HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Sunday - December 9, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [void]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

void

VOID, a. [L. viduus, divido. Gr.]

1. Empty; vacant; not occupied with any visible matter; as a void space or place. 1Kings 22.

2. Empty; without inhabitants or furniture. Gen. 1.

3. Having no legal or binding force; null; not effectual to bind parties, or to convey or support a right; not sufficient to produce its effect. Thus a deed not duly signed and sealed, is void. A fraudulent contract is void, or may be rendered void.

My word shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please. Is. 55.

I will make void the counsel of Judah and Jerusalem in this place. Jer. 19.

4. Free; clear; as a conscience void of offense. Acts 24.

5. Destitute; as void of learning; void of reason or common sense.

He that is void of wisdom, despiseth his neighbor.

Prov. 11.

6. Unsupplied; vacant; unoccupied; having no incumbent.

Divers offices that had been long void.

7. Unsubstantial; vain.

Lifeless idol, void and vain.

Void space, in physics, a vacuum.

1. To make void; to violate; to transgress.

They have made void thy law. Ps. 119.

2. To render useless or of no effect. Rom. 4.

VOID, n. An empty space; a vacuum.

Pride, where wit falls, steps in to our defense, and fills up all the mighty void of sense.

Th' illimitable void.

VOID, v.t.

1. To quit; to leave.

Bid them come down, or void the field.

2. To emit; to send out; to evacuate; as, to void excrementitious matter; to void worms.

3. To vacate; to annul; to nullify; to render of no validity or effect.

It had become a practice - to void the security given for money borrowed.

4. To make or leave vacant.

VOID, v.i. To be emitted or evacuated.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [void]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

VOID, a. [L. viduus, divido. Gr.]

1. Empty; vacant; not occupied with any visible matter; as a void space or place. 1Kings 22.

2. Empty; without inhabitants or furniture. Gen. 1.

3. Having no legal or binding force; null; not effectual to bind parties, or to convey or support a right; not sufficient to produce its effect. Thus a deed not duly signed and sealed, is void. A fraudulent contract is void, or may be rendered void.

My word shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please. Is. 55.

I will make void the counsel of Judah and Jerusalem in this place. Jer. 19.

4. Free; clear; as a conscience void of offense. Acts 24.

5. Destitute; as void of learning; void of reason or common sense.

He that is void of wisdom, despiseth his neighbor.

Prov. 11.

6. Unsupplied; vacant; unoccupied; having no incumbent.

Divers offices that had been long void.

7. Unsubstantial; vain.

Lifeless idol, void and vain.

Void space, in physics, a vacuum.

1. To make void; to violate; to transgress.

They have made void thy law. Ps. 119.

2. To render useless or of no effect. Rom. 4.

VOID, n. An empty space; a vacuum.

Pride, where wit falls, steps in to our defense, and fills up all the mighty void of sense.

Th' illimitable void.

VOID, v.t.

1. To quit; to leave.

Bid them come down, or void the field.

2. To emit; to send out; to evacuate; as, to void excrementitious matter; to void worms.

3. To vacate; to annul; to nullify; to render of no validity or effect.

It had become a practice - to void the security given for money borrowed.

4. To make or leave vacant.

VOID, v.i. To be emitted or evacuated.


VOID, a. [Fr. vuide; It. voto; L. viduus; Sw. öde; G. and Dan. öde, waste, which seems to be the Eng. wide; so waste and vast are from one root. It coincides with Gr. ιδιος, and the root of L. dividο, Ar. بَدَّ badda, to separate. Class Bd, No. 1. See also No. 48.]

  1. Empty; vacant; not occupied with any visible matter; as, a void space or place. – 1 Kings xxii.
  2. Empty; without inhabitants or furniture. – Gen. i.
  3. Having no legal or binding force; null; not effectual to bind parties, or to convey or support a right; not sufficient to produce its effect. Thus a deed not duly signed and sealed, is void. A fraudulent contract is void, or may be rendered void. My word shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please. Is. lv. I wilt make void the counsel of Judah and Jerusalem in this place. – Jer. xix.
  4. Free; clear; as, a conscience void of offence. – Acts xxiv.
  5. Destitute; as, void of learning; void of reason or common sense. He that is void of wisdom, despiseth his neighbor. – Prov. xi.
  6. Unsupplied; vacant; unoccupied; having no incumbent. Divers offices that had been long void. – Camden.
  7. Unsubstantial; vain. Lifeless idol, void and vain. – Pope. Void space, in physics, a vacuum. To make void, to violate; to transgress. They have made void thy law. – Ps. cxix. #2. To render useless or of no effect. – Rom. iv.

VOID, n.

An empty space; a vacuum. Pride, where wit falls, steps in to our defense, / And fills up all the mighty void of sense. – Pope. Th' illimitable void. – Thomson.


VOID, v.i.

To be emitted or evacuated. – Wiseman.


VOID, v.t.

  1. To quit; to leave. Bid them come down, / Or void the field. – Shak.
  2. To emit; to send out; to evacuate; as, to void excrementitious matter; to void worms.
  3. To vacate; to annul; to nullify; to render of no validity or effect. It had become a practice … to void the security given for money borrowed. – Clarendon.
  4. To make or leave vacant.

Void
  1. Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

    The earth was without form, and void. Gen. i. 2.

    I 'll get me to a place more void. Shak.

    I 'll chain him in my study, that, at void hours,
    I may run over the story of his country.
    Massinger.

  2. An empty space; a vacuum.

    Pride, where wit fails, steps in to our defense,
    And fills up all the mighty void of sense.
    Pope.

  3. To remove the contents of] to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave; as, to void a table.

    Void anon her place. Chaucer.

    If they will fight with us, bid them come down,
    Or void the field.
    Shak.

  4. To be emitted or evacuated.

    Wiseman.
  5. Having no incumbent; unoccupied; -- said of offices and the like.

    Divers great offices that had been long void. Camden.

  6. To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge; as, to void excrements.

    A watchful application of mind in voiding prejudices. Barrow.

    With shovel, like a fury, voided out
    The earth and scattered bones.
    J. Webster.

  7. Being without; destitute; free; wanting; devoid; as, void of learning, or of common use.

    Milton.

    A conscience void of offense toward God. Acts xxiv. 16.

    He that is void of wisdom despiseth his neighbor. Prov. xi. 12.

  8. To render void; to make to be of no validity or effect; to vacate; to annul; to nullify.

    After they had voided the obligation of the oath he had taken. Bp. Burnet.

    It was become a practice . . . to void the security that was at any time given for money so borrowed. Clarendon.

  9. Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.

    [My word] shall not return to me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please. Isa. lv. 11.

    I will make void the counsel of Judah. Jer. xix. 7.

  10. Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.

    "Idol, void and vain." Pope.
  11. Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification; null. Cf. Voidable, 2.

    Void space (Physics), a vacuum.

    Syn. -- Empty; vacant; devoid; wanting; unfurnished; unsupplied; unoccupied.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

573

64

620

87

608
Void

VOID, adjective [Latin viduus, divido. Gr.]

1. Empty; vacant; not occupied with any visible matter; as a void space or place. 1 Kings 22:10.

2. Empty; without inhabitants or furniture. Genesis 1:2.

3. Having no legal or binding force; null; not effectual to bind parties, or to convey or support a right; not sufficient to produce its effect. Thus a deed not duly signed and sealed, is void A fraudulent contract is void or may be rendered void

My word shall not return to me void but it shall accomplish that which I please. Isaiah 55:11.

I will make void the counsel of Judah and Jerusalem in this place. Jeremiah 19:7.

4. Free; clear; as a conscience void of offense. Acts 24:16.

5. Destitute; as void of learning; void of reason or common sense.

He that is void of wisdom, despiseth his neighbor.

Proverbs 11:12.

6. Unsupplied; vacant; unoccupied; having no incumbent.

Divers offices that had been long void

7. Unsubstantial; vain.

Lifeless idol, void and vain.

VOID space, in physics, a vacuum.

1. To make void; to violate; to transgress.

They have made void thy law. Psalms 119:126.

2. To render useless or of no effect. Romans 4:14.

VOID, noun An empty space; a vacuum.

Pride, where wit falls, steps in to our defense, and fills up all the mighty void of sense.

Th' illimitable void

VOID, verb transitive

1. To quit; to leave.

Bid them come down, or void the field.

2. To emit; to send out; to evacuate; as, to void excrementitious matter; to void worms.

3. To vacate; to annul; to nullify; to render of no validity or effect.

It had become a practice - to void the security given for money borrowed.

4. To make or leave vacant.

VOID, verb intransitive To be emitted or evacuated.

Why 1828?

0
0
 


I am a preacher/ missionary and I study the bible. therefore i need good proper definitions to Bible words from the KJV rather than the diluted definitions being written today. thank you

— Jon Wrightson (Maysville, NC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

unfathomably

UNFATH'OMABLY, adv. So as not to be capable of being sounded.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

305

Compact Edition

124

105

CD-ROM

102

81

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.351 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top