals. Among rude nations, bridges are sometimes formed of other materials; and sometimes they are formed of boats, or logs of wood lying on the water, fastened together, covered with planks, and called floating bridges. A bridge over a marsh is made of logs or other materials laid upon the surface of the earth.

Pendent or hanging bridges are not supported by posts, but by the peculiar structure of the frame, resting only on the abutments.

A draw bridge is one which is made with hinges, and may be raised or opened. Such bridges are constructed in fortifications, to hinder the passage of a ditch or moat; and over rivers, that the passage of vessels need not be interrupted.

A flying bridge is made of pontoons, light boats, hollow beams, empty casks or the like. They are made, as occasion requires, for the passage of armies.

A flying bridge is also constructed in such a manner as to move from one side of a river to the other, being made fast in the middle of the river by a cable and an anchor.

1. The upper part of the nose.

2. The part of a stringed instrument of music, over which the strings are stretched, and by which they are raised.

3. In gunnery, the two pieces of timber which go between the two transoms of a gun-carriage.

BRIDGE, v.t. To build a bridge or bridges over; as, to bridge a river.

1. To erect bridges on; to make a passage by a bridge or bridges.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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