HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [voice]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

voice

VOICE, n. [L. vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.

2. Any sound made by the breath; as the trumpet's voice.

3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote however given.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice of holy senates, and elect by voice.

I have no words; my voice is in my sword.

4. Language; words; expression.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church.

5. In Scripture, command; precept.

Ye would not be obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. Deut. 8.

6. Sound.

After the fire, a still small voice. 1Kings 19.

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job. 40.

The floods have lifted up their voice. Ps. 93.

7. Language; tone; mode of expression.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice. Gal. 4.

8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as the active voice; the passive voice.

VOICE, v.t.

1. To rumor; to report.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.]

2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

3. To vote.

VOICE, v.i. To clamor; to exclaim. Obs.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [voice]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

VOICE, n. [L. vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.

2. Any sound made by the breath; as the trumpet's voice.

3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote however given.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice of holy senates, and elect by voice.

I have no words; my voice is in my sword.

4. Language; words; expression.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church.

5. In Scripture, command; precept.

Ye would not be obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. Deut. 8.

6. Sound.

After the fire, a still small voice. 1Kings 19.

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job. 40.

The floods have lifted up their voice. Ps. 93.

7. Language; tone; mode of expression.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice. Gal. 4.

8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as the active voice; the passive voice.

VOICE, v.t.

1. To rumor; to report.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.]

2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

3. To vote.

VOICE, v.i. To clamor; to exclaim. Obs.


VOICE, n. [Fr. voix; L. vox; It. voce; Sp. voz; Gaelic, bagh, a word; baigham, to speak to; Ir. focal, a word; Sans. vach, to speak, L. voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

  1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.
  2. Any sound made by the breath; as, the trumpet's voice.
  3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote, however given. Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice / Of holy senates, and elect by voice. – Dryden. I have no words; / My voice is in my sword. – Shak.
  4. Language; words; expression. Let us call on God in the voice of his church. – Felt.
  5. In Scripture, command; precept. Ye would not he obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. – Deut. viii.
  6. Sound. After the fire, a still small voice. – 1 Kings xix. Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? . – Job xl. The floods have lifted up their voice. – Ps. xciii.
  7. Language; tone; mode of expression. I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice. Gal. iv.
  8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as, the active voice; the passive voice.

VOICE, v.i.

To clamor; to exclaim. [Obs.] – Bacon.


VOICE, v.t.

  1. To rumor; to report. It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.] – Shak.
  2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ. – Ed. Encyc.
  3. To vote.

Voice
  1. Sound uttered by the mouth, especially that uttered by human beings in speech or song; sound thus uttered considered as possessing some special quality or character; as, the human voice; a pleasant voice; a low voice.

    He with a manly voice saith his message. Chaucer.

    Her voice was ever soft,
    Gentle, and low; an excellent thing in woman.
    Shak.

    Thy voice is music. Shak.

    Join thy voice unto the angel choir. Milton.

  2. To give utterance or expression to] to utter; to publish; to announce; to divulge; as, to voice the sentiments of the nation.

    "Rather assume thy right in silence and . . . then voice it with claims and challenges." Bacon.

    It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. Bacon.

  3. To clamor; to cry out.

    [Obs.] South.
  4. Sound of the kind or quality heard in speech or song in the consonants b, v, d, etc., and in the vowels; sonant, or intonated, utterance; tone; -- distinguished from mere breath sound as heard in f, s, sh, etc., and also whisper.

    * Voice, in this sense, is produced by vibration of the so-called vocal cords in the larynx (see Illust. of Larynx) which act upon the air, not in the manner of the strings of a stringed instrument, but as a pair of membranous tongues, or reeds, which, being continually forced apart by the outgoing current of breath, and continually brought together again by their own elasticity and muscular tension, break the breath current into a series of puffs, or pulses, sufficiently rapid to cause the sensation of tone. The power, or loudness, of such a tone depends on the force of the separate pulses, and this is determined by the pressure of the expired air, together with the resistance on the part of the vocal cords which is continually overcome. Its pitch depends on the number of aërial pulses within a given time, that is, on the rapidity of their succession. See Guide to Pronunciation, §§ 5, 146, 155.

  5. To utter with sonant or vocal tone; to pronounce with a narrowed glottis and rapid vibrations of the vocal cords; to speak above a whisper.
  6. The tone or sound emitted by anything.

    After the fire a still small voice. 1 Kings xix. 12.

    Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job xl. 9.

    The floods have lifted up their voice. Ps. xciii. 3.

    O Marcus, I am warm'd; my heart
    Leaps at the trumpet's voice.
    Addison.

  7. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.
  8. The faculty or power of utterance; as, to cultivate the voice.
  9. To vote; to elect; to appoint.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  10. Language; words; speech; expression; signification of feeling or opinion.

    I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice; for I stand in doubt of you. Gal. iv. 20.

    My voice is in my sword. Shak.

    Let us call on God in the voice of his church. Bp. Fell.

  11. Opinion or choice expressed; judgment; a vote.

    Sic. How now, my masters! have you chose this man?
    1 Cit. He has our voices, sir.
    Shak.

    Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice
    Of holy senates, and elect by voice.
    Dryden.

  12. Command; precept; -- now chiefly used in scriptural language.

    So shall ye perish; because ye would not be obedient unto the voice of the Lord your God. Deut. viii. 20.

  13. One who speaks; a speaker.

    "A potent voice of Parliament." Tennyson.
  14. A particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs, or a particular form of a verb, by means of which is indicated the relation of the subject of the verb to the action which the verb expresses.

    Active voice (Gram.), that form of the verb by which its subject is represented as the agent or doer of the action expressed by it. -- Chest voice (Phon.), a kind of voice of a medium or low pitch and of a sonorous quality ascribed to resonance in the chest, or thorax; voice of the thick register. It is produced by vibration of the vocal cords through their entire width and thickness, and with convex surfaces presented to each other. -- Head voice (Phon.), a kind of voice of high pitch and of a thin quality ascribed to resonance in the head; voice of the thin register; falsetto. In producing it, the vibration of the cords is limited to their thin edges in the upper part, which are then presented to each other. -- Middle voice (Gram.), that form of the verb by which its subject is represented as both the agent, or doer, and the object of the action, that is, as performing some act to or upon himself, or for his own advantage. -- Passive voice. (Gram.) See under Passive, a. -- Voice glide (Pron.), the brief and obscure neutral vowel sound that sometimes occurs between two consonants in an unaccented syllable (represented by the apostrophe), as in able (a"b'l). See Glide, n., 2. -- Voice stop. See Voiced stop, under Voiced, a. -- With one voice, unanimously. "All with one voice . . . cried out, Great is Diana of the Ephesians." Acts xix. 34.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

577

64

625

87

612
Voice

VOICE, noun [Latin vox; voco. The sense of the verb is to throw, to drive out sound; and voice is that which is driven out.]

1. Sound or audible noise uttered by the mouth, either of human beings or of other animals. We say, the voice of a man is loud or clear; the voice of a woman is soft or musical; the voice of a dog is loud or harsh; the voice of a bird is sweet or melodious. The voice of human beings is articulate; that of beasts, inarticulate. The voices of men are different, and when uttered together, are often dissonant.

2. Any sound made by the breath; as the trumpet's voice

3. A vote; suffrage; opinion or choice expressed. Originally voice was the oral utterance of choice, but it now signifies any vote however given.

Some laws ordain, and some attend the choice of holy senates, and elect by voice

I have no words; my voice is in my sword.

4. Language; words; expression.

Let us call on God in the voice of his church.

5. In Scripture, command; precept.

Ye would not be obedient to the voice of the Lord your God. Deuteronomy 8:20.

6. Sound.

After the fire, a still small voice 1 Kings 19:12.

Canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Job 40:9.

The floods have lifted up their voice Psalms 93:3.

7. Language; tone; mode of expression.

I desire to be present with you now, and to change my voice Galatians 4:20.

8. In grammar, a particular mode of inflecting or conjugating verbs; as the active voice; the passive voice

VOICE, verb transitive

1. To rumor; to report.

It was voiced that the king purposed to put to death Edward Plantagenet. [Little used.]

2. To fit for producing the proper sounds; to regulate the tone of; as, to voice the pipes of an organ.

3. To vote.

VOICE, verb intransitive To clamor; to exclaim. obsolete

Why 1828?

1
4
 


I would like to use for reference to words in the KJV bible.

— Bob (Salisbury, MA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

sparry

SP'ARRY, a. [from spar.] Resembling spar, or consisting or spar; having a confused cyrstraline structure; spathose.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

309

Compact Edition

125

106

CD-ROM

103

82

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.343 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top